Subscribe: Arts+ :: The New York Sun
http://www.nysun.com/edition/8_rss_2.0.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
art  artist  arts  based  canvases  day  exhibit  exhibition  gallery  museum  new york  new  painting  paintings  york sun  york 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Arts+ :: The New York Sun

Arts+ :: The New York Sun



Arts+ :: Stories from The New York Sun



Last Build Date: Sat, 23 Sep 2017 01:56:46 -0500

Copyright: Copyright 2017 The New York Sun
 



Reinventing, Downtown

Sat, 24 Jun 2017 09:58:49 EST

Abstract Expressionists Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline urged a pair of friends to start an art gallery. Tibor de Nagy and John Bernard Myers followed their advice and, in 1950, on East 53rd Street, they opened the Tibor de Nagy Gallery.In the years to come, Mr. Myers and Mr. de Nagy would exhibit works by a number of second-generation Abstract Expressionists, including Alfred Leslie, Grace Hartigan, Robert Goodnough and Helen Frankenthaler. They also showed figurative...



Sing 'Misty' for All of Us: Whatever We May Yet Do, Hold Fast Artistic Dreams

Tue, 2 May 2017 15:24:17 EST

The following is adapted from the prepared text of remarks delivered April 22 at the annual dinner of the Signet Society at Harvard University by Seth Lipsky, editor of The New York Sun and founding editor of the Forward. * * * At the Signet's musical reception, I enjoyed Julia Beidry's fabulous rendition of "Misty." I kept thinking of Colonel Bud Day. He was a U.S. Air Force officer who was shot down over North Vietnam and became the only prisoner ever to escape. Though Day had a broken arm and was barefoot and had been tortured, he made it across the Demilitarized Zone back to Free Vietnam only to be recaptured and dragged back to the communist North. One day he was leading a group of fellow POW's in forbidden prayer, when guards burst in. One of them jammed the barrel of his rifle against Day's forehead. There was a horrifying moment as everyone waited for the guard to pull the trigger. What did Day do? He started singing "The Star Spangled Banner." Suddenly, all of the prisoners started singing our anthem. The guards backed down. America would eventually give Day the Medal of Honor. The reason I kept thinking of Colonel Day is that his trademark...



Cubist Art, Fresh Angles

Fri, 28 Apr 2017 15:16:42 EST

Two gallery shows of contemporary art in Manhattan bring geometry and tactility together with vibrant results. New York based artist Celia Gerard is exhibiting her signature large-scale mixed media drawings alongside relief sculptures in ceramic and bronze at Sears Peyton Gallery in Chelsea. At Fox Gallery on the Upper West Side, Greek artist Eozen Agopian adds thread and fabric to her abstract paintings. Large and small-scale works by Ms. Agopian fill two rooms of the salon-style gallery. Both...



Raiding the Fridge for Inspiration

Wed, 25 Jan 2017 13:54:28 EST

Philadelphia-based artist Aubrey Levinthal (b. 1986) raids her fridge for inspiration. She repurposes her leftovers, turning Tupperware containers packed with fruit salad and spaghetti into inventive still lifes. Milk jugs and the condiments in the icebox are arranged into formally rigorous compositions that show off Ms. Levinthal's feel for paint. Stroked, glazed, scraped and sanded, textured canvases here depict late-night binges and bubbling lasagna."Refrigerator Paintings," a little exhibit...



Underworlds

Tue, 13 Dec 2016 14:15:44 EST

Artist Thaddeus Radell's current exhibit at Bowery Gallery presents recent oils by a painter at the top of his game. Though Mr. Radell's commitment to furthering the tradition of figure painting dates back to his student days (he studied with New York School artists Paul Resika, Leland Bell and Jack Heliker at Parsons in the early 1980s), this is his best work yet. In rugged, large-scale, multiple-figure compositions inspired by classical literature, Mr. Radell seems to have found his voice...



Mind's Eye

Tue, 11 Oct 2016 22:29:23 EST

Visitors to artist Gregory Amenoff's current exhibit might mistake the paintings on view as the work of a nature lover. The artist is displaying small, medium and large-size landscape-based abstractions teeming with organic shapes that suggest trees, caves, plant cells, soil, sky and water. But the forms here are not based on careful observation of the natural world. Rather, these are studio creations, more indebted to American Modernist landscape paintings than Mother Nature.For more than 30...



Mount Washington's Majesty On Exhibit at Currier In a Major New Show

Tue, 4 Oct 2016 14:05:32 EST

Rarely have I looked forward to a museum exhibition with quite the eagerness with which I'm anticipating a visit to "Crown of New England," the paean to Mount Washington that opened October 1 at the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire. It contains 146 paintings and historical objects, including canvases by Bierstadt, Cole, Homer, Kensett, and Champney among others who felt the enormous gravity of this magnificent mountain.I've felt it myself, having been lured up Mount...



Art of War

Fri, 26 Aug 2016 10:02:26 EST

For museumgoers already familiar with the Rococo masterpieces of Jean-Antoine Watteau (1684-1721), a special exhibition at the Frick will illuminate a little-known aspect of his oeuvre. Filling a single gallery of the Frick's lower level, Watteau's Soldiers: Scenes of Military Life in Eighteenth-Century France, brings together four of seven surviving military paintings by Watteau, along with related drawings.But for those not fully aware of Watteau's achievements, this exhibit could further...



To Plumb Modern Israel Jabotinsky's 'My Life' Is the Place To Start

Thu, 18 Aug 2016 11:54:57 EST

For anyone seeking to understand the continuing prominence of the Likud Party in Israeli politics the story of its progenitor, Vladimir Jabotinsky, is essential. A talented writer raised in an assimilated Odessa family, Jabotinsky threw himself into Zionism after witnessing the 1903 Kishinev pogrom. He spent the rest of his life advocating for a Jewish state in Palestine, and died in 1940 in New York while campaigning for a Jewish army to fight the Nazis.For many years, little of Jabotinsky's...



Flattery Will Get You Everywhere

Mon, 16 May 2016 10:14:15 EST

In Van Dyck: The Anatomy of Portraiture, the largest special exhibition ever mounted at the Frick Collection, towering portraits look very much at home on the museum's velvet-covered walls. Van Dyck's elegantly colored canvases in elaborately carved frames flatter the who's who of 17th century European high society. Visitors to this exhibit have the opportunity to assess the legacy of an artist who used his extraordinary ability to achieve fame and fortune as leading court painter to Charles I...



April Flowers

Mon, 4 Apr 2016 13:41:31 EST

"April Flowers," a group exhibition organized by New York Sun Arts contributor Xico Greenwald, opens today at the Queens College Art Center. The exhibit presents floral-themed artworks by 22 artists."From the vegetal patterns of Islamic tile design to Warhol's iconic silkscreens of hibiscus blossoms, flowers have long served as artistic inspiration," Greenwald says. "With a range of color as dazzling as any artist's palette, they epitomize brevity and beauty... As the azalea bushes and cherry...



Portrait of a First Lady

Tue, 15 Mar 2016 12:37:59 EST

The National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC is paying tribute to First Lady Nancy Reagan, who died March 6th at the age of 94. A painting on paper of Mrs. Reagan in a cherry-red dress by portraitist Aaron Shikler has been installed in the museum's In Memoriam space on the first floor.Shikler's painting was made for Time Magazine, a cover design that appeared on newsstands in January 1985, just before President Reagan's second inauguration.Born in Brooklyn, Shikler, who studied painting with...



Janes' Domain

Wed, 13 Jan 2016 19:26:12 EST

New York School painters Jane Freilicher and Jane Wilson lived parallel lives. Born in 1924, they died at 90, just a few weeks apart, a year ago. They came of age in an art world dominated by Abstract Expressionism, but opted to work representationally. After summering together in the Hamptons in the late 1950s, they both bought second homes in the hamlet of Water Mill, where, for the next fifty years, they painted the scenery of East End Long Island.An exhibition at the Parrish Art Museum, now...



Grand Tourists

Mon, 14 Dec 2015 17:53:50 EST

Painters Zach Harris and Eleanor Ray supplemented their art school educations with modern-day Grand Tours of Europe, expeditions to view Renaissance masterworks in the churches and museums of Italy and France. The affects of their encounters with the treasures of Western civilization can be seen in concurrent gallery exhibitions on the Lower East Side.Ray's postcard-sized pictures are perfectly suited to the narrow walls of Steven Harvey Fine Arts, a diminutive gallery on Forsyth Street. Based...



The New Music of Freedom

Mon, 9 Nov 2015 21:34:22 EST

Is it possible for the classical music world to make a coherent statement about the struggle for freedom at a time of increasing anti-Semitism, Islamist terror and the growing strength of tyrannies like Iran? To judge by the groupthink in the arts community and critics that endorsed the moral equivalent treatment of terrorists and victims in John Adams's The Death of Klinghoffer last year it would be difficult to answer that question in the affirmative. But the release of a new CD titled...



The Scenery of Napoli

Mon, 2 Nov 2015 09:07:51 EST

Occupying a townhouse on Park Avenue, the Italian Cultural Institute has filled its rooms with 19th century "Neapolitan School" paintings. Artworks from regions across Southern Italy (the Mezzogiorno) range in style and subject but inoffensive landscapes of attractive coastline predominate.Art dealer Marco Bertoli has curated this show with works drawn from private collections and the pieces on display are for sale.Giuseppe Laezza's and Attilo Pratella's painterly plein-air canvases of the Gulf...



By Giorgio, They've Got It

Sun, 25 Oct 2015 12:54:12 EST

Nicknamed "Il Monaco" (The Monk), painter and printmaker Giorgio Morandi (1890 -1964) is known for having lived a simple existence devoted to art. A lifelong bachelor, Morandi rarely strayed far from his hometown of Bologna, where he shared an apartment with his three sisters. There he painted still lifes of bottles and vases, artworks revered today for their subtle harmonies of shape and color.When the Phillips Collection mounted a Morandi retrospective in 2009, the Bolognese painter was...



What Caillebotte Is All About

Mon, 21 Sep 2015 07:54:09 EST

Even the curators of the Gustave Caillebotte retrospective, currently on view at the National Gallery in Washington D.C., concede that Caillebotte "never achieved the kind of mastery of painting that Degas, Monet, Renoir, Pissarro and C anne did." Though he did not develop a comprehensive artistic vision, the body of work here suggests a complicated personality with a deep sense of pathos, leaving museum visitors imagining what might have been had the artist lived a longer life.The creator of...



Worth the Wait

Tue, 1 Sep 2015 13:29:40 EST

A rare exhibition of the works on paper by Ben Solowey is going up October 3 at the studio-cum-museum that bears his name, a cable from its director, David Leopold, informs us. His wire comes with the subject line "Worth the Wait," and I have no doubt of it, and not just because Solowey openings are rare. The painter, who lived and worked at Bucks County, Pennsylvania, was one of my boyhood heroes and, by any account, is an American master.It looks like the show about to open is something of a...



Bischoff, Right On

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 21:41:51 EST

Artists Elmer Bischoff, David Park and Richard Diebenkorn helped form the Bay Area Figurative Movement in the early 1950s. Their paintings, often characterized as realism rendered with Abstract Expressionist style brushwork, were equally influenced by the Intimist canvases of Pierre Bonnard and ouard Vuillard.Bischoff, like Park and Diebenkorn, made artworks about daily life in Northern California. Using strong colors and assertive marks, he made dynamic street scenes and interiors portraying...