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Preview: French History - current issue

French History Current Issue





Published: Tue, 28 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Fri, 08 Dec 2017 15:07:47 GMT

 



Retraction Notice

Tue, 28 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Brittany 1750 – 1950. The Invisible Nation. By Sharif Gemie. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. 2007. xv + 308 pp. £55. ISBN 978 0 7083 2002 0.



Pirates, Slavers, Brigands and Gangs: the French terminology of anticolonial rebellion, 1880–1920

Mon, 27 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
During the most rapid period of French colonial expansion (roughly 1880–1914) the French faced regular, often violent, resistance to the expansion of their imperial dominion over people in Africa and Southeast Asia. This article examines the changing terminology that French soldiers, officers and administrators used to describe the anticolonial movements they were called upon to suppress during the course of French conquest and ‘pacification’ operations. This terminology is gleaned both from archival sources, as well as from the so-called ‘grey literature’ of books, letters and pamphlets published by members of the French military, which do not exist in traditional libraries and holdings like the Bibliothèque Nationale. Taken as a whole this analysis grants us insight into how the French thought about themselves, their anticolonial opponents, how these conceptions changed over time, and how these conceptions translated into action and methodology.



SSFH Society News

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
The Society for the Study of French History (SSFH) supports postgraduate research by funding students to carry out archival research as well as helping them to attend and/or present work at conferences. These awards are open to all postgraduate students, registered at a UK university, who are carrying out research on an aspect of French history, and reports from successful applicants clearly indicate the tremendous range of research interests supported by the Society. The Society also supports conferences on French history as well as Visiting Scholars to UK and Irish Universities. In this edition we present three reports from Postgraduate Research Grants, together with two reports from Conference and Ralph Gibson bursaries. The edition also includes details on the Studies in French History series with Manchester University Press (MUP). More information on the postgraduate awards (and on the full range of bursaries and prizes offered by the SSFH) is available from the Society’s website: http://www.frenchhistorysociety.ac.uk.



In memoriam—Richard Bonney

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
This article reviews the career and contribution of Professor Richard Bonney (1947–2017), founder of the UK Society for the Study of French History and first editor of its journal French History from 1986 to 2001.



Le silence du peuple: The Rhetoric of Silence during the French Revolution

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
In July 1789, a phrase was introduced into French political discourse that would quickly become a standing expression: le silence du peuple est la leçon des rois. Taking this political bon mot as a starting point, the article traces the uses of and responses to collective silences during the French Revolution. It is argued that silence cannot be reduced to just the lack of ‘voice’ indicating suppression or political impotence. Rather, it must be understood as a mode of political action with a rhetoric of its own. Sketching this rhetoric not only highlights the nature and functions of a mode of political communication too often disregarded. It also shows how the controversies surrounding these silences reflected some of the major political questions of the day, playing a key role in the renegotiations of the communicative spaces of politics set off by the Revolution.



‘For Progress and Civilization’: History, Memory and Alterity in Nineteenth-Century Colonial Algeria

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
This article explores the role played by the past and by notions of alterity and belonging in political and cultural debates pertaining to the Algerian colony in the nineteenth century. It identifies a number of historical and memorial references in French and Algerian discourse and shows how they inflected power relations in the colony at the time. This study considers how history and memory, as well as colonial relationships were invoked and represented by the French and by Algerian Muslims. It examines how French colonial narratives on past wars and conflicts intersected with representations the actual phenomenon of colonisation. It also discusses the emergence on the political scene of a small group of French-educated Algerian Muslims from the end of the nineteenth century. It assesses the extent to which those Algerians were able to develop an alternative political voice and to construct an empowering narrative on Algerians’ experience and identity that countered dominant French discourse.



Second French Republic, 1848–1852: A Political Reinterpretation

Mon, 06 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Second French Republic, 1848–1852: A Political Reinterpretation. By GuyverChristopher. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 2016. 380 pp. £63.00. ISBN 978 1 1375 9739 9.



Patrons Résistants? French industrialists during the Second World War

Mon, 06 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Abstract—Drawing on previously unexploited archival sources from the Comité d’organisation de la sidérurgie (CORSID), the article challenges the patron résistant thesis, which has been widely accepted in the literature on Vichy France. It advances several important counter-arguments. It also questions the motives of industrialists who undermined attempts to send French workers to Germany and shows that these actions were initially taken with the tacit support of the Vichy government and were motivated primarily by business interests. Drawing on postwar production figures, this article also challenges the claim that lower output during the war was owing to conscious under-production by industrialists. Finally, it demonstrates that the handful of industrialists who allowed the Resistance to sabotage their factories were not motivated by resistance but were in fact blackmailed into such acts with threats by the Resistance. Based on original research, this article challenges the established view of the patron résistant by arguing that none of these industrialists’ actions should be considered as resistance.



British Writers and Paris 1830–1875

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

British Writers and Paris 1830–1875. By JayElisabeth. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. 344 pp. £60.00. ISBN 978 0 1996 5524 3.



William the Conqueror

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

William the Conqueror. By BatesDavid. New Haven: Yale University Press. 2016. xvi + 595 pp. £30.00. ISBN 9780300118759.



Jorge Semprún: The Spaniard Who Survived the Nazis and Conquered Paris

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Jorge Semprún: The Spaniard Who Survived the Nazis and Conquered Paris. By Fox MauraSoledad. Brighton and Eastbourne: Sussex Academic Press. 2017. xxiii + 320 pp. £25.00. ISBN 978 1 8451 9852 7.



The Courtesan and the Gigolo: The Murders in the Rue Montaigne and the Dark Side of Empire in Nineteenth-Century Paris

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

The Courtesan and the Gigolo: The Murders in the Rue Montaigne and the Dark Side of Empire in Nineteenth-Century Paris. By FreundschuhAaron. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2017. vii + 258 pp. £20.99. ISBN 978 1 5036 0082 9.



‘Ces affaires sont toujours fâcheuses’: The marital separation case of the comte and comtesse de Sainte-Maure, 1724–31

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Louis Marie, comte de Sainte-Maure, and Marie Des Chiens de la Neuville were married in 1720 and separated by judicial decision in 1731. This case deserves and rewards study because it is both typical in some ways and not in others. It followed the usual process, from complaint to lawsuit, including depositions by witnesses and memoirs by lawyers, and involved the usual issues, verbal and physical violence, sexual and financial misconduct, private and public disorder. At the same time, the case includes procedural irregularities and, as it unfolded, the count was arrested for sodomy. The extant sources provide constructed and conflicting versions of the broken marriage, as well as instructive evidence of the ambiguity and flexibility of gendered expectations about the conduct of both sexes.



A Theatre of Diplomacy. International Relations and the Performing Arts in Early Modern France

Wed, 11 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

A Theatre of Diplomacy. International Relations and the Performing Arts in Early Modern France. By WelchEllen R.. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 2017. v + 302 pp. £65.00. ISBN 978 0 8122 4900 2.



From Vichy to the Sexual Revolution Gender and Family Life in Postwar France

Wed, 11 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

From Vichy to the Sexual Revolution Gender and Family Life in Postwar France. By FishmanSarah. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2017. xxvi + 263 pp. £22.99. ISBN 978 0 1902 4862 8.



Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France

Sun, 08 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France. By RobertsMeghan K. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 2016. 214 pp. £31.50. ISBN 978 0 2263 8411 5.