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Updated: 2017-11-21T16:25:33+01:00

 



Josh Suereth receives community award

2017-09-25T00:00:00+02:00

We are pleased to announce that the Phil Bagwell Memorial Scala Community Award for 2017 has been awarded to Josh Suereth. The award was presented in the UK’s Lake District at Scala World 2017.

Josh has been a prominent member of the Scala community ever since the early days of the language’s commercial adoption. He is known to Scala users as:

  • author of Scala in Depth and co-author of sbt in Action
  • maintainer of the sbt build tool for several years at Typesafe (the company now known as Lightbend)
  • leader or contributor to numerous other open source Scala projects including scala-arm, pickling, and assorted sbt plugins
  • cohost of the Scalawags podcast (and its predecessor, The Scala Types)
  • a friendly and tireless conference-goer and presenter (and organizer of the Scala Lift Off unconference in Virginia in 2009)
  • a positive force on nearly every online medium devoted to Scala – mailing lists, chat rooms, Twitter, you name it – answering any and all questions with tact and humor

Here’s a three minute video of friends and colleagues paying tribute to Josh. The video was shown when the award was presented.

Josh’s surname is pronounced “Suereth”.

The Bagwell Award is named in honor of Phil Bagwell, who passed away in 2012. In a 2012 blog post, Martin Odersky remembers Phil and his special place in the Scala community.

Past winners of the award:




Scala 2.11.11, 2.12.2 and 2.13.0-M1 now available!

2017-04-18T00:00:00+02:00

We are happy to announce three new Scala releases: 2.11.11 concludes the 2.11 series, 2.12.2 brings bug fixes and small improvements, and 2.13.0-M1 sets the scene for modularization and improvements coming in the next major release next year. Many thanks to everyone who contributed!

As part of our ongoing efforts at Lightbend to simplify contributing to Scala, we are thrilled to announce our move to GitHub for bug reporting, as well as for release notes.

For the highlights of these three releases, read on.

Scala 2.11.11 contains many smaller fixes and a few backports from 2.12. It also features improved error messages on missing dependencies; this improvement was developed by @jvican at the Scala Center under proposal SCP-009, which aims to speed up builds by shrinking the build classpath.

(Yes, we skipped 2.11.9 and 2.11.10. Special thanks to @xuwei-k and @sjrd for reporting and helping diagnose the regressions in those withdrawn releases.)

Scala 2.12.2 adds support for trailing commas, the first proposal (SIP-27) to make it all the way through the revived Scala Improvement Process. Congratulations, @dwijnand!

Scala 2.13.0-M1 (milestone 1) prepares for the next phase of the standard library modularization and the collections rework. The parallel collections are now a separate module, and many deprecated members have been removed. As a reminder, our full 2.13 roadmap is available for review on GitHub.




Scala 2.13 roadmap

2017-03-06T00:00:00+01:00

On behalf of the Scala team at Lightbend, I’d like to share our plans with you, and invite you to join us in shaping Scala’s roadmap for 2017. As this is a collective effort, and roadmaps evolve, we’ve decided to use our development issue tracker to organize our thoughts and open up the discussion for your feedback. Below is the overview of what we plan to work on. Please join the discussion on the roadmap theme issue or any of the issues linked below! The next release of Scala will focus on the following themes: compiler performance simplifying the collections modularizing the standard library user-friendliness We intend to shorten the development cycle a little compared to 2.12, with the first 2.13 release candidate slated for the end of Q1 2018. In 2017, we will release quarterly 2.13 milestones so you can get a good sense of the library changes. While Scala 2.11 will come to a halt with 2.11.9 in Q1 2017, we will maintain 2.12 with regular minor releases throughout 2017. In collaboration with the Scala Center, as outlined in SCP-007: Collaborative redesign and implementation of Scala 2.13’s collections library and Stefan’s blog post, the collections library rework effort has kicked off at https://github.com/scala/collection-strawman. Our goal is to simplifying usage and improve performance, with a smooth migration path from the current collections. Please join and help shape one of the defining parts of Scala! In tandem, the modularisation of the standard library (begun with Scala 2.11) will continue as part of the Scala Platform process, to foster innovation in our eco-system while maintaining a stable core. The core consists of the collections and the other standard types, such as Option, TupleN, Either and Try. Ultimately, we’d like provide even stronger binary compatibility guarantees for the core, with a vibrant complement of modules that evolve more quickly (offering only backwards compatibility). Discuss this theme. Scala 2.13 is a library release, which means the language itself won’t see big changes. However, we continue to invest heavily in the implementation, with a single goal: make the compiler faster. The first phase of this work involves benchmarking infrastructure, to guide our progress towards a faster compiler. After that, we will attack slowness on all fronts with all available tools. In addition to YourKit and other JVM profilers, which we have been using intensively over the years, we now have a JMH benchmarking harness for the compiler. We are also investigating lower-level performance (cpu caches, memory access patterns, JIT profiles, etc). We are eager to hear your ideas at the compiler performance theme issue. Please head over to the new compiler-benchmark repo for the benchmarks and the issue tracker, or discuss this theme here. Finally, there are many more things we’d like to include in 2.13. Let us know if you’d like to work on one of these. We’re always happy to help! In addition to GitHub, you’ll find us on Scala Contributors (forum) and scala/contributors (chat). [...]



Google Summer Of Code 2017

2017-02-22T00:00:00+01:00

This year the Scala team applied again for Google Summer of Code. Scala contributors are welcome to propose project ideas on our discussion forums! Students can apply for projects until 3rd of April!




Erik Osheim receives community award

2016-10-26T00:00:00+02:00

We are pleased to announce that the Phil Bagwell Memorial Scala Community Award for 2016 has been awarded to Erik Osheim. The award was presented in Lake District, UK at Scala World 2016.

Erik is known to Scala users as:

  • creator of Spire, a leading library for numerics in Scala
  • creator of other tools and libraries such as kind-projector (a compiler plugin for type lambdas) and jawn (a very fast JSON parser)
  • leader of the Cats project, which provides abstractions for functional programming in Scala (“cats” being short for “category”, as in category theory)
  • cofounder of Typelevel, a Scala community organization dedicated to furthering pure, typeful functional programming in Scala
  • a friendly and tireless conference-goer and presenter

Erik’s 2015 Scala World presentation, “Principles for approachable, modular, functional libraries” (slides, video) is a classic on the subject of open-source library design, not only from a technical perspective, but with attention to how software communities and ecosystems operate.

The Bagwell Award is named in honor of Phil Bagwell, who passed away in 2012. In a 2012 blog post, Martin Odersky remembers Phil and his special place in the Scala community.

Past winners of the award:




Bill Venners receives community award

2015-06-25T00:00:00+02:00

We are pleased to announce that the Phil Bagwell Memorial Scala Community Award for 2015 has been awarded to Bill Venners. The award was presented in Amsterdam at the outset of Scala Days.

Bill is known to Scala users as:

  • creator of ScalaTest, a popular open-source test framework first released in 2008, as well as other tools and libraries such as Scalactic
  • co-author of the first Scala book, Programming in Scala (Artima)
  • founder of Artima, which continues to publish Scala-themed books, and hosted Scala-themed blogs and forums which were important in spreading the news about Scala in its early years
  • friendly and tireless conference-goer, presenter, and trainer

The Bagwell Award is named in honor of Phil Bagwell, who passed away in 2012. In a 2012 blog post, Martin Odersky remembers Phil and his special place in the Scala community.

Past winners of the award:




Google Summer of Code 2015

2015-03-16T00:00:00+01:00

This year the Scala team applied again for Google Summer of Code, and we’re happy to announce that we have been approved to be mentoring organization! Students can apply for projects until 27th of March!




Google Summer of Code 2014

2014-02-24T00:00:00+01:00

This year the Scala team applied again for Google Summer of Code, and we’re happy to announce that we have been approved to be mentoring organization!

What is Google Summer of Code

Google invites students to come up with interesting, non-trivial problems for their favourite open-source projects and work on them over the summer. Participants get support from the community, plus a mentor who makes sure they don’t get lost and that students meet their goals. Aside from the satisfaction of solving challenging problems, students get paid for their work. This is an incredible opportunity to get involved in the Scala community and get helpful support along the way.

How to get involved

First, have a look at our project ideas page. The ideas there are meant as suggestions to serve as a starting point. We expect students to explore the ideas in much more detail, preferably with their own suggestions and detailed plans on how they want to proceed. But don’t feel constrained by the provided list! We welcome any challenging project idea pertaining to Scala!

The best place to propose and discuss your proposals is our “scala-language” mailing list. This way you will get quickly responses from the whole Scala community. If you know of a potential mentor, it also might be a good idea to also include them in your discussion on the scala-language mailing list. If not, don’t be afraid to ask who you might be able to contact in your discussion on scala-language.

Previous Summer of Code

We encourage you to have a look at our Summer of Code 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 pages to get an idea of kind of projects we undertook in previous years.

Please join us!




10 Years of Scala

2014-01-22T00:00:00+01:00

The first release of Scala happened ten years ago on January 20th.

Looking back I am stunned how we could have taken an experimental research language and turned it into a tool for everyday programming that’s used by hundreds of thousands of developers. This is even more surprising in that no big company or organization backed Scala. Instead it was a grassroots movement with many super smart and motivated contributors. They are far too numerous to be all listed here, but I nevertheless want to thank some of the contributors by name who influenced the trajectory of Scala in a crucial way. In particular, there were:

  • The early EPFL contributors around Matthias Zenger, Michel Schinz, Philippe Altherr.
  • The second wave of EPFL contributors, including Iulian Dragos, Philipp Haller, Lukas Rytz, Tiark Rompf, Stéphane Micheloud, Burak Emir, Vincent Cremet, Ingo Meier, Nikolay Mihaylov, Lex Spoon, Antonio Cunei, Sean McDermid, Erik Stenman.
  • Early users who told the world about it: John Pretty, Miles Sabin, David Pollak, Dick Wall, Bill Venners, David McIver, Josh Suereth, Jonas Bonér, Viktor Klang, James Iry, Daniel Sobral and many others.
  • Phil Bagwell, who designed our core collection structures, and was a great spokesperson for the community.
  • Paul Phillips, who put in amazing work over many years.
  • The many active open-source committers, including Simon Ochsenreither, Denys Shabalin, Pavel Pavlov, Dominik Gruntz, Rex Kerr.
  • The Typesafe Scala team: Adriaan Moors, Jason Zaugg, Greg Kossakowski.
  • The people working hard on giving us good tooling: Scala IDE, IntelliJ, NetBeans, SBT, Ensime.
  • Lalit Pant, for making Scala accessible to children and Shadaj Laddad for showing how much fun Scala can be.
  • The people who contributed to our massive open online courses: Heather Miller, Aleksandar Prokopec, Vojin Jovanovic, Lukas Rytz, Nada Amin, Tobias Schlatter, Roland Kuhn, Erik Meijer.
  • The other people who take Scala forward at EPFL: Hubert Plocinicak, Eugene Burmako, Manohar Jonalagedda, Vlad Ureche, Sandro Stucki, Miguel Garcia, Christopher Vogt.
  • The vibrant Scala team around Sébastien Doeraene and Haoyi Li.
  • The authors of all the Scala books.
  • The people writing great open-source libraries using Scala and contributing them back to the public.

Drawing up this list, I am humbled by the amount of hard work people have put in to make Scala what it is. I am sure I have forgotten many others whose contributions were equally crucial. A big thank you to you all!

Now, looking at the next ten years, I believe we have some truly exciting times ahead. I’ll write about some of the opportunities and challenges that I see in another post.




New Online Courses

2013-08-27T00:00:00+02:00

Last year, the Scala team and I developed a massive open online course for Principles of Functional Programming in Scala on the Coursera platform. We were blown away by the success of that course. So far, it got over 100’000 registrations, with one of the highest completion rates of any open online course.

Today, I am thrilled to announce together with the third iteration of Principles of Functional Programming two new offerings.

Reactive Programming

First, there will be a successor to the course. It’s called Principles of Reactive Programming. I am super-excited to co-teach the course together with Erik Meijer, of Rx fame, and with Roland Kuhn, the tech lead of the Akka actors framework. Reactive programming will assume a good grounding in functional programming and will add topics such different forms of monads, combining functions and state, composing with futures and observables, and designing resilient actor systems.

Time wise, the two courses follow each other. Principles of Functional Programming starts September 16 and goes for 7 weeks, then Principles of Reactive Programming starts November 4 and also goes for 7 weeks. So if you want learn about reactive programming but feel your Scala skills could use some improvement, there’s still time to enroll for the functional programming course.

Personalized Tutorials

In a second new development, Typesafe will offer supervised tutorial classes that follow both classes and run concurrently with them. One of the challenges of massive online courses is that students get only automated feedback on their homework assignments. Using Typesafe’s online tutorial platform, students can enroll in small groups with an expert tutor who will give detailed feedback on programming techniques in their homework assignments and elsewhere.




Scala Workshop (Scala2013) Program Announced!

2013-05-21T00:00:00+02:00

The Scala2013 Workshop Program is now available! We’re quite excited about this year’s program– we received a record number of submissions, leading to a first-class program spanning compilation & metaprogramming, parallelism/concurrency, verification & synthesis, debugging tools and more!

In order to accomodate as many quality submissions as we could, we teamed up with the organizers of the LaME’13 workshop (short for “Languages for the Multicore Era”) to co-sponsor a special Scala parallelism/concurrency session that will take place on July 1st. That means we will now be having Scala2013 talks on two days– July 1st & 2nd.

Please join us this summer in Montpellier! For more info, and to register, visit: http://lampwww.epfl.ch/~hmiller/scala2013/




Scala Workshop (Scala2013) Student Talks to be Awarded Full ECOOP Registration!

2013-04-11T00:00:00+02:00

Thanks to a generous donation from Typesafe and Oracle Labs, we will be awarding a limited number of accepted student talks with full ECOOP registration (a value of 350EUR). Student talks are designed to be 5-10 minutes in duration, presenting ongoing or completed research related to Scala, or announcing a project that would be of interest to the Scala community. To be considered, simply submit a title and abstract by April 12th (students may update/change title/abstract until the final April 19th deadline) at the Scala2013 website. In addition to student talks, we solicit full research papers, short research papers, and tool demos.




Prof. Philip Wadler to Keynote at the Scala Workshop (Scala2013)!

2013-04-11T00:00:00+02:00

We’re excited to announce that Prof. Philip Wadler will be keynoting at this year’s Scala Workshop (Scala2013)! Prof. Wadler is Professor of Theoretical Computer Science at the University of Edinburgh. An ACM Fellow, he is well- known for his seminal work on effectful computations in purely functional languages based on monads, as well as his contributions to the design of Haskell, Java, and XQuery.

The fourth Scala Workshop is the leading forum for research and development on or related to the Scala programming language. It will take place July 2nd, 2013, and will be co-located this year with ECOOP, ECMFA, and ECSA in Montpellier, France.

We solicit full research papers, short papers, tool demos, and student talks. Abstracts are due April 12 (23:59 Samoa time), full papers/demos/etc are due April 19th. Students are encouraged to submit talk proposals, as we will be awarding a limited number of student talks with full ECOOP registrations (a 350EUR value).




Google Summer of Code 2013 Scala Projects

2013-03-20T00:00:00+01:00

This year the Scala team applied again for the Google Summer of Code program to work with enthusiastic students on challenging Scala projects and got accepted! What is Google Summer of Code Google invites students to come up with interesting, non-trivial problems for their favourite open-source projects and work on them over the summer. Participants get support from the community, plus a mentor who makes sure you don’t get lost and that you meet your goals. Aside from the satisfaction of solving challenging problems, students get paid for their work. But wait, there’s more! Successful participants also receive an official Google Summer of Code t-shirt! This is an incredible opportunity to get involved in the Scala community and get helpful support along the way. Project Ideas Below we have collected a list of project ideas. The suggestions are only a starting point for students. We expect students to explore the ideas in much more detail, preferably with their own suggestions and detailed plans on how they want to proceed. Don’t feel constrained by the provided list! We welcome any of your own challenging ideas, but make sure that the proposed project satisfies the main requirements mentioned here below. How to get involved The best place to propose and discuss your proposals is our “scala-language” mailing list (scala-language @ Google Groups, instructions to subscribe are available at http://www.scala-lang.org/node/199#scala). This way you will get quickly responses from the whole Scala community. Previous Summer of Code We encourage you to have a look at our Summer of Code 2010, 2011 and 2012 page to get an idea on what we and you can expect while working on Scala. Please make sure to read carefully the instructions at the end of this page for requirements and submission details. Project Ideas Here are some project ideas for you. The list is non-binding and any reasonable project related to Scala that is proposed by student will be thoroughly reviewed. Scala language Prototype an extension of for-comprehensions for Scala The to goal of this project is to extend the desugaring of for-comprehensions in the Scala compiler to support additional operations like grouping or sorting. Similar work has been done for Haskell (see http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/simonpj/papers/list-comp/). The optimal design for this is not clear yet. We have some written documentation of our past thoughts on the topic you can use as a basis for your own ideas (drafts SIP and SIP alternative). Your implementation along with a SIP (Scala Improvement Process) proposal, should serve as a proof of concept that could lead to the addition of this feature to the Scala language. We want to work with you in an agile, ticket-based development style with frequent communication and coordination. Alternative / social Scala documentation This project has two parts. First you will work on generating alternative api documentation formats for Scaladoc. You will need to hook into the scaladoc part of the scala compiler, to access and work with Scaladoc’s code model. We have a small prototype you can use as a starting point. You should then generate documentation in (non-framed, non-js) single/multi-page HTML, PDF, CHM formats. The result should make sensible use of the scaladoc @-commands and you should think about a good way to present apis designed as in cake patterns. HTML-Formats should support external linking to methods. You can use a documentation generator such as Sphinx to help generating different formats. The second part of this project concerns collaboration. You will need to come up with smart and simple ideas and an implementatio[...]



4th Scala Days Conference to run in New York City

2013-03-12T00:00:00+01:00

The fourth annual Scala Days will be held this year at The Hudson Theater in NYC, June 10th-12th. Now is the time to submit speaking sessions and register to attend!

Scala Days 2013 aims to bring together developers from all corners of the world to share their experiences and new ideas around creating applications with Scala and Scala-based libraries and frameworks. The conference will provide a unique opportunity for Scala users to interact with contributors to the language and related technologies. Martin Odersky will give this year’s keynote, and featured speakers include Jonas Bonér, Viktor Klang and others.

The call for papers will stay open until Monday, April 15th; however, we will announce accepted talks on a rolling basis, so get your proposals in quickly! We are aiming to host a series of Technical Talks, Reports of Real World Applications and Tools Demonstrations. The Scala Days committee also looks for creative ideas from you, so submit any topics you think the community would find exciting, inspiring, thought provoking and interesting!

Please prepare an abstract of your talk (less than 1000 characters), and submit it to info@scaladays.org