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Preview: British Journal of Criminology - Advance Access

The British Journal of Criminology Advance Access





Published: Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2018 11:54:34 GMT

 



‘#IT’S Dangerous’: The Online World of Drug Dealers, Rappers and the Street Code

Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
As the digital divide has narrowed, the internet and social media have become more accessible to disadvantaged populations, including drug dealers, gang members and street hustlers. These individuals increasingly publicize their activities and associations via social media networks. Little is known, however, about the dangers criminal actors face in using social media, and how they manage those risks. Based on interview data and ethnographic observation of criminally-involved men in Toronto’s Regent Park neighbourhood, we argue that the men both reproduce and reinforce many of the dangers of life on the urban streets, while fostering new strategies for managing those risks through an ongoing process of online impression management. In the process, the code of the street goes virtual; dis-embedded from its originating physical location, it circulates on new media platforms, and occasionally becomes re-embedded onto those same streets, but with different inflexions and implications.



‘#IT’S Dangerous’: The Online World of Drug Dealers, Rappers and the Street Code

Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
As the digital divide has narrowed, the internet and social media have become more accessible to disadvantaged populations, including drug dealers, gang members and street hustlers. These individuals increasingly publicize their activities and associations via social media networks. Little is known, however, about the dangers criminal actors face in using social media, and how they manage those risks. Based on interview data and ethnographic observation of criminally-involved men in Toronto’s Regent Park neighbourhood, we argue that the men both reproduce and reinforce many of the dangers of life on the urban streets, while fostering new strategies for managing those risks through an ongoing process of online impression management. In the process, the code of the street goes virtual; dis-embedded from its originating physical location, it circulates on new media platforms, and occasionally becomes re-embedded onto those same streets, but with different inflexions and implications.



Troubling recognitions in British responses to modern slavery

Mon, 08 Jan 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
This article interrogates the advent of modern slavery policy in Britain, explaining how the police and NGO sector have welcomed an organized crime model, politically conceived in ‘excessively positive’ terms. Deploying Christopher Bollas’ (1993: 167) concept of ‘violent innocence’, defined as a defence against the ‘desire to be innocent of a troubling recognition’, we argue that the politics of modern slavery render it difficult for many to imagine offenders as anything other than the ‘evil’ nemesis of ‘innocent’ victims. The article argues for the need to be mindful of Britain’s historical role in the advent of slavery and practices like it, and recognition of the extent to which immigration control practices exacerbate the vulnerabilities to exploitation modern slavery policy attempts to tackle.