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Preview: TAB Events - in the Shibuya, Setagaya area

TAB Events - in the Shibuya area





 



A la mode

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A la mode
at L'illustre Galerie Le Monde
201 Dormi Harajuku, 6-32-5 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001
Media: Illustration
(2017-09-26 - 2017-10-01)

Images with exciting visuals by a group of fashion illustrators.




Masakatsu Tagami Exhibition Vol.5: I want to fly!

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Masakatsu Tagami Exhibition Vol.5: I want to fly!
at Atsukobarouh Arts Drinks Talk
5F Crossroad Bldg., 1-29-1 Shoutou, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0046
Media: Painting - Talks
(2017-09-16 - 2017-10-01)

Painter Masakatsu Tagami is one of the reasons the owner of Atsukobarouh decided to open this gallery, as he was so keen to have his work seen by a wider audience. In this, his firth exhibition at the gallery, Tagami will present a varied lineup of works. The artist will be in attendance on Sep. 16 (Sat), 17 (Sun), 18 (Mon).




Masayoshi Nojo “Mirage”

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Masayoshi Nojo “Mirage”
at Tokyo Arts Gallery
2-23-8 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0011
Media: Painting
(2017-09-15 - 2017-10-01)

Masayoshi Nojo’s approach to making art is incredibly interesting and unique. Despite his works obviously being paintings, there is no act of so-called “painting” involved in their production; the images that flow forth from his brain are represented on the canvas in a manner that is unbound by traditional painting techniques. Discover his truly a mirage-like scenes here.




Post Living Room

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Post Living Room
at Shibuya Hikarie 8/ Cube 1, 2, 3
Shibuya Hikarie 8F, 2-21-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Painting - Architecture - Sculpture - Installation
(2017-09-22 - 2017-10-01)

A quirky and fun-filled group exhibition that freely moves across the boundaries of art, architecture and interior design. Works of various genres and the unexpected relationships that form between them offer a fresh and unique experience for viewers. It will bring together creators such as Ittah Yoda, who is based in both London and Berlin, Takashi Kunitani, who works out of Kansai, and The Copy Travelers, whose work can rarely be seen in Tokyo, architect Daisuke Motoki, Katsuyoshi Kameda of Alternative Antiques, and cynical conceptual artist Taiyo Kimura. [Related Event] “Art and Architecture/Interiors” Talk Event Jun Aoki and Jo Nagasaka - two architects deeply involved with the art world - discuss art, architecture, and interiors. *Please see the official website for details on how to book. *Event in Japanese.




This Week at Gallery Le Deco

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This Week at Gallery Le Deco
at Gallery Le Deco
LE DECO Building, 3-16-3 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Photography
(2017-09-26 - 2017-10-01)

Le Deco 4 Musashino Art University Imaging Arts and Sciences Department Norio Kobayashi Photography Seminar Exhibition “The Last Gamble” Le Deco 3 Nihonga x Irish Harp Exhibition “The Harp Draws, the Painting Plays”




Kohtaro Abe “Complete Natural Color”

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Kohtaro Abe “Complete Natural Color”
at Nanzuka
Shibuya Ibis bldg., B2F 2-17-3 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Painting - Party
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-07)

Born in 1988 in Oita Prefecture in the south of Japan, Kohtaro Abe is a young artist who has been living and working in Tokyo since completing his MFA at Musashino Art University in 2015. Abe creates works using natural materials such as spices, flour, and dried fruits that usually serve as ingredients in food. Although Abe has continued to create works using this particular method since his late teens, while a student at preparatory school, the roots of this practice lie in his family trade of aquaculture, where he observed fish being given feed made of natural food coloring as a means to improve their coloring. Aside from presenting his works at university, Abe has not held any solo shows thus far. He has experienced numerous failures and setbacks on route to completing the works introduced here, at times his pieces being spoiled by mold or decay, and even devoured by mice. His production approach includes the mixing of raw materials in order to achieve durable works of art, this requiring repeated experimentation before arriving at an optimal means of drying and fixing the materials to the support medium. This method is uncanny and unique, somewhat comparable to the practices of a scientist. Approximately six works on canvas will be showcased here.




Yuji Honbori “Yakushido”

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Yuji Honbori “Yakushido”
at Nanzuka
Shibuya Ibis bldg., B2F 2-17-3 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Sculpture - Installation - Party
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-07)

Yuji Honbori produces statues of Buddha through means of used cardboard and paper cartons. Such works appear permeable from the front, while at the same time fragments of cardboard emerge stereoscopically when viewed from the side. Honbori finds significance in reusing materials that we consume in our daily lives - wood, paper, newspapers, milk cartons - in the context of his work. This said, he does not define the concept of his practice as specifically pertaining to ecological issues and recycling, but rather as more concerned with metempsychosis as articulated in Buddhism. Honbori began working with materials such as cardboard, which is both easily attainable and highly malleable, as a result of his hesitation to use new materials after experiencing the Great Hanshin Earthquake. The strength and dignity of Honbori’s works lie in the almost discrepant act of creating statues of Buddha - a subject of admiration and worship - from used cardboard that has already fulfilled its initial purpose. The exhibition is comprised of an installation work that replicates the Yakushido (hall of worship for the Yakushi Buddha), and a large-scale statue of the Fudo Myo-o (a dharmapala primarily revered in Vajrayana Buddhism). Born in Kobe in 1958, Honbori graduated with a degree in sculpture from Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music, and currently lives and works in Kobe in Hyogo Prefecture.




Yuji Kobayashi “New Matango”

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Yuji Kobayashi “New Matango”
at Nanzuka
Shibuya Ibis bldg., B2F 2-17-3 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Sculpture - Party
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-07)

Drawing on his rare and distinguished modeling skills, Yuji Kobayashi has been continuously producing paper clay masks as a means to decorate the interior of New Matango, his bar situated in Hatsudai in Tokyo’s Shinjuku district. There are many admirers of these masks that actually sold out at last year’s exhibition, “Morning Star #01,” curated by Hiroki Tsukuda to raise charity funds for the Kumamoto Earthquake. Kobayashi’s works convey the strength of his creative practice where he has continued unflinchingly to pursue his own ideas and interests. The exhibition will feature approximately five new mask works by Kobayashi. Born in 1973 in Aichi Prefecture, Kobayashi currently lives and works in Tokyo. After graduating from high school and working as a stage designer and illustrator, Kobayashi currently works as a bartender at his own bar, “New Matango.”




47 People of Nippon 2017 Our Future Way of Living — Off-Grid Life

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47 People of Nippon 2017 Our Future Way of Living — Off-Grid Life
at Shibuya Hikarie 8/ d47 Museum
Shibuya Hikarie 8F, 2-21-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8510
Media: Product - Fashion - Crafts - Talks
(2017-08-03 - 2017-10-09)

An imagining of the lifestyle collectives that will define our future, as seen from 47 diverse perspectives. This exhibition is about people leading diverse lifestyles unbound by conventional wisdom on things like housing, food, energy, work, and logistics. Some have years of experience; others are just getting started. Some are doing it on their own; others have founded companies. Knowing where you’re going is important, but so is having the continuity to make it all fit into the realities of our society. The exhibition is more than simply stories and dreams. It’s a vision of how people are finding different ways to enjoy their lives in a mature, capitalist, democratic society with a shrinking population. We hope you’ll enjoy connecting these 47 perspectives together to imagine where our society might be headed in the future, and what shape it might take. *Please go to the official website to refer to the related events.




Off-Grid Life: Lifestyles of the Future

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Off-Grid Life: Lifestyles of the Future
at Shibuya Hikarie 8/ Court
8F Shibuya Hikarie, 2-21-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Architecture - Talks
(2017-08-03 - 2017-10-09)

Architect and Tohoku University of Art and Design professor Masayoshi Takeuchi presents 47 displays offering ideas for living beyond the framework of technologies, infrastructures, and lifestyles that seem increasingly tenuous in Japan’s late-capitalist, post-3/11 society. [Event] Off-Grid Life Lecture & Talk Dates: 9/9 (Sat), 9/10 (Sun), 10/7 (Sat), 10/8 (Sun) In Japanese. Please see the official website for reservations and details.




John Dove & Molly White “Sensibility and Wonder”

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John Dove & Molly White “Sensibility and Wonder”
at Diesel Art Gallery
cocoti B1F, 1-23-16 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Illustration - Prints - Fashion - Video and Film - Sound
(2017-08-25 - 2017-11-09)

This exhibition features the origin of street fashion and the punk movement while reflecting on the works of John Dove and Molly White. The T-shirt has been a clothing staple in Street fashion for quite a while, and its history dates back to 1968 when John Dove and Molly White produced fully printed T-shirts under the label “Wonder Workshop” at their atelier in London. The pair used the same silkscreen techniques for making prints to forge their work of art; they applied their printing skills and uniquely developed inks for textiles to make prints on T-shirts for people to wear on the street with an affordable price instead of making small editions on paper or canvas. Their T-shirts allowed the images, which used to exist only on canvas or posters for a limited number of people reach a global audience. Through screen printings, collage and sculpture, the show traces modern art and fashion techniques born in the 60’s and 70’s. It also follows the origin of ideas that have become commonplace today, along with a sense of moment and a sense of wonder.




Windsor Chair Exhibition

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Windsor Chair Exhibition
at Japan Folk-Craft Museum
4-3-33 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-0041
Media: Product - Crafts
(2017-09-07 - 2017-11-23)

Windsor chairs are thought to have originated in England in the first half of the 18th century. Much admired by members of Japan’s Folkcraft Movement such as Soetsu Yanagi, Shoji Hamada, Keisuke Serizawa, and Sanshiro Ikeda, these all-wooden chairs became representative of Western furniture. Unprecedented in scope, this exhibition introduces the beauty of Western chairs with outstanding examples of Windsor chairs in Japan as well as several other kinds of chairs from Europe and America.




Ko-Imari Masterpieces of the 18th Century

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Ko-Imari Masterpieces of the 18th Century
at Toguri Museum of Art
1-11-3 Shoto, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0046
Media: Ceramics
(2017-09-15 - 2017-12-20)

The 17th century saw the advent of Imari ware as Japan’s first domestic porcelain, as well as sweeping technological innovations that carried the craft to its zenith in manufacturing methods. The many superb works made at that time were luxury items that only the upper reaches of society could afford. In the 18th century, however, the market for Imari ware changed and expanded. The kilns now made products for a wider base of users, ranging from luxury ware to more affordable items. On the one hand, there were the great vases and jars made for export, now in even larger sizes, that were so favored by the nobility of Europe for display in their castles and manor homes. But the kilns were now also making products for the domestic market, which expanded during the prosperous Genroku era (1688–1704). These new products include splendid dishes in the Kinrande style, which features rich colors and the lavish use of gold, which were popular with wealthy merchants who would bring them out for use on special occasions. As food culture developed and spread, the kilns also moved into larger-scale production of simpler, useful blue-and-white dishes and bowls. The potters skillfully adjusted their designs and product line to appeal to different users, and to suit the fashions of the times. These changes helped popularize Imari ware, bringing this beautiful porcelainware into the lives of a greater number of people. In this exhibition, we present approximately 80 fine works, ranging from tiny dishes that could fit into the palm of your hand to large vases over 70 cm tall. Some of the pieces you will see are being exhibited in our museum for the first time. As you appreciate and compare the various shapes, designs, and decorative elements, we hope you will make new discoveries, experiencing for yourself the many reasons that 18th century Imari ware has captivated so many people in so many places across so many different times.




Geneto “The Wall”

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Geneto “The Wall”
at Diesel Art Gallery
cocoti B1F, 1-23-16 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Installation
(2017-02-18 - 2018-02-16)

Every year Diesel Shibuya, the one-and-only concept-based store where you can experience the Diesel lifestyle, invites an architect, interior designer, or artist to create a freely inspired space showcasing the home collection. This year’s installation is by Geneto, who works in urban planning, architecture, product design, and art. Geneto calls this display “The Wall” because it presents a single scene created with wall arrangements altering perceptions of size and space. Its design will change with the seasons, so the viewing experience is different each visit. Discover the new possibilities of the wall, an element of interior design that has been with us since antiquity.




Yusuke Asai "@Yoyogi Park"

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Yusuke Asai "@Yoyogi Park"
at Yoyogi Park
2 Jinnan, Kamizono-cho, Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0041
Media: Painting

Consisting of a tendriled mass of white lines, Yusuke Asai's work was completed on October 8th with the help of a team of assistants. This work is on view 24 hours a day at the Harajuku entrance to Yoyogi Park. [Image: Keizo Kioku]