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Preview: TAB Events - in category 2D: Illustration

TAB Events - in category 2D: Illustration





 



Kana Ohtsuki + Kuniko Kinoto “Home & Stone - Whereabouts of the spirit-dwelling object - ”

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Kana Ohtsuki + Kuniko Kinoto “Home & Stone - Whereabouts of the spirit-dwelling object - ”
at Paku Paku An (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-09-21 - 2017-09-26)

In its annual two-artist exhibitions, Paku Paku An encourages a type of chemistry to develop between artworks of vastly different genres by bringing together artists active in diverse fields. This installment will present the works of Kana Ohtsuki, a painter and illustrator popular across various media, and Kuniko Kinoto, a ceramicist who is also a member of the Hyouge Jissaku Extreme Potters Group. With the brand new works on exhibit here these two creators search for a common outlook, which began from the moment of their first encountered. Otsuki has long been depicting a contemporary sense of emptiness through the girls that appear in her works, and since the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami has expressed the subsequent era of transformation through the image of the chrysalis. In the attempt to embody the form of contemporary Japan, her most recent motif is that of the home. Meanwhile, Kinoto has developed the style of his ceramics by adding various processes to the glazing stage, producing works that resemble naturally-formed stones by manipulating pigments and other elements. This idea was originally inspired by a stone that he received as a souvenir from overseas. At first Kinoto considered the stone to be a fake, but such stones are now recognized as “precious stones” or “gemstones,” and though they are man made, it seems that they also signify something beyond human existence. Stones can be understood as the foundations of the homes in which we live. Discover for yourself the unique chemistry that forms between the works of these two distinct artists.




41ONO of the Hell “Heading to New York”

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41ONO of the Hell “Heading to New York”
at Shinjuku Ophthalmologist Gallery (Shinjuku area)
(2017-09-15 - 2017-09-27)

41ONO of the Hell is an art unit that produces work that addressing the dark side of history, showing the flip side to love. Venue: Space O *Please see the official website for details regarding related events.




Saki Nakajima “Everyday Fragments”

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Saki Nakajima “Everyday Fragments”
at OPA gallery/shop (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-09-22 - 2017-09-27)

The quiet flow of time, the soft light of the sun, the sweetness of the atmosphere. This is what Saki Nakajima usually experiences in the objects and landscapes she comes into contact with. Drawing almost everyday, this exhibition is formed of the fragments that color Nakajima’s day to day life.




Mud, Tokyo and Swimming

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Mud, Tokyo and Swimming
at Shinjuku Park Tower (Shinjuku area)
(2017-09-24 - 2017-09-30)

This exhibition is the first project presented by artist-run gallery im labor. In this show, eight emerging artists from England and Japan will present their work.




Yoshiko Abe “Line + colors”

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Yoshiko Abe “Line + colors”
at Space Yui (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-09-25 - 2017-09-30)

Embroidered collages, drawings, and silkscreens.




Yurie Sekiya “Gyaru and Mandalas”

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Yurie Sekiya “Gyaru and Mandalas”
at Awaji Cafe & Gallery (Chiyoda area)
(2017-09-16 - 2017-09-30)

Yurie Sekiya loves “gyaru,” and this solo exhibition presents work on the theme of gyaru and mandalas. The word “gyaru” became popular as a term that referred to a Japanese street fashion subculture that emerged in the 90s, when women began dressing in different styles, often wearing striking hair styles and makeup. The term is now more broadly used, referring generally to fashionable girls. See how Sekiya navigates the term “gyaru” in her work. [Related Events] Live Painting Event Date: Sep. 23 (Sat) 15:00-




868788

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868788
at The Artcomplex Center of Tokyo (Shinjuku area)
(2017-09-22 - 2017-10-01)

Each of the artists included in this group show expresses the things they have seen and experienced as they’re grown up and lived their lives so far. How will these individual lives and the personalities of these artists - who have all come of age at the same time - look when viewed together in a single space? The title of the exhibition refers to the birth years of those participating: 1986, 1987, 1988.




A la mode

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A la mode
at L'illustre Galerie Le Monde (Shibuya area)
(2017-09-26 - 2017-10-01)

Images with exciting visuals by a group of fashion illustrators.




Butterflies and Ribbons ll

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Butterflies and Ribbons ll
at Books & Gallery cafe Tentekido (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-09-20 - 2017-10-01)

Group exhibition where the works of various artists float together and intermingle. Artists: humming bird, MYSTIC, *PUKU*, Chiimalma+Kingyo, cheri.e moi, Spice-Hitosaji, otomeiro., Otomeya, Korisusha, chita coppe, Sami Kamiya, mamono




Film Illustrations: David Lynch Edition

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Film Illustrations: David Lynch Edition
at Dazzle (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-09-26 - 2017-10-01)

Several artists present illustrations of David Lynch films and series, including Dune, Blue Velvet, and Twin Peaks.




Marie Assenat “Petit Bonjour De Paris”

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Marie Assenat “Petit Bonjour De Paris”
at Galerie Doux Dimanche (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-09-19 - 2017-10-01)

Presenting the works of package illustrator Marie Assenat.




I Want to be Tamio Okuda

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I Want to be Tamio Okuda
at Parco Museum (Tokyo: Others area)
(2017-09-14 - 2017-10-02)

After establishing his own label “Ramen Curry Music Record” (RCMR), Tamio Okuda released the original solo album “Saboten Museum” on September 6. With the film “Okuda Tamio ni Naritai Boy to Deau Otoko Subete Kuruwaseru Girl” (The Boy Who Wants To Be Tamio Okuda and the Girl Who Drives All the Men She Meets Mad) set to come out on September 16, we are witnessing an autumn of Tamio Okuda. This exhibition introduces his work.




Satoshi Murakami “Grasping Labor”

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Satoshi Murakami “Grasping Labor”
at Bakuro-cho ART + EAT (Bakurocho area)
(2017-09-05 - 2017-10-07)

Satoshi Murakami has published a picture book and diary about his experiences since 2014 walking across Japan with a Styrofoam house he made himself in response to the Great East Japan Earthquake. Here he attempts to grasp the relationship between economic activity, labor, and the human body. [Related Event] Talk “Labor and the Body, Advertising, and the Olympics” Speakers: Satoshi Murakami and anthropologist Ryuta Imafuku Date: Sep. 5 (Tues) 19:30–20:30 Admission: ¥1500. Please place at least one food or drink order. In Japanese. Please see the official website for reservations and details.




GoFa 20th Anniversary Exhibition: Kotono Kato’s “Altair: A Record of Battles”

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GoFa 20th Anniversary Exhibition: Kotono Kato’s “Altair: A Record of Battles”
at Gofa (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-09)

Original illustrations and animation props by manga artist Kotono Kato, whose “Altair: A Record of Battles” launched as a TV series this July.




New “Artists Today” Exhibition 2017 Compilations of Memories and Records

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New “Artists Today” Exhibition 2017 Compilations of Memories and Records
at Yokohama Civic Art Gallery (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-09-22 - 2017-10-09)

This group exhibition on the theme of “Today” examines contemporary art and contemporary forms of expression. The artists chosen to participate incorporate elements of the past in their practice, through approaches such as investigating land and history, and interviewing people, hence the exhibition subtitle “Compilations of Memories and Records.” In recent years, and especially since the Great East Japan Earthquake which shook people to the core, artists who feature memories and records as key elements in the work are speading. Scheduled alongside “Yokohama Triennale 2017: Islands, Constellations & Galapagos” (August 4 - November 5), which looks to address issues such as connectivity and isolation, this exhibition will also respond to the event and provide an opportunity to look again at the “now” and “us” through their works. Venue: Exhibition Room 1, B1 Yokohama Civic Art Gallery [Related Events] Sakura Koretsune Performance: Reading from “The Common Whale” Event Date: Sep. 23 (Sat), 24 (Sun) 13:00-13:30 Venue: Exhibition Room B1 Admission: Free (no booking required) Talk Event: The shape succession takes Event Date: Sep. 23 (Sat) 14:30-16:00 Venue: 4F Atelier Speakers: Haruka Komori, Natsumi Seo, Tadahito Yamamoto (Teaching Assistant at Aoyama Gakuin Women’s Junior College) Admission: Free (no booking required) *Events in Japanese




Tokitama “Tamatama”

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Tokitama “Tamatama”
at Quiet Noise Arts and Break (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2017-09-20 - 2017-10-09)

Tokitama produces works that reflect on things he comes into contact with by chance. These encounters happen as part of everyday life - the world is full of them. It just so happens that in this exhibition, the works will be between you and the artist. *The artists will be in attendance on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays throughout the exhibition period.




Barry McGee + Clare Rojas “Big Sky Little Moon”

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Barry McGee + Clare Rojas “Big Sky Little Moon”
at Watari-um, The Watari Museum of Contemporary Art (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-06-24 - 2017-10-15)

A growing sense of tension can currently be sensed in cities around the world, with great shifts in American society having occurred since the start of the 21st century. Born in San Francisco, California in 1966, Barry McGee is a graffiti artist who burst onto the art scene in the late 1980s. As an artist who works on the streets and free of constraints, McGee has remained conscious of issues such as community and continues to focus on the subject of people living on the streets. This exhibition presents works by McGee and his longtime partner, the artist Clare Rojas. [Related Events] Opening Night Date: June 24 (Sat) 20:00-22:00 Talk: Barry McGee Live Performance: Peggy Honeywell (Clare Rojas) Background Music: Towa Tei & Friends Admission: ¥2000 *Please see the official website for further details




Toru Fukuda “Still-Green Gardener”

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Toru Fukuda “Still-Green Gardener”
at Honkbooks (Tokyo: Others area)
(2017-09-26 - 2017-10-15)

Illustrations from Toru Fukuda’s picture book about a new recruit to a company that creates gardens.




Yui Takada “Swimming Graphic”

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Yui Takada “Swimming Graphic”
at Creation Gallery G8 (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-09-19 - 2017-10-19)

Displaying works by Yui Yui Takada, an advertising, logo, packaging, book, and typography designer and founder of Allright Graphics.




A Story Begins in a Meeting of Pictures and Words – Into the Forests of Imagination

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A Story Begins in a Meeting of Pictures and Words – Into the Forests of Imagination
at Art Museum & Library, Ota (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-08-04 - 2017-10-22)

Art Museum & Library, Ota places special focus on illustrated stories and children’s books. Its first show in a series about books and art explores the imaginative and creative power of combinations of pictures and words. Original illustrations by picture books artists and authors including Mizumaru Anzai, Haruki Murakami, Komako Sakai, Hatsue Nakawaki, Yu Nagashima, Shin Fukunaga, and Aru Sunaga are accompanied by a forest-themed installation by contemporary artist Takashi Nakajima and a mural by Maki Okojima.




Finnish design: Celebrating 100 years of independence

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Finnish design: Celebrating 100 years of independence
at Fuchu Art Museum (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-22)

There are many everyday items produced in Finland that are widely popular in Japan, such as Marimekko fabrics, tableware from Iittala and Arabia, and furniture by Alvar Aalto, to name but a few. They are pretty much a permanent fixture in the lives of Japanese people, though many here are not aware that these products are Finnish. So why do designs from Finland, which is so far away from Japan, capture the hearts of the Japanese? Well, at the heart of Finnish design is a philosophy that values “harmony between man and nature.” This does not simply refer to the use of natural materials, but to nature being at the center of design, as can be observed in Iittala’s Kastehelmi glassware, which is based on the image of water droplets. The Finnish view of nature - which respects the balance between people and nature - is rare in most Western countries, but resonates strongly with Japanese traditions. The sense that objects are designed to be used in the daily lives of all people is also key, with Kaj Franck’s dishes providing decorative fun for the dining table, and Marimekko’s dresses suiting everyone from baby girls to grandmas. It is through design that we can get a sense of Finnish lifestyles and how the Finnish value life. In this exhibition commemorating Finland’s 100 years of independence, you can see all manners of Finnish design, ranging from crafts produced at the end of the 19th century, to items made by leading present day designers. There will also be a program of mini workshops that you are invited to participate in.




Makoto Wada and Japanese Illustration

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Makoto Wada and Japanese Illustration
at Tobacco & Salt Museum (Kiyosumi, Ryogoku area)
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-22)

The words “illustration” and “illustrator” became widely known in Japan as of the 1960s thanks to the formation of groups like “Tokyo Illustrators Club” in 1964, and the publication of magazines such as “Hanashi no tokushu” in 1965. Makoto Wada thus rose to prominence in the world of Japanese illustration with his cover designs for magazines such as “Highlight” and the weekly “Shukan bunshun.” After receiving the Nissan Prize - then considered gateway award for entry into the field of graphic design - in 1957 while still a student at Tama Art University, Wada began his career. Together with others such as Yokoo Tadanori, he raised the profile of illustration as an occupation and expanded the scope of what this work included. Centering on images by Wada and others who worked alongside him, this exhibition will introduce the history of Japanese illustration. [Related Events] Schedule for special screenings of film works by Makoto Wada “Kaito Ruby” (1988, 96 mins.) Event Date: Sep. 16 (Sat) 14:00- Venue: 3F Audio-visual Hall Capacity: 90 “Round About Midnight” (2001, 109 mins.) Event Date: Oct. 7 (Sat) 14:00- Venue: 3F Audio-visual Hall Capacity: 90




Full Metal Alchemist Exhibition

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Full Metal Alchemist Exhibition
at Gallery AaMo (Tokyo: Others area)
(2017-09-16 - 2017-10-29)

The first major art exhibition for Hiromu Arakawa’s Full Metal Alchemist manga series displays more than 200 works, including original and color illustrations and items from the animation. Original merchandise is available.




BankART Life Ⅴ (5) —Kanko

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BankART Life Ⅴ (5) —Kanko
at BankArt Studio NYK (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-08-03 - 2017-11-05)

The Kanko tour starts out at BankArt Studio NYK with a stroll around fields of flowers by the sea, then heads up to an “island” room of architecturally enclosed light. The river bank features flora and fauna. The group will also visit a house floating on the water. The next part of the program goes to Koganecho, the NYK Maritime Museum, and Kitanaka, an area currently undergoing redevelopment that once served as an epicenter of Japan’s modernization and that hosted the Kitanaka Brick & Kitanaka White studio hosting 253 artists just over a decade ago.




The Picture Books of Yosuke Inoue

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The Picture Books of Yosuke Inoue
at Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-08-24 - 2017-11-05)

For its third 40th anniversary exhibition, Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo showcases the work of picture book creator, manga artist, and illustrator Yosuke Inoue. Focusing on picture books such as his first publication “Odango Gopan” (Dango Rice) and “Kuma no ko Ufu” (Oof, the Bear Cub), it also introduces his and manga art and other works. Enjoy Inoue’s original world of whimsical humor in wonderfully impressive illustrations.




The Poetry of Chihiro: Pictures Like Poems

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The Poetry of Chihiro: Pictures Like Poems
at Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-08-24 - 2017-11-05)

Known for liking fairy tales that are “short, beautiful, and called to mind a range of images, like poetry does,” Chihiro Iwasaki developed her own unique method of picture book expression through a series of publications that were referred to as “feeling picture books,” such as the title, “Kotori no Kuruhi (The Pretty Bird).” From a young age she was a fan of “Manyoshu,” the oldest existing collection of Japanese poetry, and the poems of Kenji Miyazawa. Through this exhibition - the third exhibition held in commemoration of the museum’s 40th anniversary - you can explore the sensibilities behind the overflowing poetic charm that infuses Chihiro’s illustrations. [Related Events] Gallery Talk by Takeshi Matsumoto Chiriro’s son Takeshi Matsumoto will share stories surrounding some of his mother’s works. Event Date: Sep. 3 (Sun) 14:00- Speaker: Takeshi Matsumoto (special adviser to Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo, Chair of Picture Book Association) Admission: Free Gallery Talk Hear about exhibition highlights as you walk around the gallery. Event Date: Every 1st and 3rd Saturday, 14:00- *Events in Japanese




Yokohama Triennale 2017 - Islands, Constellations & Galapagos

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Yokohama Triennale 2017 - Islands, Constellations & Galapagos
at Yokohama Museum Of Art (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-08-04 - 2017-11-05)

The title of the sixth edition of the Yokohama Triennale is “Islands, Constellations and Galapagos.” Together with the concept, it was conceived following a series of discussions by directors and experts of different generations who work in a variety of fields and form the triennale’s Conception Meeting committee. The words “islands,” “constellations,” and “galapagos” open up possibilities for the discussion of issues such as isolation and connectivity, imagination and guidance, and distinctness and diversity. In contemplating what we should consider wisdom for our future during this time of uncertainty, this event hopes to engage people in discussion through imagination and creativity. In addition to the exhibition, “Yokohama Round,” a series of public forums that kicked off in January 2017, is being hosted as a platform for conversations, contemplation and sharing of ideas around the 2017 triennale theme. Venues: Yokohama Museum Of Art, Yokohama Red Brick Warehouse No. 1, Yokohama Port Opening Memorial Hall (Basement)




John Dove & Molly White “Sensibility and Wonder”

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John Dove & Molly White “Sensibility and Wonder”
at Diesel Art Gallery (Shibuya area)
(2017-08-25 - 2017-11-09)

This exhibition features the origin of street fashion and the punk movement while reflecting on the works of John Dove and Molly White. The T-shirt has been a clothing staple in Street fashion for quite a while, and its history dates back to 1968 when John Dove and Molly White produced fully printed T-shirts under the label “Wonder Workshop” at their atelier in London. The pair used the same silkscreen techniques for making prints to forge their work of art; they applied their printing skills and uniquely developed inks for textiles to make prints on T-shirts for people to wear on the street with an affordable price instead of making small editions on paper or canvas. Their T-shirts allowed the images, which used to exist only on canvas or posters for a limited number of people reach a global audience. Through screen printings, collage and sculpture, the show traces modern art and fashion techniques born in the 60’s and 70’s. It also follows the origin of ideas that have become commonplace today, along with a sense of moment and a sense of wonder.




The Art Show – Art of the New Millennium in the Taguchi Art Collection

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The Art Show – Art of the New Millennium in the Taguchi Art Collection
at Museum of Modern Art, Gunma (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-09-16 - 2017-11-12)

Exhibiting 65 works of contemporary art by 53 artists, with a focus on pieces from the year 2000 onward. In addition to Japanese artists including Keiichi Tanaami, Yoko Ono, Yoshitomo Nara, Takashi Murakami, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Chiharu Shiota, Tomoko Sawada, and Teppei Kaneuji, international stars such as Damien Hirst, Rob Pruitt, and Vik Muniz are displayed. Boasting more than 400 works, the Taguchi Art Collection has been one of Japan’s preeminent collections of contemporary art since the 1980s.




Patricia Field “Art Collection: The world of Patricia Field”

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Patricia Field “Art Collection: The world of Patricia Field”
at Nakamura Keith-Haring Collection (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-07-01 - 2017-11-19)

The Patricia Field boutique, where Madonna, Debbie Harry, and Jean-Michel Basquiat were regulars, existed as a melting pot of cultures where musicians, their fans, artists, celebrities, downtown personalities, and fashionistas from around the world met and mingled. In 1983, Patricia Field’s East Village shop sold T-shirts created by Keith Haring – a perfect collaboration between Field’s philosophy of “fashion as wearable art” and Haring’s philosophy of “art is for everyone.” Another alluring factor about the boutique, which neighbored the now defunct CBGB’s and the legendary Bowery Poetry Club, was its expansive art collection. Artworks ranging from paintings to photography, posters, sculptures, and prints adorned the walls of the shop. Most of the works were created by unknown and undiscovered artists, all of which exhibited immense artistry and technique, interacting and displayed with the same revere as the glamorous garments of the boutique. Including the works in her boutique, office, home, and storage, Field was a proud owner of over 300 pieces of art that she collected herself. The collection also includes pieces created by artists, designers, and fans who were inspired by Patricia Field and the House of Field. Each artwork has significance and a special story, and, as Field explains, “…the art collection is my memories of 50 years of my career. They’re treasures of the House of Field.” As the boutique closed its doors in the spring of 2016 after marking its mark in New York City for over half a century, the Nakamura Keith Haring Collection continues its legacy by preserving 190 of the main pieces in its collection. The Patricia Field Art Collection reflects the styles of the East Village underground culture, which include the downtown club, music, and street art scene. The exhibition will not only focus on Patricia Field’s unique vision and the origin of her immense influence on the fashion world, but will also focus on her art collection. The works were created outside of the boundaries, mode, and style of that time, and were created with unconventional approach, without aspirations of fame, evoking the art brut movement.




Livres d’enfance français, Collection Kashima Shigeru

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Livres d’enfance français, Collection Kashima Shigeru
at Gunma Museum of Art, Tatebayashi (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-09-23 - 2017-12-24)

This is the first time for these French picture books treasured for many years in the collection of rare Western books belonging to Shigeru Kashima, a scholar of French literature, to be shown in public. They date mainly from the late nineteenth century, when fine children’s books emerged, to the early twentieth century, when subtle, modern, and lively pictures played the leading role. The entirety of this collection rich in charming, beautiful French picture books is revealed here.




10th Anniversary Exhibition “Keith Haring and Japan: Pop to Neo-Japonism”

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10th Anniversary Exhibition “Keith Haring and Japan: Pop to Neo-Japonism”
at Nakamura Keith-Haring Collection (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-02-05 - 2018-01-08)

The Nakamura Keith Haring Collection, the only museum in the world dedicated to the collection of Keith Haring’s artwork, celebrates its 10th anniversary in 2017. This exhibition focuses on the footprints Haring left in Japan, exploring his liberating and diverse point of view in works expressing Japanese aesthetics. It also features an important mural made with 500 children at Parthenon Tama, Tokyo in 1987. This work is the culmination of an art that communicates beyond language. On his first visit to Japan, Haring made drawings on mediums unique to Japan, such as folding screens, scrolls, kites and fans with Sumi ink. Haring had not only been influenced by his early introduction to Zen but also inspired by Eastern philosophy, including both cultural and literary elements. He experienced the height of Tokyo’s economic boom of the 80’s, and the dichotomy of ultra-modern and the traditional was both a source of fascination and inspiration for him. After the success of his revolutionary art project Pop Shop, which inherited the concept of his break out graffiti project Subway Drawings, Haring opened Pop Shop Tokyo in Aoyama, Tokyo in 1988. The shop was a sensation and many people waited in line just to get a glimpse of Haring’s pop-style.




Delicious! Animating Memorable Meals

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Delicious! Animating Memorable Meals
at Ghibli Museum, Mitaka (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-05-28 - 2018-05-01)

Studio Ghibli films are renowned for depicting daily life in great detail. What often lingers in the memory of viewers are scenes of food and meals: Pazu and Sheeta sharing a fried egg on toast in “Castle in the Sky,” Chihiro shedding tears of relief while eating a rice ball received from Haku in “Spirited Away,” Howl frying up bacon and eggs for Sophie, Markl and everyone in “Howl’s Moving Castle,” the list goes on… The foods that appear are not particularly special, often being rather common, but their appearance in the films always has special meaning. Pazu and Sheeta’s hearts connect when they share the same food. The courage to face her challenges blooms in Chihiro as she eats the rice ball. Around the dining table a family forms while everyone enjoys bacon and eggs in “Howl’s Moving Castle.” Scenes of casual meals are infused with tremendous storytelling importance, and achieving dramatic effect while creating delicious-looking meals and characters enjoying them - show in their expressions and gestures - comes from the power of finely detailed drawing. Food that is still warm, that looks soft and tender, with the wonderful flavor showing on the faces of those eating them - these scenes of meals are appealing and charming. No dialogue is needed to convey deliciousness and happiness. This exhibition introduces how food can be drawn to appear even more delectable than the real thing, creating scenes of joy.