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Preview: TAB Events - in category 3D: Crafts

TAB Events - in category 3D: Crafts





 



Early Cloth: Tapa and Felt

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Early Cloth: Tapa and Felt
at LIXIL Gallery 1 & 2 (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2017-12-07 - 2018-02-24)

Tapa and felt are early types of fabric that were made by hand and utilized commonly available plants or wool. It is believed that they were used long before the technology for weaving was developed. This exhibition looks at tapa and felt that has been used in daily life since ancient times on the South Pacific islands and in regions of Southeast Asia, showing the attraction of tapa and felt as simple, strong, non-woven fabrics. Displayed in the gallery are some 60 precious examples collected by Shigeki Fukumoto, who has commuted to the South Pacific islands for over 30 years to research tapa, and Goro Nagano, who researched pressed felt technologies in Southeast Asia primarily in the 1990s. Visitors will be struck by the toughness of these early cloths and by their designs and textures, which combine boldness and delicacy to attain a beauty symbolic of ethnic culture. Through these non-woven fabrics infused with ethnic traditions and skills inherited over many years, the exhibition offers a chance to encounter the ancient beginnings of human technology and the arts of dyeing and weaving. [Related Event] Talk Event “The story before woven textiles - From field work” Date: Jan. 27 (Sat), 2018, 14:00-15:30 Speakers: Fukumoto Shigeki (dye artist, director of The Society for Ethno-Arts), Hiroko Iwatate (director of Iwatate Folk Textile Museum) Venue: AGC Studio, 2F Kyobashi soseikan, 2-5-18 Kyobashi, Chuo, Tokyo 104-0031 Admission: Free (booking required) Capacity: 80 *Please see the official website for booking and further information. *Event in Japanese.




Yuki Kawado “A Parade of Mouse-like Characters from the US”

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Yuki Kawado “A Parade of Mouse-like Characters from the US”
at Megumi Ogita Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2018-02-09 - 2018-02-24)

Yuki Kawado (b. 1984), who began her artistic work with a pair scissors at the age of 3, has been affiliated with the social welfare corporation Art Karen since 2003. She uses embroidery to express the theme of “reproduction,” producing various series such as those that recreate the cityscapes of locations such as Shibuya and Shinjuku, as well as parades and non-specifiable natural landscapes and so forth. This exhibition will display her embroidered parade series, inhabited by lines of intriguing mouse-like characters from the US.




The World of Saeko Yamazaki

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The World of Saeko Yamazaki
at Jike Studio (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2018-02-03 - 2018-02-25)

Painting straight onto denim and producing semi three-dimensional works, through her practice Saeko Yamazaki brings to life what is best described as her own unique world.




KUAD Annual 2018: Schrödinger’s Cat

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KUAD Annual 2018: Schrödinger’s Cat
at Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2018-02-23 - 2018-02-26)

Displaying works by 23 individuals and one seven-person team selected from the undergraduate and graduate schools of Kyoto University of Art and Design by professor Kataoka. These works represent a wide range of fields such as Japanese painting (Nihonga), oil painting, printmaking, textiles, CG animation, environmental design, and product design. The exhibition captures the “multi-tiered and uncertain ambiguity” of the Schrödinger’s Cat metaphor for the “uncertainty and plurality of perspectives in society, economics, politics, culture, and history.” With this aim, it does not just show final works, but serves as a venue where the research process is also valued and ideas can be transformed into finished works.




Tohoku University of Art and Design Graduation Exhibition [Tokyo Exhibition]

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Tohoku University of Art and Design Graduation Exhibition [Tokyo Exhibition]
at Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2018-02-21 - 2018-02-26)

Here selected works from the Tohoku University of Art and Design Graduation Show are presented in Tokyo. This is a rare opportunity to see unique, large-scale dynamic works by graduates of this university in the capital. Venue: Exhibition Space 4, Lobby Floor; Exhibition Space 4, 1F; Gallery A




Miho Katsuragawa “Eye to Eye”

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Miho Katsuragawa “Eye to Eye”
at Flew Gallery (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2018-02-23 - 2018-02-28)

Eye to eye, hand and hand, heart and heart. Miho Katsuragawa looks to connect people through her works comprised of dyed textile hangings.




Ushio Takumi “Shelter”

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Ushio Takumi “Shelter”
at Tokyo Garden Terrace Kioicho (Chiyoda area)
(2018-01-09 - 2018-02-28)

Ushio Takumi’s textile installations consider the meaning of shelter in our lives.




Break Zenya - The Next Generation of Artists

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Break Zenya - The Next Generation of Artists
at Bunkamura Gallery (Shibuya area)
(2018-02-01 - 2018-03-04)

“Break Zenya - The Next Generation of Artists” is the name of a 5-minute television program that airs each Friday from 21:55 on BS Fuji and introduces artists who are about to take the art scene by storm. This exhibition brings together works by around 60 of the roughly 100 highly-anticipated artists who have been featured to date, presenting examples of artworks across diverse fields such as oil painting, Japanese-style nihonga painting, photography, installation, calligraphy, puppets, sculpture and so forth. The exhibition will be divided into two parts. Part I: Feb. 1 (Thu) - 12 (Mon) Part II: Feb. 24 (Sat) - Mar. 4 (Sun)




Female Gaze: Arts Maebashi Collection

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Female Gaze: Arts Maebashi Collection
at Arts Maebashi (Greater Tokyo area)
(2018-02-02 - 2018-03-04)

This exhibition gathers artworks selected from our museum collection including both western-style and Japanese-style works that have women as their motif, as well as other works by female artists who have a connection with Gunma. Viewing female figures from the20th century, starting from the nudes, a traditional theme in western countries, and proceeding to the other portraits of women wearing kimono and western-style clothes, you can see how the representation of women has been changing according to the times. On the other hand, if you move your attention to the contemporary artists, you can also notice how they experiment with a wide range of technique. This time, we wish to present the works of Tomoko Shiobara, who works on collages of Japanese paper and other materials, while using materials that are traditional of Japanese-style paintings, and Sachiko Teramura, who creates artworks with silk applying tie-dye techniques. The exhibition aims at presenting women portraits together with the activities of the female artists and, while interpreting women’s figures, also focuses on the looks that come and go touring the fine arts world. [Event] Children’s Art Discovery Feb. 24 (Sat) 14:00




History and Folklore of Musashino: From the Collection of the Former Musashino Folk Museum

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History and Folklore of Musashino: From the Collection of the Former Musashino Folk Museum
at Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-09-26 - 2018-03-04)

In 1993, Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum took over the collection of the Former Musashino Folk Museum, which was located on the Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum’s site from 1954 to 1991. This exhibition offers a sampling of some 250 artifacts from the Former Musashino Folk Museum, including documents and other exhibits on the archeology, industry, lifestyles, beliefs, and amusements of Musashino culture. Displays include earthen earrings designated as Important Cultural Properties.




Miyako Ishiuchi “Grain And Image”

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Miyako Ishiuchi “Grain And Image”
at Yokohama Museum Of Art (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-12-09 - 2018-03-04)

Leading Japanese photographer Miyako Ishiuchi has consistently addressed themes such as existence and absence, people’s memories, and vestiges of time through her images of abandoned buildings, scars, silk kimono, and personal articles that belonged to atomic bomb victims. This exhibition marking the 40th anniversary of her professional debut focuses on “grain” - one of Ishiuchi’s buzz words. Consisting of approximately 240 works, here you can enjoy being captivated by early monochrome works as well as never-before-shown pieces. Don’t miss must-see vintage prints from her debut series “Yokosuka Story.” [Related Event] In Conversation Date: Dec. 9 (Sat) 14:00-15:30 (doors open: 13:30) Venue: Lecture Hall, Yokohama Museum Of Art Speakers: Natsuo Kirino (novelist), Miyako Ishiuchi Capacity: 220 Admission: Free *Event in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details.




Seiki Kikuchi + Kinya Koyama “Encounters with Nishinouchi Paper”

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Seiki Kikuchi + Kinya Koyama “Encounters with Nishinouchi Paper”
at Tachikawa Blind Ginza Space Åtte (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2018-02-21 - 2018-03-04)

Nishinouchi Washi, a type of paper created by the Mito domain during the Edo period (1603–1868), is an Intangible Cultural Property of Ibaraki Prefecture. This exhibition presents collaborations between paper artist Kinya Koyama and Seiki Kikuchi, an artisan passing down the traditional techniques of Nishinouchi Washi to the next generation. While introducing fine materials from the nature-rich area of Nasukozo, Ibaraki and the techniques used to make the paper, this show also displays 20 items including paper cloth goods made by both artists and paper clothing made by Koyama.




Splendid Form – Five Artists

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Splendid Form – Five Artists
at Wako Hall (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2018-02-23 - 2018-03-04)

Exhibiting works by five leading practitioners of traditional Japanese crafts.




The 40-Year History of Yamanashi Prefectural Museum of Art

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The 40-Year History of Yamanashi Prefectural Museum of Art
at Yamanashi Prefectural Museum of Art (Greater Tokyo area)
(2018-01-02 - 2018-03-04)

This exhibition examines the 40-year history of Yamanashi Prefectural Museum of Art, which opened in 1978, through various collections and materials organized into four chapters. The first section focuses on before the museum was built, covering the construction period and right up to when it opened to the public with a display of Jean-François Millet’s “The Sower.” The photographic documentation on show here has rarely been put on public view. Following this, section two is based on “favorite works” in the collection as voted by viewers. Section 3 revisits special exhibitions that have been held to date, considering the significance of these shows through print matter and documentary photographs. Finally, the last section addresses the development of the museum’s educational projects.




Yoko Tamura “Shoes with the Memories of 90 People”

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Yoko Tamura “Shoes with the Memories of 90 People”
at Case Gallery (Shibuya area)
(2018-02-24 - 2018-03-04)

The first exhibition in Tokyo for Yoko Tamura, a fiber artist from Hokkaido whose sculptures take the form of “shoes representing the compilation of human memories.” The works on display here represent 90 people.




Tama Art University Department of Ceramic, Glass and Metal Works Graduation Exhibition 2018: Kagari

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Tama Art University Department of Ceramic, Glass and Metal Works Graduation Exhibition 2018: Kagari
at Spiral (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2018-02-23 - 2018-03-05)

Two-part exhibition of graduation works by students of Tama Art University Department of Ceramic, Glass and Metal Works. See how each of these graduates approaches materials in their artistic process. Part 1: Feb. 23 (Fri) - 27 (Tue) Part 2: Mar. 1 (Thu) - 5 (Mon) *Closed on Feb. 28 (Wed) for rehanging Venue: Spiral Garden, 1F Spiral




Hyakudan Hinamatsuri: Vintage Ornamental Dolls from Omi, Mino and Hida

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Hyakudan Hinamatsuri: Vintage Ornamental Dolls from Omi, Mino and Hida
at Hotel Gajoen Tokyo (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2018-01-19 - 2018-03-11)

Meguro Gajoen’s celebration of Hinamatsuri, also known as Girls’ Day, has become a popular annual event. This year marks the ninth time this exhibition has been held. It will highlight antique “hina” dolls from Omi, Mino and Hida, presenting a total of around 500 dolls from nine regions spread throughout Gifu and Shiga prefecture, south of Tokyo. Take this opportunity to learn about these charming ornamental dolls.




Kei Takemura “Which moment is the most exciting?”

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Kei Takemura “Which moment is the most exciting?”
at Pola Museum of Art (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2018-01-13 - 2018-03-11)

Kei Takemura is an artist who attributes new aesthetic value to forgotten objects, past memories, and personal stories through his works such as those comprising the “Restored” series. Here he combined pieces of embroidered thin white cloth with photographs and drawings to produce works that reconstruct and keep a record of personal stories relating to himself and his close friends, and that which has been lost or forgotten. Takemura also temporarily fixes personal items that have been damaged through everyday wear and tear by wrapping them in thin fabric that is then stitched with white silk thread. This exhibition focuses on the individual moments that overlap to create the flow of daily life, and the beauty of time in memoriam. Recently Takemura has produced works that incorporate playing cards sharing universal meanings that function regardless of geographical or linguistic differences. Here you can see the 24 works from the “Playing Cards 2017, Austrian Cards on German Cards” series, where he has embroidered German-made cards with Austrian designs using Japanese silk thread, expressing the transgression of geographic and temporal borders. You can also see pieces from “Playing Dominos in J.City,” which is a series inspired by a card game named “Domino” that the artist first came across this year and is popular in the Indonesian city of Yogyakarta. This is the first time any of these works has been shown publicly. [Related Event] Artist Talk & Performance of “Meeting Point with Playing Card” Date: Jan. 13 (Sat), 15:00- Performer: Kei Takemura Venue: 1F Atrium Gallery, Pola Museum of Art *Event in Japanese. *Please see the official website for booking and further details.




My Favorites: Toshio Hara Selects from the Permanent Collection (Part 1)

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My Favorites: Toshio Hara Selects from the Permanent Collection (Part 1)
at Hara Museum of Contemporary Art (Tokyo) (Tokyo: Others area)
(2018-01-06 - 2018-03-11)

Since he started the Hara Museum in 1979 as one of Japan’s first museums dedicated to contemporary art, the director Toshio Hara has devoted himself to the promotion of international exchange and the advancement of art and culture through the holding of special exhibitions, international traveling shows and other activities. This permanent collection show, which stands out as the first to be curated by Toshio Hara himself, features works that he personally selected from the collection’s approximately 1,000 pieces of post-1950s art which spans the entire spectrum of media from painting, sculpture and photography to video art and installation. The first half of this two-part exhibition focuses on artworks collected during the first decade or so of the collection’s history, from the late ‘70s through the first half of the ‘80s, while the second will showcase works that have appeared in exhibitions held at the museum over the years. Together they provide an introduction to the museum over its almost 40-year history, as well as the major art trends that have prevailed from the middle of the 20th century onward. Part 1: Jan. 6 (Sat) - Mar. 11 (Sun) Part 2: Mar. 21 (Wed) - Jun. 3 (Sun) [Artists featured in Part 1] Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Andy Warhol, On Kawara, Lee Ufan, Yayoi Kusama, Nam June Paik, Ai Weiwei, Aiko Miyawaki and others.




Our Favorite Shop’s Hinamatsuri: Goten Decorations and Hina Dolls

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Our Favorite Shop’s Hinamatsuri: Goten Decorations and Hina Dolls
at Our Favourite Shop (Shirokane, Hiroo area)
(2018-02-16 - 2018-03-11)

This year’s annual event celebrating “Hina Matsuri,” also known as Girls’ Day, will present a colorful array of handmade Hina dolls designed by Kigi and produced by Mataro Doll, Kigi and Pass the Baton. You can also see a selection of goten decorations that Yoshie Watanabe has be making since the start of the 1960s. [Related Events] Enjoy Hinamatsuri with Chioben spring-themed boxed lunches A chance to try beautifully colorful and deliciously fresh bento boxed lunches by Chioben. Date: Feb. 24 (Sat), 25 (Sun), 12:00-15:00 Limited to 35 per day (booking is possible) Price: ¥1500 (inc. tea and dessert) *Please see the website for booking and further information




The Empire of Imagination and Science of Rudolf II

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The Empire of Imagination and Science of Rudolf II
at Bunkamura Museum of Art (Shibuya area)
(2018-01-06 - 2018-03-11)

Rudolf II (1552-1612) reigned as the Holy Roman Emperor and is known as an unrivalled collector and patron of art. He made major contributions to European artistic culture during the late-16th and early-17 centuries by amassing paintings, writings, artifacts, and flora and fauna from around the globe. This exhibition displays work by Giuseppe Arcimboldo and other artists under Rudolf II’s patronage. Won’t you take a look into the world of art and science contained in his “Chamber of Curiosities”?




The Hinamatsuri Doll Festival

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The Hinamatsuri Doll Festival
at Donichi Garoh (Musashino, Tama area)
(2018-02-22 - 2018-03-11)




Treasures from Ninnaji Temple and Omuro

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Treasures from Ninnaji Temple and Omuro
at Tokyo National Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2018-01-16 - 2018-03-11)

Ninnaji, the head temple of the Omuro branch of the Shingon sect, was founded by the devotion of Emperor Koko in 886 (Ninna 2), and completed under the following Emperor Uda in 888 (Ninna 4). Subsequent generations of emperors thus became followers of the temple. Today, the temple is designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as one of the “Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto.” This exhibition features treasures of Ninnaji, together with Buddhist sculptures and other precious artifacts preserved at temples of the Omuro branch.




Roads of Arabia: Archaeological Treasures of Saudi Arabia

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Roads of Arabia: Archaeological Treasures of Saudi Arabia
at Tokyo National Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2018-01-23 - 2018-03-18)

The Arabian Peninsula has been intersected by trade routes since ancient times, acting as crossroads of diverse peoples and civilizations. This exhibition will, for the very first time in Japan, display treasures from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia that reveal a dynamic history and culture. More than 400 invaluable cultural properties will be displayed, including the oldest stone tools in Asia, dating back over a million years; anthropomorphic stelae erected in the desert 5,000 years ago; excavated artifacts from the thriving ancient cities of the Hellenistic and Roman periods; a 17th-century door from the Ka’ba in Mecca, the holiest site in the religion of Islam; and possessions of King Abdulaziz, the first monarch of Saudi Arabia, from the 20th century. You are invited to take advantage of this unique opportunity to experience the immensely rich and fascinating history of the Arabian Peninsula. Venue: Hyokeikan, Tokyo National Museum




Delicate Crafts

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Delicate Crafts
at Matsuya Design Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2018-02-20 - 2018-03-19)

The woodcraft artisan Ryuji Mitani, respected among the Japanese design community for his fine taste, introduces the work of five selected artisans and antique dealers in an exhibition asking how crafts are perceived in today’s society, how they should be understood, and how their roles in our lives are changing.




The Modern Minstrels in Metalworking

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The Modern Minstrels in Metalworking
at LIXIL Gallery 1 & 2 (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2018-01-11 - 2018-03-20)

Lixil’s Future of Creation series presents exhibitions directed by art director Toshio Shimizu, metal craft artist Ryohei Miyata, and architect Kengo Kuma. Each three-month show features works representing the future of a unique subject chosen by the director. The 14th Future of Creation exhibition is Ryohei Miyata’s “Minstrels in Metalworking.” On display are 20 works by 11 artists on the front lines of metal craft, including two holders of important intangible cultural properties. Parts I & II of the exhibition will display different works by all 11 artists. Part 1: Jan. 11 (Thurs)–Feb. 13 (Tues) Part 2: Feb. 15 (Thurs)–Mar. 20 (Tues) [Event] Artists’ Symposium Presenters: Ryohei Miyata and others Date: Feb. 9 (Fri) 18:30–20:00 Reservations required. Please see the official website for reservations and details.




Beautiful Glazes in Ko-Imari Ware

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Beautiful Glazes in Ko-Imari Ware
at Toguri Museum of Art (Shibuya area)
(2018-01-07 - 2018-03-21)

Glaze is the glass-like layer that covers the surface of a piece of ceramics. In Japanese, glaze is generally called uwagusuri or yūyaku. Applying glaze does more than simply make the dish more durable and impervious to liquid; the chemical reactions that occur during firing also create textures and colors that add to the beauty of the piece. The four main coatings seen on Edo-era Imari ware are transparent glaze, celadon, a bluish glaze known as ruriyu, and an iron-brown glaze called sabi-yu. Various and differing works were made taking full advantage of the special color and characteristics of each glaze. Some pieces, for example, are completely devoid of painted design, allowing the color and texture of the glaze to draw out the inherent beauty of the shape. In other cases, rich expression is achieved by using multiple glazes on a single piece. In this exhibition, we focus on glazes as we present approximately 80 fine examples of Imari ware. As you see with your own eyes how different works can be depending on the glaze and application techniques used, we hope you will gain new appreciation for glaze and find ever more pleasure in ceramics.




Herend: Porcelain from Hungary

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Herend: Porcelain from Hungary
at Shiodome Museum | Rouault Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2018-01-13 - 2018-03-21)

The town of Herend in western Hungary became a legendary site of porcelain production in the 19th century as it flourished under the patronage of the Habsburg Dynasty with works treasured by European heads of state. Herend: Porcelain from Hungary presents some 250 works of Herend porcelain, from early pieces to items in Baroque and Rococo styles and Eastern-inspired works based on study of Asian ceramics. Experience 190 years of history in the timeless grandeur of Herend, a name that stands for the highest quality. *Some of the items on display will be replaced midway through the exhibition period. The initial display will be from January 13 to February 13; the second display will be on show from February 15 to March 21. [Related Events] Victorian Table Coordination Exhibition Dates: Jan. 13 (Sat) - Mar. 21 (Wed), 10:00-17:00 (closed on Weds. but open Mar. 21) Venue: Reform Park, Panasonic Living Showroom Tokyo, 1F Panasonic Tokyo Shiodome Building Tea Tasting Event Dates: Feb. 9 (Fri) - Feb. 12 (Mon), 11:00-16:30 *No booking required. *Please be aware that there may be a wait involved if the event is crowded. *The event may end early if the tea runs out.




Shiko Munakata and Soetsu Yanagi

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Shiko Munakata and Soetsu Yanagi
at Japan Folk-Craft Museum (Shibuya area)
(2018-01-11 - 2018-03-25)

This exhibition sheds light on the relationship between Shiko Munakata, a woodblock maker and important 20th century Japanese artist, and Soetsu Yanagi, leader of the Mingei folk-craft movement. Munakata respected and admired Soetsu Yanagi as a teacher throughout his life while Yanagi recognized and cherished Munakata’s talent. Focusing on these two major players in the Mingei movement in a way only possible at the Japan Folk-Craft Museum, this show introduces letters between Munakata and Yanagi and spotlights the beauty of Munakata’s work.




A Bouquet of Incense Containers

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A Bouquet of Incense Containers
at The Nezu Museum (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2018-02-22 - 2018-03-31)

Lidded containers for incense known as kogo are one of the most popular utensils used at tea gatherings. Chinese lacquerwares were initially used as incense containers, but with an increase in the popularity of tea culture, Japanese ceramics such as Kiseto and Shino wares, as well as old lacquer boxes with gold maki-e and mother-of-pearl inlay designs and new Chinese wares such as blue-and-white ceramics and celadons, were also adopted for used in tea gatherings. These containers were made from a wide range of materials, from lacquer to ceramics, and their shapes were also richly varied, limited not only to round and square containers, but even taking the form of animals and musical instruments. Incense containers can be said to be the most diverse of tea utensils. This exhibition features approximately 170 incense containers that show how their world blossomed. [Event] Curator’s Slide Lecture Dates: Mar. 9 (Fri) and Mar. 16 (Fri) 13:30–14:15 In Japanese. Please see the official website for details.




Hina Dolls of the Sano Art Museum Collection

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Hina Dolls of the Sano Art Museum Collection
at Sano Art Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2018-02-24 - 2018-04-01)

Sano Art Museum presents Hina dolls and accessories from its collection for Girls’ Day on March 3rd.




La Parisienne: Portraying Women in the Capital of Culture, 1715-1965 from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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La Parisienne: Portraying Women in the Capital of Culture, 1715-1965 from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
at Setagaya Art Museum (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2018-01-13 - 2018-04-01)

The word “Parisienne” refers to women who live in the alluring city of Paris. This traditionally included refined hostesses who oversaw salons, women who sported novel hairstyles and trendy attire, models who served as artists’ muses, and painters and actresses whose flourishing talent allowed them to make their own way in life. The myriad lifestyles of these women were reflections of the age. This exhibition focuses on the women who embodied French culture from the 18th to the 20th century in some 120 works from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. In addition to extravagant dresses and hand-colored prints that depict trends and fashions of the period, viewers can look forward to Renoir’s painting of a woman in exotic costume, Manet’s portrait of a dignified singer on a street corner, and works by Mary Cassatt, an American artist who made a name for herself in Paris. Enjoy this diverse range of works related to Parisiennes. [Related Events] Lecture Series (with sign language interpretation) Venue: Auditorium, Setagaya Art Museum Capacity: 140 Admission: Free *Numbered admission ticket will be distributed from 13:00 on the day of the event. Lecture: Portraits of Women of the Belle Epoch - As a Painter, As a Women, As a Parisienne Date: Jan. 14 (Sun), 14:00-15:30 (doors open 13:30) Speaker: Nobuyuki Senzoku (Director of Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum) ¥100 Workshop - O France Fragrance Date: Every Saturday during the exhibition period, 13:00-15:00 (attendees can join/leave at any point) Venue: B1F workshop rooms, Setagaya Art Museum Admission: ¥100 per session *Events in Japanese. *Please see the official website for information on further events.




Ninsei and Kenzan – Kyoto Pottery and Painting

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Ninsei and Kenzan – Kyoto Pottery and Painting
at Okada Museum Of Art (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-11-03 - 2018-04-01)

Ninsei Nonomura and Kenzan Ogata were two important ceramics artists during the Edo period. The former perfected the Kyoto Kyoyaki style of painting in color on fired ceramics, creating masterpieces of beautiful form and color favored by nobility and daimyos. The latter, brother of painter Korin Ogata, produced painted dishes combining the arts of painting and pottery, carrying on the torch of Kyoyaki tradition from Ninsei Nonomura. Ceramics by these two artists from the Okada Museum of Art collection, including Important Cultural Properties, are displayed along with paintings by Korin Ogata and Jakuchu Ito.




Hina Dolls of the Mitsui Family

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Hina Dolls of the Mitsui Family
at Mitsui Memorial Museum (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2018-02-10 - 2018-04-08)

“Hina Dolls of the Mitsui Family” is an annual event marking the coming of spring in Nihonbashi. In this exhibition, Hina dolls and miniature furniture treasured by the wives and daughters of the Mitsui family are displayed. It features luxurious pieces once belonging to Motoko (1869-1946), the wife of Takamine Mitsui (10th generation head of the Kita Mitsui family), Toshiko (1901-1976), the wife of Takakimi Mitsui (11th head), Hisako Asano (1933- ), the only daughter of Takakimi, and Okiko (1900-1980), the wife of Takahisa Mitsui (9th head of the Isarago Mitsui family). The highlight is the gorgeous display of Hina dolls on a 3-meter wide five-tiered stand specially made by Heizo Oki V of Maruhei, Oki Doll Company in Kyoto. *Please see the official website for information on related events.




Silk Crepe Handiworks

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Silk Crepe Handiworks
at Tobacco & Salt Museum (Kiyosumi, Ryogoku area)
(2018-01-23 - 2018-04-08)

Chirimen, also known as crepe, is a delicate and fine silk fabric with a bumpy texture that has been valued since the Edo Period (1603-1868) right up to the present day as a material for kimono production in Japan. Pieces that were made from left over crepe fabric are these days known as “Chirimen-zaiku crepe work.” Shigeyoshi Inoue, Director of the Japan Toy Museum, was the first to refer to this fine needlework as “Chirimen-zaiku,” and since naming it such in 1986, this name has become established nationwide through exhibitions and publications. In the latter half of the Edo Period, women in wealthy households, such as samurai families, merchants and Imperial household maids began sewing left over crepe fabrics into beautiful pouches and small decorative boxes. In this way, the valuing of small amounts of fabrics, aesthetic sense and crafts which taught hand dexterity became a part of the cultural refinement of Japanese women. From the Meiji Period (1868-1912), crepe work became a subject for girls at school, and girls competed to develop interesting designs, referring to sewing specialty books. Crepe was formed into pouches with flowers or animals for holding fragrances and plectrums for playing the koto, pouches formed into toys or dolls as lucky charms for children, and the custom of using crepe pouches as part of bridal dowries was also observed in the Chubu and Tokai regions of central Japan. This exhibition, held under the auspice of Tobacco & Salt Museum and Japan Toy Museum consists of two sections, the first section being a collection of old works from the 17th century to the first half of the 20th century, which will introduce the history and culture of crepe work. The second section will exhibit Heisei (1989~) crepe work by season and type, showing its revival today through the reconstruction work of the Japan Toy Museum. You will also be able to view “hanging decorations” and small “decorated umbrellas” that demonstrate the enjoyment of crepe work and the pleasure of giving.




Special Exhibition “The Dawn of Design – From the Oldest Stone Tools to Handaxes”

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Special Exhibition “The Dawn of Design – From the Oldest Stone Tools to Handaxes”
at Intermediatheque (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-12-12 - 2018-04-08)

On the occasion of collaboratively exhibiting in Japan some of the oldest stone tools discovered in Ethiopia, Intermediatheque is holding a special exhibition focusing on the design of the stone tools in their formative periods. [Related Exhibition] Special Exhibition “The Oldest Stone Tools and Handaxes – The Dawn of Design” Schedule: 2017.10.20–2018.01.28 Venue: The University Museum, the University of Tokyo (UMUT) (Hongo Campus)




The Hosokawa Clan and Chinese Ceramics

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The Hosokawa Clan and Chinese Ceramics
at Eisei-Bunko Museum (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2018-02-10 - 2018-04-11)

Chinese ceramics have been held in high esteem in Japan since ancient times, considered works of superior quality and quantity. Eisei-Bunko Museum is home to more than 100 Chinese ceramic items produced from the Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD) right through to the Qing Dynasty (1644 to 1912), its founder Moritatsu Hosokawa (16th generation the Hosokawa Clan, 1883-1970) having built the collection of Chinese art objects while traveling in Europe from 1926 for around a year and a half, continuing to add to it thereafter. The family was also known for its interest in the tea ceremony tradition, which can be traced back to Tadaoki Hosokawa (1563-1645). As a result they also collected many Karamono ceramics used in tea ceremony. This exhibition will trace the history of Chinese ceramics through the 50 or so exhibits showcased, including two items recognized as important cultural properties.




Gift: What Design Offers Us – The Keiji Nagai Collection

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Gift: What Design Offers Us – The Keiji Nagai Collection
at Atelier Muji (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2018-01-26 - 2018-04-15)

In this exhibition, “gift” themed products have been specially selected from Keiji Nagai’s vast product design collection that looks to enrich everyday life. In the last 50 years, he has traveled all around the world from his home in Fukuoka. Using his hands, eyes and feet, he has been carefully gathering individual items for his collection. Here only a small portion of his entire collection - from his own residence, as well as from four separate warehouses (now consolidated into two) - is on display. It covers a wide range of product genres, from furniture, home décor, electrical appliances to welfare products and books. The Nagai collection is filled with beautiful yet functional objects, with each item telling a story that answers the fundamental question of what design means for human beings and their lives. [Related Events] Keiji Nagai’s Collection, according to Keiji Nagai himself Date: Jan. 26 (Fri), 13:30-15:00 *Event in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details.




Metal Art Museum Hikarinotani Permanent Exhibition

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Metal Art Museum Hikarinotani Permanent Exhibition
at Metal Art Museum Hikarinotani (Greater Tokyo area)

Our permanent exhibition, held on the first floor, features the work of metal-cast artists Hotsuma Katori and Shinobu Tsuda. Both being born in the same period, in the Hokuso area of Chiba Prefecture, the two were opposites in artistic viewpoints; Katori emphasized tradition while Tsuda called for revolution. Works on display will be rotated every three months.




Picasso Pavilion

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Picasso Pavilion
at Hakone Open Air Museum (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)

The Hakone Open-Air Museum’s Picasso Collection consists of a substantial number of Picasso’s ceramic creations, purchased from his eldest daughter Maya Picasso, as well as his paintings, prints, sculptures, gold objets d’art. They are permanently exhibited to the public. The photographs of David Douglas Duncan, who documented the artist’s last 17years, also play a vital role in this collection.




“Time-Travel! The World of the Ancient Orient”

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“Time-Travel! The World of the Ancient Orient”
at Ancient Orient Museum (Tokyo: Others area)

A variety of cultures and civilizations have emerged since humans first walked the lands of the ancient Orient 1.8 million years ago. When thinking about the history of the world and its ties to contemporary people, the role of the ancient Orient cannot be overlooked. This exhibition introduces pieces of this history with ancient artifacts and art from the Paleolithic era through the flourishing of Islam. Venue: Main Exhibition Room




3331 Art Fair

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3331 Art Fair
at 3331 Arts Chiyoda (Chiyoda area)
(2018-03-07 - 2018-03-11)

3331 Art Fair is Tokyo’s “alternative art fair” spotlighting an exciting and varied lineup of young creators to artists with well-established careers. The main gallery features works by notable artists recommended by connoisseurs and curators from galleries across Japan, while other participants include commercial galleries, alternative spaces, the gymnasium featuring university works, and 3331 Arts Chiyoda’s individual galleries and educational spaces. This one-of-a-kind event fills the complex from the basement to the top floor for five whole days!




ART in PARK HOTEL TOKYO 2018 (AiPHT)

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ART in PARK HOTEL TOKYO 2018 (AiPHT)
at Park Hotel Tokyo (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2018-03-09 - 2018-03-11)

The third annual Art in Park Hotel Tokyo (AiPHT) co-hosted by Park Hotel Tokyo and Art Osaka features works from 42 galleries in places including Osaka, Tokyo, South Korea, and Taiwan. The hotel’s guestrooms are transformed into galleries displaying and selling works of many genres, from paintings to photographs to installation art, and offer a chance to encounter these works that could hang in your home in a different environment than the typical gallery experience. Artists who have created works for the guest rooms will also give talks (please make reservations).