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Preview: TAB Events - in the Shibuya, Setagaya area

TAB Events - in the Shibuya area





 



Sopheap Pich “Desire Line”

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Sopheap Pich “Desire Line”
at Shibuya Hikarie 8/ Art gallery
8F Shibuya Hikarie, 2-21-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Installation
(2017-10-27 - 2017-11-20)

8/ Art Gallery/ Tomio Koyama Gallery and Tomio Koyama Gallery (Roppongi) will concurrently hold two solo exhibitions by internationally prominent Cambodian artist Sopheap Pich. Both titled “Desire Line,” the name came about during the artist’s stay at the Rauschenberg Residency in Florida (2017), where he found a path that had naturally emerged though the process of people repeatedly walking through the forest. This exhibition will feature approximately 12 new works, including “Miroiise” and “Moonstone,” two works employing marble and rosewood roots that represent a more abstract yet intimate direction in his exploration of three-dimensional works. Also included in the show are new large-scale drawings produced using natural earth pigments that were created with a bamboo stick that the artist presses repeatedly on paper to create resonant and rhythmic lines in space. These works are progressions from the drawings shown at this year’s Venice Biennale. It is the artist’s first solo exhibition in Japan.




Masahiro Tsubakihara “Birds”

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Masahiro Tsubakihara “Birds”
at No.12 Gallery
2-29-13 Uehara, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0064
Media: Drawing
(2017-11-17 - 2017-11-22)

Presenting a lineup of bird-themed works that have been produced intermittently since the beginning of last year. Masahiro Tsubakihara’s series titled “Birds” features both these feathered creatures and young boys as subjects through which to address the dangers of our relationship with ourselves and with others.




Windsor Chair Exhibition

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Windsor Chair Exhibition
at Japan Folk-Craft Museum
4-3-33 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-0041
Media: Product - Crafts
(2017-09-07 - 2017-11-23)

Windsor chairs are thought to have originated in England in the first half of the 18th century. Much admired by members of Japan’s Folkcraft Movement such as Soetsu Yanagi, Shoji Hamada, Keisuke Serizawa, and Sanshiro Ikeda, these all-wooden chairs became representative of Western furniture. Unprecedented in scope, this exhibition introduces the beauty of Western chairs with outstanding examples of Windsor chairs in Japan as well as several other kinds of chairs from Europe and America.




Atsuhiko Misawa “Animal House: House of Enigmas”

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Atsuhiko Misawa “Animal House: House of Enigmas”
at The Shoto Museum of Art
2-14-14 Shoto, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0046
Media: Painting - Sculpture - Workshops - Talks
(2017-10-07 - 2017-11-26)

Atsuhiko Misawa (1961-) is one of modern Japan’s leading sculptors. His life-sized “animals” are carved from logs of camphor wood using a chisel or sword according to a traditional woodcarving technique, and colored with oil paints. They exude a realistic sense of vitality, as if infused with actual souls (anima). The animals appear here and there throughout the distinctive architectural space of the Shoto Museum of Art, which was designed by Seiichi Shirai, emitting a powerful presence that seems to make the very air around them vibrate as they freely strut around the building. This is “Animal House: House of Enigmas.” It is worth paying attention to the settings and narratives that Misawa’s animals appear in, as these are the result of his close rapport with other artists, namely Katsura Funakoshi, Masato Kobayashi, Hiroshi Sugito, and Masashi Asada. [Related Events] House of Enigmas Artist Talk Series Animal House 1: Oct. 7 (Sat) 14:00-15:00 Animal House 2: Oct. 28 (Sat) 14:00-15:00 Animal House 3: Nov. 25 (Sat) 14:00-15:00 Venue: 2F Exhibition Space Speakers: Atsuhiko Misawa, Katsura Funakoshi, Masato Kobayashi, Hiroshi Sugito, Masashi Asada (speakers will vary for each talk event) “Atsuhiko Misawa x Katsura Funakoshi Work in Progress - Busts in Clay” See the two artists producing clay busts of visitors to the exhibition. Event Date: Oct. 21 (Sat), Nov. 18 (Sat) 15:00-16:00 Venue: 2F Exhibition Space *Events in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details.




LÄMPÖ by Kauniste

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LÄMPÖ by Kauniste
at Case Gallery
55-6 Motoyoyogi-cho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0062
Media: Product - Fashion - Crafts
(2017-11-18 - 2017-11-26)

Displaying and selling wool clothing and other winter items by the Helsinki-based textile brand kauniste.




Tamie Okuyama “Recollecting Clouds”

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Tamie Okuyama “Recollecting Clouds”
at Mizoe Art Gallery
3-19-17 Denenchofu, Ota-ku, Tokyo 145-0071
Media: Painting
(2017-11-11 - 2017-11-26)

Tamie Okuyama presents paintings of clouds recollected from stories she was told during her travels around South America more than 40 years ago, in places such as the Lencois desert in Brazil. Visiting in the dry season, she did not see any of these clouds with her own eyes. Instead, these paintings are based on fabrications inspired by what she heard from locals.




d design travel Gunma Exhibition

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d design travel Gunma Exhibition
at Shibuya Hikarie 8/ d47 Museum
Shibuya Hikarie 8F, 2-21-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8510
Media: Installation - Product
(2017-10-13 - 2017-11-26)

This exhibition presents a three-dimensional expression of the content of a Gunma Prefectue guidebook from a design perspective. Various tools and decorative items will be installed in place of the guide book itself, recreating the attraction of what the publication, and Gunma, have to offer.




Shibuya Hikarie ShinQs Art Festival

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Shibuya Hikarie ShinQs Art Festival
at Shibuya Hikarie 8/ Cube 1, 2, 3
Shibuya Hikarie 8F, 2-21-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Art Festival - Workshops - Talks
(2017-11-16 - 2017-11-29)

Shibuya Hikarie ShinQs and Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennial have come together to organize a collaborative two-week event that will spread throughout the entire Hikarie building. Artworks will appear on each floor and customers can enjoy participating in a stamp rally, or shopping for new goods in the official art festival shop on the 5th floor. In addition, there is a workshop for making your own “gift to the land” artwork on the 3rd floor, and there will be a talk about the approaching Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennial next summer scheduled. Venue: Floors throughout Hikarie *Please see the official website for further details.




Ryuichi Ishikawa “Outremer / Ultramarine”

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Ryuichi Ishikawa “Outremer / Ultramarine”
at Atsukobarouh Arts Drinks Talk
5F Crossroad Bldg., 1-29-1 Shoutou, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0046
Media: Photography - Talks
(2017-11-11 - 2017-12-10)

Photographs from Paris by the Ihei Kimura Prize-winning photographer Ryuichi Ishikawa.




Ara Mahoshi: Art, Anything to Access A World

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Ara Mahoshi: Art, Anything to Access A World
at Tokyo Shibuya Koen-dori Gallery
Shibuya Workers' Welfare Hall 1F, 1-19-8 Jinnan, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0041
Media: Painting - Sculpture - Talks
(2017-11-09 - 2017-12-17)

Nowadays we tend to categorize things in everyday life to make them easier to understand. This said, often what we encounter defies categorization and leaves us feeling confused. To take things just as they are, accepting beauty as beauty, ugliness as ugliness, and chaos as chaos, helps us understand the world and enables us to go deeper into the heart of things with greater speed. This exhibition titled “ara mahoshi” celebrates diversity. The phrase aramahoshi, which can be translated as “may it be so,” is formed of “ara” (existence) and “mahoshi” (wish). The blank space interposed in the title indicates the diversity of everyone’s wish for existence. When we recognize that all people have a need to express, we see that expression and life are inseparable. The artworks and events presented here are diverse expressions of life. [Related Event] Symposium coordinated by Creative Support “Let’s”: Art and life - Considering culture from the perspective of disability welfare Event Date: Dec. 15 (Fri) 18300-20:30 *Event in Japanese *Please see the official website for booking and further details regarding other events.




Otto Nebel and his contemporaries - Chagall, Kandinsky, Klee

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Otto Nebel and his contemporaries - Chagall, Kandinsky, Klee
at Bunkamura Museum of Art
2-24-1 Dogenzaka, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8507
Media: Painting - Drawing - Talks
(2017-10-07 - 2017-12-17)

The painter Otto Nebel (1892–1973), who spent his artistic career in Switzerland and Germany, met Kandinsky, Klee and others at Bauhaus during a stay in Weimar in the mid-1920s, forging long-lasting friendships with these creators. This is the first-ever retrospective of Nebel’s work in Japan, organized with full backing from the Otto Nebel Foundation in Bern. The exhibition traces the themes central to Nebel’s oeuvre - architecture, drama, music, the abstract, the Middle East and so on - supplementing the artist’s own works with those of his contemporaries, such as Klee, Kandinsky and Chagall. The intention is to shed light on the process by which Nebel sought to establish his own brand of art, incorporating and experimenting with style after style. With a view to the approaching centenary of Bauhaus’s foundation in 2019, this retrospective showcases Nebel’s underappreciated artistic achievements, beginning with the painter’s early experiences at Bauhaus, and following along his career that was devoted to exploration of materials and textures. [Related Events] Talk Event: “Weimar Bauhaus and its periphery - Those encountered at Bauhaus” Event Date: Nov. 19 (Sun) 18:30-20:30 Venue: Bunkamura The Museum Exhibition Space Speaker: Kaho Somada (Curator of Misawa Bauhaus Collection) Capacity: 60 Admission: Free *Bookings can be made via the official website. *Event in Japanese.




Ko-Imari Masterpieces of the 18th Century

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Ko-Imari Masterpieces of the 18th Century
at Toguri Museum of Art
1-11-3 Shoto, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0046
Media: Ceramics
(2017-09-15 - 2017-12-20)

The 17th century saw the advent of Imari ware as Japan’s first domestic porcelain, as well as sweeping technological innovations that carried the craft to its zenith in manufacturing methods. The many superb works made at that time were luxury items that only the upper reaches of society could afford. In the 18th century, however, the market for Imari ware changed and expanded. The kilns now made products for a wider base of users, ranging from luxury ware to more affordable items. On the one hand, there were the great vases and jars made for export, now in even larger sizes, that were so favored by the nobility of Europe for display in their castles and manor homes. But the kilns were now also making products for the domestic market, which expanded during the prosperous Genroku era (1688–1704). These new products include splendid dishes in the Kinrande style, which features rich colors and the lavish use of gold, which were popular with wealthy merchants who would bring them out for use on special occasions. As food culture developed and spread, the kilns also moved into larger-scale production of simpler, useful blue-and-white dishes and bowls. The potters skillfully adjusted their designs and product line to appeal to different users, and to suit the fashions of the times. These changes helped popularize Imari ware, bringing this beautiful porcelainware into the lives of a greater number of people. In this exhibition, we present approximately 80 fine works, ranging from tiny dishes that could fit into the palm of your hand to large vases over 70 cm tall. Some of the pieces you will see are being exhibited in our museum for the first time. As you appreciate and compare the various shapes, designs, and decorative elements, we hope you will make new discoveries, experiencing for yourself the many reasons that 18th century Imari ware has captivated so many people in so many places across so many different times.




Chinese Cutting Edge

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Chinese Cutting Edge
at Diesel Art Gallery
cocoti B1F, 1-23-16 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Photography
(2017-11-17 - 2018-02-14)

Amidst the madness of contemporary city life, what is China’s present, as expressed by C.H.I, the most noticed contemporary artist in Beijing? The curator of this exhibition is Yasumasa Yonehara, an editor and occasional instant camera photographer who boasts 2.36 million followers on Weibo (also known as “Chinese Twitter”). Yonehara, whose who is also known overseas, became acquainted with C.H.I in 2012. That year, he visited C.H.Iʼs solo exhibition in Beijing, at a gallery run by the same curator who had handled his own exhibition. Seeing C.H.I’s work, with all sorts of eccentric and fashionable presentations he had never before imagined, gave him a shock stronger than anything from Japan could have. Five years have since passed, and this is Yonehara’s first opportunity to introduce the work of this cutting-edge Chinese artist in Tokyo. This exhibition will showcase around 60 of C.H.I’s main artworks, in addition to displaying some new pieces.




Geneto “The Wall”

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Geneto “The Wall”
at Diesel Art Gallery
cocoti B1F, 1-23-16 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
Media: Installation
(2017-02-18 - 2018-02-16)

Every year Diesel Shibuya, the one-and-only concept-based store where you can experience the Diesel lifestyle, invites an architect, interior designer, or artist to create a freely inspired space showcasing the home collection. This year’s installation is by Geneto, who works in urban planning, architecture, product design, and art. Geneto calls this display “The Wall” because it presents a single scene created with wall arrangements altering perceptions of size and space. Its design will change with the seasons, so the viewing experience is different each visit. Discover the new possibilities of the wall, an element of interior design that has been with us since antiquity.




Yusuke Asai "@Yoyogi Park"

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Yusuke Asai "@Yoyogi Park"
at Yoyogi Park
2 Jinnan, Kamizono-cho, Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0041
Media: Painting

Consisting of a tendriled mass of white lines, Yusuke Asai's work was completed on October 8th with the help of a team of assistants. This work is on view 24 hours a day at the Harajuku entrance to Yoyogi Park. [Image: Keizo Kioku]




Aiko Fukawa “Small Windows”

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Aiko Fukawa “Small Windows”
at L'illustre Galerie Le Monde
201 Dormi Harajuku, 6-32-5 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001
Media: Painting
(2017-11-21 - 2017-12-03)

Displaying and selling illustrations by Aiko Fukawa, including new works. 2018 calendars and other merchandise are also available.