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University Events - University Events



Events of interest to the Boston University Community



 



Morning Study Group

Morning Study Group

In honor of Dean Hill's ten years of service and leadership at Marsh Chapel, this semester we'll be reading Village Green: Sermons from Asbury First United Methodist Church. We will read and discuss some of the Dean's sermons, consider the differences and similarities in ministry contexts between Rochester and Boston, and learn about how sermons get written. We might even have a special appearance from Dean Hill himself at the end of the semester! (Contact: The Rev. Jen Quigley, jenquig@bu.edu) Special Note: As always, books are free to anyone who wants to join. However, Dean Hill has ordered these books at his publisher’s rate (half off). If you're willing to make a donation of the book cost ($23), we will cover the cost of the book and give the other half as a donation to the Dean's Endowment Fund. Books are available in the Chapel Office.

9:45am on Sunday, November 26th 2017

Thurman Room, located on the lower level of Marsh Chapel (735 Commonwealth Ave.)

http://www.bu.edu/chapel/




Take Note

Take Note

This brief and informal session is designed to enhance congregants’ experience of the music offered each week in the 11:00 a.m. Marsh Chapel worship service. Curated by Patrick T. Waters, a weekly host will offer insights to the anthems, hymns, service music, and/or organ repertoire that so richly adorn worship at Marsh Chapel. In addition to biographical information about composers and their compositions, attendees learn useful suggestions for possibilities of active listening to the day’s musical selections.

10:35am on Sunday, November 26th 2017

Robinson Chapel, located on the lower level of Marsh Chapel (735 Commonwealth Ave.)

http://www.bu.edu/chapel/




Mellon Seminar- Is this an Epistemological Revolution? Big Data and the Philosophy of Science

Mellon Seminar- Is this an Epistemological Revolution? Big Data and the Philosophy of Science

Co-sponsored with BU Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science and the Rafik B. Hariri Institute for Computing, BU. Sabina Leonelli (Exeter), John Symons (University of Kansas) and others.

4:00pm on Monday, November 27th 2017

610 Commonwealth Ave.




Global Christianity, 1910 to Today: Independents in China, with Xiyi Yao

Global Christianity, 1910 to Today: Independents in China, with Xiyi Yao

Christianity in China is growing rapidly—much of it is charismatic and evangelical in nature, and Christians still face discrimination and restrictions in practicing their faith. What does Chinese Christianity look like today? BuSTH alumnus and Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary professor Xiyi Yao will share his experience and study of Chinese Christianity.

6:30pm on Monday, November 27th 2017




CReM Seminar

CReM Seminar

9:00am on Tuesday, November 28th 2017

650 Albany Street, Building X, Room 715




Jewish Visual Culture Lecture

Jewish Visual Culture Lecture

Professor Maya Balakirsky Katz of Touro College comes BU to discuss the Jewish Art of Papercuts. Free & Open to the Public

6:00pm on Tuesday, November 28th 2017




Friends Speaker Series: Chef Mary Ann Esposito, Host of TV's "Ciao Italia"

Friends Speaker Series: Chef Mary Ann Esposito, Host of TV's "Ciao Italia"

Mary Ann Esposito will speak on her life and work as part of HGARC's Friends Speaker Series. Esposito is the creator and host of the nationally-televised PBS series, "Ciao Italia with Mary Ann Esposito." Through her program and her books, she has brought Italian cuisine, history and tradition to millions of Americans. This year, the series celebrates its milestone 26th season, making it the longest running cooking series in television history. Esposito has worked beside world-renowned chefs such as Julia Child, Todd English, Daisy Martinez, Sara Moulton, Jacques Pépin, Martin Yan, and many others who share the same passion for cooking. Countless organizations have recognized Esposito for her efforts to preserve the traditions surrounding Italian food and culture. In 2013, she received the Order of the Star of Italy Cavaliere award from the President of the Italian Republic, as well as the Premio Artusi award for her work in promoting Italian food. Johnson & Wales University presented Esposito with their Distinguished Author Award. St. Anselm College conferred an honorary doctorate for her dedication to teaching and preserving authentic Italian cuisine. The Italian Trade Commission further distinguished Esposito by naming her a 2010 Hall of Fame honoree. Her most recent cookbook is "Ciao Italia: Family Classics." Fellow celebrity chef Mario Batali praised the book, saying "Like her award-winning TV series, this book will live on for years with all of those who cook her delicious recipes." Chef Esposito will be signing copies of her books following her talk. Books will be available for purchase.

6:00pm on Tuesday, November 28th 2017

http://www.bu.edu/archives




Visiting Professor Lecture with David Blumenthal, MD

Visiting Professor Lecture with David Blumenthal, MD

"Managing the Sickest of the Sick in an Accountable Environment" 2-3 p.m. Lecture 3-3:20 p.m. Reception Coffee and tea reception to follow. David Blumenthal, MD, MPP, is president of The Commonwealth Fund, a national philanthropy engaged in independent research on health and social policy issues.

2:00pm on Friday, December 1st 2017

Instructional Building




BU Transformative Training Program in Addiction Science Seminar Series. "The Co-occurence of Anxiety and Subtance Use Disorders." Speaker: R. Kathryn McHugh, PhD

BU Transformative Training Program in Addiction Science Seminar Series. "The Co-occurence of Anxiety and Subtance Use Disorders." Speaker: R. Kathryn McHugh, PhD

3:00pm on Friday, December 1st 2017

E201, 85 East Newton Street




CISE Seminar: Stéphane Lafortune, University of Michigan

CISE Seminar: Stéphane Lafortune, University of Michigan

"Privacy Enforcement Using Obfuscation: An Event-Based Approach using Opacity"

3:00pm on Friday, December 1st 2017

8 St. Mary's St., PHO 211

http://www.bu.edu/systems/december-1-2017-stephane-lafortune-university-of-michigan/




Morning Study Group

Morning Study Group

In honor of Dean Hill's ten years of service and leadership at Marsh Chapel, this semester we'll be reading Village Green: Sermons from Asbury First United Methodist Church. We will read and discuss some of the Dean's sermons, consider the differences and similarities in ministry contexts between Rochester and Boston, and learn about how sermons get written. We might even have a special appearance from Dean Hill himself at the end of the semester! (Contact: The Rev. Jen Quigley, jenquig@bu.edu) Special Note: As always, books are free to anyone who wants to join. However, Dean Hill has ordered these books at his publisher’s rate (half off). If you're willing to make a donation of the book cost ($23), we will cover the cost of the book and give the other half as a donation to the Dean's Endowment Fund. Books are available in the Chapel Office.

9:45am on Sunday, December 3rd 2017

Thurman Room, located on the lower level of Marsh Chapel (735 Commonwealth Ave.)

http://www.bu.edu/chapel/




Take Note

Take Note

This brief and informal session is designed to enhance congregants’ experience of the music offered each week in the 11:00 a.m. Marsh Chapel worship service. Curated by Patrick T. Waters, a weekly host will offer insights to the anthems, hymns, service music, and/or organ repertoire that so richly adorn worship at Marsh Chapel. In addition to biographical information about composers and their compositions, attendees learn useful suggestions for possibilities of active listening to the day’s musical selections.

10:35am on Sunday, December 3rd 2017

Robinson Chapel, located on the lower level of Marsh Chapel (735 Commonwealth Ave.)

http://www.bu.edu/chapel/




Global Christianity, 1910 to Today: Ethnodoxology, with Robin Harris

Global Christianity, 1910 to Today: Ethnodoxology, with Robin Harris

As global Christianity changes, so does the expressions of the faith. Worship is central to the lives of many Christians and thus takes a wide variety of forms. Ethnodoxology is the study of worship around the world, and is a fascinating and growing subject within world Christianity. Robin Harris of the International Council of Ethnodoxologists will share what it actually is that ethnodoxologists do, with plenty of music to share!

6:30am on Monday, December 4th 2017




The Protestant Origins of Wilsonianism

The Protestant Origins of Wilsonianism

Contemporary international relations theorists agree that President Woodrow Wilson gave birth to the American liberal internationalist project. While Wilson’s efforts to create the League of Nations failed, subsequent liberal visions for international order inevitably drew from the Wilsonian vision. Insufficiently acknowledged, however, is how much Wilson’s vision was rooted in his religion. What was the role of religion in Wilson’s worldview, and in Wilsonianism? What does that mean for the place of religion in U.S. foreign policy? Drawing on primary source material from Wilson and his contemporaries, this paper demonstrates that Wilson’s views were grounded in a liberal Protestant and Southern Presbyterian vision of democracy, American-led progress, international cooperation, economic openness, and the struggle of good against evil as a military march of slow progress with many casualties. Against the common portrayal of Wilsonianism as rooted in secular, liberal values derived from Immanuel Kant, this paper unearths the Protestant origins of Wilsonianism. By doing so, the paper sheds light on a latent theological aspect of liberal internationalism that helps to explain its missionary fervor. Additionally, by highlighting liberal internationalists’ systematic elision of religion from the history of Wilsonianism, the paper affirms the constructivist view that international relations continues to be motivated by normative political theory.

1:00pm on Tuesday, December 5th 2017

http://www.bu.edu/cura/protestant-origins-of-wilsonianism/




Fall 2017 Postdoc and Student Seminar Series

Fall 2017 Postdoc and Student Seminar Series

TBA

2:00pm on Wednesday, December 6th 2017

85 East Newton Street (Building E), Keefer Auditorium, Room 111




How to ‘Love Thy Neighbor’: Lessons from Hegel on Conflict and Reconciliation

How to ‘Love Thy Neighbor’: Lessons from Hegel on Conflict and Reconciliation

The Institute for Philosophy and Religion presents Professor Molly Farneth (Haverford) speaking on "How to ‘Love Thy Neighbor’: Lessons from Hegel on Conflict and Reconciliation." This event is free and open to the public. Co-sponsored by the BU Center for Humanities.

5:00pm on Wednesday, December 6th 2017

http://www.bu.edu/ipr/program/




Poetry Reading by David Ferry, The Aeneid

Poetry Reading by David Ferry, The Aeneid

David Ferry, reading from his new version of the Aeneid: December 6, 6pm in the Katzenberg Center at BU College of General Studies David Ferry is an acclaimed American poet and translator. Ferry’s translations, which include some of the world’s major works of poetry including The Odes of Horace, and both The Eclogues and Georgics of Virgil, are known for their fluency and grace. In addition to his lauded translations, Ferry is also a prize-winning poet in his own right. His poetic works include Dwelling Places(1993) and Of No Country I Know: New and Selected Poems and Translations (1999), which won the Lenore Marshall Prize, the Bingham Poetry Prize, the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry from the Library of Congress, and was a finalist for the L.L. Winship/PEN New England Award and the New Yorker Book Award. Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations(2012), won the National Book Award for Poetry.

6:00pm on Wednesday, December 6th 2017

https://www.bu.edu/cgs/citl/poetry-reading-series/




Communication Research Colloquium - Dr. Stephen Greyser & Dr. Mats Urde

Communication Research Colloquium - Dr. Stephen Greyser & Dr. Mats Urde

The Branding and Identity of the Nobel Prize

3:30pm on Thursday, December 7th 2017

COM 209, 640 Commonwealth Avenue




The Branding and Identity of the Nobel Prize

The Branding and Identity of the Nobel Prize

This talk will review recent research conducted with the cooperation of the Nobel Foundation, encompassing interviews with a range of Nobel Prize stockholders including Nobel Foundation management, heads of the awarding entities, selection committee members and laureates. This work represents the first (and only so far) field-based research on the topic. The complexities of the Nobel organization and the management, branding, communications and reputation issues confronting "the world's most prestigious award" will be covered.

3:30pm on Thursday, December 7th 2017




Linguistics Colloquium: "How Phonetic Learners Should Use Their Input"

Linguistics Colloquium: "How Phonetic Learners Should Use Their Input"

Abstract: Children have impressive statistical learning abilities. In phonetic category acquisition, for example, they are sensitive to the distributional properties of sounds in their input. However, knowing that children have statistical learning abilities is only a small part of understanding how they make use of their input during language acquisition. This work uses Bayesian models to examine three basic assumptions that go into statistical learning theories: the structure of learners' hypothesis space, the way in which input data are sampled, and the features of the input that learners attend to. Simulations show that although a naïve view of statistical learning may not support robust phonetic category acquisition, there are several ways in which learners can potentially benefit by leveraging the rich statistical structure of their input.

5:30pm on Thursday, December 7th 2017

https://www.facebook.com/events/846247092203474/