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Preview: TAB Events - in the Roppongi, Akasaka area

TAB Events - in the Roppongi, Nogizaka area





 



Joji Nakamura “Drawing Show”

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Joji Nakamura “Drawing Show”
at Clear Edition & Gallery
Kishida Bldg. 2F, 7-18-8 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Drawing
(2018-01-12 - 2018-01-20)




Lui Nemeth “Portraits”

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Lui Nemeth “Portraits”
at Cale
1F, 3-4-6 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0044
Media: Painting - Party
(2017-12-22 - 2018-01-21)




Shobu Style “Thanks to you”

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Shobu Style “Thanks to you”
at SFT Gallery
7-22-2 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8558
Media: Painting - Sculpture - Product - Ceramics
(2017-11-01 - 2018-01-22)

Shobu Style is a social welfare facility in Kagoshima City that nurtures the creative activity of those in this supportive community, producing free, fun, and expressive art. Numerous highly individual works created at four different workshops - woodwork, Japanese paper making, ceramics, textiles - are showcased in this craft exhibition.




Lorraine Pritchard “Ma”

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Lorraine Pritchard “Ma”
at Embassy of Canada Prince Takamado Gallery
7-3-38 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-8503
Media: Drawing
(2017-11-29 - 2018-01-25)

The concept of space has always been a visceral and intimate reality for Lorraine Pritchard, who created this series of ink drawings on Japanese paper inspired by the concept of “ma,” which means time/space in Japanese. While time and space are abstractions, they are nevertheless essential for us to function in this world. Prichard demonstrates these concepts through the use of curves, arcs and parallel lines forming intersections, planes and fluctuating densities that create changing spatial interrelationships. The result is seen in this exhibit - a series of original work depicting a balance of delicate, structured planes. Pritchard was born in the Canadian Prairies of Manitoba and is influenced by the patterning and spatial relationships of the vast plains. As a visual artist her work includes drawings, painting, and constructed assemblages. The underlying motivation of this artist is a search for a visual language that expresses the interrelationship of spiritual and physical reality. Her work has been exhibited in Canada, France, Belgium, the United States and Japan. She currently lives and works in her studio in Montreal and is represented by Beaux-arts des Amériques.




Kouichi Tabata “Quince, inside and out”

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Kouichi Tabata “Quince, inside and out”
at YKG Gallery
2F Piramide Bldg., 6-6-9 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Painting - Drawing - Photography - Party
(2017-12-02 - 2018-01-27)

Kouichi Tabata has been working on his “one way or another” series since 2016, experimenting with new approaches to oil painting and drawing. These works depict objects surrounding the artist, such as plants, fruit, tea cups and cakes, while demonstrating a shift in perspective, consciousness, and other technical elements. Meanwhile, he has also been producing collage works based on photographs shot himself, using these to create pieces that straddle two and three dimensionality. A line up of his works, including both collages and those from the “one way or another” series, will be on exhibit.




Sèvres: 300 Creative Years Porcelain for the French Court

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Sèvres: 300 Creative Years Porcelain for the French Court
at Suntory Museum of Art
Tokyo Mid-town Garden Side, 9-7-4 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-8643
Media: Ceramics - Workshops - Talks
(2017-11-22 - 2018-01-28)

In 2010, the Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres and the Musée national de Céramique-Sèvres were integrated to establish a new organization under the name Sèvres, Cité de la céramique. This exhibition is the first in Japan to introduce the manufacture of Sèvres porcelain throughout its 300-year history, showcasing masterpieces and prized items from the Sèvres, Cité de la céramique collection; the last exhibition presenting pieces from the Musée national de Céramique-Sèvres collection was held in Japan 20 years ago. In 1740, the Soft-paste porcelain factory that was initially set up in Vincennes at the eastern edge of Paris was relocated to Sèvres in the west of the city with the support of King Louis XV of France (1710-74), and here expanded to become a royal producer of porcelain. Court painters and sculptors devised sophisticated shapes and patterns one after another. These were then realized in the delicate medium known as porcelain by technicians with exceptional abilities. The collaborative efforts of these creators produced elegant Sèvres porcelain works that soon caught the eye of royalty and aristocrats both inside and outside France. Since then, the Sèvres porcelain factory has continued to reign as one of the leading manufacturers of supreme European porcelain. This exhibition comprised of four sections gives an overview of Sèvres porcelain in context of the 18th century, the 19th century, Art Nouveau and Art Deco, and from the 1960s to the present, bringing an unprecedented amount of key works from each of these golden periods to Japan. The first non-French artist that Sèvres collaborated with was, rather surprisingly, Japanese sculptor Ichiga Numata (1873-1954), while to this day Sèvres continues to collaborate with famous artists and designers from Japan. Discover the creative exchange between Sèvres and Japan through works on show here in this exhibition that allows you to enjoy the finest porcelain produced through the ages. [Related Events] Casual Talk Events Date: Every Saturday during the exhibition period, 11:00-, 13:00-, 15:00- (duration approx. 20 mins) Capacity: 30 Venue: 1F Lecture Room Admission: Free (no booking required) *Event in Japanese. Talk Event: Introducing the exhibition highlights Date: Dec. 17 (Sun), Jan. 7 (Sun), 11:00-, 14:00- (duration approx. 30 mins) Capacity: 80 Venue: 6F Hall Admission: Free (no booking required) *Event in Japanese. Hand sculpting demonstration (pastillage): Sèvres porcelain flowers and fruits Date: Nov. 26 (Sun), 10:30-, 12:30-, 14:30- (duration approx. 60 mins) Artist: Murielle Joubert (ceramicist, instructor of pastillage at Sèvres) Venue: 1F Lecture Room Admission: Free (no booking required) *Please see the official website for further details and information on other events.




Gerhard Richter “Painting 1992-2017”

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Gerhard Richter “Painting 1992-2017”
at Wako Works of Art
Piramide Bldg 3F, 6-6-9 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Painting
(2017-12-16 - 2018-01-31)

A survey of the past 25 years of Richter’s career, including works from the series “Strip Painting,” Sils Maria,” and “Over Painted Photograph.” A new catalogue will be published for the exhibition.




Masaki Yamamoto “Guts”

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Masaki Yamamoto “Guts”
at Zen Foto Gallery
Piramide Bldg 2F, 6-6-9 Roppongi Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Photography - Party
(2018-01-12 - 2018-02-03)

Masaki Yamamoto’s exhibition presents one of the most daring family portraits in Japanese photographic history. Shot entirely in his family’s tiny apartment, with walls yellowed from cigarette smoke, broken doors and trash covering the ground, Yamamoto’s unashamed, uncompromising black-and-white photos nonetheless depict a strong and rare sense of familial intimacy and affection.




Tohru Matsushita “Open / Close City Part. 2: Room of Joban”

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Tohru Matsushita “Open / Close City Part. 2: Room of Joban”
at Snow Contemporary
404 Hayano Bldg., 2-13-12 Nishiazabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0031
Media: Painting - Drawing - Party
(2018-01-12 - 2018-02-03)

This second installment of Open / Close City introduces the work of Tohru Matsushita, who was born in Kanagawa Prefecture in 1984 and graduated from Tokyo University of the Arts Graduates School of Inter Media Art in 2010. Since encountering graffiti culture when he was a high school student in the U.S., Matsushita has continued to research graffiti, street culture and the histories associated with these movements, reflecting these experiences in his works. In 2008 Matsushita conducted the project ”Fresh” while studying at university, this going from being an exhibition to a movement involving many young artists. He later launched “Tokyo Urban Arrrrt”(2011) and questioned how we live and create works in a city, establishing the artist collective “Side Core” together with Sakie Takasu in 2012. While leading movements focusing on actual social issues, as an individual artist Matsushita focuses on the creation of paintings as they relate to movements in history. Here Matsushita presents works produced around the keyword “Joban.” Geographically speaking, the Joban railroads and Tone river lie in the Joban area, which is known as a “boring suburb” and “workplace” where Matsushita’s creative studio is also located. As a returnee to Japan, Matsushita assumed an identity that mainly related to cultures he’d encountered in the US. Once he realized that he’d spend more time in Joban that in the U.S., however, he acknowledged that this “boring suburb” located adjacent to the national highway constitutes a part of himself. This Joban area itself is home to multiple histories.




Yukio Fujimoto “Stars”

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Yukio Fujimoto “Stars”
at Shugoarts
2F Complex665, 6-5-24 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Sculpture - Party
(2017-12-02 - 2018-02-03)

Having spent much of the 1970s in music studios, Yukio Fujimoto is an artist working from outside traditional artistic modes of expression. Using “sound and things” as his point of departure, he has created numerous unique works that arouse the senses, whether its hearing, sight, smell, or touch. This exhibition will present “Stars” (1990), one of Fujimotoʼs most important works, made up of 54 music boxes that each play a single note. The title is based on the visual perceptions of those who created stories about the constellations, a linked group of individual stars floating in the night sky. The work indicates the potential of human hearing as we reorganize each randomly emitted sound to make a chord in our heads and feel compelled to find patterns and melodies. Perhaps we are the ones who generate and manifest the world. There will also be a brand new piece by the artist featured. Born in Nagoya in 1950, Fujimoto is a Kansai-based internationally active artist who participated in the 2001 and 2007 Venice Biennale (the first time in the Japan Pavilion). In 2007, he also held solo exhibitions at the National Museum of Art, Osaka, the Otani Memorial Art Museum, Nishinomiya, and the Museum of Modern Art, Wakayama.




Wild: Untamed Mind

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Wild: Untamed Mind
at 21_21 Design Sight
Tokyo Midtown, 9-7-6 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0052
Media: Illustration - Manga - Photography - Sculpture
(2017-10-20 - 2018-02-04)

The base of our culture and life lies in the “untamed mind.” This mind affects both human instinct and intellect, and it is the trigger and stimulant for creativity. What does the “untamed mind” mean in context of the present day? How can people rediscover it within themselves? How can they understand and express its previously-undetected qualities? This exhibition focuses on the fascinating power of the instinctive, untamed mind of contemporary creators, unveiling how to detect the “untamed mind” through their works and archives. Venue: Gallery 1, Gallery 2




Thomas Demand + Tomoo Gokita + Annette Kelm + Maria Taniguchi Exhibition

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Thomas Demand + Tomoo Gokita + Annette Kelm + Maria Taniguchi Exhibition
at Taka Ishii Gallery Tokyo
3F Complex665, 6-5-24 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Painting - Photography
(2018-01-13 - 2018-02-10)




Masahiro Kodaira “I am that I am”

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Masahiro Kodaira “I am that I am”
at Taka Ishii Gallery Photography/Film
2F Axis Bldg., 5-17-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Photography - Party
(2018-01-13 - 2018-02-17)

In his second solo exhibition at the gallery, and his first there in 3 years, Masahiro Kodaira will present 13 works from the “I am that I am”, series produced since his first show “The Wholly Other.” Based on his interest in the fundamental relations between man and the world, Kodaira has documented and shared a “chain of meanings that exceeds coincidence” through intuitive snap shooting practices. Through meticulous work in the darkroom, he has continuously expressed the sense of what he feels while shooting by fully analyzing the photographic subjects that have drawn his eye. In his intuitive approach to making photographs, which might be described as “guidance of the eye,” he has identified a manifestation of human existence: “The dual presence of a consciousness aware of the self, and another that I sense in the center or slightly towards the back of my head.” The attempt to make contact with the second, hidden presence through his practice has been summarized in the exhibition title “I am that I am.” Kodaira’s new series maintains a certain tension in the overwhelming confrontation of peculiar scenes and moments. However, in contrast to his previous series, which was an accumulation of awe and ecstasy that one feels in response to absolutely external worlds such as landscapes and natural phenomena, in the latest work, his focus has shifted to the “something” that controls his consciousness as he confronts the world. At times, he shoots at sites where significant socio-historical events have occurred. In these images, the subject is not only the natural object or phenomena, but also extended to include humans, society, and the city, suggesting that he is moving in closer to the subject for intent gazing. Kodaira’s eyes have been sharpened through aggressive insertion into his relations with the social world. With them, he captures new sensibilities and ways of seeing to show how people are connected and able to be connected from the world.




Kikuji Kawada “Los Caprichos - Instagraphy - 2017”

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Kikuji Kawada “Los Caprichos - Instagraphy - 2017”
at PGI
3F TKB Bldg., 2-3-4 Higashi-azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0044
Media: Photography
(2018-01-12 - 2018-03-03)

“Los Caprichos - Instagraphy - 2017” features a new edition of the original works created between the 1960s and early 1980s presented together with previously unreleased images and a sequel shot between 2016 and 2017. Kikuji Kawada was so inspired by Goya’s “Los Caprichos” that he found himself roaming the streets to pay homage to the fanciful engravings. Employing a snapshot aesthetic, along with the occasional multiple exposure, he began to scour scenes from everyday life and shadowy urban sprawls for equally fantastical imagery. The result is a powerful yet dire commentary on everything from social unrest to the end of days. New archival pigment prints were produced from the original negatives for this exhibition.




Asao Kodama “Plant”

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Asao Kodama “Plant”
at ANA InterContinental Tokyo
1-12-33 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0052
Media: Painting
(2017-12-06 - 2018-03-05)

The title of this exhibition - “Plant” - describes not only the motifs in Asao Kodama’s paintings, but also her intention to plant and grow seeds on the canvas, imbuing life into her work. Weeds and trees, radiantly blooming flowers, and fading leaves and petals on the pavement - sensing strong vitality in each of them, Kodama says she feels deep affection for ordinary plants she encounters day to day. Her depiction of plants is vivid, emphasizing their strong presence. In her words, they are plants that, according to Kodama, “endure the rain and the wind, showing a sense of existence even when they decay.” The forcefully and freely portrayed motifs appear to be celebrating the joy of live. Bucking the recent artistic trend in Japan that sees artists applying acrylic paint with feather light brush strokes that leave an airy touch on the canvas, Kodama remains firm in leaving thick and heavy marks using oil paints with speedy and bold brush strokes. In this way she refuses to allow her works to be categorized as traditional painting or contemporary art, or even as abstract or representational. In this exhibition, she will present her new works portraying stones and waves.




Kikuchi Biennale IV

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Kikuchi Biennale IV
at Musee Tomo
Nishikubo Bldg., 4-1-35 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001
Media: Ceramics
(2017-12-16 - 2018-03-18)

The Kikuchi Biennale is a competition to which entries are invited from the public and has been held every other year since 2004 with the aim of promoting contemporary ceramics. For this seventh Biennale, entries were accepted until the end of June this year and we received 322 works, exceeding the previous occasion. There were entrants from all over Japan and also abroad, ranging broadly from those in their twenties to their eighties. Through the first-stage screening of photographic images and a second-stage screening of the actual works, fifty-two (including five prizewinners) were chosen for this exhibition. With an acceptance rate of approximately sixteen percent, the works that passed the strict examination to be included here each reflect the creativity and skills of their creator and reveal a variety of ceramic expressions.




Leandro Erlich: Seeing and Believing

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Leandro Erlich: Seeing and Believing
at Mori Art Museum
Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 53F, 6-10-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-6150
Media: Sculpture - Installation - Media Arts
(2017-11-18 - 2018-04-01)

Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich is known for works like “The Swimming Pool” at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa that employ optical illusions to shake up our preconceptions. This exhibition, his largest solo show to date, presents some 40 works including new pieces. Eighty percent are shown in Japan for the first time, including the installation series “Building,” which invites visitors to pose in disorienting structures switching around walls and floors. [Related Events] 1. Kids’ Workshop “Along with Mr. Erlich” Date and Time: 19th Nov (Sun) 10:00-12:00 Appearing: Leandro Erlich (Artist) For: Pre-school children (Ages 4 to 6) *Japanese-English consecutive interpretation available 2. Artist Talk “Antropocosmos -The Architecture of Reality” Date and Time: 20th Nov (Mon) 19:00-20:30 Speaker: Leandro Erlich *Japanese-English simultaneous interpretation available 3. Kids’ Workshop “Philosophy for Children @’Leandro Erlich’ Exhibition” Date and Time: 9th Dec (Sat) 10:00-12:00, Facilitators: Ijiri Takako, Shimizu Shogo, Ogawa Taiji (NPO Practical Philosophy Ardacoda) For: Elementary-school Children (ages 8-12) *Conducted in Japanese 4. Talk Session “A New Look at Art Prototypes, based on the Works of Leandro Erlich” Date and Time: 20th Dec (Sat) 14:00-15:30 Speakers: Elie During(Associate Professor of Philosophy, Paris Nanterre University), Tsubaki Reiko(Curator, Mori Art Museum) *Japanese-English simultaneous interpretation available 5. Poetry Reading / Performance “Reading Leandro Erlich” Date and Time: 27th Feb (Tue) 19:00-20:00 Appearing: Tatehata Akira(Poet / Art Critic), Adachi Tomomi(Performer / Composer / Sound Poet) *Conducted in Japanese ■Gallery Talk 1. Gallery Talks by the Exhibition Curator Date and Time: [Day 1] 29th Nov (Wed) 19:00-20:00, [Day 2] 14th Mar (Wed) 19:00-20:00 Speaker: Tsubaki Reiko (Curator, Mori Art Museum) *Conducted in Japanese 2. Gallery Talks Date and Time: [Day 1] 20th Dec (Wed) 14:00-15:00, [Day 2] 24th Jan (Wed) 19:00-20:00 *Conducted in Japanese *Please see the official website for further details and other events.




MAM Collection 006: Materials and Boundaries - Handiwirman Saputra + Masaya Chiba

MAM Collection 006: Materials and Boundaries - Handiwirman Saputra + Masaya Chiba
at Mori Art Museum
Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 53F, 6-10-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-6150
Media: Painting - Drawing - Sculpture
(2017-11-18 - 2018-04-01)

“MAM Collection 006” will showcase works by Handiwirman Saputra and Masaya Chiba. They both employ a diverse range of materials and techniques in practices, predominantly sculpture and painting. The exhibition will focus on the differences in gaze, approach, etc. between the two artists with regard to matter, materials, environment and boundaries, and also what they have in common. Distancing his output from sociopolitical currents in contemporary art responding to the Indonesian democracy movement of 1998 rather than making statements, Saputra declares his works to be simply the materials existing in that place, unbound by any sort of meaning or purpose. Tak Berakah Tak Berpucuk Num. 12 (No Roots No Shoots No. 12) presented at this exhibition may resemble a soft, bag-like object tied up with rubber bands, or the seed of a giant plant, however Saputra declines to offer such answers or meaning, leaving it to the individual viewer to decide how they feel about the work, and how they interpret it. Chiba meanwhile is known for his method of using sculptures he makes himself to construct bizarre, fantastical environments in his studio and other settings, and making these scenes the motifs of his paintings. Powerful Young Boy at 2013 on display in this exhibition was inspired by a visit to the “Sasurai Jizo- [Wandering Ksitigarbha]” in Tono, Iwate Prefecture that had fascinated him for years. Sketches and notes from the trip, and drawings showing detailed plans for the painting, will also be on public display here for the first time.




MAM Project 024: Dane Mitchell

MAM Project 024: Dane Mitchell
at Mori Art Museum
Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 53F, 6-10-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-6150
Media: Photography - Installation - Talks
(2017-11-18 - 2018-04-01)

Dane Mitchell (b. 1976) researches the energies and dynamics of the invisible world from artistic, scientific, and historical perspectives. His investigations are frequently informed by the connection between our visual and olfactory senses, and Mitchell views the scents that lure our consciousness into invisible realms and ancient layers of memory as vital “sculptural materials.” For this show, Mitchell will present his new work Iris, Iris, Iris, the product of multi-faceted research during his stay in Japan that ranged from the world of traditional incense to the latest perfume technologies. Various areas of interest for the artist - such as the many meanings of the word “iris,” including the flower name, the colored part of the eyeball, the camera aperture that controls exposure, and the rainbow goddess Iris of Greek mythology; the fact that incense was also used to tell the time; and the presence of tsukumogami spirits in long-used tools - are assembled here in a single installation. Both scent as Japanese history and culture, and scent as scientific element, are sure to stimulate our perceptions and sensibilities in new ways. [Related Event] Talk Session “Musings on the Invisible” Date and Time: Nov. 19 (Sun) 15:00-16:30 (Door Open 14:30) Speakers: Dane Mitchell, Hata Masataka (President, Shoyeido Incense Co.) Moderator: Kataoka Mami (Chief Curator, Mori Art Museum) *Japanese-English simultaneous interpretation available *Please see the official website for further details.




MAM Screen 007: Atsushi Yamamoto

MAM Screen 007: Atsushi Yamamoto
at Mori Art Museum
Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 53F, 6-10-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-6150
Media: Video and Film
(2017-11-18 - 2018-04-01)

In his career to date, Atsushi Yamamoto (b. 1980) has made an incredible 174 films, from documentaries to works of fiction and experimental comedy skit-like shorts. Many of Yamamoto’s works are set in new towns and similar anonymous suburban locations and feature the artist himself playing roles such as an idle youth or casual laborer, in the process channeling Yamamoto’s own upbringing in an ordinary household on the outskirts of Tokyo. His latest work, “The Past and the Future in the Present” is a highly personal documentary piece in which Yamamoto visits an old girlfriend during his wife’s pregnancy, and finds himself engaging with past, present and future. Both types of work portray Yamamoto’s earnest attempts to address the reality before him. For this screening, we have combined early short films by Yamamoto with a more recent full-length feature, in a program offering a close-up look at the diverse delights of the artist’s film oeuvre. *Please see the official website for further details and schedules.




Love is Wonderful

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Love is Wonderful
at Snoopy Museum Tokyo
5-6-20 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Illustration - Drawing - Manga - Animation
(2017-10-07 - 2018-04-08)

In the comic strip “Peanuts,” there are various romantic episodes that excite the heart; Charlie Brown lets out a sigh upon seeing the Little Red Haired Girl in front of him, the crabby Lucy struggles with her unrequited love for Shroeder. Even Snoopy has a bitter experience when his brother Spike runs off with his bride-to-be just before their wedding. This exhibition on the theme of love has a dramatic atmosphere, introducing around 80 original comic strips and animation sequences depiciting the many romantic episodes in “Peanuts.”




Zojoji Temple Treasures

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Zojoji Temple Treasures
at Zojoji Temple
4-7-35 Shibakoen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0011
Media: Drawing

Displaying the treasures of Zojoji Temple, with the highlight being a 1/10th-sized model of the Daiden Main Hall from the British Royal Collection.




Hernan Bas “Insects from Abroad”

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Hernan Bas “Insects from Abroad”
at Gallery Perrotin Tokyo
Piramide Bldg. 1F, 6-6-9 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
Media: Painting - Party
(2018-01-18 - 2018-03-11)

“Insects from Abroad” exhibits Bas’s newly-created series of paintings and drawings inspired by “Insects Abroad: Being a popular account of foreign insects, their structure, habits, and transformations,” an entomology book published in 1874. Bas found the extensive poetics used to describe insects compelling as an approach to the visual representation of the Dandy, a figure which came to prominence in Europe during the same time in the nineteenth century. There the Dandy was a foppish effeminate male, excessively conscious of fashion (some even resorted to using a corset to reform their bodies.) By contrast, in Japan the figure of the “Dandy” has a different and more recent history, referring to restrained but sophisticated stylish men, traditionally called “Date-Otoko,” although this figure is undeniably masculine. A closer contemporary comparison can be made to those who identify with “Visual Kei,” a specific musical subculture whose members are similarly concerned with altering their appearance through fashion and makeup. (However, there is no exact equivalent in Japan to the European Dandy.) In nineteenth-century Europe, Dandies were ridiculed and, according to Bas, they were described as if they were insects, often depicted as “’monstrosities,’ [given] the appearance of some otherworldly species completely separate from ‘common decent society.’” Thus, he has taken the poetic framing of the scientific text, which renders the otherwise abject insects accessible, as an inspiration to develop complex visual descriptions to similarly portray his male figures as approachable, if not attractive.




Mariko Ogawa Exhibition

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Mariko Ogawa Exhibition
at Gallery Closet
2-11-10 Nishi-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0031
Media: Painting
(2018-01-18 - 2018-01-30)




Akira Wakita “Symptom Visualized - Visualized Sign“

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Akira Wakita “Symptom Visualized - Visualized Sign“
at Art & Science Gallery Lab AXIOM
5-9-20 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 160-0032
Media: Installation - Video and Film - Media Arts - Performance Art
(2018-01-20 - 2018-03-10)

Akira Wakita produces works that reinterpret the world by visualizing entities that exist before us but cannot be perceived as such. In this solo exhibition, Wakita expresses social phenomena such as ideological conflict, unstable economic systems, accelerated consumerism from a macro perspective using methodologies typically employed in chemistry and physics as his base. There will also be spin off work inspired by Wakita’s live performance with Tetsuya Komuro at MUTEK / RedBull Music Festival.




en: Art of Nexus - Homecoming Exhibition of the Japan Pavilion from the 15th Venice Biennale International Architecture Exhibition
en: Art of Nexus - Homecoming Exhibition of the Japan Pavilion from the 15th Venice Biennale International Architecture Exhibition at Gallery Ma 3F Toto Nogizaka bldg., 1-24-3 Minami-aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0062 Media: Architecture - Talks (2018-01-24 - 2018-03-18) The original “en—art of nexus” exhibition presented at the Japan Pavilion in the 15th International Architecture Exhibition of the Venice Biennale (May 28 – November 27, 2016) put the spotlight on 12 groups of architects born after 1975 and lucidly presented the work that they have been engaging in during these difficult times under the three themes of “The en of People,” “The en of Things” and “The en of Locality.” The exhibition struck a chord with visitors from around the world and was awarded a Special Mention. After sprinting down the path of modernization to match stride with the Western world in the belief it was making progress, seeing its period of rapid economic growth come to an end, and experiencing the disastrous events of March 11, 2011, Japan now stands at a major turning point at which each and every architect needs to ask themselves once again what architecture must strive to achieve in today’s society. The architects featured in this exhibition have been creating new architectural value by meticulously giving form to the small, intimate stories woven through people’s relationships with others and their localities. The presented projects have emerged from a background strongly influenced by a flexible wood-based culture distinct to Asia and disparate from Europe’s rigid stone-based culture that gave rise to modernism. Every one of them can be seen as reflecting the supple fortitude of their architects, who are striving to establish their own unique positions by pushing the possibilities of architecture. The homecoming exhibition will introduce the work being born from the fresh sensibilities of the young exhibitors by building on the original exhibition shown in Venice. It will also show what the architects have been working on since the Biennale with new exhibits such as movies and models. The exhibition and its complementing symposium and gallery talks aim to provide an outlook on the role of architecture and architects in the coming age. [Related Event] Homecoming Exhibition of the Japan Pavilion from the 15th International Architecture Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia, Anniversary Symposium Date: Feb. 16 (Fri), 18:00-20:30 (doors open 17:00) Venue: Kenchiku Kaikan Hall, Architectural Institute of Japan, 5-26-20 Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo) Moderators: Yoshiharu Tsukamoto (Architect / Atelier Bow-Wow, Professor of the Tokyo Institute of Technology Graduate School), Yoshiyuki Yamana (Architect, Professor of the Tokyo University of Science; Exhibition Director) Panelists: Fumihiko Maki (Architect / Maki and Associates), Osamu Nishida (Architect / ON design partners), Yuri Naruse (Architect / Naruse Inokuma Architects), Fuminori Nousaku (Architect / Nousaku Architects), Satoru Ito (Architect / BUS, Satoru Ito Architects) Capacity: 350 Admission: Free (online booking required) *Event in Japanese. *Please see the official website for further details. [...]



PechaKucha Night Vol. 154

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PechaKucha Night Vol. 154
at Super Deluxe
3-1-25-B1F Nishi-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0031
Media: Talks
(2018-01-31)

This is a platform event hosted by Klein Dytham architecture for people to tell the world about their design, their thoughts and their ideas; anyone in the architectural and design world can ‘show and tell.’ It may be a newly finished building, a new project, a new piece of furniture, a new event, a new idea, or just something fresh they want to share with everyone. Architects, architectural students, students who are job-hunting and want to promote their skills, any creative person, or anyone interested in taking part is invited to join. Each presenter delivers a talk alongside 20 images that are each shown on the screen for 20 seconds.