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Preview: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education - Advance Access

The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education Advance Access





Published: Tue, 31 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Tue, 31 Oct 2017 07:45:26 GMT

 



School-aged Children with Mild Bilateral and Unilateral Hearing Loss: Parents’ Reflections on Services, Experiences, and Outcomes

2017-10-31

Abstract
Following the establishment of newborn hearing screening programs, age of identification and length of time before receiving interventions has been reduced for children, including those with milder degrees of hearing loss who were previously not identified until school age. This population of early-identified children requires new support programs for parents. Although literature is emerging on how parents experience the initial years, there is limited information on support needs during early school years. The objectives were to gain insights into parents’ experiences with services during the early period of identification until early school years, as well as their perceptions of the consequences of hearing loss on their child’s overall development. A qualitative research design informed by Interpretive Description was employed. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 parents of children identified with mild hearing loss. Transcripts were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Four themes emerged from the data: early experiences with services and hearing technology, effects of hearing loss on social functioning, effects of hearing loss on language and academics, and experiences in early school years. From parents’ perspectives, more support during the early school years is needed to help ensure academic success.



Altering Practices to Include Bimodal-bilingual (ASL-Spoken English) Programming at a Small School for the Deaf in Canada

2017-10-13

Abstract
Bimodal-bilingual programs are emerging as one way to meet broader needs and provide expanded language, educational and social-emotional opportunities for students who are deaf and hard of hearing (Marschark, M., Tang, G. & Knoors, H. (Eds). (2014). Bilingualism and bilingual Deaf education. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; Paludneviciene & Harris, R. (2011). Impact of cochlear implants on the deaf community. In Paludneviciene, R. & Leigh, I. (Eds.), Cochlear implants evolving perspectives (pp. 3–19). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press). However, there is limited research on students’ spoken language development, signed language growth, academic outcomes or the social-emotional factors associated with these programs (Marschark, M., Tang, G. & Knoors, H. (Eds). (2014). Bilingualism and bilingual Deaf education. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; Nussbaum, D & Scott, S. (2011). The cochlear implant education center: Perspectives on effective educational practices. In Paludneviciene, R. & Leigh, I. (Eds.) Cochlear implants evolving perspectives (pp. 175–205). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press. The cochlear implant education center: Perspectives on effective educational practices. In Paludnevicience & Leigh (Eds). Cochlear implants evolving perspectives (pp. 175–205). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press; Spencer, P. & Marschark, M. (Eds.) (2010). Evidence-based practice in educating deaf and hard-of-hearing students. New York, NY: Oxford University Press). The purpose of this case study was to look at formal and informal student outcomes as well as staff and parent perceptions during the first 3 years of implementing a bimodal-bilingual (ASL and spoken English) program within an ASL milieu at a small school for the deaf. Speech and language assessment results for five students were analyzed over a 3-year period and indicated that the students made significant positive gains in all areas, although results were variable. Staff and parent survey responses indicated primarily positive perceptions of the program. Some staff identified ongoing challenges with balancing signed and spoken language use. Many parents responded with strong emotions, some stating that the program was “life-changing” for their children/families.



Exploring Cascading Effects of Multimodal Communication Skills in Infants With Hearing Loss

2017-10-13

Abstract
Infants and toddlers with hearing loss (HL) are at risk for developing communicative delays that can have a substantial lasting effect. Understanding child characteristics that may be targeted in early intervention is essential to maximizing communicative outcomes in children with HL. Among the most malleable predictors of communication skills include maternal responsivity, gestures, and vocalizations. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among maternal responsivity, prelinguistic communication skills and expressive vocabulary in children with HL. Based upon the results we propose a theoretical cascading model of communicative outcomes for children with HL such that gesture use may be associated with future vocalizations which may in turn be related to long-term spoken language outcomes. This exploratory model may be supported by the underlying transactional model of bidirectional language development that occurs through maternal sensitivity in the first two years of life. Additionally, parents of children with HL may be less likely to respond to a single mode of communication than to a combination of modes. This exploratory study provides a theoretical framework by which multimodal communication development in infants and toddlers with HL may be better understood, and suggests hypotheses for future research and implications for intervention practice.