Subscribe: TAB Events - in the Musashino, Tama area
http://www.tokyoartbeat.com/list/feed/event_area_musashino_tama.en.rdf
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
art museum  art  exhibition  gallery  japanese  media  musashino  museum  shi tokyo  shi  tokyo media  tokyo  works   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: TAB Events - in the Musashino, Tama area

TAB Events - in the Musashino, Tama area





 



Masahide Kudo “I Have Been in the Forest”

(image)
Masahide Kudo “I Have Been in the Forest”
at Gallery Yume
4-15-2-101 Shimorenjaku, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-0013
Media: Painting
(2017-09-09 - 2017-09-24)

Oil painted fabrics exploring subconscious memories and events.




Minami Arai “Trace of an Act lll”

(image)
Minami Arai “Trace of an Act lll”
at TAV Gallery
1-31-2 Asagaya Kita, Suginami-ku, Tokyo 166-0001
Media: Sculpture - Party - Workshops
(2017-09-09 - 2017-09-24)

It has been three years since Minami Arai’s previous solo exhibition, “Trace of Writing,” curated by author Kyoichi Tsuzuki. This time around she will present her graduation work “Trace of an Act - The World behind Print” (2012), her postgraduate work “Trace of an Act ll - Expressing oneself in poetry” (2014), and her latest work in this series. [Related Event] Keita Ito x Isakari Mare: Exhibition Lighting Workshop - Different ways to look at and show artworks Event Date: Sep. 16 (Sat) 18:00-20:00 Admission: ¥1000 *Event in Japanese




Takuma Sano “WYSASSS”

(image)
Takuma Sano “WYSASSS”
at Circle / Gallery & Books
Yabology, 5119 Yaho, Kunitachi-shi, Tokyo 186-0011
Media: Architecture - Sculpture
(2017-09-08 - 2017-09-24)

An exhibition of contemporary architectural models, including Le Corbusier’s “Villa Savoye.”




Toshiro Hayashi + Etsuko Hayashi Exhibition

(image)
Toshiro Hayashi + Etsuko Hayashi Exhibition
at Plaza Gallery
104, 1-25-2 Sengawa-cho, Chofu-shi, Tokyo 182-0002
Media: Drawing - Ceramics
(2017-09-02 - 2017-09-24)




Anna Tsubaki “Women with Sake - Tsubaki and Sake: Director’s Cut”

(image)
Anna Tsubaki “Women with Sake - Tsubaki and Sake: Director’s Cut”
at Gallery Little High
464-2 4F Broadway Center, 5-52-15 Nakano, Nakano-ku, Tokyo 164-0001
Media: Illustration - Painting - Nihonga
(2017-09-15 - 2017-09-25)

Anna Tsubaki is a contemporary female ukiyo-e teacher who produces striking and highly original contemporary prints with a distinctive expression of modernity and Japanese culture. They feature three key themes they are namely, “Nippon,” a concept that harks by the Japan of the Edo era, rock, and eroticism. See her depictions of beautiful women, at times dashing and cool, at others mysterious and sexy, drunk on exquisite sake. Approximately 30 ukiyo-e works will be introduced, including those featuring her signature “kappa” girl.




Mie Ito “Morbidezza - the pursuit of flexibility”

(image)
Mie Ito “Morbidezza - the pursuit of flexibility”
at Niji Gallery
2-2-10 Kichijoji-Honcho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-0004
Media: Prints
(2017-09-21 - 2017-09-26)

Morbidezza is an Italian noun that refers to softness, or flexibility. Here Mie Ito will present studies for etchings of motifs such as jellyfish and ballet.




Julie Marie Duro “Looking for My Japanese Family”

(image)
Julie Marie Duro “Looking for My Japanese Family”
at Youkobo Art Space
Zempukuji 3-2-10, Suginami-ku, Tokyo 167-0041
Media: Photography - Video and Film
(2017-09-20 - 2017-09-28)

Julie Marie Duro was on a train in Japan when her mother explained how her grandfather, who died before she got the chance to really meet him, had had a son with a Japanese woman in the 1970s. Her mother doesn’t know her Japanese brother’s exact age or where he lives. She doesn’t even know his name. It is because of this that Duro began observing the faces of men in their forties who shared Japanese and European features, and started hearing an increasingly strong voice in her head saying, “This might be him!” Since the revelation, she has continued to wonder who her uncle is. What does he look like? What kind of life does he lead? Two years ago, while the cherry blossom started to bloom, she decided to look for him. The project, “Looking for my Japanese Family,” is actually composed of two chapters: “I am a cloud and Today” and “Autumn” - “Kyoaki” in Japanese. Venue: Studio 1




Keiichi Ito “Inside the tea bowl”

(image)
Keiichi Ito “Inside the tea bowl”
at Gallery Tosei
5-18-20 Chuo, Nakano-ku, Tokyo 164-0011
Media: Photography - Party
(2017-09-01 - 2017-09-30)




Yumi Iwasaki “At night”

(image)
Yumi Iwasaki “At night”
at Switch Point
4-12-4-1F Honcho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo 185-0012
Media: Painting
(2017-09-14 - 2017-09-30)




Butterflies and Ribbons ll

(image)
Butterflies and Ribbons ll
at Books & Gallery cafe Tentekido
2F, 1-10-3 Naka-cho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-0006
Media: Illustration - Painting - Prints - Product - Fashion - Crafts
(2017-09-20 - 2017-10-01)

Group exhibition where the works of various artists float together and intermingle. Artists: humming bird, MYSTIC, *PUKU*, Chiimalma+Kingyo, cheri.e moi, Spice-Hitosaji, otomeiro., Otomeya, Korisusha, chita coppe, Sami Kamiya, mamono




Hideyuki Nagasawa “Ghosts of the Future”

(image)
Hideyuki Nagasawa “Ghosts of the Future”
at Musashino Art University Museum & Library
1-736 Ogawacho, Kodaira-shi, Tokyo 187-8505
Media: Painting
(2017-09-04 - 2017-10-01)

Hideyuki Nagasawa’s touch, with countless dots of pigment covering the picture plane, melts the momentary perimeters into ambiguity and makes the distance between the present in which one stands and the past come to the fore. Painting a picture on the canvas, then randomly applies pigments upon it. In his work, we discover someone’s landscape, a landscape that is nowhere. This exhibition focuses on Hideyuki Nagasawa’s most recent paintings in introducing the work of this Musashino Art University professor who continues to contemplate the origins of painting.




Hiroyuki Oki “Sei sei ◯”

(image)
Hiroyuki Oki “Sei sei ◯”
at Art Center Ongoing
1-8-7 Kichijoji-Higashicho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-0002
Media: Installation - Video and Film
(2017-09-13 - 2017-10-01)

Hiroyuki Oki expresses his expansive thoughts and ideas frankly through video, installations and performances, producing distinctive and chaotic works with a live focus that overpowers viewers. In his third solo exhibition at Art Center Ongoing, Oki - for the first time - experiments with developing a dialog with the video works projected at the venue. The words and objects that come into being in this facing up to his video works create a new space with a fresh impression that departs from the past. Meanwhile, both the videos and the installation space will continue to evolve subject to their relationship with each other, allowing the form of the works to change day by day. Oki’s video work “Sei sei,” which is also the name of this exhibition, was filmed in Colombia in March 2017. Here he will draw out and reflect upon words such as “purification”, “creation,” “relief,” and “holiness” - which are all pronounced “seisei” in Japanese. Other video works featured include “M · I,” “Western breeze,” and “KenjiLow.”




Shin Miyazaki “The Earth Which Absorbs All Things”

(image)
Shin Miyazaki “The Earth Which Absorbs All Things”
at Tama Art University
1-33-1 Ochiai, Tama-shi, Tokyo 206-0033
Media: Painting - Drawing - Installation
(2017-07-15 - 2017-10-09)

After serving in the army during the Second World War and witnessing the absurdity of modern society first hand, Shin Miyazaki (b. 1922-) began to explore expressions of what is it to be human and to understand what life is through art. This practice has been directly informed by his experiences in a harsh Siberian detention center where he saw the damage and harm caused by the vortex of war up close. The university art museum previously held an exhibition introducing Miyazaki’s early works in 2009, titled “Wandering.” This time around it will show works produced in the 1990s and thereafter. You can see planar works as well as three-dimensional pieces, including numerous drawings and monotype prints that resonate with the artist’s energy, showing his personal regrets and scenes from the past, as well as expressions of the now.




Fumiaki Aono “Conversation Piece/Peace Part A”

(image)
Fumiaki Aono “Conversation Piece/Peace Part A”
at Kichijoji Art Museum
FF Bldg. 7F, 1-8-16 Kichijoji Hommachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-0004
Media: Sculpture - Talks
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-15)

Revival-themed sculpture and installation art created from scraps and objects damaged in the Great East Japan Earthquake tsunami.




Hideo Hagiwara “Cold Stone”

(image)
Hideo Hagiwara “Cold Stone”
at Kichijoji Art Museum
FF Bldg. 7F, 1-8-16 Kichijoji Hommachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-0004
Media: Graphics - Painting - Drawing
(2017-06-01 - 2017-10-15)

Hideo Hagiwara has been creating works featuring stone motifs since the 1960s. This series produced with a new self-developed double-sided printing invites the viewer into a cool, quiet world where the beauty of Hagiwara’s beloved stones can be fully enjoyed.




Yozo Hamaguchi “One Cherry, Many Cherries”

(image)
Yozo Hamaguchi “One Cherry, Many Cherries”
at Kichijoji Art Museum
FF Bldg. 7F, 1-8-16 Kichijoji Hommachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-0004
Media: Painting - Drawing
(2017-06-01 - 2017-10-15)

An exhibition of works by Yozo Hamaguchi featuring cherries, a major motif for the print artist. Rediscover the poetic beauty of Hamaguchi’s compositions skillfully combining vivid reds and numerical arrangements to evoke summer with its symbolic fruit.




Asuka Takamatsu “The Unreachable Place”

(image)
Asuka Takamatsu “The Unreachable Place”
at Mitaka City Gallery of Art
5F Koral, 3-35-1 Shimorenjaku, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-0013
Media: Painting
(2017-08-11 - 2017-10-22)

Asuka Takamatsu paints familiar surroundings and single scenes from films. Get swept up in the poetic power of her works at her first exhibition in Tokyo, presenting 164 paintings arranged in 27 groups.




Finnish design: Celebrating 100 years of independence

(image)
Finnish design: Celebrating 100 years of independence
at Fuchu Art Museum
Sengen-cho 1-3, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-0001
Media: Graphics - Illustration - Product - Crafts - Workshops - Talks
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-22)

There are many everyday items produced in Finland that are widely popular in Japan, such as Marimekko fabrics, tableware from Iittala and Arabia, and furniture by Alvar Aalto, to name but a few. They are pretty much a permanent fixture in the lives of Japanese people, though many here are not aware that these products are Finnish. So why do designs from Finland, which is so far away from Japan, capture the hearts of the Japanese? Well, at the heart of Finnish design is a philosophy that values “harmony between man and nature.” This does not simply refer to the use of natural materials, but to nature being at the center of design, as can be observed in Iittala’s Kastehelmi glassware, which is based on the image of water droplets. The Finnish view of nature - which respects the balance between people and nature - is rare in most Western countries, but resonates strongly with Japanese traditions. The sense that objects are designed to be used in the daily lives of all people is also key, with Kaj Franck’s dishes providing decorative fun for the dining table, and Marimekko’s dresses suiting everyone from baby girls to grandmas. It is through design that we can get a sense of Finnish lifestyles and how the Finnish value life. In this exhibition commemorating Finland’s 100 years of independence, you can see all manners of Finnish design, ranging from crafts produced at the end of the 19th century, to items made by leading present day designers. There will also be a program of mini workshops that you are invited to participate in.




Anders Edstrom ”Jan-Aug 2017”

(image)
Anders Edstrom ”Jan-Aug 2017”
at Amala
1-36-8 Kichijoji Honcho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-0004
Media: Photography
(2017-09-15 - 2017-10-28)

Swedish photographer Anders Edstrom moved to Paris in 1990 and began working with fashion designer Martin Margiela. He later shot for magazines such as “Self Service,” “Dazed & Confused,” “Index,” and “Dune.” This exhibition presents six works from his new collage series combining 31 images photographed between January and August 2017. These works demonstrate the same remarkable visual language Endstrom shows in the internationally acclaimed film he recently directed.




Kenshichi Heshiki “Okinawa, My Love”

(image)
Kenshichi Heshiki “Okinawa, My Love”
at Shadai Gallery, Tokyo Institute of Polytechnics
2-4-7 Honcho, Nakano-ku, Tokyo 164-8678
Media: Photography
(2017-09-04 - 2017-10-29)

Born during the U.S. occupation, Kenshichi Heshiki (1948–2009) dedicated his life to photographing his homeland of Okinawa. His internationally acclaimed work received Nikon Salon’s 33rd Ina Nobuo Award and has been featured at shows including the 2015 exhibition “For a New World to Come: Experiments in Japanese Art and Photography, 1968–1979” at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Heshiki attended the then-newly founded Tokyo Institute of Polytechnics (Shadai) from 1967. Keeping his work focused on Okinawa, he captured life on the islands, including images of its families, street scenes, prostitution, and poverty. Throughout his career he remained concerned with how Okinawa should be recorded on film. This exhibition presents photographs from his life’s work “Yagi no Hai” (Goat’s Lung), a collection published in 2007, plus works from his series “Nanto Ryo” (Nanto Dorm) documenting Okinawan-born students at the Komae, Tokyo dorm during the 1970s and 1980s.




The Picture Books of Yosuke Inoue

(image)
The Picture Books of Yosuke Inoue
at Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo
4-7-2 Shimo Shakujii, Nerima-ku, Tokyo 177-0042
Media: Graphics - Illustration
(2017-08-24 - 2017-11-05)

For its third 40th anniversary exhibition, Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo showcases the work of picture book creator, manga artist, and illustrator Yosuke Inoue. Focusing on picture books such as his first publication “Odango Gopan” (Dango Rice) and “Kuma no ko Ufu” (Oof, the Bear Cub), it also introduces his and manga art and other works. Enjoy Inoue’s original world of whimsical humor in wonderfully impressive illustrations.




The Poetry of Chihiro: Pictures Like Poems

(image)
The Poetry of Chihiro: Pictures Like Poems
at Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo
4-7-2 Shimo Shakujii, Nerima-ku, Tokyo 177-0042
Media: Illustration - Drawing - Talks
(2017-08-24 - 2017-11-05)

Known for liking fairy tales that are “short, beautiful, and called to mind a range of images, like poetry does,” Chihiro Iwasaki developed her own unique method of picture book expression through a series of publications that were referred to as “feeling picture books,” such as the title, “Kotori no Kuruhi (The Pretty Bird).” From a young age she was a fan of “Manyoshu,” the oldest existing collection of Japanese poetry, and the poems of Kenji Miyazawa. Through this exhibition - the third exhibition held in commemoration of the museum’s 40th anniversary - you can explore the sensibilities behind the overflowing poetic charm that infuses Chihiro’s illustrations. [Related Events] Gallery Talk by Takeshi Matsumoto Chiriro’s son Takeshi Matsumoto will share stories surrounding some of his mother’s works. Event Date: Sep. 3 (Sun) 14:00- Speaker: Takeshi Matsumoto (special adviser to Chihiro Art Museum Tokyo, Chair of Picture Book Association) Admission: Free Gallery Talk Hear about exhibition highlights as you walk around the gallery. Event Date: Every 1st and 3rd Saturday, 14:00- *Events in Japanese




Where is Your Ceramic?

(image)
Where is Your Ceramic?
at Musashino Art University Museum & Library
1-736 Ogawacho, Kodaira-shi, Tokyo 187-8505
Media: Ceramics
(2017-09-04 - 2017-11-11)

This exhibition presents selected works from Musashino Art University’s collection of over 400 ceramics, which covers wide-ranging periods and regions, including Jomon ware, Scandinavian ceramics, and folk art vessels along with 3D data and high-resolution images. Using the latest technology, this exhibition explores newly revealed, fascinating aspects of MAU’s ceramics collection intended for educational purposes.




100 Years of Japanese Animation Part 1: Song, Dance, and Aikatsu Stars!

(image)
100 Years of Japanese Animation Part 1: Song, Dance, and Aikatsu Stars!
at Suginami Animation Museum
Suginami Kaikan 3F, 3-29-5 Kamiogi, Suginami-ku, Tokyo 167-0043
Media: Manga - Video and Film - Animation - Sound - Workshops
(2017-09-06 - 2018-01-14)

2017 marks the 100th anniversary of animation in Japan. To celebrate the occasion, Suginami Animation Museum presents a two-part song and dance-themed tribute to the art form. Part 1 looks back on the history of song and dance in Japanese anime through epoch-making works and the culture and eras they came out of. It also introduces the latest from “Aikatsu Stars!,” a five year-old series loved by children and adults alike. From memory-making blockbusters to new-to-you series, experience the wonderful world of Japanese animation through sight and sound. Please see the official website for information on related events.




Delicious! Animating Memorable Meals

(image)
Delicious! Animating Memorable Meals
at Ghibli Museum, Mitaka
The West Park of Inokashira Park, 1-1-83 Shimorenjaku, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-0013
Media: Illustration - Animation
(2017-05-28 - 2018-05-01)

Studio Ghibli films are renowned for depicting daily life in great detail. What often lingers in the memory of viewers are scenes of food and meals: Pazu and Sheeta sharing a fried egg on toast in “Castle in the Sky,” Chihiro shedding tears of relief while eating a rice ball received from Haku in “Spirited Away,” Howl frying up bacon and eggs for Sophie, Markl and everyone in “Howl’s Moving Castle,” the list goes on… The foods that appear are not particularly special, often being rather common, but their appearance in the films always has special meaning. Pazu and Sheeta’s hearts connect when they share the same food. The courage to face her challenges blooms in Chihiro as she eats the rice ball. Around the dining table a family forms while everyone enjoys bacon and eggs in “Howl’s Moving Castle.” Scenes of casual meals are infused with tremendous storytelling importance, and achieving dramatic effect while creating delicious-looking meals and characters enjoying them - show in their expressions and gestures - comes from the power of finely detailed drawing. Food that is still warm, that looks soft and tender, with the wonderful flavor showing on the faces of those eating them - these scenes of meals are appealing and charming. No dialogue is needed to convey deliciousness and happiness. This exhibition introduces how food can be drawn to appear even more delectable than the real thing, creating scenes of joy.




Jins Art Project

(image)
Jins Art Project
at Jins Kichijoji Daiyagai
1-8-1 Kichijoji Honcho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-0004
Media: Painting

Two fresh, bold works by the cutting-edge artist Taro Izumi that express the relationship between eyeglasses and vision from new points of view are displayed on the second floor of Jins Kichijoji Daiyagai, a gallery brimming with concepts and ideas that only Jins could come up with. [Image: Taro Izumi “Wink Lion” (2013) crayon on paper and wood panel 83.5×153.7 cm]




Permanent Collection

(image)
Permanent Collection
at Murauchi Art Museum
787 Sanyumachi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0012
Media: Painting

Murauchi Art Museum holds western paintings with an emphasis on works by the Barbizon painters in the 19th century. Works of Impressionist painters and modern artists are also contained in the collection. [Image: Jean-François Millet "Antoinette Hebert looking herself in the Mirror" (1844-45) Oil on canvas 98.0 x 78.0cm]




Yasuyoshi Tokida “Piece”

(image)
Yasuyoshi Tokida “Piece”
at Gallery Satoru
B1F, 1-2-6 Gotenyama, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-0005
Media: Painting - Party
(2017-09-23 - 2017-10-08)