Subscribe: TAB Events - in category 2D: Drawing
http://www.tokyoartbeat.com/list/feed/event_type_print_drawing.en.rdf
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade C rated
Language: English
Tags:
area  art  artists  collection  drawings  event  exhibition  gallery  japan  japanese  museum  new  tokyo  work  works   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: TAB Events - in category 2D: Drawing

TAB Events - in category 2D: Drawing





 



Masahiro Tsubakihara “Birds”

(image)
Masahiro Tsubakihara “Birds”
at No.12 Gallery (Shibuya area)
(2017-11-17 - 2017-11-22)

Presenting a lineup of bird-themed works that have been produced intermittently since the beginning of last year. Masahiro Tsubakihara’s series titled “Birds” features both these feathered creatures and young boys as subjects through which to address the dangers of our relationship with ourselves and with others.




Artists who have crossed the seas

Artists who have crossed the seas
at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Karuizawa (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-04-27 - 2017-11-23)

In this exhibition celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Karuizawa, visitors will be invited to explore the genealogy of the museum’s collection, with around 70 works presented on the theme, “artists who have crossed the seas.” These works are by artists who left their home country of Japan in order to base their art practice overseas, not for short-term sojourns, but to spend most of their lives working hard to establish themselves abroad. One such artist is Tsuguharu Foujita, who relocated to France at the beginning of the 20th century and became the darling of Ecole de Paris. On the other hand, Isamu Noguchi and Genichiro Inokuma set up their studios in the United States. They became known in Japan for their accomplishments in continuing the work of the Gutai group and the Mono-ha (school of things) movement that were both prominent in postwar avant-garde art of Japan. Currently it is Yayoi Kusama, Yoshitomo Nara, and Takashi Murakami who are taking on the art world both in Japan and overseas. Venue: 1F Permanent Exhibition Gallery




Erika Kobayashi “Childhood”

(image)
Erika Kobayashi “Childhood”
at Utrecht / Now Idea (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-11-14 - 2017-11-25)

It does matter who or what type of animal you are, all living creatures have gone through childhood. It is the distant future that seemed oh so far away when we were children that we are now living. This exhibition will introduce drawings of present day children and of day-to-day life in the past. There will also be drawing card sets designed by Mina Tabei available.







Record Extraordinaire! Uzo Nishiyama’s Notebooks on Houses and Living

(image)
Record Extraordinaire! Uzo Nishiyama’s Notebooks on Houses and Living
at LIXIL Gallery 1 & 2 (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2017-09-07 - 2017-11-25)

Architect and architectural scholar Uzo Nishiyama is regarded as a pioneer of scientific research into housing. He is also known as an advocate of the “Separation of Eating and Sleeping Quarters in Small Houses” and the creator of the post-war “dining-kitchen” residential plan. At the foundation of these achievements is Nishiyama’s tenacious research into housing for the purpose of improving ordinary people’s dwellings. The period of the 1940s to ‘60s when he actively conducted research was a time of dramatic change for housing in Japan. His research findings served an important role in clarifying the housing situation in this period. From the great volume of questionnaires, illustrations, and photographs he amassed from careful fieldwork, we can sense Nishiyama’s sincere perspective as a researcher and his devotion to observing, sketching, and recording. This exhibition looks at Uzo Nishiyama’s “housing studies” research and colorful career through some 90 items. They include sketches, illustrations, and photographs by Nishiyama—who had an excellent eye for observation and such a talent for drawing he thought of becoming a manga artist—as well as manga works from his junior high school days and early journals that foretell his compulsion for recording. Please enjoy browsing the gallery, which is filled with Nishiyama’s records. [Event] Lecture “Showa Housing Scholar Uzo Nishiyama” Speaker: Shigeru Matsumoto (University of Hyogo Professor Emeritus, The Uzo Nishiyama Memorial Library Chairman) Date: Oct. 5 (Thurs) 18:30–19:45 Free In Japanese. Please see the official website for reservations and details.




Emi Otaguro “Spot”

(image)
Emi Otaguro “Spot”
at KayokoYuki (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2017-10-28 - 2017-11-26)

Titled “spot,” the current exhibition by Emi Otaguro consists of a series of works at the core of which sits a story woven by the artist herself, inspired by Greek mythology’s tale of “Narcissus.” In her story, a hunter finds himself in the pool formed by his own urine, starting to feel unsure as to his bodily existence. Trying to get a confirmation of his being, he gazes into the pool of urine, only to face various haunting images such as those of cats, horses, and ravens, emerging from there; this situation is the point of departure for her works in the show. Here, the urine, in the form of a pool, symbolizes the boundary between the inside and outside of a living body, and the image inside of it that resembles oneself serves as what shakes one’s self perception of their bodily existence. To sweep away that feeling of insecurity, and prompted by a bit of curiosity, the hunter approximates to his other self dwelling in the urine pool. However, what is revealed to him there, is not his own, true self, which he was pursuing, but images deriving from fragments of his memory. They seem rather like a proof of his being in the world. Throughout her artistic practice, Otaguro has consistently worked under the themes of inexplicable events slipping into everyday life as well as states of human psyche when oscillating between sanity and insanity. Her new works featured in this exhibition present more direct expressions, as a result of employing more restrained methods and materials. “To draw and paint a picture is the act of staining memory,” says the artist; she gives a mark to a piece of memory by cutting out a fleeting moment from the eternally flowing time and then filling it with a black marker. By devoting herself continually to the primitive and physical act of “drawing and painting a picture,” Otaguro confronts uncertainty of bodily existence and ambiguity of self-recognition. That is the way she works, and the new pieces in this exhibition show us her latest development.




Eriko Hiyoshi Exhibition

(image)
Eriko Hiyoshi Exhibition
at O Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-11-20 - 2017-11-26)




Johnny Miller “Station to Station”

(image)
Johnny Miller “Station to Station”
at Bambinart Gallery (Chiyoda area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-11-26)

Solo exhibition by Johnny Miller, who was born in 1962 in Newcastle, England and currently lives and works in Osaka. He graduated with a Masters in Printmaking from the Royal College of Art, London. In Franco De Masi’s concept of the unconscious he puts forward the idea that, as a part of our unconscious mind there is an emotional reservoir that never reaches the consciousness. This part of the mind underpins conscious thinking. De Masi says that it allows for an intuitive quality of thought, where ideas and experiences connect and relate. Without unconscious emotional underpinning he says that life’s poetry fades away and thinking becomes fragmented and disconnected. According to Miller’s friend Giles, De Masi’s idea has the capacity to make one think about picture making as a way to maintain a link with the unconscious emotional reservoir. Miller says of himself, “I think I use the commuting time between stations to enter into this state of intuitive picture making which forms the base of all my pictures lately.”




Johnny Miller “Station to Station”

(image)
Johnny Miller “Station to Station”
at 3331 Arts Chiyoda (Chiyoda area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-11-26)

In Franco De Masi’s concept of the unconscious he puts forward the idea that, as a part of our unconscious mind there is an emotional reservoir that never reaches the consciousness. This part of the mind underpins conscious thinking. De Masi says that it allows for an intuitive quality of thought, where ideas and experiences connect and relate. Without unconscious emotional underpinning he says that life’s poetry fades away and thinking becomes fragmented and disconnected. According to Miller’s friend Giles, De Masi’s idea has the capacity to make one think about picture making as a way to maintain a link with the unconscious emotional reservoir. Miller says of himself, “I think I use the commuting time between stations to enter into this state of intuitive picture making which forms the base of all my pictures lately.” Venue: B107




Makoto Ito “Sculptures & Drawings”

(image)
Makoto Ito “Sculptures & Drawings”
at Tir na nog Gallery (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-11-26)

Wander and explore the labyrinth of this simple yet intricate installation created by renowned sculptor Makoto Ito. The form looks basic, even primitive, but it guides the eye as if one were following a maze. At first glance the figure appears to be nonsense or an odd cartoon; there is a familiarity there, but viewers also feel tantalized because they can’t recall why exactly.




Rie Kashiwage “Travel and Folklore”

(image)
Rie Kashiwage “Travel and Folklore”
at Galerie Malle (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-11-21 - 2017-11-26)

Rie Kashiwage has featured ethnic costumes as a motif in her works for many years, attracted to the beauty of handcrafted items rooted in unique cultures. The lineup of works presented here gives visitors the sense of heading out on a small journey. 2018 calendars and various miscellaneous goods will also be for sale.




Taiyo Matsumoto “Original works from “Iru jan (I’m here)”“

(image)
Taiyo Matsumoto “Original works from “Iru jan (I’m here)”“
at Rainy Day Bookstore & Cafe (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-03 - 2017-11-26)

Exhibition presenting original artwork drawn for picture book “Iru jan (I’m here”) by manga artist Taiyo Matsumoto and his mother poet Naoko Kudo. After appearing in the magazine Monkey vol.11, this work has now been published as a picture book. It is 16 years since this mother-son duo last collaborated and it is the first picture book Matsumoto has released in three years. A total of 17 works will be exhibited here. [Related Event] Closing Event: Kushi and Dango Music Event Event Date: Nov. 26 (Sun) 17:00- Performers: Naoko Kudo, Toshihiko Shinzawa (singer-songwriter) Admission: ¥1500 *Please see the official website for bookings.




The Beginnings of Japanese Pastels - Tsurunosuke Takeuchi, Chiyoji Yazaki, and their Contemporaries

(image)
The Beginnings of Japanese Pastels - Tsurunosuke Takeuchi, Chiyoji Yazaki, and their Contemporaries
at Meguro Museum of Art (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-10-14 - 2017-11-26)

There are many artists who work with pastels and there have been since the Meiji Period (1868-1912). However, most of the works created to date have been on a small scale, classified as esquisses or types of sketches that focus on the unique qualities of pastels, which are faster to work with than oil paints in terms of application and drying out time, and can produce particularly subtle expressions of color. Pastels are also frequently used in combination with other painting materials to support other media. Consequently, the number of artists working specifically with pastels to create works that would not be achievable with any other medium is extremely limited. Tsurunosuke Takeuchi and Chiyoji Yazaki are among the few artists who have used pastels as their primary medium, and to this end they have established a dedicated following, their works considered as unparalleled by those of others. The shared ground between Takeuchi and Yazaki, two artists whose backgrounds and styles differ greatly, is their parallel effort to advance the medium of pastels manufactured in Japan. During in the Taisho Period (1912-1926) and start of the Showa era, when the domestic manufacture of various items such as industrial products grew, pastels that had previously been imported from countries like France and Germany began being made domestically, and Yazaki, a trained painter, began teaching with them. While Yazaki worked to spread the popularity of these pastels, Takeuchi also played a key pioneering role. Focusing in the work of these two artists, this exhibition will consider what they learned from European pastel works in the process of establishing their very own uniquely “Japan-ized” approaches. It will also focus on the creation of the pastels themselves, considering the materials as an important element in the process of “Japan-ization.”




Zushi Art Festival 2017

(image)
Zushi Art Festival 2017
at Zushi Beach (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-10-07 - 2017-11-26)

Zushi Art Festival 2017 presents more than 70 works including photography, painting, installation, and more by artists on the international scene. A public exhibition, culture festival, music, and other events will also be held. Please see the official website for details. Venues: Zushibunka Plaza Hall, Zushi Kaikan, Zushi Catholic Church, Kameoka Hachimangu Shrine, Zushi City Hall, Kotsubo Fishing Port, Kikuchi Bldg. 2, others




Kiyoshi Kawashima “Water Quantity - Wood Plasma”

(image)
Kiyoshi Kawashima “Water Quantity - Wood Plasma”
at Galerie Tokyo Humanité (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2017-10-27 - 2017-11-27)

Kiyoshi Kawashima’s works are comprised of materials such as iron, lead, wood, and plaster, constructing space through a unique vocabulary. This exhibition presents brand new work from the “Water Volume” series that Kawashima began in 2005 and can be considered the core of his sculptural practice, as well as two drawings.




Mikako Mizuuchi “First Steps on the New Earth”

(image)
Mikako Mizuuchi “First Steps on the New Earth”
at Nidi gallery (Shibuya area)
(2017-11-22 - 2017-11-28)

Mikako Mizuuchi’s pencil drawings combine abstract geometric patterns with delicate lines.




2nd Daen Exhibition: Chaos, Waves, Destruction

(image)
2nd Daen Exhibition: Chaos, Waves, Destruction
at Neues Asahi (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-11-21 - 2017-11-29)

The second annual exhibition by the Daen-no-kai (Ellipses Association). Their works speak to breaking out of their shells in search of new creative expression, creating ripples that could turn into large waves amid today’s tumultuous society.




15th Anniversary Exhibition: The Tree of Life

(image)
15th Anniversary Exhibition: The Tree of Life
at The Vangi Sculpture Garden Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-04-22 - 2017-11-30)

Trees remain a source of fascination to people even in contemporary times. For its 15th anniversary, the Vangi Sculpture Garden Museum presents an exhibition focused on works from its collection on the theme of “the tree of life.” Trees have been depicted in culture throughout the ages. The Bible speaks of the “tree of life” and the “tree of knowledge.” Today not only painters and sculptors but other artists including photographers take up trees as their subjects, creating dialogues with them. Manabu Miyazaki, for instance, spent two years photographing a single hilltop persimmon tree in Nagano Prefecture, recording the changes in its landscape as the months and seasons went by. Seiichi Motohashi has documented the baobab trees of a Senegalese village and the people who live there in photographs and film, interpreting the meanings of the carvings on the trunks of the trees. Sculptor Shigeo Toya heads into forests of Japan with a chainsaw in pursuit of his art. Similarly, Koji Tanada converses with the wood he uses in his carvings of children and youth, imbuing them with the life of their materials. Furthermore, numerous painters feature trees in their works, portraying them on enormous canvases like figures in dreams. See how 15 contemporary artists bring life to their works in dialogue with trees. [Related Event] Performance Artist Kasetsu will give a performance on the theme of “the tree of life.” Artworks created during the performance will displayed at the exhibition. Date: April 28 (Fri) 13:30–15:30 Please see the official website for details and information on more related events.




Daisuke Nishijima “In Search of True End”

(image)
Daisuke Nishijima “In Search of True End”
at Awaji Cafe & Gallery (Chiyoda area)
(2017-11-18 - 2017-12-02)

New paintings and sculptures inspired by the story “true end,” the climax in the story “Dog House” produced for Dommune.




Mari Miyamoto Exhibition

(image)
Mari Miyamoto Exhibition
at Galerie Omotesando (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-11-20 - 2017-12-02)

Mari Miyamoto (nee Helisevä) is a Finnish artist currently based in Tottori, Japan. She graduated with MFA from the Finnish Academy of Fine Arts in 2014. Her works have been seen in both solo and group exhibitions in Finland, Japan, and Taiwan. Miyamoto works with painting, sculpture and installation. This is her first solo exhibition in Tokyo.




100 Years of Japanese Animation: Pioneers of Moving Manga

(image)
100 Years of Japanese Animation: Pioneers of Moving Manga
at Kawasaki City Museum (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2017-09-02 - 2017-12-03)

This exhibition looks back on the origins of Japanese animation a century ago, spotlighting four pioneers in the field: Hekoten Shimokawa, Seitaro Kiyama, Junichi Kouchi, and Senpan Maekawa. It also looks at ties between prewar manga and animation culture, and screens the recently rediscovered “Namakura Katana” – Japan’s oldest animation – and a tribute by contemporary animators to Hekoten Shimokawa. [Screenings] Early Animation Date: Oct. 22 (Sun) 11:30 and 14:00 (two programs) Hekoten Shimokawa Tribute & Contemporary Animators’ Works Date: Nov. 19 (Sun) 13:30–16:00 Animation Masterpieces Every Saturday and Sunday Oct. 14 (Sat)–Nov. 26 (Sun) 11:30 and 14:00 In Japanese. Please see the official website for details and information on more events.




Atelier 21 “100 Croquis Drawings”

(image)
Atelier 21 “100 Croquis Drawings”
at Fei Art Museum Yokohama (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-11-21 - 2017-12-03)

Exhibiting 100 pages of croquis sketches by Atelier 21, a group comprised of artists Takahiro Okada, Kozo Ueda, and Minoru Hirota.




Marc Chagall: The Third Dimension

(image)
Marc Chagall: The Third Dimension
at Tokyo Station Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-09-16 - 2017-12-03)

Marc Chagall is famous as a painter and engraver, but in his later years he also created many sculptures. This is the first exhibition in Japan to offer an in-depth look at his sculptures. Based on the distinctive traits of Chagall’s sculptures, which have a deep connection with his two-dimensional works, this exhibition guides the visitor around the three-dimensional world of Marc Chagall, displaying his sculptures along with related sketches and paintings, as well as works based on the same themes. The exhibition is made up of 60 sculptures and ceramics, 70 oil and watercolor paintings, and 40 sketches and prints. Many of the exhibits have not been displayed in Japan before, making this a precious opportunity to see new facets of Marc Chagall’s art.




My BooK Vol. 6

(image)
My BooK Vol. 6
at Dazzle (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-11-21 - 2017-12-03)

Presenting books by a variety of illustrators.




Raw Signals: The Current Form of Portraiture

(image)
Raw Signals: The Current Form of Portraiture
at Koganei Art Spot Chateau 2F (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-03)

This exhibition curated by artist Goro Murayama, who in October returned from a Culture Ministry-sponsored trip to research emerging art in Vienna, presents portraits in a variety of media by promising young artists born in the 1980s and 1990s. These new works shed light on perceptions of symbols in the art of Japan. [Event] Talk by Seiichi Hanamura (psychiatrist) Date: Dec. 3 (Sun) 15:00–17:00




Seasonal Poetry - 140 years since the birth, and 50 years since the death of poet Utsubo Kubota

(image)
Seasonal Poetry - 140 years since the birth, and 50 years since the death of poet Utsubo Kubota
at Bunkyo Museum (Chiyoda area)
(2017-10-21 - 2017-12-03)

Utsubo Kubota (1877-1967) spent more than 50 years studying Japanese poetry and literature from his base in Bunkyo Ward, Tokyo. During his long literary career, which spanned the Meiji (1868-1912), Taisho (1912-1926) and Showa (1926-1989) eras, Kubota penned more than 14,000 poems, counting those in his anthologies alone, while also researching classical Japanese waka poetry, and teaching at Waseda University. He supported the growth of many successors who continue to dedicate themselves to Japanese poetry. This exhibition celebrating the 140th anniversary of his birth, and marking 50 years since his death, will focus on Kubota’s seasonal poetry about Bunkyo and other related works. [Related Event] Talk but the curator Event Dates: Nov. 1 (Wed), 16 (Thu) 14:00-14:30 *Event in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details.




Diego Cirulli “The Thickness of Silence”

(image)
Diego Cirulli “The Thickness of Silence”
at 104Galerie (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-10-07 - 2017-12-10)

Diego Cirulli makes art focusing on historical, political and societal conflict, dealing with topics such as inequality, childhood, gender identity, the complexities of his country’s present, and its recent past. He also works as a stage producer in the scenography department of the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, which, along with Theatre National de l’Opera de Paris and Teatro alla Scala, is one of the three major opera companies in the world. He expands and crosses into new fields of work, such as the contemporary dance company Animales Danza Teatro, where he is the artistic advisor, designer and scenography producer, and Kalos, his own workshop, where he works both as a director and as an art/art history instructor.His highly praised work has received various awards, including First Prize for Painting, Salón ‘Palermo Viejo’ (2011). This exhibition, Cirulli’s first in Japan, presents approximately 25 paintings on canvas, 10 drawings, two sculptures, and a three-dimensional audio-visual installation using virtual reality. As an experienced director of theater production and stage designer, Cirulli’s unique approach to the space and his inspiration are also in focus. An opening reception with the artist is due to be held at 18:00 on Saturday, October 7th. In addition, a few events conducted by Cirulli himself are being planned. The details of these events will be posted on the gallery website.




Reborn-Art festival Tokyo exhibition: What went on?

(image)
Reborn-Art festival Tokyo exhibition: What went on?
at Watari-um, The Watari Museum of Contemporary Art (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-10-20 - 2017-12-10)

This exhibition revisits Reborn-Art Festival, a brand new art, music, and food focused event that was held this summer at locations throughout Ishinomaki city center and Oshika Peninsula in Tohoku. Scheduled at a time when Tohoku is going through a dramatic period of rebirth, those visiting the festival had the unique opportunity to encounter new people and ideas that wouldn’t be found anywhere else in Japan. Here, visitors had the chance to discover a new aspect of themselves that they had not yet glimpsed. In this way, the event was not just about the reconstruction of the Tohoku region, but also a festival that offered visitors a chance to be reborn. This exhibition will present works and documentation that were exhibited at Reborn-Art Festival 2017, giving those who could not attend the event another opportunity to enjoy the work that was on offer there.




Newspace

(image)
Newspace
at Waitingroom (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2017-11-18 - 2017-12-17)

The first exhibition in Waitingroom’s new space after moving from Ebisu to Bunkyo presents works by Yuki Iiyama, Nobuaki Itoh, Rikako Kawauchi, Naho Kawabe, Yusuke Shibata, Koichiro Takesue, Masaya Nakahara, Yuichi Hirako, Saori Miyake, Shoko Morita, and a new artist, Saya Okubo, who will have her first solo exhibition at the gallery in February 2018. Several artists are showing brand new works specifically made for this exhibition, Waitingroom’s largest group show to date. Others present works on view for the first time in Tokyo. These artists actively seek new ideas and concepts with their own distinctive perspectives and expressions. Waitingroom is excited to introduce their works at this new space marking new beginnings for the artists and the gallery.




Otto Nebel and his contemporaries - Chagall, Kandinsky, Klee

(image)
Otto Nebel and his contemporaries - Chagall, Kandinsky, Klee
at Bunkamura Museum of Art (Shibuya area)
(2017-10-07 - 2017-12-17)

The painter Otto Nebel (1892–1973), who spent his artistic career in Switzerland and Germany, met Kandinsky, Klee and others at Bauhaus during a stay in Weimar in the mid-1920s, forging long-lasting friendships with these creators. This is the first-ever retrospective of Nebel’s work in Japan, organized with full backing from the Otto Nebel Foundation in Bern. The exhibition traces the themes central to Nebel’s oeuvre - architecture, drama, music, the abstract, the Middle East and so on - supplementing the artist’s own works with those of his contemporaries, such as Klee, Kandinsky and Chagall. The intention is to shed light on the process by which Nebel sought to establish his own brand of art, incorporating and experimenting with style after style. With a view to the approaching centenary of Bauhaus’s foundation in 2019, this retrospective showcases Nebel’s underappreciated artistic achievements, beginning with the painter’s early experiences at Bauhaus, and following along his career that was devoted to exploration of materials and textures. [Related Events] Talk Event: “Weimar Bauhaus and its periphery - Those encountered at Bauhaus” Event Date: Nov. 19 (Sun) 18:30-20:30 Venue: Bunkamura The Museum Exhibition Space Speaker: Kaho Somada (Curator of Misawa Bauhaus Collection) Capacity: 60 Admission: Free *Bookings can be made via the official website. *Event in Japanese.




Picture…book?

(image)
Picture…book?
at Atelier Muji (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-11-03 - 2017-12-17)

The relationship between people and books is long-established. At first these objects that form an integral part of our lives were made from natural materials such as stone, soil, plants, and animal skin. Over the years, however, the structure of books has changed, and we now have books available in digital formats. How about if books and picture books became three-dimensional? Would this be a strange reading experience? Here four artists/artist groups explore this question, interrogating what a book is. [Related Events] Gallery Talk The artist will deliver a talk in the gallery space. Details of when it will be held will be published on the official website. Venue: Atelier Muji, 2F Muji Yurakucho Admission: Free Speaker: Anna Budanova *Please see the official website for booking.




Styles of Calligraphy II - Succession and Originality of Beauty -

Styles of Calligraphy II - Succession and Originality of Beauty -
at Idemitsu Museum of Arts (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-17)

It was after studies of Chinese calligraphic works that the tradition of cherishing calligraphy as an art form was cultivated in Japan and a distinctive framework established. Intellectuals of each distinctive time period throughout the ages have been well acquainted with “calligraphic writing,” maintaining the discipline and respecting the rules while also competing with each other to improve their skills. Such customs remain in place today and have brought about the development of many styles. This exhibition will explore how calligraphic traditions have been carried forward since the old days and demonstrate how people have sought for originality and ideal beauty. In addition, it will consider the manner in which calligraphy can be appreciated through calligraphic masterpieces from China and Japan.




Tatsuhiko Shibusawa “The Domain of Draconia”

(image)
Tatsuhiko Shibusawa “The Domain of Draconia”
at Setagaya Literary Museum (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2017-10-07 - 2017-12-17)

Tatsuhiko Shibusawa was a scholar of French literature, translator, critic, essayist, and writer of novels. This exhibition, held 30 years after his death, will review his works and that which he left to posterity from a new perspective, looking at his own literary expression, often referred to as “Shibusawa style.” From the beginning, Shibusawa worked with a different shade of literature, famously working with titles by the Marquis de Sade. This exhibition will include Shibusawa’s essay collection “Yume no Uchu-shi,” as well as “The Travels of Prince Takaoka,” one of his best known works, and more than 300 handwritten materials, such as writing drafts, manuscripts, and creative memos. There will also be various art works and objects that he was particularly fond of, and his collection of Japanese and Non-Japanese books. [Related Events] Related exhibition: “Salon Exhibition: Ryoichi Enomoto Kokaiki” Event dates: Oct. 7 (Sat) - Dec. 17 (Sun) 10:00-18:00 (may close for special events) Venue: 1F Literature Salon Admission: Free *Please see the official website for further details and information on other events.




Shinkai Makoto “From “Voices of a Distant Star” to “Your Name””

(image)
Shinkai Makoto “From “Voices of a Distant Star” to “Your Name””
at The National Art Center, Tokyo (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-18)

This exhibition presenting a range of works by Makoto Shinkai, from “Voices of a Distant Star” to “Your Name,” marks the 10th anniversary of The National Art Center, Tokyo. Shinkai debuted commercially with his short film “Voices of a Distant Star” in 2002. Since then, he has spent the last 15 years producing refined “stories of a man and a woman who cross their paths in a beautiful and magnificent world,” receiving widespread attention from audiences across the board. Shinkai’s journey will be introduced here through his production materials, such as storyboards, plannings, drawings, arts, and visual images, as well as other objects that enable visitors to experience his world. This is an opportunity to enjoy an in depth experience of Shinkai’s charming animations. “Voices of a Distant Star” marks his first self-production, while “The place promised in our early days” - which received the Mainichi Film Concours Award - can be considered his first feature length work produced with a professional team. Other key titles include “5 Centimeters Per Second,” which remains popular to this day, the young adult fantasy film “Children Who Chase Lost Voices,” “The Garden of Words,” which tells a story of visual literature in the digital era, and “your name,” which celebrated record-breaking success right after its release last year.




David Shrigley “New Drawings”

(image)
David Shrigley “New Drawings”
at Yumiko Chiba Associates | Viewing Room Shinjuku (Shinjuku area)
(2017-11-02 - 2017-12-22)

British Artist David Shrigley’s drawings are recognizable for their iconic expressions. In 2014, Shrigley created a large installation work where his drawings filled the whole space at “Sketch,” a high-end cafe in London. This exhibition will present his most recent works produced for the drawing series that was presented in the cafe. [Related Event] Talk Event: David Shrigley and Ken Kagami in Conversation Event Date: Oct. 31 (Tue) 18:00-20:00 (doors open 17:30) Venue: Lecture Hall 1, Central Building, Tokyo University of the Arts Ueno Campus (Ueno Koen 12-8, Taito-ku, Tokyo, 110-8714) Speakers: David Shrigley, Ken Kagami Chair: Kenji Miwa Capacity: 180 *Event in Japanese and English. *Please see the official website for further details.




Olaf Breuning “Walking on Love”

(image)
Olaf Breuning “Walking on Love”
at Kodama Gallery | Tennozu (Tokyo: Others area)
(2017-10-21 - 2017-12-22)

The New York-based Swiss artist Olaf Breuning’s work encompassing photography, film, installation, drawing, and sculpture all shares a unique sense of humor and sharp irony. This exhibition marks the Asian debut for Breuning’s recent series of large-scale drawings and drawing-inspired ceramic sculptures.




Yurie Nagashima + Miyo Stevens-Gandara “Forever is Composed of Nows”

(image)
Yurie Nagashima + Miyo Stevens-Gandara “Forever is Composed of Nows”
at Maho Kubota Gallery (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-11-21 - 2017-12-22)

This exhibition brings together works that give insight into the creative origins of Yurie Nagashima and Miyo Stevens-Gandara with works representing current threads or pointing to future directions in the careers of the two artists. The idea of putting on a joint exhibition came to the pair suddenly, during one of their conversations. After spending time during their twenties together in California, when they were both heavily influenced by the riot grrrl movement, the two artists were separated when Nagashima moved back to Japan. Since then, they have continued exploring the possibilities of artistic expression on opposite sides of the Pacific. Nagashima’s preoccupation with the relationship between self and other, as well as the issues associated with being a female artist, have come together in her artistic focus on the course of women’s lives. Stevens-Gandara, while teaching at Rio Hondo College in Los Angeles, creates work around the themes of feminism, identity, and environmental destruction. Representing Nagashima’s early work are five skateboard works made in 1997 while the artist was living in America. These mixed-media pieces were realized by coating actual skateboards with photographic emulsion and directly printing photographs onto their surfaces. Also exhibited are several of Nagashima’s botanical photographs captured over the last few years in various locations around the United States, presented for the first time. Several pieces from Stevens-Gandara’s Wunderkammer series make their Japan debut, along with distinctive work from her ‘The Wilderness of Childhood’ series, which depicts scenes from the Indiana and Kentucky countryside that are deeply interwoven with her childhood memories. In addition to her photographs, embroidery works entitled “In Mourning” are exhibited. If all of the works making up this exhibition are the culmination of these two artists’ daily insights and thoughts, they also present a picture of the great changes the world has undergone over the past twenty-something years and some of the many problems it has faced. One thing that the pair’s recent work seems to have in common is a particular attitude to artistic creation—that of taking a step back from the gushing torrent of worldly affairs and retreating to a place of mental solitude, so as to take one’s time and create at one’s own pace, without being carried along by others. Appropriate, then, that the title of this exhibition is drawn from “Forever—is Composed of Nows,” the work of 19th century American poet Emily Dickinson.




Junpei Nousaku Exhibition

(image)
Junpei Nousaku Exhibition
at Prismic Gallery (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-24)

Show presenting various models, drawings, and video works produced by Junpei Nousaku for his architectural projects planned over the last eight years. A talk event will also be scheduled during the exhibition period.




Livres d’enfance français, Collection Kashima Shigeru

(image)
Livres d’enfance français, Collection Kashima Shigeru
at Gunma Museum of Art, Tatebayashi (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-09-23 - 2017-12-24)

This is the first time for these French picture books treasured for many years in the collection of rare Western books belonging to Shigeru Kashima, a scholar of French literature, to be shown in public. They date mainly from the late nineteenth century, when fine children’s books emerged, to the early twentieth century, when subtle, modern, and lively pictures played the leading role. The entirety of this collection rich in charming, beautiful French picture books is revealed here.




Tadao Ando Exhibition

(image)
Tadao Ando Exhibition
at Akio Nagasawa Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-09-29 - 2017-12-24)




The Poetry of Gozo Yoshimasu

(image)
The Poetry of Gozo Yoshimasu
at Ashikaga Museum of Art (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-11-03 - 2017-12-24)

Gozo Yoshimasu (1939-) has been at the forefront of contemporary Japanese poetry since the 1960s. His activity, which continues to draw great interest, extends beyond the scope of ​​words and poetry to include photography, video, sculpture and much more. Yoshimasu’s poetry that pushes linguistic boundaries has traveled throughout Japan and around the world, receiving acknowledgement from all kinds of people, both well-known and unknown, in the East and West. This exhibition will explore his representative works produced during various periods over the last half century, looking at individual poems and photographs, and presenting these alongside artworks and various materials by related artists.




Mats Gustafson “Nude”

(image)
Mats Gustafson “Nude”
at MA2 Gallery (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-11-17 - 2017-12-27)

Born in Sweden in 1951, Mats Gustafson is artist who has been based in New York since the late 1970s and is active around the globe. He has worked on a number of magazines and brand visuals for names such as “Vogue,” “Harper’s Bazaar,” “Visionnaire,” “Dior,” “Hermes,” “Yohji Yamamoto,” “Comme des Garçons,” and “Estnation.” Alongside his fashion illustrations, Gustafson has maintained a focus on art and the pursuit of themes such as nature and the nude. This second exhibition at MA2 Gallery will present around 20 works comprised of watercolor paintings and ink drawings of nudes made in the late 1980s and thereafter. As HIV began to spread in the early 1980s, there was little awareness of AIDS, and many lives were lost while much prejudice prevailed. Gustafson, who was doing fashion-related work in New York at the time, began drawing nudes to in order to focus consciousness on the body during this tumultuous period.




Smart Illumination Yokohama 2017

(image)
Smart Illumination Yokohama 2017
at Zou-no-hana Terrace (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-11-01 - 2017-12-31)

“Smart Illumination Yokohama” is the first ever project to create a night view by fusing eco-friendly technology and art. This event, celebrating its seventh anniversary, will see artists from around the world gathering in Yokohama, their works displayed not only at Zou-no-hana Park but also across downtown Yokohama. During this special period, citizens, artists, historical buildings, towns, and local businesses will take the stage, joining forces to boldly reinvent Yokohama’s creative night view on the stage of Yokohama city and its vibrant urban landscape. Artists: Taira Ichikawa, Kateryna Snizhko, Naho Kawabe, Yasue Kitamura, Takahito Kimura, Junichi Kusaka, Jaime Ibanez, Switch Research Institute, Asae Soya, Kyota Takahashi, Yasuhiro Chida, Rintaro Hara, Kenji Hirasawa, Martina Stock, Takayuki Mori, Lilian Bourgeat, and more.




10th Anniversary Exhibition “Keith Haring and Japan: Pop to Neo-Japonism”

(image)
10th Anniversary Exhibition “Keith Haring and Japan: Pop to Neo-Japonism”
at Nakamura Keith-Haring Collection (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-02-05 - 2018-01-08)

The Nakamura Keith Haring Collection, the only museum in the world dedicated to the collection of Keith Haring’s artwork, celebrates its 10th anniversary in 2017. This exhibition focuses on the footprints Haring left in Japan, exploring his liberating and diverse point of view in works expressing Japanese aesthetics. It also features an important mural made with 500 children at Parthenon Tama, Tokyo in 1987. This work is the culmination of an art that communicates beyond language. On his first visit to Japan, Haring made drawings on mediums unique to Japan, such as folding screens, scrolls, kites and fans with Sumi ink. Haring had not only been influenced by his early introduction to Zen but also inspired by Eastern philosophy, including both cultural and literary elements. He experienced the height of Tokyo’s economic boom of the 80’s, and the dichotomy of ultra-modern and the traditional was both a source of fascination and inspiration for him. After the success of his revolutionary art project Pop Shop, which inherited the concept of his break out graffiti project Subway Drawings, Haring opened Pop Shop Tokyo in Aoyama, Tokyo in 1988. The shop was a sensation and many people waited in line just to get a glimpse of Haring’s pop-style.




Layered Forms - Selections from the Hara Museum Collection

(image)
Layered Forms - Selections from the Hara Museum Collection
at Hara Museum Arc (Gunma) (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-09-16 - 2018-01-08)

The keyword behind the works from the Hara Museum Collection featured in this exhibition is “layer,” a reference not only to a work’s structural aspect, but also to the idea of “layers of meaning.” In his assemblage of stacked portraits, Christian Boltanski has created an altar with each young girl’s face a metaphor for a memory of life and death. Lee Ufan’s work is comprised of a repeating pattern of dark, fading lines against white negative space. In Yoshitomo Nara’s work, we sense both hope and despair in the eyes of a girl standing in a war zone, eyes that seem to trace the lyrics of an anti-war song. In Kohei Nawa’s work, a stuffed doe is covered with transparent spheres that transform its existence into a “PixCell” (i.e., “picture” + “cell”). Explore the layered meanings in these and other works. [Featured Artists] Arman, Koji Enokura, Shinro Ohtake, Gilbert & George, Yayoi Kusama, Christian Boltanski, Jae-Eun Choi,Tokihiro Sato, Tabaimo, Yoshitomo Nara, Kosai Hori, Tomio Miki, Tadanori Yokoo, Katsuro Yoshida, Lee Ufan, Louise Nevelson, Robert Rauschenberg and others




“The Doraemon Exhibition Tokyo 2017”

(image)
“The Doraemon Exhibition Tokyo 2017”
at Mori Arts Center Gallery (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-01 - 2018-01-08)

Organized under the concept “Create Your Own Original Doraemon,” this exhibition brings together 28 artists and artist groups who will present their unique artworks capturing memories of the popular Japanese manga series, “Doraemon.” Since its birth in 1970, “Doraemon” has been capturing the imagination of audiences across Japan. There are also a great number of “Doraemon” fans among globally renowned artists who have been touched and inspired by this long-running manga. How exciting it is to see these artists expressing their feelings and memories of Doraemon through their work? This exhibition invites you to share in this special moment when “art” and “Doraemon” come together. [Artists] Makoto Aida, Kayo Ume, Motohiko Odani, Ryota Kuwakubo, Tomoko Konoike, Akinori Goto, Satomi Kondo, Tomoyoshi Sakamoto, Masaharu Sato, ShiShi Yamazaki, Ai Shinohara, Kotobuki Shiriagari, Yuta Nakazato, Suito Nakatsuka, Yoshitomo Nara, Yasuyuki Nishio, Mika Ninagawa, Miran Fukuda, Sebastian Masuda, Kumi Machida, Mr., Takashi Murakami, Yasumasa Morimura+Junko Koike, Akira Yamaguchi, Hidenori Yamaguchi + Wataru Ito, Ryuki Yamamoto, RenaRena, Nozomi Watanabe




Works on Paper

(image)
Works on Paper
at Rin Art Association (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-11-18 - 2018-01-14)

Introducing drawings by artists of the same generation in a show curated by Kengo Kuma.




Rethinking Bernard Buffet: Half A Century of Masterpieces

(image)
Rethinking Bernard Buffet: Half A Century of Masterpieces
at Bernard Buffet Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-03-18 - 2018-01-16)

Bernard Buffet made his debut as a painter at the age of 20, becoming famous for his portraits that characteristically use straight black lines and subdued hues to embody the social anxiety and void following the war. In order to prepare for solo exhibitions he held each year and expand his language of expression, in 1952 Buffet began setting himself themes to paint by, such as “passion” and “circus.” By following the various themes that Buffet painted it is possible to trace his struggle as a painter and the evolution of his much praised “Buffet style.” This exhibition will introduce the “Japan” series and the other materials that formed the basis of his 1981 exhibition, while also exploring the close relationship between Japan and Buffet. More than 100 key works from the museum collection that span half a century will be presented. [Related Events] Gallery Tours Event Dates: Every Fourth Sunday during the exhibition period. Event Time: 11:15- (Duration: approx. 30 mins.) No booking required. *Event in Japanese. *See official website for further details.




David Shrigley “Lose Your Mind”
David Shrigley “Lose Your Mind” at Contemporary Art Center, Art Tower Mito (Greater Tokyo area) (2017-10-14 - 2018-01-21) Art Tower Mito is holding Japan’s first large-scale solo exhibition of the work of acclaimed British artist David Shrigley, known for his darkly humorous take on everyday situations. David Shrigley works in a wide range of media, including drawing, animation, sculpture and photography. He moves easily between the worlds of high art and popular culture, collaborating with high-profile musicians and fashion brands, whilst also producing political cartoons and public artworks. The provocative title of the exhibition, “Lose Your Mind,” can be seen as an expression of a unique sense of humour that is present through the entire oeuvre of Shrigley. For the first time in Japan, the exhibition, presented in partnership with the British Council, comprehensively introduces the diverse activities of the artist, presenting an immensity of his drawings, darkly humorous animations, surreal sculptures and conceptual works that gently undermine the seriousness of art. Additionally, a balloon replica of his public artwork Really Good, which has been gaining attention since it was unveiled at Trafalgar Square in London in autumn 2016, will have its world premiere at the exhibition. Enjoy the world of David Shrigley, illuminated by dark humour, which, one may say, is unique to British culture. [Related Event] 1. Artist Talk Date and Time: 14th Oct (Sat), 2017 14:00-15:00 Guest: David Shrigley Venue: Workshop room, Contemporary Art Gallery, Art Tower Mito Capacity: 70 (reservation unnecessary, first-come-first-served basis) *Numbered tickets are distributed from 11:00 in front of the venue. *Fee is included in the admission for the exhibition. 2. Session! - Gallery Tour with the visually impaired Dates: 9th Dec (Sat) 2017, 13th Jan (Sat) 2018 Time: 15:00-17:00 Capacity: 5(reservation required, first-come-first-served basis) Fee: ¥1000(including the admission of the exhibition) *Only in Japanese. 3. Weekend Gallery Talk Date: 28th Oct (Sat), 2017, to 21th Jan (Sun), 2018. Every Saturday and Sunday during the period of the exhibition except 19th Nov (Sun), 6th Jan (Sat) and 7th Jan (Sun). Time: Starts at 14:30 (Gallery talk lasts approximately 40 minutes.) Venue: Contemporary Art Center, Art Tower Mito *A gallery talk might be canceled due to circumstances. *Fee is included in the admission for the exhibition. *Only in Japanese *Please see the official website for further details [...]



Sam Stocker “Surrogate Structures”

(image)
Sam Stocker “Surrogate Structures”
at The Container (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-11-06 - 2018-01-22)

Sam Stocker’s installation “Surrogate Structures” is inspired by research and visits the artist conducted around this area of Tokyo. One such location that influenced the work is a fujizuka situated just behind the gallery location. Fujizuka are small mounds - replicas of Mount Fuji - that can be found in and around the capital. These surrogates became popular during the Edo period to enable pilgrims who could not climb Mount Fuji to experience the ten stations of the mountain right to the summit. The irony of the concept intrigued the artist, while the nurturing nature of fujizuka, which comfort the needy like a womb, a vessel, or a box, also interested him. [Related Event] Opening night reception + launch of publication Event Date: Nov. 6 (Mon) 19:30-21:30 Reception includes live performances by Sam Stocker, Aquiles Hadjis, Alexander Sigman + Takao Hyakutome, and Jack McLean.




The 100-Year History of Japanese Picture Books

(image)
The 100-Year History of Japanese Picture Books
at Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-11-08 - 2018-01-31)

In the 1910s, several Japanese magazines for children, such as “Kodomo no Tomo (The Children’s Companion)” and “Akai Tori (Red Bird),” were launched one after the other. Against the backdrop of the prosperity that arrived to Japan after World War I - a period known as the Taisho Democracy - highly artistic illustrated magazines and picture books emerged from the movement at the time promoting fairy tales, nursery songs and pictures for children. Following World War II, picture books enjoyed a resurgence thanks to the contributions of Chihiro Iwasaki and other distinctive artists. This exhibition follows the progression of the uniquely rich expressiveness of Japanese picture books over the past 100 years.




Architecture on Paper: Architectural Drawings of Japan 1970s-1990s

(image)
Architecture on Paper: Architectural Drawings of Japan 1970s-1990s
at National Archives of Modern Architecture (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2017-10-31 - 2018-02-04)

Architectural drawings are what are commonly referred to as “plans.” They may take the form of preliminary sketches, design drawings, construction drawings, or beautifully colored and shaded presentation renderings. Sometimes, however, architects may also construct imaginative worlds on paper that stand independent of any actual design-to-construction process. In Japan, architectural drawings made great strides particularly after the Osaka Expo, in the period spanning from the 1970s to the 1980s. The architects of this post-postwar period poured extensive energy into developing their drawings beyond practical requirements. Sheets grew larger, techniques diversified, and drawings came to be appreciated as works of art on their own. Why did these architects make such drawings? What did they seek to achieve through their work on paper? When we look at the drawings, what we see are visions that would not necessarily be completed even if they were constructed as buildings. Even since CAD (computer-aided design) came into wide use in the 1990s, hand-drawn architectural plans have become rare, and the art of drawing has fallen into decline. What significance did the drawings of the post-postwar architects have in their time? What questions do they pose for us today? This exhibition was conceived to reflect upon these themes. [Architects] Youji Watanabe, Arata Isozaki, Hiromi Fujii, Hiroshi Hara, Takefumi Aida, Zo Atelier, Tadao Ando, Kikoo Mozuna, Ryoji Suzuki, Riken Yamamoto, Shin Takamatsu [Related Events] Symposium: Architectural Drawings and Japanese Architecture 1970s-1990s Date: Dec. 2 (Sat) 14:00-16:00 Speakers: Makoto Ueda (Editor in Chief, Sumai Library Publishing Company), Norihito Nakatani (Scholar in the history of engineering, Professor at Waseda University) Moderator: Jo Toda (Associate Professor at Kanazawa Institute of Technology) Venue: Larg Hall, Kenchikuka Kaikan Capacity: 120 (booking recommended) Admission: Free *Event in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details.




Decoration Never Dies, Anyway

(image)
Decoration Never Dies, Anyway
at Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-11-18 - 2018-02-25)

This decoration-focused exhibition features seven artists whom are all different in age, nationality, and genre. The means of expression they employ are diverse, including a trailer adorned with Gothic decoration, carpets that mix together patterns derived from various cultural spheres, and paintings that through the façade of windows imagines the life and personalities of the people who live there. In their works the artists juxtapose entirely different epochs and values, imagine worlds that do not actually exist, and attempt to interpret the concept of “decoration” as it exists in the context of daily life. In observing their endeavors, we as viewers recognize that the act of decoration is indeed the essential key to perceiving the vivid and complex reality that inextricably surrounds us. After all, “Decoration never dies, anyway.” [Related Events] Artist Talk On 18 November, Sat. 13:00− Short presentation by participating artists (with simultaneous interpreting English-Japanese) Venue: Annex Gallery 2, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum Seating capacity: 120 Pre-registration required (available on TTM website from 18 Oct.) Free with museum admission




Yayoi Kusama Museum Inaugural Exhibition - Creation is a Solitary Pursuit, Love is What Brings You Closer to Art

(image)
Yayoi Kusama Museum Inaugural Exhibition - Creation is a Solitary Pursuit, Love is What Brings You Closer to Art
at Yayoi Kusama Museum (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2017-10-01 - 2018-02-25)

This inaugural exhibition at the Yayoi Kusama Museum centers on the artist’s newest painting series, “My Eternal Soul.” Other new works by Kusama will be on display in addition to the sixteen paintings from this series, including pieces from the series entitled “Love Forever,” which forms the precursor to “My Eternal Soul” and is comprised of a collection of monochrome drawings. Furthermore, an installation work created by Kusama specially for the museum’s opening will be showcased, along with a new pumpkin. [Related Events] Lecture Event Museum Director Akira Tatehata will discuss Kusama’s works and artistic process, starting with “My Eternal Soul,” the focus on this inaugural exhibition. Event Date: Oct. 22 (Sun) 14:30- Venue: 3F Exhibition Space Speaker: Akira Tatehata Capacity: 30 Admission: Free (no booking required, museum admission ticket required) Gallery Talk by the Curator Bi-monthly gallery talks will be given by curators of the museum, who will point out exhibition highlights and offer explanations of the works on show. Event Dates: Oct. 7 (Sat) 14:30-, Oct. 28 (Sat) 14:30-, Nov. 12 (Sun) 14:30-, Nov. 18 (Sat) 14:30-, Dec. 9 (Sat) 14:30-. Further dates will be updated on the official website. Venue: Meeting place will be specified on the day of the event Capacity: 30 Admission: Free (no booking required, museum admission ticket required) *Events in Japanese.




Art is Science Ⅱ

(image)
Art is Science Ⅱ
at Karuizawa New Art Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-10-07 - 2018-03-31)

This summer, Karuizawa New Art Museum hosted “Art is Science,” focusing on artistic expressionism that has emerged from the advancement of scientific technology. From the early 20th century and into the post-war period, there was experimental use of scientific technology in art. We now notice that this has influenced our esthetic sensibilities and contributes to their diversity. In “Art is Science Ⅱ,” the museum will continue to address the idea of new horizons, looking at artists who have been working on links with science in contemporary art. In 1973 a British-born artist Harold Cohen (1928-2016) invented “Aaron,” an automatic drawing machine. Through numerous trial-and-error experiments with his computers, Cohen pursued not only artistic expressions generated from human drawings and colors, but also sought out creations by Artificial Intelligence that could learn and develop autonomously. John Cage (1912-1992) is well known as an avant-garde composer of experimental music, who presented “Radio Music” (1958) and “Cartridge Music” (1960) by making use of the capacities of machines such as radios and microphones. Through examples such as these, we can see there has been use of scientific technologies to embody ideas in conceptual aspects. In this exhibition you can encounter a variety of works that are the result of artists’ unflagging enthusiasm for fresh expressions in the new era. While some works are sure to astonish visitors with their novelty appeal, others may elicit strange feelings, challenging stereotypical views.




MAM Collection 006: Materials and Boundaries - Handiwirman Saputra + Masaya Chiba

MAM Collection 006: Materials and Boundaries - Handiwirman Saputra + Masaya Chiba
at Mori Art Museum (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-18 - 2018-04-01)

“MAM Collection 006” will showcase works by Handiwirman Saputra and Masaya Chiba. They both employ a diverse range of materials and techniques in practices, predominantly sculpture and painting. The exhibition will focus on the differences in gaze, approach, etc. between the two artists with regard to matter, materials, environment and boundaries, and also what they have in common. Distancing his output from sociopolitical currents in contemporary art responding to the Indonesian democracy movement of 1998 rather than making statements, Saputra declares his works to be simply the materials existing in that place, unbound by any sort of meaning or purpose. Tak Berakah Tak Berpucuk Num. 12 (No Roots No Shoots No. 12) presented at this exhibition may resemble a soft, bag-like object tied up with rubber bands, or the seed of a giant plant, however Saputra declines to offer such answers or meaning, leaving it to the individual viewer to decide how they feel about the work, and how they interpret it. Chiba meanwhile is known for his method of using sculptures he makes himself to construct bizarre, fantastical environments in his studio and other settings, and making these scenes the motifs of his paintings. Powerful Young Boy at 2013 on display in this exhibition was inspired by a visit to the “Sasurai Jizo- [Wandering Ksitigarbha]” in Tono, Iwate Prefecture that had fascinated him for years. Sketches and notes from the trip, and drawings showing detailed plans for the painting, will also be on public display here for the first time.




Love is Wonderful

(image)
Love is Wonderful
at Snoopy Museum Tokyo (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-10-07 - 2018-04-08)

In the comic strip “Peanuts,” there are various romantic episodes that excite the heart; Charlie Brown lets out a sigh upon seeing the Little Red Haired Girl in front of him, the crabby Lucy struggles with her unrequited love for Shroeder. Even Snoopy has a bitter experience when his brother Spike runs off with his bride-to-be just before their wedding. This exhibition on the theme of love has a dramatic atmosphere, introducing around 80 original comic strips and animation sequences depiciting the many romantic episodes in “Peanuts.”




MOMAT Collection Exhibition

MOMAT Collection Exhibition
at The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (Chiyoda area)
(2017-11-14 - 2018-05-27)

In this ongoing series of exhibitions, the museum presents trends in modern and contemporary Japanese art from the 20th century to the present, including references to international connections. The “Highlights” section (Room 1, 4th floor) is filled with a selection of masterpieces from the museum collection. The displays in Rooms 2 to 12 are arranged in more or less chronological order. Since the items in each room are based on a particular theme, such as “The Sun, Me, and Women” and “The Great Kanto Earthquake,” you can enjoy comparing and contrasting them. Considering the historical background of the works should also make for an enjoyable viewing experience. Other rooms contain themes related to the Kumagai Morikazu exhibition (Dec. 1 - Mar. 21) and the Yokoyama Taikan exhibition (Apr. 13 - May 27), both held on the first floor. In Room 9 (3rd floor), there is an exhibit on Robert Frank, one of America’s preeminent photographers, featuring a group of recently acquired works, and in Gallery 4 (2nd floor), an exhibit titled “Refugees.” In addition, “Spring Festival in MOMAT” will be held in the spring of 2018 to coincide with cherry-blossom season. Among the works awaiting you there will be Kawai Gyokudo’s Parting Spring (on view from Mar. 20 to May 27). [Related Events] Guided Tour of Exhibition Event Dates: Nov. 14 (Tue), 2017 - May 27 (Sun), 2018, 14:00-15:00 everyday that the museum is open (times are subject to change when other events are scheduled) Venue: Permanent Collection Gallery (meeting at the 1F entrance) Tour of Exhibition Highlights Event Dates: Dec. 3 (Sun), 2017, Jan. 7 (Sun), 2018, Feb. 4 (Sun), Mar. 4 (Sun), 11:00-12:00 Venue: Permanent Collection Gallery (meeting in front of the 4F elevator) *Please see the official website for further details.




NMWA Museum Collection

NMWA Museum Collection
at National Museum Of Western Art, Tokyo (Ueno, Yanaka area)

The NMWA was established in 1959 around the core Matsukata Collection as Japan’s museum specializing in Western art. The galleries feature pre-18th century paintings including those by Ritzos, Van Cleve, Veronese, Rubens, Van Ruysdael, and Ribera, 19th to early 20th century French paintings including works by Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Renoir, Monet, Van Gogh, Gauguin, and Moreau and works by the next generation of artists, such as Marquet, Picasso, Soutin, Ernst, Miro, Dubuffet and Pollock.




Yokoyama Taikan Memorial Hall Permanent Exhibit

Yokoyama Taikan Memorial Hall Permanent Exhibit
at Yokoyama Taikan Memorial Hall (Ueno, Yanaka area)

Works, studies, sketches, ceramics, kimonos, artworks by friends, letters, bamboo crafts, and other belongings of Yokoyama Taikan are on display. Exhibits will change every three months. Closed during summer, winter, and rain season. May be closed in heavy snow or hurricane.




Zojoji Temple Treasures

(image)
Zojoji Temple Treasures
at Zojoji Temple (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)

Displaying the treasures of Zojoji Temple, with the highlight being a 1/10th-sized model of the Daiden Main Hall from the British Royal Collection.




Petzel at Nanzuka

(image)
Petzel at Nanzuka
at Nanzuka (Shibuya area)
(2017-11-23 - 2017-12-22)

Nanzuka and Petzel Gallery are pleased to present, Petzel at Nanzuka, a group exhibition featuring works by Simon Denny, Sarah Morris, Joyce Pensato, Seth Price, Dirk Skreber, Hiroki Tsukuda, and Nicola Tyson. Together, these seven artists investigate salient topics that pervade today’s society. The reinterpretation of images and the exploration of potential futures, combined with a variety of working methods, produce a diverse body of works that hope to individually reshape the current society that we live in today.




Tomoko “Blue bloom”

(image)
Tomoko “Blue bloom”
at Art Gallery Yamate (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2017-11-23 - 2017-11-28)