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Preview: TAB Events - in the Roppongi, Akasaka area

TAB Events - in the Roppongi, Nogizaka area





 



Naomi Shigeta “Only the silence remains”

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Naomi Shigeta “Only the silence remains”
at Gallery Closet
2-11-10 Nishi-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0031
Media: Painting
(2017-09-14 - 2017-09-26)




5th Fei Print Award Prize Winner’s Exhibition: Atsushi Nemoto “Places with Light”

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5th Fei Print Award Prize Winner’s Exhibition: Atsushi Nemoto “Places with Light”
at Hideharu Fukasaku Gallery Roppongi
1F Fukasaku Ophthalmological Clinic Bldg., 7-8-9 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Prints
(2017-09-20 - 2017-09-30)

Exhibition presenting the simple yet somewhat melancholic print works of Atsushi Nemoto, an artist who graduated from Printmaking at the Tokyo University of the Arts Graduate School and was awarded the top prize at the 5th Fei Print Award sponsored by Fei Art Museum Yokohama and related galleries last year. This is an exhibition where you can get a sense of what the artist is thinking through his works. [Related Event] “Roppongi one shot art week” Event Dates: Sep. 26 (Tue) - 30 (Sat) This event held alongside Roppongi Art Night (Sep. 30 - Oct. 1) is a stamp rally in which various galleries are participating. Those who collect all of the stamps will receive a free drink at the gallery on Sep. 30.




Interface - Or, What Japan’s Great Post-War Photographers Kept Looking For: An Inquiry into the Artistic Practice of Shomei Tomatsu

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Interface - Or, What Japan’s Great Post-War Photographers Kept Looking For: An Inquiry into the Artistic Practice of Shomei Tomatsu
at Fujifilm Square
West 1F, Tokyo Midtown, 9-7-3 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0052
Media: Photography
(2017-07-01 - 2017-09-30)

At the begin of the 1960s, Shomei Tomatsu stunned Japan’s photographic scene with his black-and-white series’ such as “House,” “Occupation” and “Nagasaki.” After covering the U.S. military bases in Okinawa at the end of the 1960s — he published photographs of these bases as part of a collection titled “The Pencil of the Sun” in 1975 — Tomatsu then turned to color photography and, while making the coverage of Nagasaki his lifework, brought forth a diverse portfolio that continues to influence the world of photography in various ways today. When engaging with photographs by Shomei Tomatsu, one should remember that his heart surgery in 1986 marked a turning point also in his photographic practice. For, as Tomatsu stated after the surgery, this experience shifted his interest to questions surrounding the human will and power to survive. With this experience as a connecting node, the exhibition is divided into two parts. The first part will show Tomatsu’s series “Plastics,” which he shot a few years after his surgery, in 1988 and 1989. The second part will feature “Interface,” a series of photographs he took between 1968 and 1996. “Plastics” was shot at Kujukuri Beach in Chiba, where Tomatsu lived after his surgery. It depicts plastic objects washed ashore and in doing so explores the possibilities of aesteticizing the inorganic, the ‘dead’ within nature. “Interface” begins with the 1966 photograph “Intertidal Zone” and consists of works focusing on — as the title of the initial photograph suggests — the area of land that is above water at low tide and underwater at high tide. Tomatsu offers us a vivid overview of the manifold facets of this zone, which is habitat to various forms of life and, delimited by continuously changing boarders, constitutes an interface, so to say, between land and sea that invites us to question rigid distinctions between different spheres of life. In this exhibition you will also find a number of other ‘interfaces:’ between the past and present, nature and civilization, which Tomatsu stages in a multilayered approach so as to challenge the self-evidence of what we see as borderlines between them and we hope that juxtaposing “Plastics” and “Interface” within one exhibition, then, will in turn result in yet another ‘interface’ that leads us toward new insights into the aesthetic practice of Shomei Tomatsu. Venue: Photo History Museum, Fujifilm Square Schedule: Part 1 - July 1 (Sat) - August 14 (Mon) Part 2 - August 15 (Tue) - September 30 (Sat) [Related Events] Gallery Talk Yasuko Tomatsu (CEO of Shomei Tomatsu Office Interface) discusses Shomei Tomatsu and his work. Event Date: July 29 (Sat) 14:00-, 16:00-, September 2 (Sat) 14:00-, 16:00- (duration: approx. 30 mins. each) Admission: Free (no booking required) *Event in Japanese




Lucas Dillon + Russell Maurice “Slow Vibrating Atom”

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Lucas Dillon + Russell Maurice “Slow Vibrating Atom”
at Calm & Punk Gallery
Asai Bldg. 1F, 1-15-15 Nishi-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0031
Media: Graphics - Painting - Drawing - Sculpture - Party
(2017-09-16 - 2017-09-30)

Lucas Dillon and Russell Maurice both have had a long standing interest in the subconscious, using it as a tool to inform their works. The works presented in “Slow Vibrating Atom” deal with the idea of the lost and found. What is beyond the picture and what has happened before. Dillon and Maurice present a series of works, which are fragments of a larger narrative and history. Dillon uses drawing and painting as a medium to project energies from the world as we know it, to depict another. Whilst Maurice similarly displays his projected histories through painting and sculpture. The works on display all outline a history of searching and finding.




Mikito Ozeki “Static & Dynamic”

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Mikito Ozeki “Static & Dynamic”
at Clear Edition & Gallery
Kishida Bldg. 2F, 7-18-8 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Graphics - Sculpture - Crafts - Party
(2017-09-01 - 2017-09-30)

Third solo exhibition by Mikito Ozeki, an artist currently working out of his home city of Nagoya, Japan. Recently, Ozeki has started to move towards the idea of freeing himself from the traditional concept of paper cutting, expanding his expressions to encompass more of a sense of three dimensionality. In his past series, Ozeki depicted a robot-like figure created using a gathering of shapes that resemble industrial pipes and materials. He started out making works like this by cutting a single piece of paper to produce an artificial life form. Soon, however, his style evolved to become more abstract and included the usage of layered colored paper so as to capture and frame particular mental states. His most recent work, which was installed in the Facebook office in Tokyo, is comprised of a complex combination of layers of colorful organic parts that resemble organs. Although one aspect that Ozeki seeks through his practice is the physicality of paper cutting, it is also clear that he is mesmerized by lifeforms themselves. In his most recent series, he attempts to depict modules of life and combine them together. Discover his fresh approach to the traditional techniques and potential of paper cutting.




Ryuji Miyamoto “Lo Manthang 1996”

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Ryuji Miyamoto “Lo Manthang 1996”
at Taka Ishii Gallery Photography/Film
2F Axis Bldg., 5-17-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Photography - Party - Talks
(2017-08-26 - 2017-09-30)

Interested in architecture’s material features beyond their raison d’être or purpose, Ryuji Miyamoto has been photographing, from a unique perspective, the city as it is transformed, ruined, and revived. This solo exhibition, his first with the gallery, will feature approximately 22 never-before-shown photographs of the Nepalese walled city Lo Manthang. [Related Event] Talk event: “Mikiro Sasaki x Ryuji Miyamoto” Event Date: Aug 26 (Sat) 16:30-18:00 (Doors open: 16:00) Guest: Mikiro Sasaki (Poet) Venue: IMA Concept Store (5-17-1 3F, Roppongi, Minato-ku, 106-0032 Tokyo) Admission: ¥1000 (with one drink) Capacity: 50 (booking required) *Event in Japanese. *Please see the website for further details.




“On Paper -Monochrome & Colors-“

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“On Paper -Monochrome & Colors-“
at Gallery MoMo Projects
2F 6-2-6 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Painting - Drawing - Prints
(2017-09-02 - 2017-09-30)

Exhibition presenting a selection of works on paper, produced using a variety or materials and techniques, such as pencil sketching, acrylic paint, and printing. It will coincide with Roppongi Art Night, which is scheduled for Sep. 30, closing at 22:00 on the final day.




Grand Projects: How Far Will You Go?

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Grand Projects: How Far Will You Go?
at 21_21 Design Sight
Tokyo Midtown, 9-7-6 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0052
Media: Painting - Drawing - Photography - Architecture - Video and Film
(2017-06-23 - 2017-10-01)

Filled with the joy of making things, creators proceed on a journey toward a Grand Project. The exhibition will showcase Grand Projects by such creators who give shape to their bold and innovative ideas that transcend existing modes of expressions. In June 2016, Christo and Jeanne-Claude realized “The Floating Piers” on Lake Iseo in Italy. The piers covered with fabric that is 3 kilometers-long appeared on the lake. Along with sidewalks also covered with the same fabric, the floating piers dramatically changed the landscape, and uplifted the spirit of people. The starting point for this exhibition will be these artists who conceived projects of incredible scale that transforms bridges in cities, landscapes over some ten kilometers, and even the house of parliament to artworks, and ultimately realized what was initially thought to be impossible. From that starting point, creators from diverse fields who carry out unique activities using dynamic techniques and methods, will gather and display their works. The process of meticulous planning and giving shape to a project while receiving the cooperation and support of many people, together with the finished works that are displayed on a huge scale, evoke a feeling of awe among the visitors who are likely to wonder, “How far will you go?” The creators’ attitudes make us feel their strong will, passion, endless series of trial-and-error, and determination to take action with conviction, to confront all sorts of hardships, such as technical challenges in natural environments, as well as financial challenges and changes in times and social circumstances. Their grand projects may also be said to be grand urban projects proposed by artistic creators. By temporarily or permanently changing the city and natural landscapes, their works permeate through our daily lives. By taking part in the project and being involved from the production process, cooperators from public institutions, corporation, and other interested persons, too, get to experience the fun of working together and the joys of creating things. This is another major characteristic of this exhibition. The works they express encourage us to experience new things, and make us aware of enjoyment and sets of values we had never thought of previously. The exhibition will convey the extraordinary power that such creations have, and the joys that spread from there.




Azabujuban Gallery Little Art Fair 2017

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Azabujuban Gallery Little Art Fair 2017
at Azabujuban Gallery
1-7-2-1F Azabu-juban, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0045
Media: Painting - Crafts - Ceramics - Art Fair
(2017-09-20 - 2017-10-02)

Part 1: Sep. 20 (Wed) - 35 (Mon) Part 2: Sep. 27 (Wed) - Oct. 2 (Mon)




Lucerne Festival Ark Nova 2017

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Lucerne Festival Ark Nova 2017
at Tokyo Midtown
9-7-1 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-6205
Media: Sculpture - Video and Film - Sound - Art Festival - Talks
(2017-09-19 - 2017-10-04)

Having celebrated its 10th anniversary this spring, Tokyo Midtown presents Lucerne Festival Ark Nova this fall, the first time for the event to come to Tokyo. Tokyo Midtown Grass Square will host to the massive Ark Nova mobile concert hall, an 18 meter tall, 30 meter wide, 36 meter deep structure that has aided recovery from the East Japan Earthquake via music and art. The interior will also be open to the public for some of the time, allowing you to look back on the events that were held in the disaster regions as well as experiencing concerts or movie screenings inside this massive work of art. From the desire to support the disaster regions, which are still in the process of recovery, take this opportunity to participate in events involving the very embodiment of such hopes – the incredible Ark Nova.




Doyagai - Day labouring districts of Japan -continued-

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Doyagai - Day labouring districts of Japan -continued-
at Zen Foto Gallery
Piramide Bldg 2F, 6-6-9 Roppongi Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Photography
(2017-09-15 - 2017-10-07)

Sanya, Kamagasaki and Kotobukicho are known as the three doyagai - the districts where manual laborers gather in the three great Japanese cities of Tokyo, Yokohama and Osaka. The term doyagai itself comes from the slang term “doya,” a reversal of “yado,” meaning lodging house. Japan’s cities have grown during the past century by absorbing migrants from the countryside. Most people now live in cities and think of their lives as civilized, but how did they get to this point and come to live such comfortable lives? In most cases their ancestors came from the fields in search of something better and struggled through crushing difficulties. They passed through the doyagai, or their equivalent. Images of the doyagai bring us back to this realization and to the common experience of our humanity, which may be why they been the subject of so many photographers’ works. This exhibition - the second of two parts - will introduce images of Sanya by Shoko Hashimoto, photographs of Kotobukicho by Seung-woo Yang, as well as works of Kamagasaki by Seiryu Inoue, Haruto Hoshi and Issei Suda.




Leiko Ikemura “Limits of that world”

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Leiko Ikemura “Limits of that world”
at Shugoarts
2F Complex665, 6-5-24 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Painting - Party
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-07)

Leiko Ikemura distanced himself from the student movement that took hold in Japan in the late 1960s and set off alone for Spain, where he encountered art. He then relocated to Switzerland in 1979 and began pursuing art full-time before later moving his base to Berlin in the 1990s. Since then he has continued to exhibit his work at art museums, galleries, and other institutions. In the lineup presented here, the features of his landscape paintings stand out, and the people, animals and trees that have appeared in his works to date transform, becoming part of Ikemura’s universe as a whole.




Nick Ervinck “Gni-Ri sep2017”

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Nick Ervinck “Gni-Ri sep2017”
at Art & Science Gallery Lab AXIOM
5-9-20 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 160-0032
Media: Sculpture - Party
(2017-09-02 - 2017-10-07)

Combining cutting-edge forms of computer expression and 3D printing technology, Nick Irving is an artist who breaks new ground in the traditional field of sculpture, freely moving between the digital and physical. His sculpture “Nesurak” is based on the process of evolution, when mankind transitioned from wearing furs to donning contemporary garments. As our clothes have become a kind of “skin” possessing various functions that strengthen our bodies, the hope is that they will support us in withstanding the harsh global environment of the future. See Irving’s world, inspired by everything from science fiction movies, manga, aliens and mysterious creatures, to the art and culture of Inca and Mayan civilizations, unfold here.




Rika Noguchi “At the Bottom of the Sea”

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Rika Noguchi “At the Bottom of the Sea”
at Taka Ishii Gallery Tokyo
3F Complex665, 6-5-24 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Photography - Party - Talks
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-07)

This exhibition marks Rika Noguchi’s first solo presentation at the gallery and features roughly 12 new works (7 large and 5 small color photographs) taken in Okinawa, where the artist has been residing since returning from Berlin last year. Known for her photographic works that convey a unique sense of distance from the subject and appear to freshly recapture the given world replete with convention, the gaze Noguchi expresses through her practice is critically described as that of “the stranger’s eyes” at work. Through works such as “Small Miracles” (2014), which depicts the very moment in which a drop of honey is about to fall from a spoon towards the center of the earth, “HIIA•F4” (2002), that captures the site of a rocket rising vertically up towards the sky as if escaping from such earthly forces, and “The Sun” (2005 – 2008), a series that uses a pinhole camera to photograph the sun as one of the stars in our galactic system that emits light towards both the earth we inhabit and the vast expanse of the entire universe, Noguchi serves to remind us of the existence of greater and all-controlling powers at work, like gravity and light within the scenes we observe in the everyday. In the way that Noguchi enlisted her representative work that she photographed on Mount Fuji with the title “A Prime” (1997-) - in reference to prime numbers of which the principle of their emergence remain yet to be explicated - Noguchi’s unique gaze could indeed be said to have been already established from the early stages of her artistic career. The large format color works that make up ”At the Bottom of the Sea,” Noguchi’s latest series, capture underwater scenes and follow on from her previous series “To Dive” (1995) and “Color of the Planet” (2004). These works shot in the sea of Okinawa capture images of a diver who stands upon the ocean floor while lighting up his dark surroundings, where the rays of the sun do not reach. In the profound depths of the sea that we all know exists an otherworldly realm where the inescapable gravitational forces of the earth appear to have no power. One wonders what Noguchi’s gaze discovers upon entering the sea in this third and latest installment of her underwater works. [Related Event] Rika Noguchi x Keiichiro Hirano Talk Event (Daikanyama Fair Talk Session) Event Date: Sep. 30 (Sat) 14:00-15:30 Venue: Exhibition Room, Daikanyama Hillside Forum Admission: ¥500 (capacity 40, booking recommended) *Event in Japanese




Chu Asai’s Kyoto Legacy - Kyoto Institute of Technology Arts and Crafts Collection

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Chu Asai’s Kyoto Legacy - Kyoto Institute of Technology Arts and Crafts Collection
at Sen-Oku Hakuko Kan
1-5-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Nihonga - Product - Crafts - Ceramics
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-13)

Chu Asai (1856-1907) is a well-known Japanese western-style painter who experienced Europe by traveling to events such as the Paris Exposition. He brought back with him a strong interest in design, related not only to changes in painting, but also inspired by his discovery of Art Nouveau during its heyday. During a visit, Asai was invited to join the Design Department at Kyoto High School of Art and Crafts (one of the predecessors of Kyoto Institute of Technology), after which he moved to Kyoto. He taught there from 1902 until 1907, when he left to found the Kansai Art Institute, continuing to focus on his training and research in the tradition of Western-style painting, and working hard to develop this style of painting in the Kansai region. Furthermore, he also established an organization to bring together ceramic artists, lacquer artists and designers, creating a new movement in the Kyoto craft industry that produced novel designs reminiscent of Art Nouveau. This exhibition introduces Western craft items that Asai employed as teaching materials at Kyoto High School of Art and Crafts, tracing his footsteps, as well as those of other professors such as Takeshiro Kanokogi and Eiki Totori. These objects will be displayed together with items from the Sumitomo family, who supported Western-style painters like Asai and Kanokogi. This is a chance to reconsider what Asai has contributed to arts and crafts, art education, and day to day culture in present day Kansai. (Some exhibits will change during the exhibition).




James Welling “New Work”

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James Welling “New Work”
at Wako Works of Art
Piramide Bldg 3F, 6-6-9 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Photography
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-14)

This eighth solo exhibition by James Welling is his first in five years, since the exhibition “Wyeth” in 2012. Entitled “New Work,” he will present his latest video work “Seascape” (2017) along with one photograph from his “Choreograph” series, produced from 2014 to 2016, six images from his “Meridian” series, completed between 2014 and 2015, and three prints from the “Oak Tree” series (2012-2014). It will be the first time that any of these artworks have been displayed in Asia. Welling’s works have been described as “photographs about photography”, and this new exhibition that explores recent developments such as his active introduction of digital techniques and changes in printing technology is attracting attention.




Makoto Saito “2100”

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Makoto Saito “2100”
at Tomio Koyama Gallery
2F Complex665, 6-5-24 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Painting
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-14)

Standing in front of Makoto Saito’s new works, the viewer is captivated by the technique. His use of dots combined with the organic unevenness of paint, and its density create an overwhelming sense of physical touch. The production of dots using four-color half tone reproductions, employed throughout his career, is similar to the process used in computer’s digital technique. In contrast, Saito’s analogue approach brings body to painting through the painstaking and time-consuming work that is impossible with digital media.As the viewer moves away from the abstract surfaces of mere piles of paint, the dots start forming an image. The motifs are the portraits of Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon, with whom Saito empathizes. He reads the characters of a person from their faces or eyes, picks up interesting people as his subjects, and experiments with his approach on the same subjects many times. Thus he has selected Freud and Bacon as their faces can stand with variety of Saito’s approaches. Saito reveals inner emotions and new images of humans. In our contemporary times filled with uneasiness about the potential destruction of humanity and the future with AI, how does Saito’s desire to express our underlying human “face” effect the viewer?




Tamaki Shindo “Inhabited Island”

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Tamaki Shindo “Inhabited Island”
at Gallery Art Unlimited
1-26-4-3F Minamiaoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0062
Media: Graphics - Photography - Installation - Talks
(2017-09-16 - 2017-10-14)

Tamaki Shindo, who has traveled to and photographed various remote islands in recent years, set out on a journey in search of an old hermit said to inhabit the island of Kitagi-shima in Okayama Prefecture. This exhibition presents an installation comprised of collage works and straight photographs - a first for Shindo. [Related Events] Roppongi Art Night Event Event Date: Sep. 30 (Sat) 19:30-21:00 (doors open: 19:15) Artists: Tamaki Shindo, Mari Shirayama (Head of Research, Japan Camera Industry Institute) Capacity: 30 *Bookings can be made via: info@artunlimited.co.jp *Event in Japanese.




50th Anniversary Commemoration Weekly Shonen Jump Exhibition Vol. 1: From the first issue to the 1980s - The beginning of the legend

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50th Anniversary Commemoration Weekly Shonen Jump Exhibition Vol. 1: From the first issue to the 1980s - The beginning of the legend
at Mori Arts Center Gallery
Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 52F, 6-10-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-6150
Media: Manga
(2017-07-18 - 2017-10-15)

The inaugural issue of “Weekly Shonen Jump” was published in 1968. Next year, 2018, will be the magazine’s 50th anniversary. To commemorate the occasion, the Weekly Shonen Jump Exhibition series will look back on the publication’s history from its founding to the present. The first installment is “50th Anniversary Commemoration Weekly Shonen Jump Exhibition Vol. 1: From the first issue to the 1980s - The beginning of the legend.” Numerous original drawings of works that fueled the magazine’s early success, plus a gathering of legendary heroes will be displayed.




“RESTIaRt - Tarelu”

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“RESTIaRt - Tarelu”
at Restir
9-6-17 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0052
Media: Painting - Drawing
(2017-09-14 - 2017-10-15)

The second RESTIaRt exhibition presents art and design by Zevs, Nick Walker, Dolk, and Banksy.




Taro Izumi “←contact”

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Taro Izumi “←contact”
at Take Ninagawa
2-12-4 Shinei Bldg.1F, Higashi-azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0044
Media: Painting - Sculpture - Product
(2017-09-09 - 2017-10-21)




MAM Collection 005: Recycle and Build

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MAM Collection 005: Recycle and Build
at Mori Art Museum
Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 53F, 6-10-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-6150
Media: Photography - Sculpture - Sound
(2017-07-05 - 2017-10-23)

Since the end of the Second World War, Japan has taken a “scrap-and-build” approach to development, demolishing aging buildings and infrastructure and replacing them with those employing the latest technologies. Behind this method, which alters the urban landscape in short, ten-year cycles, lies a “modern” reverence for technology, economics-first mentality, and desire for efficiency. The validity of scrap-and-build is now being reexamined, however, with renewed interest in building renovation over the past two decades being a manifestation of this. The exhibition focuses on the relationship between cities and recycling, via the work of three Japanese artists of burgeoning reputation: Iwasaki Takahiro, who is representing Japan at this year’s Venice Biennale; Ujino, a participant in Yokohama Triennale 2017 scheduled for August this year; and Miyamoto Ryuji, awarded the Medal of Honor with Purple Ribbon in 2012. Here you can see Ujino’s sound sculpture “Vertical Plywood City” (2011), which represents an imaginary city by combining plywood and old electrical appliances, as well as Iwasaki’s sculpture “Out of Disorder” (2007), consisting of miniature structures made from the threads of towels, clothes etc., and “Cardboard Houses” (1994-96), a series of photos by Miyamoto showing homeless dwellings made from collected cardboard boxes. These constructions made by recycling mundane everyday items may be unstylish, unfashionable, and lacking in rationality, but they certainly don’t lack originality, and are certain to remind us of things often forgotten.




MAM Research 005: Laboratory for Chinese Contemporary Photography – Three Shadows Photography Art Centre
MAM Research 005: Laboratory for Chinese Contemporary Photography – Three Shadows Photography Art Centre at Mori Art Museum Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 53F, 6-10-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-6150 Media: Photography - Talks (2017-07-05 - 2017-10-23) Sino-Japanese photographer duo RongRong & inri launched their Beijing-based joint practice in 2000, and since then have continued to take photographs grounded in everyday life, focusing on subjects such as their growing family, the changing Chinese landscape, and destruction of the environment. In 2007 RongRong & inri used their own funds to establish the “Three Shadows Photography Art Centre,” a complex dedicated to photography on a large site in Beijing’s Caochangdi arts district. Designed by artist Ai Weiwei, an early supporter of the pair’s career, the building was a revolutionary structure equipped with a gallery, dark room, library and artist-in-residence facility. In 2009 RongRong & inri launched the “Three Shadows Photography Award.” The aim of the award is to identify and cultivate up-and-coming Chinese photographers, and it has indeed proved a stepping-stone to success for photographers with their sights set on an international career. Three Shadows has embarked on a range of ventures from exhibitions to lectures and workshops, based on its network of photographers and critics around the world and including an international photography festival (2010- ) run jointly with the 40-year-old Rencontres d’Arles photography festival in Arles, France, and an exhibition of works from the “Three Shadows Photography Award” at the Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale in Niigata (2015). In 2015, Three Shadows opened another branch site in the city of Xiamen in Fujian Province, thus extending its activities even further. This exhibition looks back on ten years of Three Shadow’s efforts to promote the photographic arts in China. With input from art historian Wu Hung, it will also make some observations on the role of Three Shadows in the history of Chinese contemporary photography. In addition to books, magazines and photographs, the exhibition also features video footage of interviews with critics, artists and staff who have witnessed first-hand the growth of Three Shadows. The name “Three Shadows” has its origins in the words of Laozi: “Dao begets one; One begets two; Two begets three; Three begets the myriad creatures.” The exhibition will present this unique center for photography created in the hope of becoming a place where photography (the “shadows”) in turn begets infinite possibilities. [Related Events] Talk Session: “A Photography Hub to the World: Three Shadows and the Development of Chinese Contemporary Photography” Through photography, Three Shadows has made tremendous contributions to international cultural exchange. In this Session, RongRong & inri will speak about the foundation of the Centre as well as its activities, and Wu Hung, who has been watching them closely from early on, will speak about the history of Chinese contemporary photography and its background. Furthermore, Kasahara Michiko will join to discuss contemporary photography by touching upon the situation of the discipline in Japan and China. Event Time: July 29 (Sat) 14:00-16:00 (Doors open: 13:30) Speakers: Wu Hung (Distinguished Service Professor of the Department of Art History, The University of Chicago), RongRong & inri (Photographer du[...]



MAM Screen 006: Camille Henrot

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MAM Screen 006: Camille Henrot
at Mori Art Museum
Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 53F, 6-10-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-6150
Media: Video and Film
(2017-07-05 - 2017-10-23)

This exhibition presents nine films made by Camille Henrot between 2002 and 2011, in a single screening around an hour in duration. Together, these works challenge traditional assumptions about memory, film, and cultural dialogues, prompting the viewer to question the conventions by which the world is understood. Through this process, the program is sure to offer us new ways of looking at the world. Henrot’s diverse practice encompasses video, sculpture, drawing, and installation. She takes inspiration from a breadth of disciplines, including anthropology, literature, and natural history. Through these fields, Henrot offers her own unique observations on the ways in which knowledge is recorded, and how such knowledge becomes transformed as it moves across cultures. Her exploration of these themes is coupled with an awareness of how the rise of the digital has altered our relation to everything from the natural world to spirituality. In two of Henrot’s early works, “Metawolf” (2002) and “Dying Living Woman” (2005), found footage from sci-fi and horror films is obscured by the artist’s scribbles, subtly subverting the narrative conventions of both genres. “Natural History of Art” (2009) places an anthropological gaze on both plants in a greenhouse and art-handlers installing an exhibition. “Le Songe de Poliphile /The Strife of Love in a Dream” (2011) focuses on various techniques employed to conquer fear, such as pilgrimages to holy places, the production of anti-anxiety medication, and the extraction of snake venom. In her film, Henrot explores the snake as an ambiguous symbol in both Eastern and Western cultures, at once deadly and protective. The snake emerges as the source of human knowledge and imagination, and her work encourages the viewer to consider the relation between cultural myths and fear. Henrot gained international recognition in 2013 when she was awarded the Silver Lion at the 55th Venice Biennale for her video “Grosse Fatigue.” In recent years Henrot’s profile has continued to grow through a number of solo and group exhibitions in international institutions, including solo show at Kunsthalle Wien (Vienna, 2017), Fondazione Memmo (Rome, 2016), and the New Museum (New York, 2014). This fall, she will present a carte blanche at Paris’ Palais de Tokyo. [Screening Times] The duration of the program is around 55 minutes and screenings will commence at the following times: 10:00-, 11:00-, 12:00-, 13:00-, 14:00-, 15:00-, 16:00-, 17:00-, 18:00-, 19:00-, 20:00-, 21:00- (On Tuesdays: 10:00-, 11:00-, 12:00-, 13:00-, 14:00-, 15:00-, 16:00- only)




Sunshower: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia 1980s to Now

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Sunshower: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia 1980s to Now
at Mori Art Museum
Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 53F, 6-10-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-6150
Media: Painting - Drawing - Sculpture - Installation - Video and Film - Media Arts - Workshops - Talks
(2017-07-05 - 2017-10-23)

With its population totaling around 600 million, the multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-faith region of Southeast Asia has nurtured a truly dynamic and diverse culture. Contemporary art from this emerging economic powerhouse is currently earning widespread international attention. The “sunshower” – rain that falls from clear skies – is an intriguing yet frequently seen meteorological phenomenon in Southeast Asia, and serves as a metaphor for the vicissitudes of the region. This exhibition, the largest-ever of its kind, seeks to explore the many practices of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since the 1980s from nine different perspectives. It showcases the inconceivable dynamism of a Southeast Asia that is somewhat nostalgic yet extraordinarily new. *Held simultaneously with the exhibition of the same title at The National Art Center, Tokyo. [Related Event] Artists’ Talk “My Work” Apichatpong Weerasethakul and Chai Siris will talk about their new work “Sunshower” (2017) and Chiang Mai, Thailand, where they are currently based. * Japanese-English simultaneous interpretation available Moderator: Hirokazu Tokuyama (Associate Curator, Mori Art Museum) Date & Time: 19:00-20:30, Monday, July 10, 2017 (Doors open: 18:30) Free (Exhibition ticket valid for the day of issue for the admission to the Mori Art Museum required) Reservations required. Please see the official website for details.




Sunshower: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia 1980s to Now

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Sunshower: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia 1980s to Now
at The National Art Center, Tokyo
7-22-2 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8558
Media: Painting - Drawing - Sculpture - Installation - Media Arts
(2017-07-05 - 2017-10-23)

With its population totaling around 600 million, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-faith Southeast Asia has nurtured a truly dynamic and diverse culture. Contemporary art from the emerging economic powerhouse of Southeast Asia is currently earning widespread international attention. The “sunshower” – rain that falls from clear skies – is an intriguing yet frequently-seen meteorological phenomenon in Southeast Asia, and serves as a metaphor for the vicissitudes of the region. This exhibition, the largest-ever in scale, seeks to explore the many practices of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since the 1980s from nine different perspectives. It aims to showcase the inconceivable dynamism of Southeast Asia that is somewhat nostalgic yet extraordinarily new. This event will be held simultaneously with the event of the same name hosted at Mori Art Museum.




Chen Wei “Fresh Dewdrop”

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Chen Wei “Fresh Dewdrop”
at Ota Fine Arts
Piramide Bldg 3F, 6-6-9 Roppongi Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Photography - Sculpture
(2017-09-16 - 2017-10-28)

Titled “Fresh Dewdrop,” this is the second show by the artist at this gallery. Utilizing different motifs from his previous exhibition there, Chen turns beauty into forms which he has discovered during his observation of Chinese society and the people living as part of it. His work that share its title with the exhibition shows a scene where a tiles is missing from an old sidewalk. Orange colored paint falls by accident into the shape of the missing tile, appearing like a ray of light or an entrance into a black hole. In addition, this exhibition showcases sculptural works featuring LED boards in addition to photographs. Waves of light appear on the screen with varying brightness: sometimes weak lights create gradations for a while, while at other times strong lights appear as if to brighten the whole room. This rhythmical change reflects Chen’s high sensitivity for music, and also gives viewers the sense that they resemble the heartbeats of a living being. Based in Beijing, Chen has been developing new photographic expressions as a leading figure from the new generation of artists in China. His works have been well-received globally, characterized by still life painting-like compositions, dazzling lights and allegorical narratives within. His recent solo exhibitions include “The Club,” Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne (2017), and “Chen Wei: In the Waves,” Chi K11 Art Museum, Shanghai (2015).




Kozo Miyoshi “On the Road Again”

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Kozo Miyoshi “On the Road Again”
at PGI
3F TKB Bldg., 2-3-4 Higashi-azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0044
Media: Photography
(2017-09-05 - 2017-10-28)

Kozo Miyoshi’s journey as a photographer started in the 1970s. He began working with large format 8×10 cameras in 1981 and used them until upgrading to the 16×20 ultra-large format in 2009. “Road tripping is meditation,” he explains of his quest for that elusive ‘something,’ getting one step closer with each click of the shutter and mile added to the odometer. Despite the inherent time restrictions that come with travelling, these photos are instilled with a sense of unrestrained freedom. Perhaps this is a sign that Miyoshi’s seemingly endless road trips have reached their final destination.




Yusuke Kagari Exhibition

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Yusuke Kagari Exhibition
at SFT Gallery
7-22-2 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8558
Media: Product - Fashion
(2017-08-23 - 2017-10-30)

Displaying and selling new bags featuring walls as an artistic motif. Artist Yusuke Kagari is interested in how walls can transform landscapes and beckon us into mysterious worlds.




Celebrating a Decade in Roppongi “Kano Motonobu: All Under Heaven Bowed to His Brush”

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Celebrating a Decade in Roppongi “Kano Motonobu: All Under Heaven Bowed to His Brush”
at Suntory Museum of Art
Tokyo Mid-town Garden Side, 9-7-4 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-8643
Media: Nihonga
(2017-09-16 - 2017-11-05)

Kano Motonobu (1477?-1559) was the second-generation head of the Kano school, which maintained its central role in the art world for about four centuries, starting in the Muromachi period. The Kano school was a group of professional artists with members of the Kano family, connected by blood, at its core. The son of the school’s founder, Kano Masanobu (1434-1530), Motonobu possessed superb artistic skills, and his work was the most highly regarded among all Kano school artists. Motonobu’s abilities in both Japanese and Chinese styles and his mastery of both large formats such as wall and screen paintings and smaller formats, including picture scrolls and fan paintings, enabled him to respond to a wide variety of commissions and acquire many patrons. The Kano school thus made significant organizational strides under Motonobu’s direction. This exhibition introduces the breadth of Motonobu’s oeuvre, principally through his masterpieces. They are shown alongside paintings by his brilliant predecessors, whom he studied, to highlight a fascinating world of rich tradition. *Displayed artworks will be alternated over the course of this exhibition.




Paola Pivi “They All Look The Same”

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Paola Pivi “They All Look The Same”
at Gallery Perrotin Tokyo
Piramide Bldg. 1F, 6-6-9 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Sculpture - Installation - Party
(2017-08-26 - 2017-11-11)

Solo exhibition by Paola Pivi organized to coincide with her participation in the Yokohama Triennale. The series of artworks Paola Pivi presents in Tokyo exemplifies her phantasmagorical and unbridled world, “as beautiful as the chance encounter of a sewing machine and an umbrella on an operating table,” as Lautréamont would say. Here, polar bears and feathered wheels live in lighthearted harmony, as if floating in a space that looks out over the city and attracts the glances of passers-by. The work of Pivi is undisputedly compelling, leaving no viewers feeling indifferent. Her series of multicolored bears captivated viewers at the “Ok, you are better than me, so what?” exhibition for the opening of Perrotin, New York. Pivi’s bears will be put on a show once again here, striking poses and playing with the space that opens onto the exterior of the gallery. One extra large polar bear — the biggest ever made by Pivi — is caught mid-air as if it has just boldly leaped into the void, while another is pointing down in a fearless dive. The bears are covered with feathers in colors that range from white to electric blue. Massimiliano Gioni describes the spectacular nature of Pivi’s work in the following terms: “Paola Pivi’s work moves to the fevered beat of a Carnival party. And in fact, she has often thought of her work as a kind of festivity.” The impression of movement is accentuated by a series of wall-mounted wheels in motion, captivating metal creations adorned with natural feathers. The artworks in the new series “They all look the same” have been specially produced for the exhibition with feathers sourced in Japan. Evoking in turn the wheel of a peacock’s tail, Native American dream catchers, Marcel Duchamp’s bicycle wheel, or a hypnotic pendulum, Pivi’s wheels offer a minimalist counterpoint to the feathered bears on display. The very placement of Pivi’s installations is central to her creative process, boldly moving beyond the conventional codes of practice for staging exhibitions. Paola Pivi invites us to a joyful show that seems to pay no heed to any principles of reality or laws of gravity, true to her epicurean vision of creation. Proposing “an implied collective,” Pivi’s works appeal to our personal experience, our perceptions, our imagination, as opposed to a rational logic. Absurd but above all free, nature revisited by the artist affords a radical, parodying vision of our contemporary artifacts — objects, animals or similar creatures — within a strange and magical, topsy-turvy world.




Inuit Carvings from the Prince and Princess Takamado Collection

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Inuit Carvings from the Prince and Princess Takamado Collection
at Embassy of Canada Prince Takamado Gallery
7-3-38 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-8503
Media: Sculpture
(2017-09-13 - 2017-11-21)

The late Prince Takamado first went to Canada in 1978 to study at Queen’s University in Ontario. He returned a number of times after completing his studies and had a deep fondness for Canada and its people, including its Inuit culture and art. After their marriage, Prince and Princess Takamado visited Canada’s North on two occasions, meeting Inuit sculptors and artists and developing a deeper appreciation for this culture. Recently, so that a wider audience may enjoy and appreciate the beautiful sculptures and art created by Inuit peoples, Her Imperial Highness Princess Takamado has generously donated part of her collection to the Embassy of Canada. Modern Inuit carvings are often made of stone and generally created by hand, even though power tools are available, as this provides the artist with more control in releasing the spirit and image from the stone and brining the sculpture to life. Through this exhibition, viewers will experience these characteristics first hand, glimpsing Canada’s North through the eyes of its Inuit peoples. *Please be advised that you will need to show photo ID when entering the Embassy of Canada. There will also be a security check carried out on bags.




Zojoji Temple Treasures

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Zojoji Temple Treasures
at Zojoji Temple
4-7-35 Shibakoen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0011
Media: Drawing

Displaying the treasures of Zojoji Temple, with the highlight being a 1/10th-sized model of the Daiden Main Hall from the British Royal Collection.




Michael Anastassiades Exhibition

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Michael Anastassiades Exhibition
at Taka Ishii Gallery Tokyo
3F Complex665, 6-5-24 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Sculpture - Product - Crafts
(2017-09-26 - 2017-10-28)

Michael Anastassiades has been working for more than twenty years in lighting and furniture design. For his first presentation with the gallery, he will be showing four lighting works. The first of these, “Mobile Chandelier 3,” is part of the ongoing “Mobile Chandelier” series which started on 2008. The “Mobile Chandelier” plays with equilibrium through dialogue between perfectly shaped spheres and minimal lines. The other three unique works are from the series “General Illuminations,” “Biri Biri,” “Captive,” and “Nudge,” inspired by classic pinball machines. “Nudge” offers something akin to a visual illusion, as the light on the mirror surface is reflected to create the sense of endless depth. Anastassiades is interested in how lighting exists in two realities: being on and being off. When off, lighting is shown as an object, a visual element that occupies the space; it communicates its materiality, reflectivity, fragility and volume. But when on, the glowing source fills a completely different space within the room, engaging in a relationship between all the objects around it, and casting shadows around other objects against the wall. Anastassiades’ design philosophy is to preserve the inherent qualities of a given material; he finds beauty in every material, seeing material as material. He is also interested in the dynamic of how one’s relationship to objects changes over time. Positioned between fine art and industrial design, his pieces exist between what is utilitarian in function, and poetic and enigmatic in presence. Anastassiades was born in 1968 in Cyprus. He trained as a civil engineer at Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine in London before taking a Master’s Degree in Industrial Design at the Royal College of Art. He founded his London studio in 1994 and his brand in 2007, broadening the availability of his signature designs. Venue: Viewing Room, Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo




Hikaru Myoen “Painted penguins”

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Hikaru Myoen “Painted penguins”
at Nanatasu Gallery
3F Ogura Bldg., 2-12-4 Nishiazabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106‐0031
Media: Painting - Party
(2017-09-30 - 2017-10-08)

Artist Hikaru Myoen can seen to have the approach of a fickle child at times, for he has a fierce ability to concentrate all of his energies on a specific motif when it takes his fancy, but before long his attention tends to jump to something completely new. What makes him different from an actual child, however, is that when he puts his mind to something, he has the technical skills and physical ability to realize it. It seems that for Myoen, it is the difficulty of the challenge that is key, for when something is no longer hard it is no longer interesting. Last year he began painting in an abstract style, having spent two solid years prior to that depicting rubber ducks. As of this spring, it appears that penguins have already become his new focus. You may think that Myoen has simply switched from floating ducks to another species of flightless bird, while in reality a big shift has occurred, expressing itself in the form of a highly tangible soft yellow glow that appears around the heads of these animals. Myoen achieves the effect by first spray painting on the blank canvas. The form of the penguins then emerges through the subsequent layering of pre-determined black shapes, the order of this painting process creating the impression that the animals are backlit. Spray paint is a new medium for Myoen, who embraces the risk of the paint spattering in unexpected areas due to clogging or the like. This method whereby you cannot completely control the shape or position of the paint creates a tenser atmosphere during production and requires far more tolerance of chance than when painting with a brush only. When artists are able to make good use of such mental states, the potential of their artistic expression can greatly expand. According to Greek mythology, gods who fell to earth would be surrounded by a nimbus, that is, a shining cloud. Later, the word “nimbus” took on the meaning of “aura,” or an “endearing atmosphere.” The ducks the artist previously depicted as his subjects were anonymous industrial products created for human beings, but in his new works each of the penguins has its own personality, and it seems that at times Myoen is forced to sympathize with these traits. It can be said that it is here that his interest shifts from an artificially controlled situation to a more realistic world. If you think in terms of the birds’ habitats, it would be like the difference between a bathroom or pool and a harsh ocean. Not to worry though, his penguins have a nimbus. Maiko Yamauchi




Emiko Makino “Romantic Forms”

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Emiko Makino “Romantic Forms”
at Nanatasu Gallery
3F Ogura Bldg., 2-12-4 Nishiazabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106‐0031
Media: Crafts - Party
(2017-10-14 - 2017-10-05)

Emiko Makino is drawn to the unique qualities of humans and animals. Depending on how they are viewed, they can appear quite similar or entirely different – It all comes down to the particular moment, gesture, or body part. Selecting materials such as FRP, metal, or felting to create the right textures, her camphor wood sculptures bring together the shared and unique forms of living creatures combined into single entities.