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Inside Dartmouth Medicine



"Inside Dartmouth Medicine" is a series of web-extra interviews produced by Dartmouth Medicine magazine, exploring the art and science of medicine at Dartmouth Medical School and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.



Last Build Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2009 13:14:33 -0400

Copyright: 2009 © Trustees of Dartmouth
 



A Mere Mortal

Thu, 18 Jun 2009 13:11:25 -0400

A Mere Mortal Dr. Steven Schlozman wasn't terribly surprised when an insurance company rejected his request to prescribe a new treatment for a patient. And, as usual, he expected to spend personal time sitting on hold waiting to appeal the decision. But what startled him was the conversation that took place when he finally got through to a live human being. In this podcast, Schlozman—a 1994 graduate of the Brown-Dartmouth Program in Medicine—recounts what happened in this "rare and truly honest moment." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2009 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer09/html/point_of_view/


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer09_point_of_view_01.mp3




Dartmouth undergrad examines opioid death toll

Thu, 18 Jun 2009 13:09:44 -0400

Dartmouth undergrad examines opioid death toll Conducting the first comprehensive analysis of prescription opioid-related deaths in New Hampshire presented some special challenges for Laura Hester, a geography major in the Dartmouth College Class of 2009. It involved driving an hour each way from Hanover, N.H., to the Chief Medical Examiner's Office in Concord almost every other day for two months in the winter. It required combing through the 1,500 death certificates from 2003 to 2007 that were loosely classified as involving "toxic substances" in order to find the 488 deaths that were due to prescription opioids. And since the certificates exist only in paper form, it required hours and hours of data entry. But all that hard work yielded a "high-quality" database, says her advisor, and an "excellent" and "very ambitious" senior honors thesis. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2009 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer09/html/vs_briefs/


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer09_vs_painful_conclusion_01.mp3




Talking about health-care reform

Thu, 18 Jun 2009 13:06:30 -0400

Talking about health-care reform Everyone—from the Obama administration to your friends and neighbors—is talking about health-care reform. So in the Summer 2009 issue of Dartmouth Medicine magazine, alumni of Dartmouth Medical School from across the country answered questions about their practices and the changes they'd like to see made to the nation's health-care system. To find out more about what Americans who are patients rather than physicians are saying on this topic, Dartmouth Medicine spoke to people on the streets of White River Junction, Vt., and Hanover, N.H. They mentioned the wide array of medical challenges they face and discussed their priorities and concerns as the nation moves toward health-care reform. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2009 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer09/html/road_to_reform/


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer09_road_to_reform_01.mp3




Surviving cancer

Wed, 11 Mar 2009 17:54:42 -0400

Surviving cancer P.J. Hamel, a senior editor at King Arthur Flour Company, headquartered in Norwich, Vt., describes herself professionally as a "baker and blogger." She writes the King Arthur catalog, creates recipes, has written cookbooks, and blogs about baking on the company's website. And personally Hamel is, among many other roles, a cancer survivor--she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2001 and over the next nine months had surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. She began blogging about cancer as well, shortly after her diagnosis. Writing, she says, is a thread that has run through her entire life. In a feature for the Spring 2009 issue of Dartmouth Medicine, titled "My Story," she shared the experiences and emotions of being diagnosed with and treated for cancer. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2009 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring09/html/my_story.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring_09_my_story_01.mp3




A Patron of Positivity

Wed, 11 Mar 2009 17:51:10 -0400

A Patron of Positivity The summer after her first year of medical school, Dr. Julia Nordgren worked with Dr. Judy Frank, conducting research and shadowing Frank on rounds in the neonatal intensive care unit. What she learned from Frank changed her outlook on both medicine and life. "Judy Frank was clearly no ordinary woman in medicine," Nordgren says. In this podcast, originally published as an essay in the Spring 2009 issue of Dartmouth Medicine, Nordgren reflects on how her experiences that summer shaped her own career as a woman in medicine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2009 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring09/html/point_of_view.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring_09_point_of_view_01.mp3




Lee Witters discusses the discovery of insulin

Mon, 15 Dec 2008 17:00:02 -0500

Lee Witters discusses the discovery of insulin One early prescription for diabetes involved drinking a pint and a half of milk for breakfast, eating rancid meat for dinner, and using hog's lard as skin lotion. Actually, explains Dr. Lee Witters, this treatment did some good simply by causing patients to eat less (no one likes rancid meat, after all). The discovery of insulin, which paved the way for more effective diabetes treatments, was one of the great advances in medical history, and it makes for quite a story. In this video, Witters discusses diabetes in ancient societies, the first descriptions of the disease, the medical revolution that resulted from isolating insulin, and much more. The lecture in the video was originally delivered as a session in the Dartmouth Community Medical School (DCMS) and is presented as a Dartmouth Medicine web-extra with the kind permission of the DCMS. For more information about the Dartmouth Community Medical School, visit http://dms.dartmouth.edu/dcms/. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2008 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter08/html/diabetes_detectives.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter08_diabetes_detectives_01.m4v




An interview with Dr. James Bernat, a history of DHMC's ethics committee, and more information on advance directives

Mon, 15 Dec 2008 17:00:01 -0500

An interview with Dr. James Bernat, a history of DHMC's ethics committee, and more information on advance directives Dr. James Bernat, an internationally recognized medical ethicist, is a professor of neurology at Dartmouth Medical School and head of the Ethics Committee at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. In 1997, and again in 2006, Bernat was one of several scholars invited to Rome to advise the Vatican on how to define death. Reporters from prominent media outlets--from the New York Times to People magazine--often ask him to comment on major ethics cases, especially those involving brain death. He was quoted widely, for example, on Terri Schiavo, the Florida woman who lived for 15 years in a permanent vegetative state. Her husband, her parents, and the courts fought a very public battle over whether to remove her feeding tube and let her die naturally. Terri Schiavo died in 2005. Dartmouth Medicine associate editor Laura Stephenson Carter spoke to Bernat about his work on medical ethics. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2008 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter08/html/other_hand.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter08_other_hand_01.mp3




Discovering New Darwins

Mon, 15 Dec 2008 17:00:00 -0500

Discovering New Darwins Charles Darwin was lucky. Without the financial support of his family, all of his powers of observation and analysis might have gone for naught. Today, of course, most scientists do not depend on their families to fund their research. Instead, the U.S. federal government began investing heavily in science in the mid-20th century. As a result, says Dr. Ethan Dmitrovsky, the United States has been a leader in the biomedical revolution. Dmitrovsky, a DMS professor of pharmacology and toxicology, argues in this audio essay that lagging support for research in recent years risks ending the nation's tradition of scientific success. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2008 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter08/html/point_of_view.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter08_point_of_view_01.mp3




Getting, and getting used to, a cochlear implant

Fri, 19 Sep 2008 18:13:56 -0400

Getting, and getting used to, a cochlear implant Geneva Durgin was 13 months old when she heard sound for the first time through a cochlear implant. Before the implant, she couldn't hear anything, even with hearing aids. Although Geneva spent the first year of her life in silence, she thrived developmentally, thanks in large part to sign language instruction and early intervention from the Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Geneva's parents decided to get a cochlear implant for her because they thought it offered her the best chance at learning English and learning to talk. They also chose to continue signing with Geneva, in hopes of her learning two languages, English and American Sign Language. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2008 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall08/html/sound.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall08_sound_01.m4v




An interview with José Conejo-Garcia

Fri, 19 Sep 2008 18:10:22 -0400

José Conejo-Garcia talks about his discovery of PILAR The immune system protects us from a host of pathogens, but in some cases it's actually the cause of health problems. T cells, a type of white blood cell that is a key player in the immune system, become activated when they encounter antigens. Usually, those antigens are signs that a pathogen is trying to get a foothold in the body, so the response of T cells is essential to fighting off disease. But when the antigen is actually a self-antigen--when it is part of the host and not an invader--a response by T cells can result in swelling, inflammation, and pain. José Conejo-Garcia, a professor of microbiology and immunology, has discovered a receptor, which he named "PILAR," that helps to determine whether T cells respond to an antigen. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2008 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall08/html/disc_pilar.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall08_disc_pilar_01.m4v




Inside Waste Management at DHMC

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:02:00 -0400

Inside Waste Management at DHMC Over 2,500 tons of trash pass through the waste management room at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center each year. Practicing good environmental stewardship while processing so much trash—some of it hazardous—requires a well-thought-out system. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer07/html/green.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer07_green.m4v




Scenes from a Dartmouth Visit to Vietnam

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:01:00 -0400

Scenes from a Dartmouth Visit to Vietnam Last spring, the director of DMS's biomedical libraries, William Garrity, led a group of volunteers to Vietnam to launch the RICE pilot project. RICE, which stands for "remote interaction, consultation, and epidemiology," employs smartphones (such as the BlackBerry) to improve communication between rural health providers and the larger, central hospitals. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer07/html/vs_hanoi.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer07_hanoi.m4v




What are enteroviruses?

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:00:07 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. John Modlin about Enteroviruses Dr. John Modlin, an international expert in childhood infectious diseases, is the chair the Department of Pediatrics at DHMC and a professor of pediatrics (infectious disease) and of medicine at DMS. He is the former chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; has served on many other influential national committees and advisory groups; and has authored more than 150 papers on the development and prevention of human enterovirus infections, poliovirus immunization, public policy on immunizations, and related topics. His studies and advocacy on the potential risks of polio vaccination contributed to a major change in U.S. poliovirus immunization policy in the mid-1990s—to the use of a killed rather than a live vaccine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer07/html/vs_virus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer07_virus_01.m4v




How are enteroviruses spread?

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:00:06 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. John Modlin about Enteroviruses Dr. John Modlin, an international expert in childhood infectious diseases, is the chair the Department of Pediatrics at DHMC and a professor of pediatrics (infectious disease) and of medicine at DMS. He is the former chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; has served on many other influential national committees and advisory groups; and has authored more than 150 papers on the development and prevention of human enterovirus infections, poliovirus immunization, public policy on immunizations, and related topics. His studies and advocacy on the potential risks of polio vaccination contributed to a major change in U.S. poliovirus immunization policy in the mid-1990s—to the use of a killed rather than a live vaccine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer07/html/vs_virus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer07_virus_02.m4v




What is Enterovirus 71? How does it compare to polio?

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:00:05 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. John Modlin about Enteroviruses Dr. John Modlin, an international expert in childhood infectious diseases, is the chair the Department of Pediatrics at DHMC and a professor of pediatrics (infectious disease) and of medicine at DMS. He is the former chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; has served on many other influential national committees and advisory groups; and has authored more than 150 papers on the development and prevention of human enterovirus infections, poliovirus immunization, public policy on immunizations, and related topics. His studies and advocacy on the potential risks of polio vaccination contributed to a major change in U.S. poliovirus immunization policy in the mid-1990s—to the use of a killed rather than a live vaccine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer07/html/vs_virus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer07_virus_03.m4v




Why are you concerned about an outbreak of Enterovirus 71?

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:00:04 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. John Modlin about Enteroviruses Dr. John Modlin, an international expert in childhood infectious diseases, is the chair the Department of Pediatrics at DHMC and a professor of pediatrics (infectious disease) and of medicine at DMS. He is the former chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; has served on many other influential national committees and advisory groups; and has authored more than 150 papers on the development and prevention of human enterovirus infections, poliovirus immunization, public policy on immunizations, and related topics. His studies and advocacy on the potential risks of polio vaccination contributed to a major change in U.S. poliovirus immunization policy in the mid-1990s—to the use of a killed rather than a live vaccine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer07/html/vs_virus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer07_virus_04.m4v




Why did polio spread through the upper middle class in the late 1800s?

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:00:03 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. John Modlin about Enteroviruses Dr. John Modlin, an international expert in childhood infectious diseases, is the chair the Department of Pediatrics at DHMC and a professor of pediatrics (infectious disease) and of medicine at DMS. He is the former chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; has served on many other influential national committees and advisory groups; and has authored more than 150 papers on the development and prevention of human enterovirus infections, poliovirus immunization, public policy on immunizations, and related topics. His studies and advocacy on the potential risks of polio vaccination contributed to a major change in U.S. poliovirus immunization policy in the mid-1990s—to the use of a killed rather than a live vaccine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer07/html/vs_virus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer07_virus_05.m4v




Is there a treatment or vaccine for Enterovirus 71?

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:00:02 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. John Modlin about Enteroviruses Dr. John Modlin, an international expert in childhood infectious diseases, is the chair the Department of Pediatrics at DHMC and a professor of pediatrics (infectious disease) and of medicine at DMS. He is the former chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; has served on many other influential national committees and advisory groups; and has authored more than 150 papers on the development and prevention of human enterovirus infections, poliovirus immunization, public policy on immunizations, and related topics. His studies and advocacy on the potential risks of polio vaccination contributed to a major change in U.S. poliovirus immunization policy in the mid-1990s—to the use of a killed rather than a live vaccine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer07/html/vs_virus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer07_virus_06.m4v




How did you get interested in enteroviruses and polio?

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:00:01 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. John Modlin about Enteroviruses Dr. John Modlin, an international expert in childhood infectious diseases, is the chair the Department of Pediatrics at DHMC and a professor of pediatrics (infectious disease) and of medicine at DMS. He is the former chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; has served on many other influential national committees and advisory groups; and has authored more than 150 papers on the development and prevention of human enterovirus infections, poliovirus immunization, public policy on immunizations, and related topics. His studies and advocacy on the potential risks of polio vaccination contributed to a major change in U.S. poliovirus immunization policy in the mid-1990s—to the use of a killed rather than a live vaccine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer07/html/vs_virus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer07_virus_07.m4v




What's wrong with the U.S. health-care system?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:14:01 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Jack Wennberg about the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project John Wennberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director of Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) and the Peggy Y. Thomson Professor of the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. CECS was established in 1989 and is the locus for a diverse group of scientists and clinician-scholars who conduct cutting edge research on critical medical and health issues with the goal of measuring, organizing, and improving the health-care system. The Center also publishes The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which demonstrates striking variations in how health care is delivered across the United States. To learn more about Wennberg's and CECS's work read "The state of the nation's health." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/atlas.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_atlas_01.m4v




How did you become the founder of outcomes research?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:13:59 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Jack Wennberg about the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project John Wennberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director of Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) and the Peggy Y. Thomson Professor of the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. CECS was established in 1989 and is the locus for a diverse group of scientists and clinician-scholars who conduct cutting edge research on critical medical and health issues with the goal of measuring, organizing, and improving the health-care system. The Center also publishes The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which demonstrates striking variations in how health care is delivered across the United States. To learn more about Wennberg's and CECS's work read "The state of the nation's health." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/atlas.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_atlas_02.m4v




What is the Dartmouth Atlas project?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:13:58 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Jack Wennberg about the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project John Wennberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director of Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) and the Peggy Y. Thomson Professor of the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. CECS was established in 1989 and is the locus for a diverse group of scientists and clinician-scholars who conduct cutting edge research on critical medical and health issues with the goal of measuring, organizing, and improving the health-care system. The Center also publishes The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which demonstrates striking variations in how health care is delivered across the United States. To learn more about Wennberg's and CECS's work read "The state of the nation's health." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/atlas.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_atlas_03.m4v




What are some major findings of the Dartmouth Atlas?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:13:57 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Jack Wennberg about the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project John Wennberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director of Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) and the Peggy Y. Thomson Professor of the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. CECS was established in 1989 and is the locus for a diverse group of scientists and clinician-scholars who conduct cutting edge research on critical medical and health issues with the goal of measuring, organizing, and improving the health-care system. The Center also publishes The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which demonstrates striking variations in how health care is delivered across the United States. To learn more about Wennberg's and CECS's work read "The state of the nation's health." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/atlas.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_atlas_04.m4v




Why are there geographical variations in surgical procedures?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:13:56 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Jack Wennberg about the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project John Wennberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director of Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) and the Peggy Y. Thomson Professor of the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. CECS was established in 1989 and is the locus for a diverse group of scientists and clinician-scholars who conduct cutting edge research on critical medical and health issues with the goal of measuring, organizing, and improving the health-care system. The Center also publishes The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which demonstrates striking variations in how health care is delivered across the United States. To learn more about Wennberg's and CECS's work read "The state of the nation's health." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/atlas.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_atlas_05.m4v




Why are there geographical variations in chronic illness care?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:13:55 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Jack Wennberg about the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project John Wennberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director of Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) and the Peggy Y. Thomson Professor of the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. CECS was established in 1989 and is the locus for a diverse group of scientists and clinician-scholars who conduct cutting edge research on critical medical and health issues with the goal of measuring, organizing, and improving the health-care system. The Center also publishes The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which demonstrates striking variations in how health care is delivered across the United States. To learn more about Wennberg's and CECS's work read "The state of the nation's health." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/atlas.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_atlas_06.m4v




Have the Dartmouth Atlas findings been controversial?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:13:54 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Jack Wennberg about the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project John Wennberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director of Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) and the Peggy Y. Thomson Professor of the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. CECS was established in 1989 and is the locus for a diverse group of scientists and clinician-scholars who conduct cutting edge research on critical medical and health issues with the goal of measuring, organizing, and improving the health-care system. The Center also publishes The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which demonstrates striking variations in how health care is delivered across the United States. To learn more about Wennberg's and CECS's work read "The state of the nation's health." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/atlas.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_atlas_07.m4v




How can more care result in poorer outcomes?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:13:54 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Jack Wennberg about the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project John Wennberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director of Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) and the Peggy Y. Thomson Professor of the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. CECS was established in 1989 and is the locus for a diverse group of scientists and clinician-scholars who conduct cutting edge research on critical medical and health issues with the goal of measuring, organizing, and improving the health-care system. The Center also publishes The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which demonstrates striking variations in how health care is delivered across the United States. To learn more about Wennberg's and CECS's work read "The state of the nation's health." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/atlas.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_atlas_08.m4v




What is DHMC doing to address practice variations?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:13:52 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Jack Wennberg about the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project John Wennberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director of Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) and the Peggy Y. Thomson Professor of the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. CECS was established in 1989 and is the locus for a diverse group of scientists and clinician-scholars who conduct cutting edge research on critical medical and health issues with the goal of measuring, organizing, and improving the health-care system. The Center also publishes The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which demonstrates striking variations in how health care is delivered across the United States. To learn more about Wennberg's and CECS's work read "The state of the nation's health." This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/atlas.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_atlas_09.m4v




Can you describe your work treating polytrauma?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:13:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_01.m4v




Can you explain what catastrophic polytrauma is?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:12:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_02.m4v




How does the Civil War give insights into plastic surgery?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:11:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_03.m4v




How do you rebuild a face that's been destroyed?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:10:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_04.m4v




What is the "Virtual Face" project?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:09:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_05.m4v




When might a patient need an exoskeleton?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:08:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_06.m4v




How does an exoskeleton work?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:07:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_07.m4v




How else could an exoskeleton be used?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:06:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_08.m4v




How might polytrauma be treated in the future?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:05:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_09.m4v




What do we need to do to get all this to happen?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:04:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_10.m4v




What needs to be done for all this new technology to work?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:03:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_11.m4v




Can you describe your work improving health-care systems?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:02:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_12.m4v




What other projects are you working on?

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:01:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Joseph Rosen about Polytrauma Dr. Rosen is a plastic surgeon at DHMC who treats patients around the world including soldiers injured in Iraq. His specialties include nerve repair and human-machine interfaces, microsurgery and transplantation of limbs, and telemedicine and informatics. He was an organizer of the 2006 Polytrauma Conference at Dartmouth College, is a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at DMS, and is a consultant to the military. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_faculty_focus_13.m4v




A interview with physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D.

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:00:46 -0400

A conversation with physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D. Parker Towle, a neurologist who has been on the Dartmouth Medical School faculty for more than 25 years, is also a much-published poet. He has a book of poems coming out soon, and his work was recently featured on National Public Radio's Writer's Almanac. He talks here about the thrill of hearing one of his poems read by Garrison Keillor; about how he got started writing poetry; about what has kept him at it; and about the relationship between poetry and medicine. To read the associated article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/poem.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_poem_01.m4a




A poetry reading: The Best Time by physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D.

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:00:45 -0400

A poetry reading: The Best Time by physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D. Parker Towle, a neurologist who has been on the Dartmouth Medical School faculty for more than 25 years, is also a much-published poet. He has a book of poems coming out soon, and his work was recently featured on National Public Radio's Writer's Almanac. He talks here about the thrill of hearing one of his poems read by Garrison Keillor; about how he got started writing poetry; about what has kept him at it; and about the relationship between poetry and medicine. To read the associated article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/poem.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_poem_02.m4a




A poetry reading: Cases by physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D.

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:00:44 -0400

A poetry reading: Cases by physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D. Parker Towle, a neurologist who has been on the Dartmouth Medical School faculty for more than 25 years, is also a much-published poet. He has a book of poems coming out soon, and his work was recently featured on National Public Radio's Writer's Almanac. He talks here about the thrill of hearing one of his poems read by Garrison Keillor; about how he got started writing poetry; about what has kept him at it; and about the relationship between poetry and medicine. To read the associated article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/poem.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_poem_03.m4a




A poetry reading: Hooking Rugs and Ice Fishing by physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D.

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:00:43 -0400

A poetry reading: Hooking Rugs and Ice Fishing by physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D. Parker Towle, a neurologist who has been on the Dartmouth Medical School faculty for more than 25 years, is also a much-published poet. He has a book of poems coming out soon, and his work was recently featured on National Public Radio's Writer's Almanac. He talks here about the thrill of hearing one of his poems read by Garrison Keillor; about how he got started writing poetry; about what has kept him at it; and about the relationship between poetry and medicine. To read the associated article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/poem.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_poem_04.m4a




A poetry reading: At the Hiroshima hospital by physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D.

Thu, 22 Mar 2007 12:00:42 -0400

A poetry reading: At the Hiroshima hospital by physician-poet Parker Towle, M.D. Parker Towle, a neurologist who has been on the Dartmouth Medical School faculty for more than 25 years, is also a much-published poet. He has a book of poems coming out soon, and his work was recently featured on National Public Radio's Writer's Almanac. He talks here about the thrill of hearing one of his poems read by Garrison Keillor; about how he got started writing poetry; about what has kept him at it; and about the relationship between poetry and medicine. To read the associated article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring07/html/poem.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring07_poem_05.m4a




Gordon Gribble Tells the Story of the Triterpenoid Project

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:07:00 -0500

Triterpenoids and Chemoprevention: A Dartmouth Collaboration For 11 years, Dartmouth chemists Gordon Gribble and Tadashi Honda have collaborated with Dr. Michael Sporn, a professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Dartmouth Medical School, to create drugs that prevent and treat cancer. In 1998, Gribble's lab synthesized CDDO, a synthetic triterpenoid. This compound and one of its derivatives are now in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors and leukemia. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/compound_interest.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_compound_interest_01.m4v




What are triterpenoids?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:06:00 -0500

Triterpenoids and Chemoprevention: A Dartmouth Collaboration For 11 years, Dartmouth chemists Gordon Gribble and Tadashi Honda have collaborated with Dr. Michael Sporn, a professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Dartmouth Medical School, to create drugs that prevent and treat cancer. In 1998, Gribble's lab synthesized CDDO, a synthetic triterpenoid. This compound and one of its derivatives are now in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors and leukemia. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/compound_interest.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_compound_interest_02.m4v




How did you create the synthetic triterpenoids?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:05:00 -0500

Triterpenoids and Chemoprevention: A Dartmouth Collaboration For 11 years, Dartmouth chemists Gordon Gribble and Tadashi Honda have collaborated with Dr. Michael Sporn, a professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Dartmouth Medical School, to create drugs that prevent and treat cancer. In 1998, Gribble's lab synthesized CDDO, a synthetic triterpenoid. This compound and one of its derivatives are now in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors and leukemia. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/compound_interest.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_compound_interest_03.m4v




How did you begin working with Dr. Sporn?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:04:00 -0500

Triterpenoids and Chemoprevention: A Dartmouth Collaboration For 11 years, Dartmouth chemists Gordon Gribble and Tadashi Honda have collaborated with Dr. Michael Sporn, a professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Dartmouth Medical School, to create drugs that prevent and treat cancer. In 1998, Gribble's lab synthesized CDDO, a synthetic triterpenoid. This compound and one of its derivatives are now in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors and leukemia. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/compound_interest.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_compound_interest_04.m4v




Why has your collaboration with Dr. Sporn been so successful?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:03:00 -0500

Triterpenoids and Chemoprevention: A Dartmouth Collaboration For 11 years, Dartmouth chemists Gordon Gribble and Tadashi Honda have collaborated with Dr. Michael Sporn, a professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Dartmouth Medical School, to create drugs that prevent and treat cancer. In 1998, Gribble's lab synthesized CDDO, a synthetic triterpenoid. This compound and one of its derivatives are now in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors and leukemia. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/compound_interest.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_compound_interest_05.m4v




How do triterpenoids relate to cancer prevention?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:02:00 -0500

Triterpenoids and Chemoprevention: A Dartmouth Collaboration For 11 years, Dartmouth chemists Gordon Gribble and Tadashi Honda have collaborated with Dr. Michael Sporn, a professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Dartmouth Medical School, to create drugs that prevent and treat cancer. In 1998, Gribble's lab synthesized CDDO, a synthetic triterpenoid. This compound and one of its derivatives are now in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors and leukemia. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/compound_interest.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_compound_interest_06.m4v




Do academic chemists often see their compounds go into trials?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:01:00 -0500

Triterpenoids and Chemoprevention: A Dartmouth Collaboration For 11 years, Dartmouth chemists Gordon Gribble and Tadashi Honda have collaborated with Dr. Michael Sporn, a professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Dartmouth Medical School, to create drugs that prevent and treat cancer. In 1998, Gribble's lab synthesized CDDO, a synthetic triterpenoid. This compound and one of its derivatives are now in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors and leukemia. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/compound_interest.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_compound_interest_07.m4v




Is the U.S. facing a physician shortage?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:00:07 -0500

A Q&A with Dr. David Goodman about Physician Workforce Dr. David Goodman has researched physician workforce issues for over 10 years at Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He is a professor of pediatrics and of community and family medicine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_faculty_focus_01.m4v




Do more doctors mean better care?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:00:06 -0500

A Q&A with Dr. David Goodman about Physician Workforce Dr. David Goodman has researched physician workforce issues for over 10 years at Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He is a professor of pediatrics and of community and family medicine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_faculty_focus_02.m4v




Are there specialties that have too few or too many doctors?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:00:05 -0500

A Q&A with Dr. David Goodman about Physician Workforce Dr. David Goodman has researched physician workforce issues for over 10 years at Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He is a professor of pediatrics and of community and family medicine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_faculty_focus_03.m4v




When physicians come to the U.S. from developing countries, is that a problem?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:00:04 -0500

A Q&A with Dr. David Goodman about Physician Workforce Dr. David Goodman has researched physician workforce issues for over 10 years at Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He is a professor of pediatrics and of community and family medicine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_faculty_focus_04.m4v




What is all this talk about raising the Medicare GME cap?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:00:03 -0500

A Q&A with Dr. David Goodman about Physician Workforce Dr. David Goodman has researched physician workforce issues for over 10 years at Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He is a professor of pediatrics and of community and family medicine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_faculty_focus_05.m4v




What is the Dartmouth Health Workforce Program?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:00:02 -0500

A Q&A with Dr. David Goodman about Physician Workforce Dr. David Goodman has researched physician workforce issues for over 10 years at Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He is a professor of pediatrics and of community and family medicine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_faculty_focus_06.m4v




What's your next project?

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:00:01 -0500

A Q&A with Dr. David Goodman about Physician Workforce Dr. David Goodman has researched physician workforce issues for over 10 years at Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He is a professor of pediatrics and of community and family medicine. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Winter 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_faculty_focus_07.m4v




Art of medicine: The Art of Prachie Narian

Mon, 08 Jan 2007 12:00:00 -0500

Art of Medicine Art has always been a welcome constant for Prachie Narain, a second-year medical student. Growing up in many different places—India, Nepal, and England—Narain found that painting gave her a way to connect intimately with her new surroundings. Even now, despite the pressures of medical school, she still makes time to paint. More of her artwork can be viewed below and at her website http://www.prachienarain.com/. Prachie Narain, a second-year medical student, has been doing art "for as long as I can remember." Her father, a surgeon, also paints and taught her about color, composition, and technique. This work was inspired by streetlights, windows, and rain. Water is one of her favorite subjects; she is drawn to "its strength, its purity, its calm, its torment, and particularly its reflections and distortions." Narain majored in comparative literature at Princeton and has lived in India, Nepal, England, and the United States. This "has made me very aware of the deep yet subtle similarities and differences between people and cultures. . . . My approach to the canvas, a blending of abstraction, impressionism, and surrealism, allows me to play with both color and culture." Though medical school leaves her less time for art, she still is "always noticing and analyzing small details around me." http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/winter06/html/art_of_medicine.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/winter06_art_of_medicine_01.m4v




What is HPV and who gets it?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:11:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_01.m4v




Is HPV always sexually transmitted?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:10:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_02.m4v




What protection will the new vaccines offer?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:09:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_03.m4v




What do we know from the vaccine trials?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:08:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_04.m4v




Are the vaccines safe and how long do they last?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:07:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_05.m4v




How does HPV affect men?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:06:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_06.m4v




Are Pap smears still necessary after getting the vaccine?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:05:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_07.m4v




What are the benefits of the vaccines in the United States?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:04:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_08.m4v




What are the benefits of the vaccines in other countries?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:03:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_09.m4v




Should insurance companies pay for the vaccines?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:02:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_10.m4v




Where can women get more information?

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:01:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Diane Harper about HPV Dr. Diane Harper, the director of Dartmouth's Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Research Group, was a principal investigator for the HPV vaccine trials of both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/faculty_focus.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_faculty_focus_11.m4v




The Music of a Harp Practitioner

Mon, 23 Oct 2006 12:00:00 -0400

Harp Plucks Heartstrings: A Harp Practitioner's Techniques. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall06/html/vs_briefs.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/fall06_vs_harp_01.m4v




What is palliative care?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:10:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_01.m4v




How does hospice care differ from palliative care?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:09:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_02.m4v




If a patient receives palliative care, does it mean that her doctors think she is going to die?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:08:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_03.m4v




Would you explain why palliative care has been descibed as just good medical care?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:07:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_04.m4v




How did you get interested in palliative medicine?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:06:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_05.m4v




Would you describe a patient and their family who benefited from palliative care?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:05:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_06.m4v




Why did you choose Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:04:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_07.m4v




How are palliative care services reimbursed?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:03:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_08.m4v




How do other disciplines integrate with palliative care?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:02:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_09.m4v




What services does palliative care provide?

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:01:00 -0400

A Q&A with Dr. Ira Byock about Palliative Care. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_gift.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_gift_10.m4v




Summertime fun at Camp Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Tue, 13 Jun 2006 12:00:00 -0400

A summer camp that offers more than s'mores. This is a web extra to an article that appeared in the Summer 2006 issue of Dartmouth Medicine Magazine. To read the article, go to: http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/summer06/html/vs_camp_dh.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/summer06_vs_camp_01.m4v




Art of medicine: More Photographs by Gabriele Popp, M.D.

Sun, 15 Jan 2006 12:00:30 -0500

Art of Medicine Dr. Gabriele Popp took up marine photography three years ago, after being diagnosed with a brain tumor. An avid diver, she was afraid she'd have to "say good-bye to the beautiful underwater world. . . . I wanted to take pictures home with me, as I believed I would never see [it] in person again." Happily, though, she is still diving; works as a hospitalist at DHMC; does research in hyperbaric medicine (a field she was drawn to because of its connection with diving) and brain tumors (a field she also, for obvious reasons, feels an affinity for); and had an exhibit of her work at DHMC a few months ago. Cancer, she says, has "changed my internal life . . . affected my work life" and led to "a new love—photography." http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring06/html/art_of_medicine.php


Media Files:
http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/podcast/spring06_art_of_medicine.m4v