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MADE IN UMUT - The University of Tokyo Collection

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MADE IN UMUT - The University of Tokyo Collection
at Intermediatheque

(2013-03-21 - 2018-06-30)

Since its foundation in 1877, the University of Tokyo has accumulated a considerable scientific and cultural heritage. Such historical specimens are most certainly an important heritage from the past. However, at the same time, they constitute a resource which we should activate now while facing the future. In order to demonstrate this, we have collected as much historical heritage as possible, and modified its design for a new use, in accordance with our contemporary needs, in the name of a process called ReDESIGN+. Just as the Intermediatheque is built on the reincarnation and inheritance of the former Central Post Office, we have renovated this ancient building and given it a new life as a museum. Nevertheless, this does not imply that we have to consider ReDESIGN+ as a bare revamp activity. In the same way as the etymological meaning of the word design, ReDESIGN+ deals with the problem of appearance at the same time as it raises epistemological issues on our view of things and our view of the world. As for the spatial distribution of the exhibits, we deliberately avoided the common method of setting up a visiting route. What the Intermediatheque aims at is providing a museum space where visitors, and especially younger generations, can experience a direct visual contact with exhibits, in an encounter full of discoveries and astonishment. Considering the fact that the architecture of the former Post Office building is representative of early Showa modernism, the permanent and semi-permanent exhibition spaces were designed so as to produce a retromodern atmosphere. Respecting the building’s original design, we have adopted an eclectic design principle stimulating our twenty-first century sensitivity, tentatively named retrofuturism. We thus intend to present to our visitors a period bridging three centuries, from the 19th to the 21st Century. Such is the base of our design strategy for the Intermediatheque. With such a scheme in mind, we have actively redesigned and reused the prewar wooden furniture that was accumulated in our museum. On the other hand, a modern sensitivity is created through the use of showcases made of thick green glass and designed in a retromodern style. These are a fruit of the research conducted in product design at the Intermediatheque. Venue:COLONNADE 2 COLONNADE 3 *The period of the Special Exhibitions of Intermediatheque are unconfirmed and so the final date recorded on TAB is only a temporary guideline




Takuro Kuwata “I’m Home, Tea Bowl”

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Takuro Kuwata “I’m Home, Tea Bowl”
at Kosaku Kanechika
Media: Sculpture - Ceramics
(2017-10-21 - 2017-12-02)

Following his recent solo exhibitions “Dear Tea Bowl” (Salon 94, New York, 2015), “From Tea Bowl” (Alison Jacques Gallery, London, 2016), and “Good Morning, Tea Bowl” (Pierre Marie Giraud, Brussels, 2017), the title “I’m Home, Tea Bowl” suggests another of Takuro Kuwata’s dialogues with tea bowls. Kuwata has come to create sculptures in the form of tea bowls as a development in relation to his sculptural work on tea bowls. In this exhibition Kuwata begins to speak, both figuratively and literally, as an artist who has returned from abroad, addressing tea bowls that he has worked on for number of years from a new perspective. The pure joy and amazement that the viewer experiences when looking at Kuwata’s work stems from the fact that the artist fosters the same connection while creating them. Reflecting our times while being rooted in tradition, these bowls are full of a sense of liberation and possibility. This exhibition will feature about 20 new works, including both tea bowls and sculptures.




Roger Ballen “Ballenesque”

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Roger Ballen “Ballenesque”
at Emon Photo Gallery
Media: Photography
(2017-10-20 - 2017-12-20)

This exhibition by photographer Roger Ballen marks Emon Photo Gallery’s 12th anniversary. Ballen was born in New York in 1950 and graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, traveling the world extensively before settling in Johannesburg, South Africa. There, Ballen has spent the last 35 years working on his photography, giving rise to an impressive body of work. The “Outland” (2001) series, published by Phaidon press, was particularly significant in his rapid rise to fame. The impact of his equally provocative subsequent works on the photography and art world hardly needs mentioning. Ballen was part of a collaborative exhibition titled “No Joke” showing at Diesel Gallery in Tokyo earlier this year. The current exhibition coincides with the publication by Thames and Hudson of his latest book “Ballenesque: Roger Ballen - A Retrospective,” which offers a powerful insight into Ballen’s practice to date. The exhibition will feature innovative works from the past together with some of his latest pieces. Ballen’s photographs are characterized by the compelling people within, shot against windowless, stained walls strewn with graffiti and chaotic wire configurations. These elements pervade his work. Impinging on the realm of painting, Ballen’s photographs encompass an unidentifiable aesthetic that can best be described as “Ballenesque.” Thus, the supernatural world of Roger Ballen robs us of words and nestles deep into our subconscious mind. At the heart of works from the earlier part of Ballen’s career lies an empathy for people living on the edge of society. His later works see a shift away from society as motif and toward the psyche, embodied in a more avant-garde expression incorporating drawings and configurations of space. A tension close to fear permeates Ballen’s photographs. The instinctual reaction is to brace oneself and withdraw slightly, and his works are viewed with baited breath. Philosopher Simone Weil proclaimed, “Good is to be found scattered like sand amongst evil. Purity is the power to be able to hold one’s gaze on filth.” Similarly, Ballen’s crisp monochrome photographs invite us to engage with what we see and provide us a chance to truly think. In addition to focusing on the landmark “Outland” (2001) series, this exhibition will introduce works from “Shadow Chamber” (2005), “Boarding House” (2009), “Asylum of the Birds” (2014), and “The Theatre of Apparitions” (2016). Discover the work of this artist, whose every step has helped establish a truly singular approach, yet, via a repeating cycle of rebirth and transformation, defies categorization. [Related Event] Book signing Event Date: Oct. 21 (Sat) 15:30- *Please see the official website for booking and further details.




“The Doraemon Exhibition Tokyo 2017”

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“The Doraemon Exhibition Tokyo 2017”
at Mori Arts Center Gallery
Media: Graphics - Painting - Drawing - Manga - Photography - Architecture - Sculpture - Installation - Video and Film - Animation - Media Arts - Sound
(2017-11-01 - 2018-01-08)

Organized under the concept “Create Your Own Original Doraemon,” this exhibition brings together 28 artists and artist groups who will present their unique artworks capturing memories of the popular Japanese manga series, “Doraemon.” Since its birth in 1970, “Doraemon” has been capturing the imagination of audiences across Japan. There are also a great number of “Doraemon” fans among globally renowned artists who have been touched and inspired by this long-running manga. How exciting it is to see these artists expressing their feelings and memories of Doraemon through their work? This exhibition invites you to share in this special moment when “art” and “Doraemon” come together. [Artists] Makoto Aida, Kayo Ume, Motohiko Odani, Ryota Kuwakubo, Tomoko Konoike, Akinori Goto, Satomi Kondo, Tomoyoshi Sakamoto, Masaharu Sato, ShiShi Yamazaki, Ai Shinohara, Kotobuki Shiriagari, Yuta Nakazato, Suito Nakatsuka, Yoshitomo Nara, Yasuyuki Nishio, Mika Ninagawa, Miran Fukuda, Sebastian Masuda, Kumi Machida, Mr., Takashi Murakami, Yasumasa Morimura+Junko Koike, Akira Yamaguchi, Hidenori Yamaguchi + Wataru Ito, Ryuki Yamamoto, RenaRena, Nozomi Watanabe




Rhythm in Monochrome - Korean Abstract Painting

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Rhythm in Monochrome - Korean Abstract Painting
at Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery
Media: Painting
(2017-10-14 - 2017-12-24)

Korean abstract painting is a genre unique to Korea, absorbing new approaches to abstract painting that emerged in the West during the 1950s while embodying the spirit of the East. In particular, the Dansaekhwa (monochrome painting) movement born in 1970s Korea was a significant development on a par with the Mono-ha and Gutai movements in Japan. Dansaekhwa was the subject of a major exhibition in Venice in 2015, and international appreciation of this movement is growing rapidly, as demonstrated by increasingly high auction prices around the world. Korean abstract art is one of the core themes in Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery’s Terada Collection. The gallery has received donations of such paintings from collector Kotaro Terada since its establishment, and now holds one of the most substantial collections in Japan. Inspired by the recent popularity of Korean abstract painting, the gallery has put together an exhibition based on its collection and augmented by works on loan from other collectors. The exhibition provides a comprehensive look at these paintings, revealing their rich combination of tranquility and liveliness.




Yang Fudong “The Coloured Sky: New Women II”

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Yang Fudong “The Coloured Sky: New Women II”
at Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo
Media: Installation - Video and Film
(2017-10-18 - 2018-03-11)

Produced and conceived under the artistic direction of the Fondation Louis Vuitton, this exhibition of Chinese artist Yang Fudong is part of the “Hors-les-murs” program, showcasing previously unseen holdings of the Collection at the Espaces Culturels Louis Vuitton in Tokyo, Munich, Beijing and Venice. Since the early 1990s, Yang Fudong has been examining the complexities of contemporary Chinese society from a symbolic, detached perspective through his art form. Formally trained as a painter, Fudong has developed an extensive body of work comprised of videos, films, installations and photographs; consistently creating a visual language enveloped in a dream-like mystery. Favoring multi-screen video projections, Fudong creates an experience that immerses the viewer. His characters, deliberately silent and disembodied, move according to choreographed gestures, always managing to transport the viewer into an aesthetically perfect environment. Often drawing stylistically on different periods in Chinese and Western cinema - as well as taking inspiration from Shanghai in the 1930s, and the landscape tradition rooted in Chinese art history - Fudong creates open-ended, existential narratives that interweave quotidian ritual with dream-like states. With a consciously romantic framework that is simultaneously contemporary and out-of-date, Fudong examines China through the eyes of young urban intellectuals as they grapple with their place in the modern world. He effortlessly references China’s cultural traditions, whilst making close observations of what makes these narratives relevant to contemporary society. The resulting timeless stories plunge viewers into an otherworldly, nostalgic atmosphere in which a generation that exists between modernity and tradition explores and questions the world. The Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo invites the public to discover this now major figure in Chinese contemporary art and cinema, through the presentation of a poetic work, “The Coloured Sky: New Women II” (2014), which belongs to the Fondation Louis Vuitton Collection. Fudong usually creates works on 35mm black and white film; this five-channel video installation marks an aesthetic departure from his signature style, through the overwhelming use of vivid color - the first color film of the artist’s oeuvre. Portraying an artificial brightly colored world, the film depicts five young women, naïve and seductive, wearing vintage swimwear on a deliberately synthetic beachfront setting. Filmed in slow-motion against sounds of laughter, sighs, ocean rumbles and cricket song, they play a game of seduction. Five screens depict images of the sun, the sea, the beach, games, food and references to Western art interspersed with the appearances of a horse and a stag. One real, the other stuffed, the animals refer to a Chinese political story from 3rd century B.C., referring to the proverb, “point to a deer and call it a horse,” connoting a moral play on what is true and what is false. “The Coloured Sky: New Women II” epitomizes Fudong’s artistic tendency to stylistically referencing different periods in both Chinese and Western cinema and culture.




Yayoi Kusama Museum Inaugural Exhibition - Creation is a Solitary Pursuit, Love is What Brings You Closer to Art

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Yayoi Kusama Museum Inaugural Exhibition - Creation is a Solitary Pursuit, Love is What Brings You Closer to Art
at Yayoi Kusama Museum
Media: Painting - Drawing - Sculpture - Installation - Talks
(2017-10-01 - 2018-02-25)

This inaugural exhibition at the Yayoi Kusama Museum centers on the artist’s newest painting series, “My Eternal Soul.” Other new works by Kusama will be on display in addition to the sixteen paintings from this series, including pieces from the series entitled “Love Forever,” which forms the precursor to “My Eternal Soul” and is comprised of a collection of monochrome drawings. Furthermore, an installation work created by Kusama specially for the museum’s opening will be showcased, along with a new pumpkin. [Related Events] Lecture Event Museum Director Akira Tatehata will discuss Kusama’s works and artistic process, starting with “My Eternal Soul,” the focus on this inaugural exhibition. Event Date: Oct. 22 (Sun) 14:30- Venue: 3F Exhibition Space Speaker: Akira Tatehata Capacity: 30 Admission: Free (no booking required, museum admission ticket required) Gallery Talk by the Curator Bi-monthly gallery talks will be given by curators of the museum, who will point out exhibition highlights and offer explanations of the works on show. Event Dates: Oct. 7 (Sat) 14:30-, Oct. 28 (Sat) 14:30-, Nov. 12 (Sun) 14:30-, Nov. 18 (Sat) 14:30-, Dec. 9 (Sat) 14:30-. Further dates will be updated on the official website. Venue: Meeting place will be specified on the day of the event Capacity: 30 Admission: Free (no booking required, museum admission ticket required) *Events in Japanese.




Artists’ Book Exhibition Sendai ⇄ Tokyo Chapter 1

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Artists’ Book Exhibition Sendai ⇄ Tokyo Chapter 1
at NADiff a/p/a/r/t
Media: Graphics - Product - Party - Talks
(2017-11-03 - 2017-11-26)

In order to explore the expressive platform known as the “Artist Book,” this event will bring together artists working in various fields who have employed their own unique methodology to create one of these books, connecting the world of art and print. What is the current value of these books, which were once considered a cutting-edge format, and how effective are they today? What does the unique physical reality of the book experience, characterised by the thickness of the pages, the overall weight, the smell of the ink, and the marks of aging, bring? Taking such factors into consideration, the creators participating in this exhibition will attempt to embody their artistic expression in the book medium. This is a chance to experience the expressive potential of books. The exhibition will be held simultaneously at six venues in Tokyo and Sendai. Each venue will present different content so it is worth visiting as many as possible. Artists: Kana Aoki, Satoru Itazu, Jin Imamura, O Jun, Ari Ookubo, Kanon Kawakubo, Toshiyuki Kimura, Sonoko Sakurai, Kenshu Shintsubo, Fumi Natsume, Seiichiro Miida, Nanae Mitobe, Shuji Yamamoto [Related Event] Talk Event: The Story of Books - The Connection Between Art and Books Event Date: Nov. 3 (Fri) 17:00-18:30 (doors open 16:45) Speakers: Akiko Takiguchi (curator at Urawa Art Museum), O Jun (painter) Venue: inside NADiff a/p/a/r/t Capacity: 50 Admission: ¥500 *Event in Japanese *Please see the official website for booking and further details.




Atsuhiko Misawa “Animal House: House of Enigmas”

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Atsuhiko Misawa “Animal House: House of Enigmas”
at The Shoto Museum of Art
Media: Painting - Sculpture - Workshops - Talks
(2017-10-07 - 2017-11-26)

Atsuhiko Misawa (1961-) is one of modern Japan’s leading sculptors. His life-sized “animals” are carved from logs of camphor wood using a chisel or sword according to a traditional woodcarving technique, and colored with oil paints. They exude a realistic sense of vitality, as if infused with actual souls (anima). The animals appear here and there throughout the distinctive architectural space of the Shoto Museum of Art, which was designed by Seiichi Shirai, emitting a powerful presence that seems to make the very air around them vibrate as they freely strut around the building. This is “Animal House: House of Enigmas.” It is worth paying attention to the settings and narratives that Misawa’s animals appear in, as these are the result of his close rapport with other artists, namely Katsura Funakoshi, Masato Kobayashi, Hiroshi Sugito, and Masashi Asada. [Related Events] House of Enigmas Artist Talk Series Animal House 1: Oct. 7 (Sat) 14:00-15:00 Animal House 2: Oct. 28 (Sat) 14:00-15:00 Animal House 3: Nov. 25 (Sat) 14:00-15:00 Venue: 2F Exhibition Space Speakers: Atsuhiko Misawa, Katsura Funakoshi, Masato Kobayashi, Hiroshi Sugito, Masashi Asada (speakers will vary for each talk event) “Atsuhiko Misawa x Katsura Funakoshi Work in Progress - Busts in Clay” See the two artists producing clay busts of visitors to the exhibition. Event Date: Oct. 21 (Sat), Nov. 18 (Sat) 15:00-16:00 Venue: 2F Exhibition Space *Events in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details.




Tatsuhiko Shibusawa “The Domain of Draconia”

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Tatsuhiko Shibusawa “The Domain of Draconia”
at Setagaya Literary Museum
Media: Graphics - Painting - Drawing - Prints - Sculpture
(2017-10-07 - 2017-12-17)

Tatsuhiko Shibusawa was a scholar of French literature, translator, critic, essayist, and writer of novels. This exhibition, held 30 years after his death, will review his works and that which he left to posterity from a new perspective, looking at his own literary expression, often referred to as “Shibusawa style.” From the beginning, Shibusawa worked with a different shade of literature, famously working with titles by the Marquis de Sade. This exhibition will include Shibusawa’s essay collection “Yume no Uchu-shi,” as well as “The Travels of Prince Takaoka,” one of his best known works, and more than 300 handwritten materials, such as writing drafts, manuscripts, and creative memos. There will also be various art works and objects that he was particularly fond of, and his collection of Japanese and Non-Japanese books. [Related Events] Related exhibition: “Salon Exhibition: Ryoichi Enomoto Kokaiki” Event dates: Oct. 7 (Sat) - Dec. 17 (Sun) 10:00-18:00 (may close for special events) Venue: 1F Literature Salon Admission: Free *Please see the official website for further details and information on other events.




17th “1_WALL” Photography Exhibition

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17th “1_WALL” Photography Exhibition
at Guardian Garden
Media: Photography
(2017-10-31 - 2017-11-24)

The 17th “1_WALL” Photography Exhibition is part of an open competition for the right to mount a solo show at the gallery. The exhibition will feature works by six finalists who have been selected following two rounds of judging: the first round focusing on all entrants’ portfolios, and the second round consisting of one-on-one discussions between the photographers selected in the initial round and the judges. In this group exhibition, each finalist is allocated one wall on which to show his or her works. The final round of judging will take place on November 2 while the exhibition is in progress. During this round, which is open to the public, the six finalists will give presentations about their works, and the judges will then discuss the relative merits of the six contenders’ works and select the Grand Prize winner. The winner’s prize includes the privilege of holding a solo show at the gallery one year later, 100,000 yen budget to prepare for the show, plus the right to prepare an exhibition pamphlet. The seventeenth exhibition in this series brings together an eclectic array of young photographers. Manami Uetake connects the moles and blemishes on her father’s back, as though they were constellations, and photographs the results. Yu Kawasaki takes photos of his family, offering glimpses of the chaos and tranquility to be found in everyday life. Satoshi Terada, using silkscreen, prints photographs of his pregnant wife on newspaper pages. Gai Den photographs scenes, together with people, of towns that once flourished from oil production but are now abandoned. Mio Fukuda depicts her own ill-at-ease feelings amid her ties with others and with society. Machiko Fujimoto takes periodic portrait photos of the same two people. [Related Events] Public Jury Meeting - Final Round of Judging Event Date: Nov. 2 (Thu), 18:00-21:30 *Event in Japanese. *Please see the official website for booking and further details.




Naohiro Utagawa + Buku Akiyama “It Can Not Be Helped”

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Naohiro Utagawa + Buku Akiyama “It Can Not Be Helped”
at Talion Gallery
Media: Painting - Photography - Installation
(2017-10-28 - 2017-11-26)

Naohiro Utagawa produces photographs through improvisational editing and processing of the things around him, an irregular process he reflects in his works. He also creates installations bringing temporary formulations into their spaces. Buku Akiyama is a graphic designer who has worked on numerous artist books and catalogues while also practicing installation art since 2001. Both artists bring their own rules and approaches to this exhibition, which they will visit on and off to alter the continuously evolving space and set of works. A collection of photographs of the exhibition titled “photo unbound_003 Naohiro Utagawa: It can not be helped” will be published by edition.nord.




Dan Isomura “Good Neighbors”

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Dan Isomura “Good Neighbors”
at On Sundays
Media: Sculpture - Installation
(2017-10-31 - 2017-11-26)

Presenting “Home Party #2,” Dan Isomura’s Gold Prize-winning installation on themes of immigration and the refugee crises. Isomura created this work as a project for the Genron Chaos* Lounge New Art School.




Andreas Slominski “Goood Luck”

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Andreas Slominski “Goood Luck”
at Wako Works of Art
Media: Sculpture
(2017-11-01 - 2017-12-02)

Eleven new works from 2017 by the German sculpture and performance artist Andreas Slominski (b. 1959), who has created sculptural reliefs of popular European lucky charms such as horseshoes and the Madonna and Child out of with polyurethane.




Ulala Imai “Doskoi Kitchen”

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Ulala Imai “Doskoi Kitchen”
at XYZ Collective
Media: Painting - Party
(2017-10-29 - 2017-11-26)







Emi Otaguro “Spot”

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Emi Otaguro “Spot”
at KayokoYuki
Media: Painting - Drawing
(2017-10-28 - 2017-11-26)

Titled “spot,” the current exhibition by Emi Otaguro consists of a series of works at the core of which sits a story woven by the artist herself, inspired by Greek mythology’s tale of “Narcissus.” In her story, a hunter finds himself in the pool formed by his own urine, starting to feel unsure as to his bodily existence. Trying to get a confirmation of his being, he gazes into the pool of urine, only to face various haunting images such as those of cats, horses, and ravens, emerging from there; this situation is the point of departure for her works in the show. Here, the urine, in the form of a pool, symbolizes the boundary between the inside and outside of a living body, and the image inside of it that resembles oneself serves as what shakes one’s self perception of their bodily existence. To sweep away that feeling of insecurity, and prompted by a bit of curiosity, the hunter approximates to his other self dwelling in the urine pool. However, what is revealed to him there, is not his own, true self, which he was pursuing, but images deriving from fragments of his memory. They seem rather like a proof of his being in the world. Throughout her artistic practice, Otaguro has consistently worked under the themes of inexplicable events slipping into everyday life as well as states of human psyche when oscillating between sanity and insanity. Her new works featured in this exhibition present more direct expressions, as a result of employing more restrained methods and materials. “To draw and paint a picture is the act of staining memory,” says the artist; she gives a mark to a piece of memory by cutting out a fleeting moment from the eternally flowing time and then filling it with a black marker. By devoting herself continually to the primitive and physical act of “drawing and painting a picture,” Otaguro confronts uncertainty of bodily existence and ambiguity of self-recognition. That is the way she works, and the new pieces in this exhibition show us her latest development.




Moon & Jeon “Freedom Village”

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Moon & Jeon “Freedom Village”
at SCAI The Bathhouse
Media: Photography - Video and Film - Media Arts
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-16)

The exhibition is comprised of photographic documentation of the village taken by the residents, a black and white film and several pieces of single-channel video and sculpture installation. The main film interweaves footage of a technical laboratory with newsreel footage from the Korean War. A nod to Bertold Brecht’s ‘Verfremdungseffekt’ (alienation effect), it challenges the spectators’ ability to contemplate in a detached and critical manner. The artists write about the exhibition: “We attempt to come to terms with the paradoxes and limitations that surround us in our world by summoning the ghost of our past, through the village where time has stood still for 60 years.” With the ongoing conflicts in the Korean Peninsula, the exhibition considers the constraint of political systems that devalue and rule our everyday lives, and elicits emotional awareness. The artists believe that political systems are essentially built upon human actions and predictions, and for that matter, create an archive of incidental value judgments. Through their documentary and fictitious interventions, Moon & Jeon navigate our imagination through the emotional capacities of the political present, where the recognition of our future is demystified by expanding a horizon of visual and narrative possibilities.




Mikiko Kumazawa “Coming and Going”

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Mikiko Kumazawa “Coming and Going”
at Mizuma Art Gallery - Ichigaya
Media: Painting
(2017-11-01 - 2017-12-02)

Mikiko Kumazawa is known for her depictions of the world that are at once subtle and overwhelming, mainly rendered in pencil. In her previous solo exhibition “Howl” (2015) the artist presented the largest work of her career to date, “Tree of Ogre’s Children,” which left an intensely strong impression upon viewers. Since last year, Kumazawa has been engaged in the new challenge of involving a uniquely distinctive element of color in her visual expression. The very first work created within this development, “World Food Tour,” won the 9th Suga Tatehiko Grand Prix. In this exhibition, Kumazawa will show three works, including “World Food Tour,” which embrace the new explorations in expressive color, as well as various pencil drawings. Whether it’s sprawling city townscapes, rampantly growing plants, or a picture plane packed to the brim with food, Kumazawa depicts scenes in which the everyday world that surrounds us has undergone a transformation. In the midst of these strange environments of continuous propagation and transformation, people appear not to be questioning the situation but instead to calmly accept it. Today, as the sense of both virtual reality and artificial reality’s presence in our lives increases year on year, and as every message we post on social media is recorded as indisputable actuality, there is the sense of a gap gradually emerging between our experiences of the landscapes of the real and the memories of reality. Given the pan-focus with which Kumazawa’s works are subtly depicted, and her continuously expanding landscapes, perhaps it is precisely their surplus of transformation that makes these compositions in fact a sincere and accurate method of depicting the world of this generation. This is unique opportunity to experience the work of Kumazawa, invested with new expressive qualities and rendering in subtle complexity the variegated landscapes of everyday life.




Takahiro Iwasaki “Light is made of Stars”

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Takahiro Iwasaki “Light is made of Stars”
at Urano
Media: Sculpture - Installation - Party - Talks
(2017-10-21 - 2017-11-25)

Takahiro Iwasaki transforms our consciousness by visualizing the reality that we overlook on a daily basis, manipulating the distance and scale of objects. He has focused on the issue of electrical power since early on and presented works addressing the subject at Yokohama Triennale in 2011. These included two pieces produced using his own hair, one inspired by the temporary closure of the large waterfront Ferris wheel in Yokohama as a result of planned blackouts immediately following the Great East Japan Earthquake, and another that depicted the fallen no. 27 steel tower on the Yoru no Mori Line, which resulted in the loss of the external power supply at the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant and caused the core meltdown to occur. At Venice Biennale, Iwasaki is currently showing works that present images of Japan from different perspective points, exploring further problems that surround this subject area, such as nuclear power and resource development, and the chemical plants that caused pollution while supporting the postwar economic growth of Japan. This exhibition will include the work “Out of order (ocean model),” a series that depicts oil rigs extracting oil from beneath the ocean floor in offshore Japanese territory and the surrounding islands. It is comprised of petroleum-based waste products, including disposable lunch boxes, straws, and plastic bags. The color of the works in the series is a uniform black, recalling the image of both crude oil and traditional ink and wash paintings by artists like Sesshu Toyo. The proportions of the table, the oil rig and the arrangement of the islands are based on the dimensions of the kare-sansui (dry landscape) at the famous Ryoan-ji garden in Kyoto. This work was made against the backdrop of recent disputes between China and Japan regarding the East Asian maritime border, which dictates rights over the exploitation of natural resources and has fallen into question with the territorial expansion of China. By using the technique of down-scaling in his work, Iwasaki facilitates a bird’s eye view perspective that links individual landscapes to a vision of the world as a whole. When viewed as part of history, our lifetime on earth can be understood as very short, the geography of the earth itself changing incredibly slowly during this time. Iwasaki’s unique point of view locates us in the here and now at the center of these goings on and suggests possibilities about how we may proceed from this point of origin. [Related Event] Talk Event & Party: “Venice Biennale and Beyond” Event Date: Oct. 22 (Sun) 15:30-16:30 Talk 16:30-19:00 Party (All-you-can-drink & buffet-style dinner) Speakers: Takahiro Iwasaki (artist), Mizuki Takahashi (Co-Director, MILL6 Foundation) Admission: ¥4000 (tax inc., booking required) Venue: T.Y. Harbor River Lounge (Tennozu) *Please see the official website for further details and booking. *Event in Japanese.