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Preview: TAB Events - in the Ueno, Yanaka area

TAB Events - in the Ueno, Yanaka area





 



Eikoh Hosoe Exhibition

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Eikoh Hosoe Exhibition
at Toki-no-Wasuremono
Las Casas, 5-4-1 Hon-komagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0021
Media: Photography - Party - Talks
(2017-10-31 - 2017-11-25)

Twenty works from photographer Eikoh Hosoe major series from the 1960s-2000s, including “Kamaitachi”, “Barakei (Ordeal by Roses)”, “Gaudi”, “Embrace”, and “Ukiyoe Projections”. [Event] Talk by photography critic Kotaro Iizawa Date: Nov. 8 (Wed) 18:00 Admission: ¥1000 In Japanese. Reservations required.




Keiichiro Sakuma and Kyoko Komoda Exhibition

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Keiichiro Sakuma and Kyoko Komoda Exhibition
at Hagurodo
2F Yushima High Town, 4-6-11 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0034
Media: Painting
(2017-11-13 - 2017-11-25)

The paintings of Keiichiro Sakuma and Kyoko Komoda have a melancholy, elusive quality that might be considered uniquely Japanese forms of expression.




Art Treasures of the Imperial Court

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Art Treasures of the Imperial Court
at The University Art Museum - Tokyo University of the Arts
12-8 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo, 110-8714
Media: Painting - Nihonga - Ceramics
(2017-10-28 - 2017-11-26)

Around 100 years ago, during the Taisho (1912-1926) to early Showa (1926-1989) periods, selected artists of various divisions created exquisite gifts to celebrate the auspicious events of the Imperial Household. Among them were nationwide-scale art projects with a large number of artists participating, though few people know about these projects today. Once these art works were presented to the Imperial Household, they were placed within their palaces and rarely viewed by the general public. The Imperial Household has promoted and passed down Japanese culture from ancient times, and since the modern era, its members have contributed to art promotion by visiting exhibitions and purchasing displayed art works, and commissioning works to decorate the interiors of Imperial palaces. Works created as gifts celebrating auspicious Imperial events were considered as the utmost honor for artists, and were also considered as a cultural policy to succeed and promote traditional artistic techniques. During the Taisho period, works created by artists of various divisions from areas throughout the entire country, directed by the 5th principle of the Tokyo Fine Arts School, Masaki Naohiko (1862- 1940), were considered as the top art works of this era. In this exhibition, works that still exist within the Imperial Household Agency will be introduced alongside materials related to their production. This exhibition is held in commemoration of the 130th anniversary of the Tokyo University of the Arts, which succeeded the Tokyo Fine Arts School and will also exhibit many master works by artists related to the school within the Imperial Household collection. Visitors can enjoy the quintessence of these cultural projects supported by the Imperial Household 100 years ago, including works that will be displayed outside of the Imperial Palace for the first time since they were presented to the Emperor and Empress of the time.




Emi Otaguro “Spot”

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Emi Otaguro “Spot”
at KayokoYuki
2-14-2 Komagome, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 173-0003
Media: Painting - Drawing
(2017-10-28 - 2017-11-26)

Titled “spot,” the current exhibition by Emi Otaguro consists of a series of works at the core of which sits a story woven by the artist herself, inspired by Greek mythology’s tale of “Narcissus.” In her story, a hunter finds himself in the pool formed by his own urine, starting to feel unsure as to his bodily existence. Trying to get a confirmation of his being, he gazes into the pool of urine, only to face various haunting images such as those of cats, horses, and ravens, emerging from there; this situation is the point of departure for her works in the show. Here, the urine, in the form of a pool, symbolizes the boundary between the inside and outside of a living body, and the image inside of it that resembles oneself serves as what shakes one’s self perception of their bodily existence. To sweep away that feeling of insecurity, and prompted by a bit of curiosity, the hunter approximates to his other self dwelling in the urine pool. However, what is revealed to him there, is not his own, true self, which he was pursuing, but images deriving from fragments of his memory. They seem rather like a proof of his being in the world. Throughout her artistic practice, Otaguro has consistently worked under the themes of inexplicable events slipping into everyday life as well as states of human psyche when oscillating between sanity and insanity. Her new works featured in this exhibition present more direct expressions, as a result of employing more restrained methods and materials. “To draw and paint a picture is the act of staining memory,” says the artist; she gives a mark to a piece of memory by cutting out a fleeting moment from the eternally flowing time and then filling it with a black marker. By devoting herself continually to the primitive and physical act of “drawing and painting a picture,” Otaguro confronts uncertainty of bodily existence and ambiguity of self-recognition. That is the way she works, and the new pieces in this exhibition show us her latest development.




The Living Treasures of France

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The Living Treasures of France
at Tokyo National Museum
13-9 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-8712
Media: Sculpture - Product - Fashion - Crafts
(2017-09-12 - 2017-11-26)

Modeled on the Japanese certification of a “Living National Treasure,” the French equivalent, called “Maître d’ Art” or “Master of Art,” was established in 1994 by the Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication, the ministry in charge of cultural and artistic affairs. The purpose of this certification is to preserve and pass down traditional craftsmanship to future generations while promoting innovation. This is the first exhibition of its kind in the world to introduce one artist from each of the fifteen classified fields, including ceramics, glass, leather, tortoiseshell, feathers, umbrellas, fans, and wallpaper. Visitors are invited to view and experience outstanding craftsmanship and tradition, as well as splendid beauty that will inspire future generations. Venue: Hyokeikan inside Tokyo National Museum




Unkei - The Great Master of Buddhist Sculpture

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Unkei - The Great Master of Buddhist Sculpture
at Tokyo National Museum
13-9 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-8712
Media: Sculpture
(2017-09-26 - 2017-11-26)

There is no Buddhist sculptor better known than Unkei in Japan. With his extraordinary artistic talent, he led a new era in sculptural expression, creating realistic works that appear before the viewer as though they were alive. For this Special Exhibition, Unkei’s masterpieces have been brought together from across Japan. These include works from Kohfukuji temple in Nara, with which he had close relations. In addition to presenting an overview of Unkei’s life as a sculptor, the origins of Unkei’s remarkable style and its succession will also be explored through the inclusion of works by his father, Kokei, as well as his sons, Tankei and Koben.




Yukinori Dehara “The Homeless”

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Yukinori Dehara “The Homeless”
at Mograg Gallery
1-5-1 Motoasakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0041
Media: Sculpture - Party
(2017-11-04 - 2017-11-26)

Yukinori Dehara presents around 100 figurines modeled after homeless people neglected by society but with their own inner light. [Event] Soft vinyl paint workshop Dates: Nov. 10 (Fri) and Nov. 24 (Fri) 19:00–21:00 Admission fee: 2000 yen Clay art workshop Date: Nov. 19 (Sun) 15:00–17:00 Admission fee: 2000 yen In Japanese. Please see the official website for reservations and details.




Research Project on Fine Arts and Education in Japan - For the enhancement of the arts and cultural infrastructure: “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” - Pablo Picasso

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Research Project on Fine Arts and Education in Japan - For the enhancement of the arts and cultural infrastructure: “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” - Pablo Picasso
at The University Art Museum - Tokyo University of the Arts
12-8 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo, 110-8714
Media: Painting
(2017-11-17 - 2017-12-03)

This exhibition presents a valuable opportunity to get to know the Japanese art education system through works produced by children attending kindergarten, elementary, junior high and high school students, those currently studying at university, and practicing artists. In the present age where values ​​are becoming increasingly diversified, it is essential that art education nurture the individuality and imagination of individuals in order to encourage young persons to “express themselves vibrantly” and awaken creative power within society. In thinking about the future of art education, this project offers a chance to reconsider the variety of artistic expression taught during early childhood and right through to further education. [Related Event] Special Symposium: Japan, Fine Arts, Education Event Date: Nov. 17 (Fri) 14:00-16:00 Venue: 1F Painting and Department of Fine Arts Building, Tokyo University of the Arts Speakers: Katsuhiko Hibino, Noboru Tsubaki, Naoya Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki Hashimoto, Masato Nakamura *Please see the official website for further details. *Event in Japanese.




Singularity of a Tree #2

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Singularity of a Tree #2
at Denchu Hirakushi house and atelier
2-20-3 Uenosakuragi, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0002
Media: Sculpture
(2017-11-23 - 2017-12-03)

Trees are carved into with a variety of tools, such as chisels, knives, and chain saws. But why is it that we carve into and create shapes from this “living” material? The second exhibition is this series once again presents wood carvings and sculptures by graduate students, research students and educational research assistants belonging to the Wood Carving Laboratory in the Department of Sculpture at Tokyo University of the Arts. [Related Event] Gallery talk by the artists Date: Dec. 2 (Sat) 13:00-, Dec. 3 (Sun) 13:00- *Event in Japanese




The Influence of the Buddhist Sculptor Unkei: With a Focus on Koen and Zen’en

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The Influence of the Buddhist Sculptor Unkei: With a Focus on Koen and Zen’en
at Tokyo National Museum
13-9 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-8712
Media: Sculpture
(2017-08-29 - 2017-12-03)

The realistic style of the Buddhist sculptor Unkei (d. 1223), with its powerful, dynamic forms and rich expression of volume, had an undeniable influence on the sculptors of later generations. Unkei’s grandson, Koen (b. 1207), for example, inherited his grandfather’s style and succeeded in making it more approachable, while the sculptors of the Zenpa school, including Zen’en (1197–1258), elaborated on Unkei’s style in the Nara region. This thematic exhibition explores how these sculptors inherited and transformed the style of Unkei in the Kamakura period (1192–1333).




Vinnie Nylon “Straphangers”

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Vinnie Nylon “Straphangers”
at Wish Less
5-12-10 Tabata, Kita-ku, Tokyo 114-0014
Media: Graphics
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-03)

This event marks the return of Vinnie Nylon, the British graffiti writer and contemporary painter, at this gallery, fresh from the success of his recent solo exhibition at London’s StolenSpace Gallery. Over his 32 year career he has gained the respect of other UK urban artists; most notably internationally-acclaimed artist Banksy once donated an artwork to fund Nylon’s first London show in 2012. Vinnie sums up his ‘manifesto’ as a “potent mix of the 50s, skating and indelible graffiti,” where icons of consumer culture are reinterpreted and given his personal twist. In his upcoming solo exhibition he will show a stunning selection of his newest painting and prints alongside some rare pieces from his personal archive.




Moon & Jeon “Freedom Village”

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Moon & Jeon “Freedom Village”
at SCAI The Bathhouse
Kashiwayu-Ato, 6-1-23 Yanaka, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0001
Media: Photography - Video and Film - Media Arts
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-16)

The exhibition is comprised of photographic documentation of the village taken by the residents, a black and white film and several pieces of single-channel video and sculpture installation. The main film interweaves footage of a technical laboratory with newsreel footage from the Korean War. A nod to Bertold Brecht’s ‘Verfremdungseffekt’ (alienation effect), it challenges the spectators’ ability to contemplate in a detached and critical manner. The artists write about the exhibition: “We attempt to come to terms with the paradoxes and limitations that surround us in our world by summoning the ghost of our past, through the village where time has stood still for 60 years.” With the ongoing conflicts in the Korean Peninsula, the exhibition considers the constraint of political systems that devalue and rule our everyday lives, and elicits emotional awareness. The artists believe that political systems are essentially built upon human actions and predictions, and for that matter, create an archive of incidental value judgments. Through their documentary and fictitious interventions, Moon & Jeon navigate our imagination through the emotional capacities of the political present, where the recognition of our future is demystified by expanding a horizon of visual and narrative possibilities.




Fear in Painting

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Fear in Painting
at Ueno Royal Museum
1-2 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo,110-0007
Media: Painting - Prints
(2017-10-07 - 2017-12-17)

The general consensus as to how we view paintings suggests that our feelings and responses are based on what we see in terms of color, overall atmosphere, methods of expression, and the like. However, in her best-selling book series “Fear in Painting” (2007), writer and scholar of German Literature Kyoko Nakano suggests that we instead focus on fear in art, basing our reading of paintings on the historical background of the works and knowledge of the underlying narrative. In this exhibition commemorating the tenth anniversary of the publication, a new selection of works will be presented, based around a number of those introduced in Nakano’s book. Assisted by various hints, this exhibition will encourage you to let your imagination help you in understanding the fear depicted in these works so that you may enter the world of each painting. It will feature Paul Delaroche’s magnificent “The Execution of Lady Jane Grey,” one of the most prized works in the collection of the National Gallery in London, which will be shown here in Japan for the first time. This large work - 2.5 meters long and 3 meters wide - depicts the final appearance made by the 16-year-old Queen of England, who was on the throne for just 9 days before being sent to execution. In total there will be around 80 oil paintings and prints from throughout early modern and modern Europe on exhibit, including titles by J. M. W. Turner, Gustave Moreau, Paul Cezanne and others.




Haikara-san ga Toru (Mademoiselle Anne):” Taisho Girls & The World of Waki Yamato!

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Haikara-san ga Toru (Mademoiselle Anne):” Taisho Girls & The World of Waki Yamato!
at Yayoi Museum
2-4-3 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032
Media: Manga - Photography - Video and Film - Talks
(2017-09-29 - 2017-12-24)

Girls who ride pushbikes and wear patterned kimonos with traditional hakama, lace-up boots, and big bows in their hair… This is the adorably cute “hakama” style that was popular with young women during the Meiji (1868-1912) and Taisho (1912-1926) eras, when fashion in Japan was transitioning from traditional modes to Western trends. The “hakama” style was later brought back into the spotlight by manga artist Waki Yamato, with the release of his hit work “Haikara-san ga Toru (Mademoiselle Anne)” (1975) which was awarded the 1st Kodansha Manga Award. This exhibition will introduce original artwork from “Mademoiselle Anne,” as well as ephemera related the culture of girlhood enjoyed by female students and young working women of the Taisho and early Showa eras. There will also be roughly 200 other works by Yamato, including those from the early part of his career and masterpieces from titles such as “The Tale of Genji,” “Yokohama Monogatari” and “The Daughter of Ishtar.” [Related Events] Screening: “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” Event Date: Nov. 3 (Fri) 17:40-19:00 Venue: 1F Exhibition Room, Yayoi Museum Speaker: Nanako Yamauchi (narrator), Ayumi Kamiya (piano) Capacity: 60 Admission: Adults ¥1500, Students ¥1400 (inc. exhibition admission) *Please see the official website for booking.




Ueno Artist Project: “Contemporary Realism - Transcending Photography and Video”

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Ueno Artist Project: “Contemporary Realism - Transcending Photography and Video”
at Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum
8-36 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-8712
Media: Painting
(2017-11-17 - 2018-01-06)

Ueno, known for its many art institutions, including the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum and Tokyo University of the Arts, has a long history as an art mecca that has fostered many important artists. Among those institutions, the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum - ”the home of the public entry exhibition” - has fulfilled a significant role by giving artists of all kinds a place to exhibit and develop their practice. Now, to build on that history and foster new potential for the future, the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum will launch the “Ueno Artist Project,” an exhibition series featuring contemporary artists who are currently active in art groups, under a fixed theme each time. Part one of the series takes the theme, “Contemporary Realism - Transcending Photography and Video.” The exhibition will feature nine artists who pursue a “contemporary real ism” that is only possible in paintings. Venue: Gallery A and C [Related Events] Series of Artist Talks Various artists contributing to the exhibition will discuss realist expression. Admission: Free (exhibition admission required) Event Date: Nov. 25 (Sat) 14:00-15:30 Speakers: Hayato Komori, Daisuke Hashimoto, Hisaharu Motoda Venue: Gallery A and C Event Date: Dec. 2 (Sat) 14:00-15:30 Speakers: Ryo Shiotani, Mihoko Hiruta, Sohey Iwata Venue: Gallery A and C Event Date: Dec. 16 (Sat) 14:00-15:30 Speakers: Naoyuki Odano, Rika Sasaki, Koji Inagaki Venue: Gallery A and C *Events in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details and other events.




Van Gogh & Japan

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Van Gogh & Japan
at Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum
8-36 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-8712
Media: Painting - Nihonga - Workshops - Talks
(2017-10-24 - 2018-01-08)

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) was profoundly interested in Japan. From his Paris period to his early days in Arles, he collected ukiyo-e prints and writings on Japanese culture. Conversely, Japanese artists and intellectuals became enamored of Van Gogh after his death and made pilgrimages to his grave in Auvers-sur-Oise in France. This exhibition explores the mutual fascination between Van Gogh and Japan, presenting enlightening new perspectives through the display of roughly 40 of Van Gogh’s oil paintings and sketches, accompanied 50 or some works by Japanese ukiyo-e artists and Van Gogh’s contemporaries, as well as various historical materials. [Related Events] Evening Lecture Event Dates: Nov. 3 (Fri), Dec. 1 (Fri) 18:30-19:00 (doors open 18:10) Venue: Auditorium Lobby Floor, Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum Capacity: 225 (no booking required) Admission: Free (exhibition admission ticket required) *Event in Japanese.




Hokusai and Japonisme

Hokusai and Japonisme
at National Museum Of Western Art, Tokyo
7-7, Ueno-Koen, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0007
Media: Painting - Nihonga - Talks
(2017-10-21 - 2018-01-28)

In the latter half of the 19th century, Western artists were fascinated by the new expression they found in Japanese art, and this led to the phenomenon known as Japonisme. It was the genius ukiyo-e artist Hokusai Katsushika (1760-1849) to whom they turned the most. Hokusai’s influence spread across the entire West, including the work of Monet, Degas and the other Impressionists, and can be found throughout myriad art forms, from paintings to prints, sculpture, posters and decorative arts. This exhibition, organized in Japan and the first of its kind worldwide, examines the development of modern Western art through the lens of Hokusai and Japonisme. Bringing together artworks from museums and private collections in Japan and overseas, the exhibition will compare around 220 Western artworks, including those by Monet, Degas, Cézanne and Gauguin, with about 110 works by Hokusai (around 40 color woodblock prints and 70 woodblock-printed books). Visitors can discover new intriguing aspects of how the West viewed and learned from Hokusai, all while enjoying Western art masterpieces born from the West’s encounter with this standard-bearer of a foreign culture. [Related Events] Evening Exhibition Viewing and Mini Talk Event Date: Nov. 15 (Wed) part 1: 18:40-19:10, part 2: 19:30-20:00 Exhibition viewing time: 18:00-21:00 (last entry: 20:30) Capacity: 300 Speakers: Mari Hashimoto (writer, editor), Shiro Takagi (chief editor of “Waraku” magazine) *Event in Japanese. *Please see the website for further details on other events and bookings.




Architecture on Paper: Architectural Drawings of Japan 1970s-1990s

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Architecture on Paper: Architectural Drawings of Japan 1970s-1990s
at National Archives of Modern Architecture
4-6-15 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8553
Media: Drawing - Architecture - Talks
(2017-10-31 - 2018-02-04)

Architectural drawings are what are commonly referred to as “plans.” They may take the form of preliminary sketches, design drawings, construction drawings, or beautifully colored and shaded presentation renderings. Sometimes, however, architects may also construct imaginative worlds on paper that stand independent of any actual design-to-construction process. In Japan, architectural drawings made great strides particularly after the Osaka Expo, in the period spanning from the 1970s to the 1980s. The architects of this post-postwar period poured extensive energy into developing their drawings beyond practical requirements. Sheets grew larger, techniques diversified, and drawings came to be appreciated as works of art on their own. Why did these architects make such drawings? What did they seek to achieve through their work on paper? When we look at the drawings, what we see are visions that would not necessarily be completed even if they were constructed as buildings. Even since CAD (computer-aided design) came into wide use in the 1990s, hand-drawn architectural plans have become rare, and the art of drawing has fallen into decline. What significance did the drawings of the post-postwar architects have in their time? What questions do they pose for us today? This exhibition was conceived to reflect upon these themes. [Architects] Youji Watanabe, Arata Isozaki, Hiromi Fujii, Hiroshi Hara, Takefumi Aida, Zo Atelier, Tadao Ando, Kikoo Mozuna, Ryoji Suzuki, Riken Yamamoto, Shin Takamatsu [Related Events] Symposium: Architectural Drawings and Japanese Architecture 1970s-1990s Date: Dec. 2 (Sat) 14:00-16:00 Speakers: Makoto Ueda (Editor in Chief, Sumai Library Publishing Company), Norihito Nakatani (Scholar in the history of engineering, Professor at Waseda University) Moderator: Jo Toda (Associate Professor at Kanazawa Institute of Technology) Venue: Larg Hall, Kenchikuka Kaikan Capacity: 120 (booking recommended) Admission: Free *Event in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details.




Ancient Civilization of the Andes

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Ancient Civilization of the Andes
at National Museum of Nature and Science
7-20 Ueno-koen, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-8718
Media: Sculpture - Crafts
(2017-10-21 - 2018-02-18)

The Ancient Civilization of the Andes exhibition examines several cultures, spotlighting the myths and religious beliefs their influences have brought about, the superior technology that allowed them to build temples and pyramids, and the unique lifestyles that developed amid harsh but diverse natural environments. A selection of some 200 artworks, artifacts, and other rare items are displayed.




The Shining Boro – Cloth of Life

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The Shining Boro – Cloth of Life
at Amuse Museum
2-34-3 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0032
Media: Fashion
(2017-03-31 - 2018-03-25)

In Aomori Prefecture, there were quilted cloths called “Bodo” or “Bodoko” made by sewing pieces of hemp and cotton cloth once worn by generations of ancestors. Bodoko were used as sheets to lie on during the night, spread over straw or dry leaves on the floor. They were also often also used during childbirth as the sheet for the baby to be delivered on. Receiving the baby with these multi-layered cloths once worn by long-gone ancestors carried the message to the baby that she did not enter the world alone. In addition to the Boro patched clothing collection of Mr. Chuzaburo Tanaka, this exhibition presents valuable Bodoko owned by Mr. Toshio Kojima (Gallery Kojima) and Ms. Sayomi Okamune (Art gallery Hagisha). The stunning world of art unexpectedly created from these “shabby” clothes represents the precise opposite of today’s consumer culture.




"Boro" Exhibition

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"Boro" Exhibition
at Amuse Museum
2-34-3 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0032
Media: Product - Fashion

"Boro" is now becoming an international phrase, originated from Japanese snowy north area, meaning the patched clothes that people back then used for many generations in a household by adding stitches and/or pieces of cloth on it over and over. The word “Boro” now also has an artistic sense to it, highly rated among the field of the textile art design, and requested for purchase by various artists and collectors. Boro is patched clothing with a lot of small cloths here and there, but nothing fancy like today’s quilted or patched works. It was made purely for the practical purposes of retaining warmth in the snowy areas and for making it last as long as possible where it was hard to obtain any other sorts of cloth. When we review its practicality and design from today’s point of view, we are able to realize its incredible sophistication. Amuse Museum is exhibiting Boro for the first time after a century has passed since its last use. It contains no waste, and this is what is called “Yuyo-no-Bi" (Beauty of Practicality), a concept which we seem to have forgotten already, the opposite of today’s prevailing consumer culture.




NMWA Museum Collection

NMWA Museum Collection
at National Museum Of Western Art, Tokyo
7-7, Ueno-Koen, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0007
Media: Painting - Drawing - Prints - Sculpture

The NMWA was established in 1959 around the core Matsukata Collection as Japan’s museum specializing in Western art. The galleries feature pre-18th century paintings including those by Ritzos, Van Cleve, Veronese, Rubens, Van Ruysdael, and Ribera, 19th to early 20th century French paintings including works by Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Renoir, Monet, Van Gogh, Gauguin, and Moreau and works by the next generation of artists, such as Marquet, Picasso, Soutin, Ernst, Miro, Dubuffet and Pollock.




Yokoyama Taikan Memorial Hall Permanent Exhibit

Yokoyama Taikan Memorial Hall Permanent Exhibit
at Yokoyama Taikan Memorial Hall
1-4-24, Ikenohata, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0008
Media: Painting - Drawing - Ceramics

Works, studies, sketches, ceramics, kimonos, artworks by friends, letters, bamboo crafts, and other belongings of Yokoyama Taikan are on display. Exhibits will change every three months. Closed during summer, winter, and rain season. May be closed in heavy snow or hurricane.