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Preview: TAB Events - in category 3D: Fashion

TAB Events - in category 3D: Fashion





 



Hiroko Koshino “Paintings Visible in Clothing”

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Hiroko Koshino “Paintings Visible in Clothing”
at KH Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-10-10 - 2017-11-25)

Hiroko Koshino has had an amazing 60-year career as a fashion designer and she still currently announces two collections a year, which continue to share beauty ahead of its generation. She has also tirelessly been releasing works of art in recent years, creating a unique world combing fashion and art. This exhibition displays clothing works from past collections in three categories of “quality, shape and color,” which have been re-defined from the design elements of paintings. Her fashion is captured in a new manner from an artistic perspective. The series with clothing works enclosed in flat and clear acrylic cases allows guests to view in detail this “quality” including different materials for each work of art, handmade decorations and the picturesque structure. Meanwhile, the optical installation features infinite “shapes” which can be imagined from one dress. You can also take in “colors” in KH gallery’s first exhibition of colorful giclée style paintings which sparkle in their own small worlds. Discovering “works of art” from past clothing could be another step forward in the fusion between fashion and art.




Viviane Sassen “Of Mud and Lotus”

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Viviane Sassen “Of Mud and Lotus”
at G/P Gallery (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-10-06 - 2017-11-25)

Viviane Sassen is a photographer considered representative of the Netherlands. Aside from her active role in various global fashion labels, she is receiving much attention for her participation in events such as “The Encyclopedic Palace” (2013) - the 55th edition of the Venice Biennale, directed by Massimiliano Gioni - and her nomination for the German Bose Award. “Of Mud and Lotus” is a work inspired by the proverbial saying that a lotus flower blooms by growing through mud. As is symbolized by these words, this body of work is imbibed with all the “richness” of primordial concepts of femininity, including female-specific bodily transformations such as pregnancy and childbirth, as well as corpulence, referring here to organic play. Sassen skillfully weaves together her ideas regarding the abstract and performance, using collage and hand-colored photographs to produce bold colors and textures that add to the multilayered nature of her images while offering viewers a variety of ways to understand and respond to her works as a result. For Sassen, bacterial fungi and clustered spores are reminiscent of the growth of the cells in the human body, organic materials such as eggs, milk, and flowers emphasizing the rich curves that are so abundant in nature while also expressing the corporeality of the female body. If you look closely at her works resembling abstract compositions, you may notice something new being born.




Lake of Grace #001 “Chikubu Island’s Green”

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Lake of Grace #001 “Chikubu Island’s Green”
at Our Favourite Shop (Shirokane, Hiroo area)
(2017-11-09 - 2017-11-26)

Ceramics, furniture, textiles, and other products inspired by Lake Biwa’s Chikubu Island. These items were created by Kikof, a brand collaboration between Kigi and artisans from the Lake Biwa area.




LÄMPÖ by Kauniste

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LÄMPÖ by Kauniste
at Case Gallery (Shibuya area)
(2017-11-18 - 2017-11-26)

Displaying and selling wool clothing and other winter items by the Helsinki-based textile brand kauniste.




Sheep Adventures

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Sheep Adventures
at Gallery Re: tail (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-11-21 - 2017-11-26)

Scarves and other accessories by a wool craft group.




The Living Treasures of France

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The Living Treasures of France
at Tokyo National Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2017-09-12 - 2017-11-26)

Modeled on the Japanese certification of a “Living National Treasure,” the French equivalent, called “Maître d’ Art” or “Master of Art,” was established in 1994 by the Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication, the ministry in charge of cultural and artistic affairs. The purpose of this certification is to preserve and pass down traditional craftsmanship to future generations while promoting innovation. This is the first exhibition of its kind in the world to introduce one artist from each of the fifteen classified fields, including ceramics, glass, leather, tortoiseshell, feathers, umbrellas, fans, and wallpaper. Visitors are invited to view and experience outstanding craftsmanship and tradition, as well as splendid beauty that will inspire future generations. Venue: Hyokeikan inside Tokyo National Museum




Kumin “Fragments of the sea, sky and land”

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Kumin “Fragments of the sea, sky and land”
at F.E.I Art Gallery (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-11-14 - 2017-11-29)

Kumin presents hats expressing “Fragments of the deep sea,” “Fragments of the distant sky,” and “Fragment of the expansive land,” bringing them together here in a single presentation. You can see how in the production of these wearable items Kumin carefully balances the aspects of the wearer and the surrounding space.




HaNNa “What do you stand for?”

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HaNNa “What do you stand for?”
at Lamp harajuku (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-10-19 - 2017-11-30)

What are you fighting for? What do you speak up for? Here HaNNa will present can pin badges as they are produced in the basement gallery at Lamp. The exhibition will also spread to the first floor window display. This is a participatory exhibition where you’re encouraged to get involved.




Loewe International Craft Prize

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Loewe International Craft Prize
at 21_21 Design Sight (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-16 - 2017-11-30)

Gallery 21_21 Design Sight displays works by 26 nominees featured in the first edition of the Loewe Craft Prize. This is the third of three touring exhibitions showcasing the merits of modern craftsmanship. The imagination, diversity, and techniques on display all attest to the crucial role artisans have in the ongoing construction of cultural heritage.




The beauty of Spanish embroidery - Spanish embroidery and the everyday

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The beauty of Spanish embroidery - Spanish embroidery and the everyday
at Instituto Cervantes Tokyo, Japones (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2017-11-15 - 2017-12-01)

There are various ethnic and cultural influences evident in embroidery from Spain. Furthermore, there are variations in method depending on the specific region. The temperate southern part of the country, for example, is known for tulle embroidery and vainica calados. Traditionally, these techniques have been passed down from mothers to children. A selection of works by Momoko Uchida will be on show here.




Climb Every Mountain vol. 1: The Lives and Embroidery of the Miao people

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Climb Every Mountain vol. 1: The Lives and Embroidery of the Miao people
at Setagaya Culture Life Information Center, Seikatsu-Kobo (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-10)

The first installment of the “Climb Every Mountain” series, which will introduce the lives of peoples residing in mountainous regions around the world, focuses on the Miao people of Guizhou Province in southwestern China. Roughly 60 traditional ethnic garments will be presented here, tracing a single year in the life of the Miao people who celebrate so many festivals that they are often said to “hold a small festival every day.” Here you can discover the lives of this ethic group through their embroidery. Venue: Seikatsu-Kobo Gallery, Workshop room B [Related Events] Business trip tour counter: Let’s visit Guizhou Event Date: Dec. 2 (Sat) 11:00-16:00 Speakers: Koji Arai (Eatable of Many Orders), Ryoko Ando (Design Musica), Kao Kanamori (Drifters International) Venue: Workshop room A Admission: Free (fee applies to mini workshop and food) *Event in Japanese. *No booking required. *You can join and leave the event freely at any time. *Please see the official website for further details and other events.




Reborn-Art festival Tokyo exhibition: What went on?

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Reborn-Art festival Tokyo exhibition: What went on?
at Watari-um, The Watari Museum of Contemporary Art (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-10-20 - 2017-12-10)

This exhibition revisits Reborn-Art Festival, a brand new art, music, and food focused event that was held this summer at locations throughout Ishinomaki city center and Oshika Peninsula in Tohoku. Scheduled at a time when Tohoku is going through a dramatic period of rebirth, those visiting the festival had the unique opportunity to encounter new people and ideas that wouldn’t be found anywhere else in Japan. Here, visitors had the chance to discover a new aspect of themselves that they had not yet glimpsed. In this way, the event was not just about the reconstruction of the Tohoku region, but also a festival that offered visitors a chance to be reborn. This exhibition will present works and documentation that were exhibited at Reborn-Art Festival 2017, giving those who could not attend the event another opportunity to enjoy the work that was on offer there.




Quai Branly Tokyo “Treasures from Foreign Lands – The Jewelry of Desert Tribes”

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Quai Branly Tokyo “Treasures from Foreign Lands – The Jewelry of Desert Tribes”
at Intermediatheque (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-01-31 - 2018-01-21)

JP Tower Museum Intermediateque (IMT) presents “Treasures from Foreign Lands – The Jewelry of Desert Tribes,” the fifth installation of its Quai Branly Tokyo project jointly organized with the Musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac in Paris. Exquisite jewelry works produced by populations from Maghreb and the Near East are displayed.




Decoration Never Dies, Anyway

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Decoration Never Dies, Anyway
at Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-11-18 - 2018-02-25)

This decoration-focused exhibition features seven artists whom are all different in age, nationality, and genre. The means of expression they employ are diverse, including a trailer adorned with Gothic decoration, carpets that mix together patterns derived from various cultural spheres, and paintings that through the façade of windows imagines the life and personalities of the people who live there. In their works the artists juxtapose entirely different epochs and values, imagine worlds that do not actually exist, and attempt to interpret the concept of “decoration” as it exists in the context of daily life. In observing their endeavors, we as viewers recognize that the act of decoration is indeed the essential key to perceiving the vivid and complex reality that inextricably surrounds us. After all, “Decoration never dies, anyway.” [Related Events] Artist Talk On 18 November, Sat. 13:00− Short presentation by participating artists (with simultaneous interpreting English-Japanese) Venue: Annex Gallery 2, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum Seating capacity: 120 Pre-registration required (available on TTM website from 18 Oct.) Free with museum admission




The Shining Boro – Cloth of Life

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The Shining Boro – Cloth of Life
at Amuse Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2017-03-31 - 2018-03-25)

In Aomori Prefecture, there were quilted cloths called “Bodo” or “Bodoko” made by sewing pieces of hemp and cotton cloth once worn by generations of ancestors. Bodoko were used as sheets to lie on during the night, spread over straw or dry leaves on the floor. They were also often also used during childbirth as the sheet for the baby to be delivered on. Receiving the baby with these multi-layered cloths once worn by long-gone ancestors carried the message to the baby that she did not enter the world alone. In addition to the Boro patched clothing collection of Mr. Chuzaburo Tanaka, this exhibition presents valuable Bodoko owned by Mr. Toshio Kojima (Gallery Kojima) and Ms. Sayomi Okamune (Art gallery Hagisha). The stunning world of art unexpectedly created from these “shabby” clothes represents the precise opposite of today’s consumer culture.




"Boro" Exhibition

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"Boro" Exhibition
at Amuse Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)

"Boro" is now becoming an international phrase, originated from Japanese snowy north area, meaning the patched clothes that people back then used for many generations in a household by adding stitches and/or pieces of cloth on it over and over. The word “Boro” now also has an artistic sense to it, highly rated among the field of the textile art design, and requested for purchase by various artists and collectors. Boro is patched clothing with a lot of small cloths here and there, but nothing fancy like today’s quilted or patched works. It was made purely for the practical purposes of retaining warmth in the snowy areas and for making it last as long as possible where it was hard to obtain any other sorts of cloth. When we review its practicality and design from today’s point of view, we are able to realize its incredible sophistication. Amuse Museum is exhibiting Boro for the first time after a century has passed since its last use. It contains no waste, and this is what is called “Yuyo-no-Bi" (Beauty of Practicality), a concept which we seem to have forgotten already, the opposite of today’s prevailing consumer culture.




Tube Socks

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Tube Socks
at Guardian Garden (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-11-28 - 2017-12-23)

Starting November 28, Creation Gallery G8 and Guardian Garden - two galleries in Tokyo’s Ginza district - will host an exhibition focusing on tube Socks for this year’s addition of the annual “Creation Project.” It represents a collaboration involving 167 creative artists and a small manufacturing company based in Osaka. Higuchi Knitting Company, located in Hirakata City in Osaka Prefecture, is a producer of socks that was founded in 1933. Sock production in Japan peaked in the late 1980s and has been in decline ever since. In the face of inexpensive imports from Asia, the Japanese sock industry as a whole is in a severe state. Higuchi Knitting takes maximum advantage of its resilience as a small-scale producer, however, creating made-to-order socks on request from the customer - even responding to orders for a single pair. The items on exhibit here are based on tube socks developed by Higuchi Knitting at the request of its customers. The company’s tube socks are unusual in having no heel and being of extra-high quality. Those featured in the exhibition are all original articles with knitted designs created by artists from various fields and backgrounds. All items on show will be available for purchase. The absence of a heel, combined with outstanding elasticity, means that Higuchi Knitting’s tube socks fit all sizes, from children to adults. They make ideal gifts, for Christmas or other occasions, and for oneself. Proceeds from the sale of the tube socks will be donated to “Save the Children.” Under that program, funds are used locally in Japan for a number of important purposes: to relieve child poverty, prevent child abuse, support recovery in disaster-affected regions, etc.




Tube Socks

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Tube Socks
at Creation Gallery G8 (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-11-28 - 2017-12-23)

Starting November 28, Creation Gallery G8 and Guardian Garden - two galleries in Tokyo’s Ginza district - will host an exhibition focusing on tube Socks for this year’s addition of the annual “Creation Project.” It represents a collaboration involving 167 creative artists and a small manufacturing company based in Osaka. Higuchi Knitting Company, located in Hirakata City in Osaka Prefecture, is a producer of socks that was founded in 1933. Sock production in Japan peaked in the late 1980s and has been in decline ever since. In the face of inexpensive imports from Asia, the Japanese sock industry as a whole is in a severe state. Higuchi Knitting takes maximum advantage of its resilience as a small-scale producer, however, creating made-to-order socks on request from the customer - even responding to orders for a single pair. The items on exhibit here are based on tube socks developed by Higuchi Knitting at the request of its customers. The company’s tube socks are unusual in having no heel and being of extra-high quality. Those featured in the exhibition are all original articles with knitted designs created by artists from various fields and backgrounds. All items on show will be available for purchase. The absence of a heel, combined with outstanding elasticity, means that Higuchi Knitting’s tube socks fit all sizes, from children to adults. They make ideal gifts, for Christmas or other occasions, and for oneself. Proceeds from the sale of the tube socks will be donated to “Save the Children.” Under that program, funds are used locally in Japan for a number of important purposes: to relieve child poverty, prevent child abuse, support recovery in disaster-affected regions, etc.




A Very Vintage Christmas

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A Very Vintage Christmas
at Isetan Shinjuku Store (Shinjuku area)
(2017-11-29 - 2017-12-05)

A selection of vintage European design in ceramics, glassware, furniture, jewelry, and other works by René Lalique and brands like Dome (France), Meissen (Germany), and Georg Jensen (Denmark). 5F Art Gallery




Shigeko Ikeda “Yokohama Style”

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Shigeko Ikeda “Yokohama Style”
at Sogo Museum of Art (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-12-13 - 2018-01-08)

Shigeko Ikeda (1925 - 2015) was a collector, designer and stylist credited as being responsible for rekindling the trend for vintage kimono. Kimonos that had enjoyed their heyday during the Meiji (1869-1912), Taisho (1912-1926), and early Showa (1926-1989) eras found a new lease of life at the hands of women of the Heisei (1989-) period who wore them in a new contemporary way. While she paid attention to the specific suitability, period and seasonality of kimono, in her styling the Yokohama-born Ikeda had a preference for chic Edo tastes rather than Kyoto’s more refined elegance. To be bold yet graceful. Her unique “Yokohama Style” picking up on elements of Edo tradition focused to the fine line between being overly chic and erring towards becoming unsophisticated. This exhibition shining the spotlight on Shigeko Ikeda is organized around the concept of “handing down aesthetic sensibilities” and will feature around 150 items. You can learn how Yukiko Ikeda inherited Shigeko’s aesthetic approach, and see the kimono that the two women produced together for the beauty brand IKKO on display. Furthermore, Shigeko Ikeda’s private room will be reconstructed here, and the changes that kimonos and the aesthetic sensibilities surrounding them underwent can be traced through the archive copies of “Fujingaho” and “Utsukushii kimono” exhibited. [Related Events] Talk Event: Shigeko Ikeda and Yokohama Style Date: Dec. 13 (Wed) 14:00-15:99 Speakers: Kyoko-Tomikawa (editor of “Fujingaho” and “Utsukushii kimono”), Rieko Adachi (kimono journalist), Yukiko Ikeda Venue: Inside the exhibition space Capacity: 60 Admission: Adults: ¥500 (exhibition admission ticket also required, no booking required), Junior High School Students and Under: Free Gallery Talk Date: Dec. 22 (Fri), Jan. 6 (Sat), 15:00- Speaker: Yukiko Ikeda Venue: Inside the exhibition space Admission: Free (exhibition admission ticket required, no booking required) *Events in Japanese