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Preview: TAB Events - in category Screen: Film

TAB Events - in category Screen: Video and Film





 



Decoration Never Dies, Anyway

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Decoration Never Dies, Anyway
at Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2017-11-18 - 2018-02-25)

Spotlighting the decorative arts, this show explores motifs from different eras and cultures through the works of seven artists of different ages, nationalities, and genres. Kour Pour references Persian carpets in his paintings. Yoshikazu Yamagata is a designer for the fashion brand writtenafterwards. Akiko and Masako Takada overturn viewer’s preconceptions and sense scale with architectural structures presented as small everyday items. Explore the significance of decoration from diverse perspectives including painting, fashion, and sculpture in this exhibition marking the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum’s first opening since April. [Related Events] Artist Talk On 18 November, Sat. 13:00− Short presentation by participating artists (with simultaneous interpreting English-Japanese) Venue: Annex Gallery 2, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum Seating capacity: 120 Pre-registration required (available on TTM website from 18 Oct.) Free with museum admission




Gozo Yoshimasu “La Broderie de feu”

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Gozo Yoshimasu “La Broderie de feu”
at NADiff a/p/a/r/t (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2018-02-08 - 2018-02-25)

Spotlighting work by leading poet Gozo Yoshimasu, this exhibition features his poem “Kaibutsu-kun” (Dear Monster) inspired by themes of “deconstruction and reconstruction” and “rubble” in the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake, and his “La Broderie de feu” (Fire Embroidery) encompassing photography, video, and poetry. This exhibition is part of the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum’s 10th Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions program. [Event] Performance Gozo Organic Fukubukuro Orchestra Vol. 5 Date: Feb. 23 (Fri) 19:00–20:30 Featuring: Gozo Yoshimasu, Maryla, Whitelight Admission: 2500 yen in advance, 2700 yen same-day Please see the official website for reservations another details.




In Between Sound & Vision

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In Between Sound & Vision
at Vacant (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2018-02-24 - 2018-02-25)

New York-based artist and composer Aki Onda presents a two-night set of collaborations with sound artist Akio Suzuki and filmmaker Takashi Makino. These artists have presented their work internationally, and were the only Japanese artists invited to the international art exhibition “documenta 14” last year. Onda and Suzuki began collaborating together in 2005. Their first collaboration, presented on the first day they met, lasted over 5 hours. Since then, they have been exploring the possibilities of site-specific approaches to sound. Onda has also been consistently exploring the relationship between the visual and the sonic throughout his career, and has collaborated with filmmakers such as Ken Jacobs and Paul Clipson. For this event, Onda will debut new work with Japan’s most prolific and adventurous filmmaker Makiko Takashi, known for hallucinatory images and immersive live cinema works. [Event Outline] Date and Time: Feb. 24 Sat Aki Onda x Akio Suzuki, Feb. 25 Sun Aki Onda x Makino Takashi, Open: 19:00, Start: 19:30 Venue: VACANT Ticket: ADV ¥3000+drink, Door ¥3500+drink, 2days ¥5000+drink *Please see the website for further details.




Maki Toshima “Imaginary Lines”

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Maki Toshima “Imaginary Lines”
at MEM (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2018-02-08 - 2018-02-25)

Maki Toshima’s video installations and drawings question “whether it is possible to apply human imagination.” The exhibition’s title “imaginary lines” typically refers to fictional lines created for the filming or production of films or narratives, particularly lines that unite two characters or single lines showing the direction of vehicles. The show features new video installations and a drawing series of imaginary cities created overseas. *This exhibition will be held as one of the Partnership Programs of Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions.




Mami Kosemura + Yuki Hayashi + Ken Matsubara “Recall”

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Mami Kosemura + Yuki Hayashi + Ken Matsubara “Recall”
at MA2 Gallery (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2018-02-07 - 2018-02-25)

This group exhibition by three artists is organized around the concept “invisible” - the theme of this year’s Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions. In contemporary society, elusive aspects such as time and existence are experienced as bodily sensations. Meanwhile, media consumption is a consciousness act. Here you can encounter a selection of works that speak to the senses. Each of the artists approaches time in a unique way and presents works that allow viewers to experience the familiar - Mami Kosemura through her video works that take advantage of the gallery space, Yuki Hayashi through his multidimensional pieces, and Ken Matsubara through his use of repetition. [Related Events] Lounge Talk: “Invisible - Recalling Memories” Date: Feb. 21 (Wed), 17:15-18:15 Speakers: Ken Matsubara (artist), Kotaro Iizawa (photography critic) Venue: Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography




Media Ambition Tokyo 2018

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Media Ambition Tokyo 2018
at Roppongi Hills Tokyo City View (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2018-02-09 - 2018-02-25)

2018 will be the sixth consecutive year of Media Ambition Tokyo (MAT), an event showcasing top-notch technological culture that takes an experimental approach to urban implementation. Here you can see edgy artwork, as well as video, music, live performances, and talk shows hosted at venues situated in Roppongi, as well as satellite locations in Harajuku, Daikanyama, Ginza, Iidabashi, Suidobashi, Odaiba, Marunouchi and other areas. MAT continues to grow as spreads organically throughout the city, offering varied programs when innovators and companies active in various fields both in Japan and overseas come together to participate in events. With 2020 and beyond in mind, the event will address the potential of technology in creating Tokyo’s future, not omitting the largely evolving systematic designs of transportation, communication and information. MAT aims to substantiate the reformative movement in technology art through experimental validations unbound by genre or category. This year’s event brings together leading artists on the media art scene, including Rhizomatiks, who are known for blending advanced technology with design, and TeamLab, which develops works beyond the boundaries of art and entertainment, as well as individuals such as Yoichi Ochiai, who explores digital nature in his art and research, and other cutting-edge artists.




The Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions 2018 “Mapping the Invisible”

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The Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions 2018 “Mapping the Invisible”
at Tokyo Photographic Art Museum (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2018-02-09 - 2018-02-25)

The Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions is an international festival of art and images that combines exhibitions, screenings, live performances, and talk sessions, and has taken place annually since 2009. As is symbolized by the open frame of the brackets in its logo, the festival seeks a multiplicity of responses to visual media while revitalizing the field from an interdisciplinary perspective. Currently in its tenth year, it has evolved into a platform where a rich variety of artists, guests, and programmers (over 840 to date) can gather to share opinions with participants regarding how best to fruitfully nurture and sustain the development of visual expression and media.




Final Fantasy 30th Anniversary Exhibition - Memories of You

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Final Fantasy 30th Anniversary Exhibition - Memories of You
at Mori Arts Center Gallery (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2018-01-22 - 2018-02-28)

“Memories of You” focuses on the deft storytelling found in the “Final Fantasy” series, presenting an elaborate, large-scale retrospective rebuilt for interactivity, which takes a look at the many “farewells” found in this game series, such as the desperate break between Porom and Palom in “Final Fantasy IV.” In keeping with the new interactive values offered by the “Final Fantasy” series, the exhibition features an audio AR (augmented reality) system newly developed for this event. The system allows visitors to experience the automatic synchronized playback of background music and character voices that are personalized to match the actions and properties of the visitor simply by standing in front of the exhibit while holding a dedicated device. Visitors can become completely absorbed in the world of “Final Fantasy” by experiencing the exhibition with their eyes and ears, using the headphones provided for everyone who visits.




Hiromi Uramoto “Slow sway”

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Hiromi Uramoto “Slow sway”
at Shinjuku Ophthalmologist Gallery (Shinjuku area)
(2018-02-23 - 2018-02-28)

Lineup of new video works by Hiromi Uramoto, including a piece based on the “telephone game” played by men trying simulated childbirth. Venue: Space O




NEWoMan Art Wall vol.10: Masahito Koshinaka

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NEWoMan Art Wall vol.10: Masahito Koshinaka
at Newoman Art Wall (Shinjuku area)
(2018-02-01 - 2018-02-28)

Video installations and pictures from Masahito Koshinaka’s series “double word” (2008) will be on view at NEWoMAN New South Gate (Shinjuku JR station) for the NEWoMan ART wall. The video installations have been specially re-edited for this exhibition, and Koshinaka’s video works will be on display on the building billboard and column monitors.




Takuro Tamayama “Night Meal, Slight Fears”

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Takuro Tamayama “Night Meal, Slight Fears”
at Little Barrel (Tokyo: Others area)
(2018-02-20 - 2018-02-28)




20th Domani: The Art of Tomorrow Exhibition

20th Domani: The Art of Tomorrow Exhibition
at The National Art Center, Tokyo (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2018-01-13 - 2018-03-04)

Subtitled “Memories of Passagers,” the 20th annual Domani exhibition showcases examples of exciting talent who have completed the study program in recent years. Including four artists who continue to be based abroad after the program, the experiences of these artists living overseas as temporary passagers (voyagers) away from home will surely emerge in the exhibition. A related special exhibition and various satellite events will also be held to commemorate the half-century anniversary of the program and the 20th anniversary of the exhibition. [Events] Artist Talk Speaker: Kae Masuda Date: Jan. 13 (Sat) 11:00–11:30 Artist Talk Speaker: Naoya Inose Date: Jan. 13 (Sat) Please see the official website for reservations and details.




Cinema: Lost and Found 2018

Cinema: Lost and Found 2018
at National Film Center (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2018-01-30 - 2018-03-04)

Held for the first time in four years, the 10th edition of the “Cinema: Lost and Found” series, which began in 1991, showcases movies that have been newly discovered and restored by the National Film Center. A total of 89 films screened across 30 programs will be presented, including titles such as “Crown Prince Watanabe” (1921), marking the first time the crown prince was captured on film, “Chushingura” (1910-1912), the Yokotashokai film production company’s first silent work, and a special collection of films documenting the Russo-Japanese War and the Great Kanto Earthquake, as well as features by companies founded in the Meiji (1868-1912) and Taisho (1912-1926) periods. Highlights include a new digital print of Yasujiro Ozu’s “Ukigusa (Floating Weeds)” (1959) and a remastered version of the satirical movie “Sailor Suit and Machine Gun” (1982). A number of talks by researchers and those involved in the project will be held during the screening period.




Digital Choc 2018: Spaceship Earth

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Digital Choc 2018: Spaceship Earth
at Institut français du Japon - Tokyo (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2018-02-09 - 2018-03-04)

The Digital Choc festival introduces cutting-edge media art with exhibits, live performances, talks, and other events. Its seventh session imagines us all to be passengers on “Spaceship Earth,” where we must consider how best to use our limited resources. These creative works give us the chance to reconsider our current situation as we hurtle through space. [Events] Talk, live performance, radio broadcast Date: Feb. 10 (Sat) 17:00 CCMC 2018 Contemporary Computer Music Concert Date: Mar. 3 from 15:00, Mar. 4 from 15:15 Admission: 1500 one-day pass, 2500 yen two-day pass Please see the official website for details.




Fujiko Nakaya + Ukichiro Nakaya “Greenland”

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Fujiko Nakaya + Ukichiro Nakaya “Greenland”
at Maison Hermès (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2017-12-22 - 2018-03-04)

Exhibition devoted to the internationally active fog artist Fujiko Nakaya and her father, Ukichiro Nakaya. In 1936, Ukichiro Nakaya, a famous scientist known for the quote, “Snow crystals are letters sent from heaven,” successfully made the world’s first artificial snow crystals. Ukichiro believed that the realization of scientific truths depended on a collaboration between human beings and nature. This continues to have a strong influence on Fujiko Nakaya, who uses fog as a medium of artistic expression. Born in 1933 as the second daughter of Ukichiro Nakaya, Fujiko started her artistic career as a painter. She later participated in E.A.T. (Experiments in Art and Technology), an experimental group focusing on collaborations between art and science that was formed in New York in 1966, and in the ’70s and ’80s produced and exhibited video works while based in Japan. Fujiko’s first “fog sculpture,” a type of work made with artificial fog that has come to be synonymous with the artist, was exhibited at the Pepsi Pavilion at Expo ’70, held in Osaka in 1970. She subsequently created over 80 installations and performances all over the world. Fujiko also has consistently collaborated with artists from various other genres, including architecture, music, dance, and light. In this exhibition, whose title refers to the site of Ukichiro’ s later research on snow and ice, Ginza Maison Hermès’ glass block is likened to the icy terrain of the Arctic, as Fujiko undertakes a fog experiment in the interior of the space. Ukichiro’ s numerous memorable phrases, such as, “To understand ice, you have to listen to ice,” convey the mental and physical impressions that transcend science when we are united with sublime nature, and the rigor and reverence that Ukichiro felt when closely examining a subject in natural science research. From 1957, around the time that Ukichiro began to spend the last summers of his life in the Arctic, Fujiko was in Paris and Madrid studying painting, which later provided a foundation for her artistic expression. The natural scientific motifs of the sun and clouds, which she depicted at the time, convey two physically separate but resonating sensibilities. Along with “Glacial Fogfall,” a new work by Fujiko, the exhibition focuses on the endlessly curious and challenging spirits of these two talented individuals. Enjoy the dialogue, straddling two generations, between Ukichiro and Fujiko Nakaya, who saw the process of observing, recording, reproducing, and understanding the ever-changing character of nature and the environment as a highly significant activity and one that is increasingly important for us today.




Lichen - A Fungi and Algae Composite

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Lichen - A Fungi and Algae Composite
at National Museum of Nature and Science (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2017-12-19 - 2018-03-04)

This exhibition shines the spotlight of the many forms and characteristics of lichen, an organism that is seen but rarely paid much attention at first glance. Approximately 70 exhibits have been carefully selected from the museum’s collection of more than 250,000 lichen specimens, presenting examples of the organism from various environments, such as those close to home, alpine and tropical habitats, and the Antarctic. Learn about its biochemistry and how it features in our lives. Lichen is often confused with moss, but while moss is a simple plant, lichen is a composite organism that relies of the harmonious symbiotic relationship of fungi with algae. This exhibition offers a chance to get to know this frequently overlooked organism through interactive exhibits, videos and other items. This show is complemented by the simultaneously held exhibition “Kumagusu Minakata: An Informant-savant 100 Years Ahead of his Time.” Venue: Multipurpose Space, 1F Japan Building, National Museum of Nature and Science




Akira Wakita “Symptom Visualized - Visualized Sign“

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Akira Wakita “Symptom Visualized - Visualized Sign“
at Art & Science Gallery Lab AXIOM (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2018-01-20 - 2018-03-10)

Akira Wakita produces works that reinterpret the world by visualizing entities that exist before us but cannot be perceived as such. In this solo exhibition, Wakita expresses social phenomena such as ideological conflict, unstable economic systems, accelerated consumerism from a macro perspective using methodologies typically employed in chemistry and physics as his base. There will also be spin off work inspired by Wakita’s live performance with Tetsuya Komuro at MUTEK / RedBull Music Festival.




Sanae Yamada “The Herds”

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Sanae Yamada “The Herds”
at S.Y.P art space (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2018-02-24 - 2018-03-10)

This exhibition consists of two videos based on research into specific regions and small experimental works made in parallel. The first video, “Rhythms from Neighborhood,” was created during Sanae Yamada’s participation in the AIR program in Portland last August. The second video, “With Friction, As Friction,” is a work comprised of footage capturing the daily routine of clearing snow off of the roofs of the houses in an area with heavy snowfall. This was researched and shot in Yukihori in Matsunoyama, Niigata prefecture.




My Favorites: Toshio Hara Selects from the Permanent Collection (Part 1)

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My Favorites: Toshio Hara Selects from the Permanent Collection (Part 1)
at Hara Museum of Contemporary Art (Tokyo) (Tokyo: Others area)
(2018-01-06 - 2018-03-11)

Since he started the Hara Museum in 1979 as one of Japan’s first museums dedicated to contemporary art, the director Toshio Hara has devoted himself to the promotion of international exchange and the advancement of art and culture through the holding of special exhibitions, international traveling shows and other activities. This permanent collection show, which stands out as the first to be curated by Toshio Hara himself, features works that he personally selected from the collection’s approximately 1,000 pieces of post-1950s art which spans the entire spectrum of media from painting, sculpture and photography to video art and installation. The first half of this two-part exhibition focuses on artworks collected during the first decade or so of the collection’s history, from the late ‘70s through the first half of the ‘80s, while the second will showcase works that have appeared in exhibitions held at the museum over the years. Together they provide an introduction to the museum over its almost 40-year history, as well as the major art trends that have prevailed from the middle of the 20th century onward. Part 1: Jan. 6 (Sat) - Mar. 11 (Sun) Part 2: Mar. 21 (Wed) - Jun. 3 (Sun) [Artists featured in Part 1] Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Andy Warhol, On Kawara, Lee Ufan, Yayoi Kusama, Nam June Paik, Ai Weiwei, Aiko Miyawaki and others.




Natsumi Wada “Tacit Creole”

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Natsumi Wada “Tacit Creole”
at NTT ICC Inter Communication Center (Shinjuku area)
(2017-12-19 - 2018-03-11)

This exhibition brings together three works that have been produced in collaboration with individuals who take a variety of different approaches to perception. Based on the unique perceptions and memories of each collaborator, the works presented explore the possibility of constructing the world from scratch through different experimental actions. A maze of sound and tactile experiences, “altag” is a work that can be experienced only through touch and the auditory. Meanwhile, “An image of” uses three experimental videos on the theme of memory and imagination to express things that are hard to communicate through language, as if tracing them by hand. Finally, “Signed” is a work that invites a highly personal viewer experience, whereby the individual movement of a hand in front of the device generates a unique narrative. As Michael Polanyi demonstrates with his concept of “tacit knowing,” there are areas of knowledge that cannot be taught or learned simply through language. In this exhibition an attempt is made to open up the world by reworking how people’s individual worlds can be understood, and how they can connect with others’ experiences. Furthermore, through these works the aim is to explore the possibility of extracting tacit knowledge and making it Creole - a new mother tongue to be shared by the community. [Related Event] Artist Talk Date: Feb. 24 (Sat), 14:00- Speakers: Mai Nagumo, Yukio Nozawa, Yuriko Kawasaki Moderator: Minoru Hatanaka(ICC) Venue: ICC 4F special stage Capacity: 150 (first-come-first-served basis) Admission: Free *Event in Japanese with sign language interpretation




Theater Commons ‘18

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Theater Commons ‘18
at Goethe Institute Tokyo (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2018-02-22 - 2018-03-11)

Theater Commons Tokyo is a project to create a collective space for society that harnesses the collective wisdom of theater. By using theater – that is, by applying theatrical ideas – in the context of everyday life and the urban space, it aims to propose a model for theater(s) to come. Theater Commons Tokyo and its artists use the imagination of theater to create experiences in which diverging elements and time periods intersect, and the ordinary is defamiliarized through dialogue and discovery. This means that, as well as theatrical productions, it also hosts lecture-style performances, workshops in which participants share in the creative process, dialogues featuring a range of different voices, and more. Venues: Goethe-Institut Tokyo; Taiwan Cultural Center, Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in Japan; Minato Gender Equality Center “Libra;” Keio University Mita Campus, Ex Noguchi Room; Shibaura House. *Please see the official website for tickets and further information.




Tsuyoshi Anzai “Shadows Cast Shadows”

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Tsuyoshi Anzai “Shadows Cast Shadows”
at Plaza North / North Gallery (Greater Tokyo area)
(2018-02-18 - 2018-03-11)

Tsuyoshi Anzai is an artist who produces kinetic sculptures and video works that address the relationship between people and things. Here he will exhibit works of machinery and equipment featuring daily necessities as motifs. Via dialogue with incomplete machines that cannot be fully controlled, visitors can visualize a world inaccessible through standard human-centered objects.




Yang Fudong “The Coloured Sky: New Women II”
Yang Fudong “The Coloured Sky: New Women II” at Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo (Omotesando, Aoyama area) (2017-10-18 - 2018-03-11) Produced and conceived under the artistic direction of the Fondation Louis Vuitton, this exhibition of Chinese artist Yang Fudong is part of the “Hors-les-murs” program, showcasing previously unseen holdings of the Collection at the Espaces Culturels Louis Vuitton in Tokyo, Munich, Beijing and Venice. Since the early 1990s, Yang Fudong has been examining the complexities of contemporary Chinese society from a symbolic, detached perspective through his art form. Formally trained as a painter, Fudong has developed an extensive body of work comprised of videos, films, installations and photographs; consistently creating a visual language enveloped in a dream-like mystery. Favoring multi-screen video projections, Fudong creates an experience that immerses the viewer. His characters, deliberately silent and disembodied, move according to choreographed gestures, always managing to transport the viewer into an aesthetically perfect environment. Often drawing stylistically on different periods in Chinese and Western cinema - as well as taking inspiration from Shanghai in the 1930s, and the landscape tradition rooted in Chinese art history - Fudong creates open-ended, existential narratives that interweave quotidian ritual with dream-like states. With a consciously romantic framework that is simultaneously contemporary and out-of-date, Fudong examines China through the eyes of young urban intellectuals as they grapple with their place in the modern world. He effortlessly references China’s cultural traditions, whilst making close observations of what makes these narratives relevant to contemporary society. The resulting timeless stories plunge viewers into an otherworldly, nostalgic atmosphere in which a generation that exists between modernity and tradition explores and questions the world. The Espace Louis Vuitton Tokyo invites the public to discover this now major figure in Chinese contemporary art and cinema, through the presentation of a poetic work, “The Coloured Sky: New Women II” (2014), which belongs to the Fondation Louis Vuitton Collection. Fudong usually creates works on 35mm black and white film; this five-channel video installation marks an aesthetic departure from his signature style, through the overwhelming use of vivid color - the first color film of the artist’s oeuvre. Portraying an artificial brightly colored world, the film depicts five young women, naïve and seductive, wearing vintage swimwear on a deliberately synthetic beachfront setting. Filmed in slow-motion against sounds of laughter, sighs, ocean rumbles and cricket song, they play a game of seduction. Five screens depict images of the sun, the sea, the beach, games, food and references to Western art interspersed with the appearances of a horse and a stag. One real, the other stuffed, the animals refer to a Chinese political story from 3rd century B.C., referring to the proverb, “point to a deer and call it a horse,” connoting a moral play on what is true and what is false. “The Coloured Sky: New Women II” epitomizes Fudong’s artistic tendency to stylistically referencing different periods in both Chinese and Western cinema and culture. [...]



Maud Lewis in Film

Maud Lewis in Film
at Embassy of Canada Prince Takamado Gallery (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2018-02-01 - 2018-03-13)

The Embassy of Canada is pleased to present an exhibition commemorating the opening at cinemas in Japan of Maudie, a film about the life of Nova Scotia painter Maud Lewis (1903-1970). The exhibition will include reproductions of her paintings, objects used in the film, a canister she decorated with floral paintings, and more. After the death of her parents, Maud Dowley lived with an aunt before marrying Everett Lewis, a fish peddler. Her painting first attracted attention when her husband began selling postcards painted by his wife to his customers along with their fish. As Maud’s juvenile rheumatoid arthritis worsened, Everett took over the housework while Maud supplemented their income by selling paintings. Her colourful renderings of landscapes, birds and flowers eventually won recognition and were featured in magazines and on television, leading to a commission from U.S. President Richard Nixon. Even so, Maud and Everett lived till their deaths in a simple one room cabin without gas or electricity. In 1984, the small cabin with Maud’s painting on the doors and walls became part of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. This exhibition will offer visitors a rare opportunity to familiarize themselves with the life and work of a remarkable Canadian artist.




Tabaimo “flow-wer arrangement”

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Tabaimo “flow-wer arrangement”
at Gallery Koyanagi (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2018-02-10 - 2018-03-15)

Presenting Tabaimo’s “flow-wer” (2013), a series of drawings depicting flowers grown from human bodies, and her “flow-wer arrangement” wall drawing projection. “flow-wer arrangement” was exhibited in the much-discussed 2017 exhibition “Hammer Projects: Tabaimo” at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. This exhibition recreates “flow-wer arrangement” in its first showing since the Hammer Museum exhibition. [Related Exhibition] Zuntentonchinshan by Tabaimo Dates: Feb. 9–Mar. 4 Venue: Kido Press (3331 Arts Chiyoda)




Eyal Segal “Ground Level”

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Eyal Segal “Ground Level”
at Loko Gallery (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2018-02-17 - 2018-03-17)

This first solo exhibition in Japan by Israeli artist Eyal Segal is the result of a residency program that was made possible through a collaboration between the gallery and Embassy of Israel in Japan, as well as the partnership program of Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions. On this occasion the gallery will present volume two of a project entitled “Displace,” which includes solo exhibitions by Japanese and Israeli artists. The key word in Segal’s work is “place.” Here, memory, history, human activities and the traces of particular places are epically depicted on screen. Furthermore, his video projects are composed and positioned such that they mutually influence each other, creating a sublimated site-specific installation in which the exhibition space itself forms an element of the work. His solid video images are as if three-dimensional objects, and the artist’s own body appears on the screen and transforms the space as a heavy bronze sculpture would. The title of the exhibition, “Ground Level” (= Ground State) refers to the state in quantum mechanics with the lowest energy that an atom or molecule can have. There is the least motion in that state. However, in this exhibition, movement can be found in the videos. These are not only physical displacements such as vertical and horizontal movements and rotation, but the flow of history, circulation of images and exchanges of life and death. Segal has created ground level by balancing the energies of different vectors in the multi-layered space of the gallery. The last piece of the exhibition puzzle, which will be completed during the residency period in Tokyo, has as motifs two stories of history involving life and death in the two cultures, Judea and Japan. Focusing on the place as a trace that continues to exist even after many years have gone by, Segal will show the shapes of lost characters in the stories and in ourselves, who exist in the same historical line as them. [Related Event] Artist Talk Date: Feb. 17 (Sat), 19:00–




Film History in Posters Part 3: Science Fiction and Monster Films

Film History in Posters Part 3: Science Fiction and Monster Films
at National Film Center (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2018-01-04 - 2018-03-25)

Voyages to outer space, timeless worlds, destruction of the earth, unbelievable futures … throughout film history, inexhaustible human imagination has undoubtedly been most freely demonstrated in the genre of Science Fiction. Those stories and visual expressions, which go way beyond our reality, have given and will give tremendous impact to audiences all over the world. As the third installment of the series “Film History in Posters”, this exhibition is for posters of this extraordinary genre, mainly from NFC’s collection. Sci-Fi started as a minor film genre then achieved mainstream status. The exhibition traces the rich genealogy from classic masterpieces such as Metropolis (1926) and King Kong (1933), through Japanese monster films with outstanding special effects technology that attracted hardcore fans inside and outside of Japan from the first Godzilla in 1954, to new generations gaining power from the 1960s such as Stanley Kubrick, and the golden age of Sci-Fi film after the worldwide success of the Star Wars series from 1977. We invite you to enjoy the flights of imagination woven into the design of these magnificent posters. Venue: 7F Exhibition Space [Related Events] Cinematic Science Fiction Landscapes Inspired by Literature Date: Jan. 13 (Sat) Speaker: Ryohei Takahashi (science fiction critic) Admission: Free (no booking required, exhibition admission ticket required) *Event in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details and information on other related events.




Jun Miura Festival

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Jun Miura Festival
at Kawasaki City Museum (Setagaya, Kawasaki area)
(2018-01-27 - 2018-03-25)

Illustrator Jun Miura is credited with starting fads like the personal obsession-focused “my boom,” the yuru kyara local mascot craze, and the current interest in Buddhist statues. He celebrates his 60th birthday on February 1, 2018. This exhibition looks back on his dynamic life and work.




Koichi Watanabe “Moving Plants”

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Koichi Watanabe “Moving Plants”
at Shiseido Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2018-01-13 - 2018-03-25)

Watanabe has been photographing “itadori” (Japanese knotweed) for over 10 years. This plant, also known as “skanpo,” is found all over Japan, and has been known throughout history as a medicinal and edible plant. However, few people know that roughly 200 years ago, Philipp Franz von Siebold, who was living in Nagasaki at the time, brought it back from Japan to Europe for use in gardening, and its hardiness has led to its spread throughout the world, reproducing so widely that it is now changing local ecosystems. Ever since coming across Japanese knotweed while photographing the scenery of Hokkaido, Watanabe has researched the ecology of this weed and traveled far and wide to see it with his own eyes. While consulting reference works, both old and new, from around the world, he has contacted local botanists, delving into the world of this plant in countries such as the U.K., the Netherlands, Poland, and the U.S. This exhibition will feature 18 photographic works and two video works from Watanabe’s “Moving Plants” series. Watanabe’s depictions of Japanese knotweed in this project convey these plants, with their profound life force, as possessing a natural, organic beauty despite being highly invasive. The exhibition features not only photographic works captured by large-lensed cameras, but also documentary films of Japanese knotweed in their natural environments around the world, and rare materials used by Watanabe in his research. This is the first time the entirety of Watanabe’s Japanese knotweed project has been shown, and the giant prints of itadori, as tall as people, fill the entire exhibition area with the strong presence of these plants. [Related Events] Talk Event: Koichi Watanabe x Tomoki Yamauchi Date: Mar. 3 (Sat), 14:00-16:00 Speakers: Koichi Watanabe, Tomoki Yamauchi (Lecturer in Kyoto University of Education Faculty of Arts, gardener) Venue: Word Hall Capacity: 60 Admission: Free *Event in Japanese.




Shuntaro Tanikawa Exhibition

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Shuntaro Tanikawa Exhibition
at Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery (Shinjuku area)
(2018-01-13 - 2018-03-25)

Shuntaro Tanikawa is a leading Japanese poet who made a striking debut in 1952 with his anthology “Two Billion Light-Years of Solitude.” Now 85 years old, his fresh and vibrant language continues to resonate with the hearts and minds of many Japanese readers. In addition to showcasing Tanikawa’s past and present work, this exhibition introduces ephemera from his childhood, sharing his favorite music, collections and so forth. Be captivated by brand new poems written for the occasion and encounter his exciting collaborations with musician Keigo Oyamada (Cornelius) and others. [Related Events] Kyoichi Tsuzuki and Shuntaro Tanikawa In Conversation Date: Jan 27 (Sat), 14:00- (doors open 13:45) Keigo Oyamada (Cornelius) and Shuntaro Tanikawa In Conversation Date: Feb. 10 (Sat), 14:00- (doors open 13:45) Venue: Meeting Hall, 7F Tokyo Opera City Building Capacity: 160 (per event, unreserved seating) Admission: Free (numbered admission ticket required for access to event; exhibition admission ticket charged separately) *Free numbered admission tickets for the event will be distributed at the Art Gallery entrance from 11:00 on the day of each event. Only one ticket is issued per person. *Attendees will be asked to line up in order of their numbered admission tickets from 13:40 ahead of the doors opening. *Events in Japanese.




Takehito Koganezawa “Three Monochromes”

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Takehito Koganezawa “Three Monochromes”
at Rin Art Association (Greater Tokyo area)
(2018-01-27 - 2018-03-25)

In his first exhibition since returning from Berlin, Takehito Koganezawa will present a lineup of works that move across the boundaries between videos, drawings, three-dimensional works and performances, presenting these throughout the three gallery floors. His practice to date has explored an interest in time and changes in consciousness from a wide variety of perspectives, ranging from the everyday life to shamanism.




Art is Science Ⅱ

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Art is Science Ⅱ
at Karuizawa New Art Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2017-10-07 - 2018-03-31)

This summer, Karuizawa New Art Museum hosted “Art is Science,” focusing on artistic expressionism that has emerged from the advancement of scientific technology. From the early 20th century and into the post-war period, there was experimental use of scientific technology in art. We now notice that this has influenced our esthetic sensibilities and contributes to their diversity. In “Art is Science Ⅱ,” the museum will continue to address the idea of new horizons, looking at artists who have been working on links with science in contemporary art. In 1973 a British-born artist Harold Cohen (1928-2016) invented “Aaron,” an automatic drawing machine. Through numerous trial-and-error experiments with his computers, Cohen pursued not only artistic expressions generated from human drawings and colors, but also sought out creations by Artificial Intelligence that could learn and develop autonomously. John Cage (1912-1992) is well known as an avant-garde composer of experimental music, who presented “Radio Music” (1958) and “Cartridge Music” (1960) by making use of the capacities of machines such as radios and microphones. Through examples such as these, we can see there has been use of scientific technologies to embody ideas in conceptual aspects. In this exhibition you can encounter a variety of works that are the result of artists’ unflagging enthusiasm for fresh expressions in the new era. While some works are sure to astonish visitors with their novelty appeal, others may elicit strange feelings, challenging stereotypical views.




Mariko Matsushita “Raw”

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Mariko Matsushita “Raw”
at Ken Nakahashi (Shinjuku area)
(2018-02-02 - 2018-03-31)

Sexual love and the pain of living are regular subjects in Mariko Matsushita’s works. Her painting harbors powerful energy, each of her works produced through an intimate relationship between the model and the artist herself. The exhibition title “Raw” embodies ideas relating to an imagined future and universe, as well as the soul seeking out a primitive and mystic “life.” In 2016, Matsushita won the grand prize for the 2nd CAFAA Award sponsored by the Contemporary Art Foundation, which meant she could join a three-months residency program at the Delfina Foundation in London from July to September. During this residency, she researched and developed different expressive outputs aside from her usual paintings, introducing a new spectrum of media to her body of work. This exhibition will present unreleased paintings from 2016 up to the latest ones produced this year, together with work produced in London, including video performance and photography, created in collaboration with photographer Mikito Tateisi. Her video performance, “Walking with Meat” (video + sound, 5min) is a metaphor for her life, expressed by walking though the streets of London holding a huge lump of flesh, while “Little Fox in London” (video + sound, 5 min) unfolds within a childish kitsch world through a playful search for foxes in downtown London and her bedroom. In addition, her nude self-portrait “Raw,” shot in her room in London where she spent three month, will be on show.




Mike Kelley “Day Is Done”

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Mike Kelley “Day Is Done”
at Watari-um, The Watari Museum of Contemporary Art (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2018-01-08 - 2018-03-31)

A solo exhibition for the American artist Mike Kelley. Born in 1954 to a working-class family in the Detroit suburbs, from his student days Kelley used a variety of materials in works that earned him a reputation as a “spokesman for American popular culture and youth culture.” This exhibition includes his series ‘Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstruction,’ comprising 365 films and installations, and a major work “Day is Done.” In the model “Educational Complex” based on schools Kelley attended, he channels individual and societal traumas through strange figures that appear in typical events like Halloween and school plays.




Yu Ogata + Ichiro Ogata “Unmanned”

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Yu Ogata + Ichiro Ogata “Unmanned”
at Taka Ishii Gallery Photography/Film (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2018-02-24 - 2018-03-31)

“Unmanned” comprises two different videos: a very representational one of the diorama city shot from the train that runs through it, and an abstract one composed exclusively of shots of the trains’ lights. As the title suggests, the work is made with as little human intervention as possible, featuring automated trains, automated announcements and automated cameras. In the first video, the unique character of dioramas - arguably the ultimate medium for representational expression - is used to give meaning to every element including the train lineup, building details, positioning of people, and train announcements. As a result, form and sound are intertwined with complex cultural factors. For example, Portuguese and Dutch - languages of nations that once conquered the world - are symbolically used to create an accumulation of global cultures. In the latter video, which is silent, cultural factors are eliminated and everything is reduced and abstracted to the movement of light. The world depicted here feels weightless like outer space and belongs to another dimension, like that of meditation and sleep, outside of realistic problems. The two videos, which were made based on human brain circuitry that travels between figuration and abstraction, like the model train that runs between concrete and abstract space, leads the viewer’s consciousness to the liminal space between reality and fiction.




MAM Screen 007: Atsushi Yamamoto

MAM Screen 007: Atsushi Yamamoto
at Mori Art Museum (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2017-11-18 - 2018-04-01)

In his career to date, Atsushi Yamamoto (b. 1980) has made an incredible 174 films, from documentaries to works of fiction and experimental comedy skit-like shorts. Many of Yamamoto’s works are set in new towns and similar anonymous suburban locations and feature the artist himself playing roles such as an idle youth or casual laborer, in the process channeling Yamamoto’s own upbringing in an ordinary household on the outskirts of Tokyo. His latest work, “The Past and the Future in the Present” is a highly personal documentary piece in which Yamamoto visits an old girlfriend during his wife’s pregnancy, and finds himself engaging with past, present and future. Both types of work portray Yamamoto’s earnest attempts to address the reality before him. For this screening, we have combined early short films by Yamamoto with a more recent full-length feature, in a program offering a close-up look at the diverse delights of the artist’s film oeuvre. *Please see the official website for further details and schedules.




Hello World - For the Post-Human Age

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Hello World - For the Post-Human Age
at Contemporary Art Center, Art Tower Mito (Greater Tokyo area)
(2018-02-10 - 2018-05-06)

Art as radar acts as “an early alarm system,” as it were, enabling us to discover social and psychic targets in lots of time to prepare to cope with them.(1) These are the words of media theorist Marshall McLuhan, writing in “Understanding Media” with sharp insight in the 1960s and predicting the social revolution that new technology would bring. Half a century has now passed since McLuhan published his important work, and the Internet has permeated our society and new technological innovations like artificial intelligence are rapidly advancing. “Any technology tends to create a new human environment.”(2) As McLuhan said, technology generates an entirely new world for mankind. While these changes will open up the door to a new age full of incredible promise, there is apprehension about the various problems and confusion that will also be ushered in. In what ways are artists responding to the positive and negative aspects that technological innovation brings? This exhibition presents the work of seven artists and one artist group from Japan and overseas, who are responding astutely to our current crossroads in history as well as the future. Their work offers us opportunities to think about the future of the society that technology makes. (1) Marshall McLuhan, “Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man” (1964) (2) Marshall McLuhan, “The Gutenberg Galaxy: the Making of Typographic Man” (1962)




Japanese Film Heritage: Works from the Collecton of the National Film Center

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Japanese Film Heritage: Works from the Collecton of the National Film Center
at National Film Center (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)

The National Film Center was established in 1952 as the first film department in a national institution in Japan. Entering the second century since the birth of film, the Center’s task to protect the accumulated items from over 50 years as historically and culturally significant documentation and heritage is becoming increasingly more important. The collection includes 30,000 films, 20,000 books, 30,000 scripts, 42,000 posters and 372,000 still photos. This exhibition presents a selection of rare items from the collection including historical equipment, mementos of prominent figures in the film industry and newly discovered films, as well as the achievements of past film restorations to trace the history of the Japanese film conservation movement.




Nobuhiko Utsumi Pictorial Expression Laboratory Exhibition 2018 Part 1

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Nobuhiko Utsumi Pictorial Expression Laboratory Exhibition 2018 Part 1
at Gallery K (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2018-02-26 - 2018-03-03)

An homage by his students to the Nihonga painter Nobuhiko Utsumi, who passed away in 1999.




Utopia & Chaos

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Utopia & Chaos
at Spiral (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2018-02-26 - 2018-03-13)

Utopia is a term that refers to an ideal society far from reality. While it sounds like a place of dreams, it can also be seen to present a sharp contrast to the real world, critiquing reality while highlighting issues that exist. In a similar vein, though the work introduced in this exhibition seems as if it expresses an ideal world full of imaginary beauty, if you look closely at the objects and landscapes featured in the works you will notice the coexistence of chaos, hidden just under the surface. Erika Kusumi creates surreal worlds from digital collages comprised of landscapes and objects that she cuts out from images she herself has photographed. Meanwhile, Ayako Kuno produces metal sculptures that manifest the vision of Tokyo as a giant metropolis. Shunsuke Nanjo uses thermochromic painting techniques to depict familiar scenes that appear quiet but challenge the imagination of the viewer. Finally, Sumito Sakakibara expresses the chaotic coexistence of utopia and dystopia. This is an exhibition where we can discover our true form amidst the fantastical worlds these artists manifest. Venue: 1F Mina-to




AIT Artist Talk #73: Low Relief / Unreal Estate

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AIT Artist Talk #73: Low Relief / Unreal Estate
at A.I.T. Room (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2018-02-27)

Marina Višić and Ksenia Galiaeva are both artists based in the Netherlands. Višić is the current artist in residence at AIT, until April 7, organized in collaboration with Mondriaan Fonds. Meanwhile, Galiaeva participated in the same residency program for three months back in 2012. These two artists will each share their stories together with slides introducing the current and previous works and projects. This will be followed by a Q&A session. Through her artistic practices, Višić investigates how a variety of textures and movements can be placed into the landscape of the moving image. Staging is important, as is the scale of the images and their relation to the body. Her research at AIT is based on a various references concerning Japanese aesthetics, for instance, from Junichiro Tanizaki’s “In Praise of Shadows” and the films of Akira Kurosawa and Yasujiro Ozu. In her talk, Višić will give an introduction to her work, followed by the motivation of her research here in Japan. In turn, Galiaeva has been photographing her parents in the paradisiacal surroundings of their Russian summerhouse for 20 years. With her project, “Unreal Estate,” Galiaeva explores the ways in which memory can be influenced and guided, and which part of it plays in perception. Galiaeva describes her work as ‘autobiographical fiction,’ a tool she uses to construct her own life story. Galiaeva considers self-dialogue through visual images the basis of all her work. Even though these two artists work in various media, both of their artistic practices examine and evoke our perception of visual experiences through. [Event Details] Date: Feb. 27 (Tue), 19:00-21:00 (Doors open 18:30) Capacity: 20 Admission: ¥1000; ¥800 for MAD students, students and AIT base members; Free for AIT house and support members *All admissions inc. 1 drink *Booking required *Event in Japanese and English (with consecutive translation) *Please see the website for further details




My Favorites: Toshio Hara Selects from the Permanent Collection (Part 2)

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My Favorites: Toshio Hara Selects from the Permanent Collection (Part 2)
at Hara Museum of Contemporary Art (Tokyo) (Tokyo: Others area)
(2018-03-21 - 2018-06-03)

Since he started the Hara Museum in 1979 as one of Japan’s first museums dedicated to contemporary art, the director Toshio Hara has devoted himself to the promotion of international exchange and the advancement of art and culture through the holding of special exhibitions, international traveling shows and other activities. This permanent collection show, which stands out as the first to be curated by Toshio Hara himself, features works that he personally selected from the collection’s approximately 1,000 pieces of post-1950s art which spans the entire spectrum of media from painting, sculpture and photography to video art and installation. While the first half of this two-part exhibition focused on artworks collected during the first decade or so of the collection’s history, from the late ‘70s through the first half of the ‘80s, the second part showcases works that have appeared in exhibitions held at the museum over the years. Together they provide an introduction to the museum over its almost 40-year history, as well as the major art trends that have prevailed from the middle of the 20th century onward. Part 1: Jan. 6 (Sat) - Mar. 11 (Sun) Part 2: Mar. 21 (Wed) - Jun. 3 (Sun) [Artists featured in Part 2] Nobuyoshi Araki, Jan Fabre, Izumi Kato, William Kentridge, Yasumasa Morimura, Yoshitomo Nara, Kohei Nara, Mika Ninagawa, Malick Sidibe, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Tabaimo, Mickalene Thomas, Miwa Yanagi and others.