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The British Journal of Criminology Advance Access





Published: Sat, 23 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Sat, 23 Sep 2017 07:52:23 GMT

 



Criminology and the UN Sustainable Development Goals: The Need for Support and Critique

2017-09-23

Abstract
The UN Sustainable Development Goals address a number of criminological issues. This article accounts for why criminologists should contribute to this agenda in a way that might benefit the international development community. We acknowledge a heightened risk of crime in parts of the Global South but argue criminologists should cautiously embrace this agenda as a platform for achieving human and sustainable development outcomes. Supporting this agenda means assisting with the design, implementation and evaluation of projects that contribute to safe, just and sustainable societies. From a critical standpoint, it also means challenging harmful or inappropriate initiatives and resisting attempts to capitalize on this agenda for political gain. Both modes of engagement are informed by the values of ‘caution’, ‘scepticism’ and southern epistemologies. The article then proceeds to examine three areas where criminological research can make important contributions: building safe and just societies, eliminating gender-based violence and promoting environmental justice.



Expanding Moral Panic Theory to Include the Agency of Charismatic Entrepreneurs

2017-09-23

Abstract
Working beyond latently Durkheimian figurations of moral panic which depict a dialectic between ‘right-thinkers’ and folk devils, this article integrates charismatic entrepreneurs into a tripartite model that sheds light on two new pathways of interaction that are relevant for the sociology of morality. First, charismatic leaders can outflank traditional leaders’ aspersions of folk devils, taking the principle of ‘one-upmanship’ to an extraordinary (and therewith charismatic) extreme. Second, charismatic leaders cancreatively subvert traditional mores, overturning value tables to ‘bedevil’ traditional leaders. Because moral panic and charismatic enthusiasm implicate distinct, complementary, and unitary social processes, I argue that, taken together, the work of Max Weber and Stanley Cohen offer a more theoretically profitable vision of moral denaturation and reformulation than either would alone. Donald Trump’s charismatic ascension during his 2015–16 US Presidential campaign is used to illustrate the theoretical contribution.



Child Arrest, Settler Colonialism, and the Israeli Juvenile System: A Case Study of Occupied East Jerusalem

2017-09-15

Abstract
Based on three interrelated theoretical frameworks—institutional racism, settler colonialism and security reasoning—the study examines child arrests in Occupied East Jerusalem (OEJ), addressing how the Israeli justice and law enforcement systems treat Palestinian children. Through analyses of Knesset protocols, court watch participatory observations, review of court proceedings and verdicts, interviews with children, families and professionals in juvenile justice, and a round table discussion, we found that criminalization and punishment are embedded in a systematic, racialized violence that characterizes the Israeli criminal justice system when dealing with Palestinian children in OEJ. The Israeli justice and law enforcement systems categorize Palestinian children as security threats, born terrorists and ideological criminals, lacking all rights.



A Qualitative Study of the Crime-Control Potency of Traditional Justice System in Oshogbo

2017-09-15

Abstract
This article examines the implications of the traditional justice system for crime control in Oshogbo. It used qualitative methods and a purposive sampling method to select 35 in-depth, 5 key informant interview participants and 3 major streets in Oshogbo, respectively. Data were content analyzed. The study found that the traditional and formal justices reduce customary and complex offenses with norms and laws, respectively. It concludes that a formal–traditional partnership will reduce criminality. It suggests the reorganization and co-optation of state and non-state systems under an institutional umbrella to reduce crime and improve public safety in Oshogbo.



The Police Foundation’s Rise: Implications of Public Policing’s Dark Money

2017-09-15

Abstract
A new kind of organization has emerged in public policing across the United States and Canada: the ‘police foundation’. The foundation’s private, nonprofit legal status allows it to engage in private fundraising activities that police, as public bodies, cannot. In many municipalities, police foundations raise funds directed toward police procurement practices and operations. We discuss reasons for and detail the rise and growth of these foundations as they have modeled the New York Police Department’s Foundation and changes in that foundations’ expenditures over time, and examine the key claim that police foundations reduce corruption by maximizing transparency. We draw from literature on financial obfuscation and explore controversies centered on police foundation solicitation and use of private funds in North America. Conceptualizing these private entities as shell corporations that permit transactions in dark money, we raise questions about police foundation transparency. We conclude by discussing the implications for public policy as well as police transparency across North America.