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Preview: TAB Events - in category Screen: Film

TAB Events - in category Screen: Video and Film





 



Benjamin Breitkopf “Uncomfortable Couples“

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Benjamin Breitkopf “Uncomfortable Couples“
at ARTnSHELTER (Tokyo: Others area)
(2017-11-21 - 2017-11-22)

“Uncomfortable Couples“ is a photography exhibition financed by ARTnSHELTER and will last for two days. Most the work is so far unpublished and newly arranged in pairs. Documentation of the cinematic essay “Once You Have No Horse, Then You Do Not Know The Way“ will also be projected. Benjamin Breitkopf is together with Trond Ansten the grand-prize winner of the Canon Cosmos of New Photography award. Their work was shown at the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum through November 19th, 2017. On the opening night of this exhibition, the Brazilian poet and singer “Cursed Corndog“ will make an appearance. Her words reflect the state of our zeitgeist as well as an imagined future where utopia is a possibility.




Shujiro Murayama “Art and Communication Through Plants”

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Shujiro Murayama “Art and Communication Through Plants”
at 3331 Arts Chiyoda (Chiyoda area)
(2017-10-20 - 2017-11-22)

The Tohoku artist Shujiro Murayama has done plant-focused art projects centered on local environments and the people who live there. In this show he looks at how people in the city communicate with nature through his original “green paintings” and photography and film about his projects.




Shinya Yao “Chorus”

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Shinya Yao “Chorus”
at Musée F (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-11-20 - 2017-11-25)

These works question the relationship between photography, moving images, time, and memory.




Strand of katharsis 2nd season

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Strand of katharsis 2nd season
at Sezon Art Gallery (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-10-01 - 2017-11-25)

Presenting works by artists working in video and a variety of other media. Venue: Art Gallery B1F, Cafe Dining Bar 367°




Arcus Project 2017 Ibaraki Open Studios

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Arcus Project 2017 Ibaraki Open Studios
at ARCUS Studio (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-11-22 - 2017-11-26)

On Nov. 22–Nov. 26, Arcus Project in Moriya, Ibaraki holds open studios for these 2017 artists-in-residence: Julieta Aguinaco & Sarah Demoen, Daniel Nicolae Djamo, and Curtis Tamm. The artists will share the processes and results of what they have been working on since their arrival for this 110-day residency. [Special Programs by Artists] ■Julieta Aguinaco & Sarah Demoen ‘Facing the Earth. Facing Information. Facing our Lives.’ Lecture performance Date and Time: Nov. 22 (Web)16:30-17:00, 23(Thu) 15:30-16:00, 24(Fri)16:30-17:00, 25(Sat), 26(Sun) 15:00-15:30 Venue: ARCUS Studio Studio 1 Admission: Free Entry ■Daniel Nicolae Djamo ‘Selling hopes’ Date and Time: Nov. 23 (Thu) 18:00-19:00, 25(Sat) 15:30-16:30 Venue: ARCUS Studio 2nd Floor Admission: Free Entry ■Curtis Tamm ‘Center for Cellular Alignment’ Venue: ARCUS Studio, Studio 3 Capacity: 1 person or 1 group/20min Admission: Free *Booking Required [Related Event] 1. Artist Talks × Kenichi Kondo Date and Time: Nov. 23 (Thu) 16:30-18:00 2. Studio Talk × Fumio Nanjo(ARCUS Project Adviser/Director, Mori Art Museum) Date and Time: Nov. 25 (Sat) 16:30-18:00 Venue: ARCUS Studio Admission: Free Entry 3. Free Shuttle Bus service from Tokyo Date and Time: Nov. 25 (Sat) 14:00[Departure from Yaesu Exit, Tokyo station]→15:30[Arrival at ARCUS Studio, Moriya Manabi-no-sato] Admission: Free Capacity: 40 seats ※Booking required 4. Soba Party Date and Time: Nov. 25 (Sat) 18:00-19:00 ※Booking and admission charge (¥500) 5. Studio Guided Tour by Resident Artists Date and Time: Nov. 26 (Sun) 14:00-15:30 6. Open Discussion ‘March 11 and Ibaraki, Examined with Art : 2011-2017’ Date and Time: Nov. 26 (Sun) 16:00-18:00 Speakers: Yuu Takehisa(Curator, Contemporary Art Center, Art Tower Mito), Tohru Nakazaki(Artist), Gojing-Maru Hayashi(Artist) Moderator: Kenichi Kondo(ARCUS Project Guest Curator 2017) Film Screening Date and Time: Nov. 22 (Wed)-26 (Sun) 13:00 - 19:00 Artists: Alicia Framis, Meiro Koizumi, Song Ming Ang, Wojciech Gilewicz, Basir Mahmood, and Stephanie Bickford-Smith Admission: Free Entry *Please see the official website for further details.




Haitian Art Exhibition

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Haitian Art Exhibition
at Kawasaki City Museum (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2017-09-02 - 2017-11-26)

Art from the Caribbean island nation of Haiti reflects the country’s beautiful natural setting, French colonial influence, and unique Hatian culture. With its vivid tropical colors, depictions of anthropomorphized animals, fantastic landscapes, and voodoo influence, Haitian art has attracted the interest of artists like leading Surrealist André Breton (1896-1966) and won international acclaim. Kawasaki City Museum showcases examples of Haiti’s vibrant art. [Events] Guided exhibition tour Date: Oct. 21 (Sat) 14:00–15:00 Family exhibition tour Date: Nov. 11 (Sat) 11:00–11:45 In Japanese. Please see the official website for reservations and details.




Impurity / Immunity

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Impurity / Immunity
at Tokyo Arts and Space Hongo (Chiyoda area)
(2017-10-14 - 2017-11-26)

“Impurity / Immunity” is a project that confronts the current era. In order to explore “coexistence” in contemporary society, which seems to be getting increasingly complex and chaotic, this exhibition introduces two concepts: “impurity” and “immunity.” Italian philosopher Roberto Esposito has described the conditions of a civilization whose people attempt to protect their own “identities” and “purities” to the extent that they end up causing their own extinction. Events such as 9.11 and the behavior of the Nazi Germany can in this way be referred to as such, and understood as a form of “auto-immunization. This said, there is the potential for anything to come into conflict with a particular immune system and become known as an “impurity.” In this sense, “coexistence” is characterized by a continuous tension between impurity and immunity.




Yuichiro Tamura “Essay: Glory and the End, or that Weekend / Week End”

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Yuichiro Tamura “Essay: Glory and the End, or that Weekend / Week End”
at Oyama City Kurumaya Museum of Art (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-09-23 - 2017-11-26)

Yuichiro Tamura and Hiroyuki Hattori have been traveling to Oyama City regularly for the last year, making observations and developing a dialog. During this process, Hattori took an interest in the Oyama City Kurumaya Museum of Art’s unique sense of scale, as well as it’s potential as a public facility, where the boundary between the public and the private are eroded. Meanwhile, Tamura singled out the Nissan Gloria vehicle used by the museum as a thing of interest. This car was once a symbol of abundance in the period of high economic growth during the post-war years, but now it seems that it cuts through the present and future situation of this regional art museum. This exhibition is a chance to think about how we can live better in the years to come. [Related Event] Opening Ceremony: Gallery Tour by the Curator and Artists Event Date: Sep. 23 (Sat) 14:00- Venue: Oyama City Kurumaya Museum of Art *Event in Japanese




Takashi Suzuki “Human Catcher”

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Takashi Suzuki “Human Catcher”
at Kana Kawanishi Gallery (Kiyosumi, Ryogoku area)
(2017-10-14 - 2017-12-02)

Takashi Suzuki ​has been ​focusing ​on ​the “unconscious ​behaviors ​of ​humans,” ​​researching ​and creating ​artworks ​around ​this ​theme since ​his ​undergraduate ​days. ​​Behavior related to addiction, ​which ​according to ​the artist ​is ​“something ​that ​humans ​do ​unconsciously ​and ​without ​being ​told, ​even ​though ​unnecessary ​for living,” ​connotes something ​that ​exceeds ​the ​consciousness ​and ​preconscious ​of ​humans yet works to ​continuously ​attract ​viewers. In ​his ​master’s ​thesis ​titled, ​“​Research ​on ​Extracting ​Addiction ​Induction ​Elements,” Suzuki ​verified aspects ​that induce ​behaviors associated with ​human ​addiction from ​various perspectives using ​experiments. In ​one ​experiment where ​he ​measured ​the stress levels ​of participants in ​captivity, ​the results showed ​that ​stress was ​considerably lower ​when ​participants ​set ​personal ​rules, ​such ​as ​“I ​would ​do ​xxx ​if ​it ​would ​xxx.” ​In ​other ​experiments, he ​also ​found ​that ​“unstable ​conditions,” i.e. conditions ​that ​evoke ​danger, ​and ​“conditions ​that ​prove the ​irreversibility of time,” i.e. conditions where ​viewers could ​see ​that time ​had ​passed, ​would ​also ​appeal to the subconscious of participants. ​Suzuki’s artworks condense ​his ​research ​on attracting humans at the level of subconsciousness.




Kawasaki History

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Kawasaki History
at Kawasaki City Museum (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2017-08-11 - 2017-12-03)

Exhibition introducing Kawasaki during in the Showa years (1926-1989) through materials such as maps, news reels and a diorama of the area in front of Kawasaki Station.




Masuo Ikeda × Chiaki Shuji “Dance of Autumn Color”

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Masuo Ikeda × Chiaki Shuji “Dance of Autumn Color”
at Park Hotel Tokyo (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-08-28 - 2017-12-03)

This exhibition featuring the work of colorists (color artists) Masuo Ikeda and Chiaki Shuji expresses vibrant autumn colors. At the entrance on the 25th floor, you’ll be greeted with a six-panel folding screen by Ikeda, and can enjoy the contrast with the colorful works of Shuji that decorate the opposite wall. At the second exhibition venue, located in the elevator hall and Gallery Room on the 31st floor, you’ll see Shuji’s dancing watercolors, while in the six windows of the corridor, lithographs with Ikeda’s vivid colorings will be exhibited. The collaboration work produced by these two artists, which will be exhibited at the atrium style lobby and the winding corridor on 31st floor, will allow you feel the splendor of the changing seasons. Enjoy the beauty of Japan in the sunshine and beneath the moonlight.




Film Class of 2017: Exploring Colors

Film Class of 2017: Exploring Colors
at National Film Center (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2017-10-11 - 2017-12-06)

The Film Class program screens important works from the Film Center’s collection that offer valuable lessons in cinematic arts and film preservation. This year’s class explores color in film: the creative methods employed by technicians pursuing ideal colors and the technology that made their work possible. Looking at animation, documentary footage, and other examples of films using domestically produced coloring from Japan’s golden age of color film, this five-session event invites researchers to talk about what makes the color in each of these diverse works so special. Come learn the basics of film. [Screenings] Dates: Oct. 11 (Wed), Oct. 25 (Wed), Nov. 8 (Wed), Nov. 22 (Wed), Dec. 6 (Wed) All screenings from 19:20. Doors open at 19:00. Film researchers will speak for 15 minutes at each screening. In Japanese. Please see the official website for details.




Diego Cirulli “The Thickness of Silence”

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Diego Cirulli “The Thickness of Silence”
at 104Galerie (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-10-07 - 2017-12-10)

Diego Cirulli makes art focusing on historical, political and societal conflict, dealing with topics such as inequality, childhood, gender identity, the complexities of his country’s present, and its recent past. He also works as a stage producer in the scenography department of the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, which, along with Theatre National de l’Opera de Paris and Teatro alla Scala, is one of the three major opera companies in the world. He expands and crosses into new fields of work, such as the contemporary dance company Animales Danza Teatro, where he is the artistic advisor, designer and scenography producer, and Kalos, his own workshop, where he works both as a director and as an art/art history instructor.His highly praised work has received various awards, including First Prize for Painting, Salón ‘Palermo Viejo’ (2011). This exhibition, Cirulli’s first in Japan, presents approximately 25 paintings on canvas, 10 drawings, two sculptures, and a three-dimensional audio-visual installation using virtual reality. As an experienced director of theater production and stage designer, Cirulli’s unique approach to the space and his inspiration are also in focus. An opening reception with the artist is due to be held at 18:00 on Saturday, October 7th. In addition, a few events conducted by Cirulli himself are being planned. The details of these events will be posted on the gallery website.




Jean-Pierre Melville: Cinéaste du Noir

Jean-Pierre Melville: Cinéaste du Noir
at National Film Center (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2017-09-26 - 2017-12-10)

The name of film director Jean-Pierre Melville shines with a special brightness in French film history. Having devoted himself to American films in his youth, he made his debut with the feature length independent film Le Silence de la Mer (1949) without any training as a film director whatsoever. Melville came to prominence when he was commissioned to direct Les Enfants Terribles (1950) by Jean Cocteau, who wrote the original novel. His independent spirit was loved and respected by young Nouvelle Vague filmmakers. He gradually gained recognition as a great director of film noir, and built up his reputation in French cinema with hard-boiled crime films such as Le Doulos [The Finger Man] (1962), Le Deuxième Souffle [Second Breath] (1966), Le Samouraï [The Godson] (1967), and Le Cercle Rouge [The Red Circle] (1970), as well as the big budget war film Army of Shadows (1969), based on his own experiences in the Resistance. Notably, it is not too much of a stretch to say that two major film stars, Jean-Paul Belmondo and Alain Delon, broke new ground with Melville’s films. Depicting complicated human beings who have both good and evil sides, and weaving men’s ties of friendship and betrayal into drama, Melville also had a strong influence on Asian films including those from Japan. To commemorate Melville’s centenary in 2017, NFC is looking back at his distinguished life and achievements by showing materials mainly collected over a period of many years by film director Olivier Bohler, who made the documentary “Code Name Melville” (2008).




Reborn-Art festival Tokyo exhibition: What went on?

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Reborn-Art festival Tokyo exhibition: What went on?
at Watari-um, The Watari Museum of Contemporary Art (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-10-20 - 2017-12-10)

This exhibition revisits Reborn-Art Festival, a brand new art, music, and food focused event that was held this summer at locations throughout Ishinomaki city center and Oshika Peninsula in Tohoku. Scheduled at a time when Tohoku is going through a dramatic period of rebirth, those visiting the festival had the unique opportunity to encounter new people and ideas that wouldn’t be found anywhere else in Japan. Here, visitors had the chance to discover a new aspect of themselves that they had not yet glimpsed. In this way, the event was not just about the reconstruction of the Tohoku region, but also a festival that offered visitors a chance to be reborn. This exhibition will present works and documentation that were exhibited at Reborn-Art Festival 2017, giving those who could not attend the event another opportunity to enjoy the work that was on offer there.




Mika Tajima “Touchless”

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Mika Tajima “Touchless”
at Taro Nasu (Bakurocho area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-16)

New installation art, video, and sculpture by Mika Tajima, an artist who focuses on how technology is intimately involved in our lives. Through explorations of the human and the artificial, her practice considers the environments and societies people create themselves.




Moon & Jeon “Freedom Village”

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Moon & Jeon “Freedom Village”
at SCAI The Bathhouse (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-16)

The exhibition is comprised of photographic documentation of the village taken by the residents, a black and white film and several pieces of single-channel video and sculpture installation. The main film interweaves footage of a technical laboratory with newsreel footage from the Korean War. A nod to Bertold Brecht’s ‘Verfremdungseffekt’ (alienation effect), it challenges the spectators’ ability to contemplate in a detached and critical manner. The artists write about the exhibition: “We attempt to come to terms with the paradoxes and limitations that surround us in our world by summoning the ghost of our past, through the village where time has stood still for 60 years.” With the ongoing conflicts in the Korean Peninsula, the exhibition considers the constraint of political systems that devalue and rule our everyday lives, and elicits emotional awareness. The artists believe that political systems are essentially built upon human actions and predictions, and for that matter, create an archive of incidental value judgments. Through their documentary and fictitious interventions, Moon & Jeon navigate our imagination through the emotional capacities of the political present, where the recognition of our future is demystified by expanding a horizon of visual and narrative possibilities.




From the Taguchi Art Collection: Richard Mosse and Maria Taniguchi

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From the Taguchi Art Collection: Richard Mosse and Maria Taniguchi
at Museum of Modern Art, Gunma (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-09-16 - 2017-12-17)

Exhibiting works by two young practicing artists featured in the Taguchi Collection, one of Japan’s leading contemporary art collections. The Irish photographer Richard Mosse (b. 1980) works with military-developed infrared film and is known for his photographs from civil conflicts in Africa and immigrant migrations from Africa to Europe. His work was featured at the 2013 Venice Biennale. Photographs from his series “Infra,” “Heat Maps,” and “Infra” are on display. Filipino artist Maria Taniguchi (b. 1981) received the 2015 Hugo Boss Asia Art Award for her genre-spanning practice that includes sculpture, installation art, video monitor pieces, and the “Brick Painting” series of modular brick-like motifs on large canvases. This exhibition presents Taniguchi’s paintings and video art from the Taguchi Collection along with new sculptures she presented at a Tokyo exhibition this April.




Newspace

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Newspace
at Waitingroom (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2017-11-18 - 2017-12-17)

The first exhibition in Waitingroom’s new space after moving from Ebisu to Bunkyo presents works by Yuki Iiyama, Nobuaki Itoh, Rikako Kawauchi, Naho Kawabe, Yusuke Shibata, Koichiro Takesue, Masaya Nakahara, Yuichi Hirako, Saori Miyake, Shoko Morita, and a new artist, Saya Okubo, who will have her first solo exhibition at the gallery in February 2018. Several artists are showing brand new works specifically made for this exhibition, Waitingroom’s largest group show to date. Others present works on view for the first time in Tokyo. These artists actively seek new ideas and concepts with their own distinctive perspectives and expressions. Waitingroom is excited to introduce their works at this new space marking new beginnings for the artists and the gallery.




Shinkai Makoto “From “Voices of a Distant Star” to “Your Name””

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Shinkai Makoto “From “Voices of a Distant Star” to “Your Name””
at The National Art Center, Tokyo (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-18)

This exhibition presenting a range of works by Makoto Shinkai, from “Voices of a Distant Star” to “Your Name,” marks the 10th anniversary of The National Art Center, Tokyo. Shinkai debuted commercially with his short film “Voices of a Distant Star” in 2002. Since then, he has spent the last 15 years producing refined “stories of a man and a woman who cross their paths in a beautiful and magnificent world,” receiving widespread attention from audiences across the board. Shinkai’s journey will be introduced here through his production materials, such as storyboards, plannings, drawings, arts, and visual images, as well as other objects that enable visitors to experience his world. This is an opportunity to enjoy an in depth experience of Shinkai’s charming animations. “Voices of a Distant Star” marks his first self-production, while “The place promised in our early days” - which received the Mainichi Film Concours Award - can be considered his first feature length work produced with a professional team. Other key titles include “5 Centimeters Per Second,” which remains popular to this day, the young adult fantasy film “Children Who Chase Lost Voices,” “The Garden of Words,” which tells a story of visual literature in the digital era, and “your name,” which celebrated record-breaking success right after its release last year.




Tomoki Imai Exhibition

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Tomoki Imai Exhibition
at Taka Ishii Gallery Photography/Film (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-18 - 2017-12-22)

This exhibition by Tomoki Imai, which will be his third solo show at the gallery, and his first there in four years, will feature 13 works all shot after 2014. Throughout his career, Imai has used the medium of photography to earnestly examine what it means to see. Looking daily at the world in front of us, he captures subjects that exert an irresistible presence and naturally draw the eye. At the same time, he carefully and consistently considers the gaps between what is visible and what becomes so; the conscious and unconscious; and the perspectives of the self and other, to come to terms with his relation to his subjects in each place and time. Following his representative series “Mahiru - In the Middle of the Day” (2001) and “Light and Gravity” (2009), Imai has continued to train his gaze on everyday landscapes in his new works. His gaze remains strong, but has grown more intimate. He photographs scenes that might otherwise be overlooked, capturing them as if he was carefully scooping them up to save them from oblivion. The title of the exhibition, “Remains to be seen,” suggests Imai’s desire to devote his gaze to the trivial and commonplace, his collection of things that suggest potential comprehension but remains incomprehensible, and his search for a place for those scenes within his memory. His gaze, which aims to not only understand that which is visible, but also see through and grasp all of the time and memory accumulated within his subjects, arouses viewers’ memories and presents a universal experience of seeing.




Animation Cabin Vol. 4: Masterpiece Contemporary Shorts From Italy

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Animation Cabin Vol. 4: Masterpiece Contemporary Shorts From Italy
at Au Praxinoscope (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2017-09-15 - 2017-12-23)

Screening outstanding contemporary short animations from Italy: “Muto” (2008) by Blu, “La Piccola Russia” (2004) by Gianluigi Toccafondo, La Funambola (2002) by Roberto Catani, “Come Persone” (1995) by Ursula Ferrara, “Invacca” (2008) by Stefano Ricci, and “Cosmoetico” (2015) by Martina Scarpelli. [Screening Times] 13:00–13:37 14:00–14:37 15:00–15:37 16:00–16:37 17:00–17:37 18:00–18:37




Haikara-san ga Toru (Mademoiselle Anne):” Taisho Girls & The World of Waki Yamato!

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Haikara-san ga Toru (Mademoiselle Anne):” Taisho Girls & The World of Waki Yamato!
at Yayoi Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2017-09-29 - 2017-12-24)

Girls who ride pushbikes and wear patterned kimonos with traditional hakama, lace-up boots, and big bows in their hair… This is the adorably cute “hakama” style that was popular with young women during the Meiji (1868-1912) and Taisho (1912-1926) eras, when fashion in Japan was transitioning from traditional modes to Western trends. The “hakama” style was later brought back into the spotlight by manga artist Waki Yamato, with the release of his hit work “Haikara-san ga Toru (Mademoiselle Anne)” (1975) which was awarded the 1st Kodansha Manga Award. This exhibition will introduce original artwork from “Mademoiselle Anne,” as well as ephemera related the culture of girlhood enjoyed by female students and young working women of the Taisho and early Showa eras. There will also be roughly 200 other works by Yamato, including those from the early part of his career and masterpieces from titles such as “The Tale of Genji,” “Yokohama Monogatari” and “The Daughter of Ishtar.” [Related Events] Screening: “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” Event Date: Nov. 3 (Fri) 17:40-19:00 Venue: 1F Exhibition Room, Yayoi Museum Speaker: Nanako Yamauchi (narrator), Ayumi Kamiya (piano) Capacity: 60 Admission: Adults ¥1500, Students ¥1400 (inc. exhibition admission) *Please see the official website for booking.




Junpei Nousaku Exhibition

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Junpei Nousaku Exhibition
at Prismic Gallery (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-24)

Show presenting various models, drawings, and video works produced by Junpei Nousaku for his architectural projects planned over the last eight years. A talk event will also be scheduled during the exhibition period.




“The Doraemon Exhibition Tokyo 2017”

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“The Doraemon Exhibition Tokyo 2017”
at Mori Arts Center Gallery (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-01 - 2018-01-08)

Organized under the concept “Create Your Own Original Doraemon,” this exhibition brings together 28 artists and artist groups who will present their unique artworks capturing memories of the popular Japanese manga series, “Doraemon.” Since its birth in 1970, “Doraemon” has been capturing the imagination of audiences across Japan. There are also a great number of “Doraemon” fans among globally renowned artists who have been touched and inspired by this long-running manga. How exciting it is to see these artists expressing their feelings and memories of Doraemon through their work? This exhibition invites you to share in this special moment when “art” and “Doraemon” come together. [Artists] Makoto Aida, Kayo Ume, Motohiko Odani, Ryota Kuwakubo, Tomoko Konoike, Akinori Goto, Satomi Kondo, Tomoyoshi Sakamoto, Masaharu Sato, ShiShi Yamazaki, Ai Shinohara, Kotobuki Shiriagari, Yuta Nakazato, Suito Nakatsuka, Yoshitomo Nara, Yasuyuki Nishio, Mika Ninagawa, Miran Fukuda, Sebastian Masuda, Kumi Machida, Mr., Takashi Murakami, Yasumasa Morimura+Junko Koike, Akira Yamaguchi, Hidenori Yamaguchi + Wataru Ito, Ryuki Yamamoto, RenaRena, Nozomi Watanabe




100 Years of Japanese Animation Part 1: Song, Dance, and Aikatsu Stars!

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100 Years of Japanese Animation Part 1: Song, Dance, and Aikatsu Stars!
at Suginami Animation Museum (Musashino, Tama area)
(2017-09-06 - 2018-01-14)

2017 marks the 100th anniversary of animation in Japan. To celebrate the occasion, Suginami Animation Museum presents a two-part song and dance-themed tribute to the art form. Part 1 looks back on the history of song and dance in Japanese anime through epoch-making works and the culture and eras they came out of. It also introduces the latest from “Aikatsu Stars!,” a five year-old series loved by children and adults alike. From memory-making blockbusters to new-to-you series, experience the wonderful world of Japanese animation through sight and sound. Please see the official website for information on related events.




Decoration Never Dies, Anyway

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Decoration Never Dies, Anyway
at Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-11-18 - 2018-02-25)

This decoration-focused exhibition features seven artists whom are all different in age, nationality, and genre. The means of expression they employ are diverse, including a trailer adorned with Gothic decoration, carpets that mix together patterns derived from various cultural spheres, and paintings that through the façade of windows imagines the life and personalities of the people who live there. In their works the artists juxtapose entirely different epochs and values, imagine worlds that do not actually exist, and attempt to interpret the concept of “decoration” as it exists in the context of daily life. In observing their endeavors, we as viewers recognize that the act of decoration is indeed the essential key to perceiving the vivid and complex reality that inextricably surrounds us. After all, “Decoration never dies, anyway.” [Related Events] Artist Talk On 18 November, Sat. 13:00− Short presentation by participating artists (with simultaneous interpreting English-Japanese) Venue: Annex Gallery 2, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum Seating capacity: 120 Pre-registration required (available on TTM website from 18 Oct.) Free with museum admission




Yang Fudong “The Coloured Sky: New Women II”
Yang Fudong “The Coloured Sky: New Women II” at Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo (Omotesando, Aoyama area) (2017-10-18 - 2018-03-11) Produced and conceived under the artistic direction of the Fondation Louis Vuitton, this exhibition of Chinese artist Yang Fudong is part of the “Hors-les-murs” program, showcasing previously unseen holdings of the Collection at the Espaces Culturels Louis Vuitton in Tokyo, Munich, Beijing and Venice. Since the early 1990s, Yang Fudong has been examining the complexities of contemporary Chinese society from a symbolic, detached perspective through his art form. Formally trained as a painter, Fudong has developed an extensive body of work comprised of videos, films, installations and photographs; consistently creating a visual language enveloped in a dream-like mystery. Favoring multi-screen video projections, Fudong creates an experience that immerses the viewer. His characters, deliberately silent and disembodied, move according to choreographed gestures, always managing to transport the viewer into an aesthetically perfect environment. Often drawing stylistically on different periods in Chinese and Western cinema - as well as taking inspiration from Shanghai in the 1930s, and the landscape tradition rooted in Chinese art history - Fudong creates open-ended, existential narratives that interweave quotidian ritual with dream-like states. With a consciously romantic framework that is simultaneously contemporary and out-of-date, Fudong examines China through the eyes of young urban intellectuals as they grapple with their place in the modern world. He effortlessly references China’s cultural traditions, whilst making close observations of what makes these narratives relevant to contemporary society. The resulting timeless stories plunge viewers into an otherworldly, nostalgic atmosphere in which a generation that exists between modernity and tradition explores and questions the world. The Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo invites the public to discover this now major figure in Chinese contemporary art and cinema, through the presentation of a poetic work, “The Coloured Sky: New Women II” (2014), which belongs to the Fondation Louis Vuitton Collection. Fudong usually creates works on 35mm black and white film; this five-channel video installation marks an aesthetic departure from his signature style, through the overwhelming use of vivid color - the first color film of the artist’s oeuvre. Portraying an artificial brightly colored world, the film depicts five young women, naïve and seductive, wearing vintage swimwear on a deliberately synthetic beachfront setting. Filmed in slow-motion against sounds of laughter, sighs, ocean rumbles and cricket song, they play a game of seduction. Five screens depict images of the sun, the sea, the beach, games, food and references to Western art interspersed with the appearances of a horse and a stag. One real, the other stuffed, the animals refer to a Chinese political story from 3rd century B.C., referring to the proverb, “point to a deer and call it a horse,” connoting a moral play on what is true and what is false. “The Coloured Sky: New Women II” epitomizes Fudong’s artistic tendency to stylistically referencing different periods in both Chinese and Western cinema and culture. [...]



Art is Science Ⅱ

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Art is Science Ⅱ
at Karuizawa New Art Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-10-07 - 2018-03-31)

This summer, Karuizawa New Art Museum hosted “Art is Science,” focusing on artistic expressionism that has emerged from the advancement of scientific technology. From the early 20th century and into the post-war period, there was experimental use of scientific technology in art. We now notice that this has influenced our esthetic sensibilities and contributes to their diversity. In “Art is Science Ⅱ,” the museum will continue to address the idea of new horizons, looking at artists who have been working on links with science in contemporary art. In 1973 a British-born artist Harold Cohen (1928-2016) invented “Aaron,” an automatic drawing machine. Through numerous trial-and-error experiments with his computers, Cohen pursued not only artistic expressions generated from human drawings and colors, but also sought out creations by Artificial Intelligence that could learn and develop autonomously. John Cage (1912-1992) is well known as an avant-garde composer of experimental music, who presented “Radio Music” (1958) and “Cartridge Music” (1960) by making use of the capacities of machines such as radios and microphones. Through examples such as these, we can see there has been use of scientific technologies to embody ideas in conceptual aspects. In this exhibition you can encounter a variety of works that are the result of artists’ unflagging enthusiasm for fresh expressions in the new era. While some works are sure to astonish visitors with their novelty appeal, others may elicit strange feelings, challenging stereotypical views.




MAM Screen 007: Atsushi Yamamoto

MAM Screen 007: Atsushi Yamamoto
at Mori Art Museum (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-18 - 2018-04-01)

In his career to date, Atsushi Yamamoto (b. 1980) has made an incredible 174 films, from documentaries to works of fiction and experimental comedy skit-like shorts. Many of Yamamoto’s works are set in new towns and similar anonymous suburban locations and feature the artist himself playing roles such as an idle youth or casual laborer, in the process channeling Yamamoto’s own upbringing in an ordinary household on the outskirts of Tokyo. His latest work, “The Past and the Future in the Present” is a highly personal documentary piece in which Yamamoto visits an old girlfriend during his wife’s pregnancy, and finds himself engaging with past, present and future. Both types of work portray Yamamoto’s earnest attempts to address the reality before him. For this screening, we have combined early short films by Yamamoto with a more recent full-length feature, in a program offering a close-up look at the diverse delights of the artist’s film oeuvre. *Please see the official website for further details and schedules.




Japanese Film Heritage: Works from the Collecton of the National Film Center

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Japanese Film Heritage: Works from the Collecton of the National Film Center
at National Film Center (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)

The National Film Center was established in 1952 as the first film department in a national institution in Japan. Entering the second century since the birth of film, the Center’s task to protect the accumulated items from over 50 years as historically and culturally significant documentation and heritage is becoming increasingly more important. The collection includes 30,000 films, 20,000 books, 30,000 scripts, 42,000 posters and 372,000 still photos. This exhibition presents a selection of rare items from the collection including historical equipment, mementos of prominent figures in the film industry and newly discovered films, as well as the achievements of past film restorations to trace the history of the Japanese film conservation movement.