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Preview: The Book Publicist

The Book Publicist



Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and book marketing firm with a special knack for working with authors and entrepreneurs to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more.



Updated: 2018-01-02T05:59:04.457-05:00

 



Authors: Get Bloggers to Promote Your Book

2013-08-28T15:09:10.116-04:00

Book Bloggers, I.E. people who blog about books, like to interview authors for their blogs. Some bloggers have tens of thousands of followers and can totally change an author’s life by exposing you and your book to their audience. Finding a blogger who interviews authors in your genre and particular topic allows you to reach your target niche. Blogs tend to generate a fairly dedicated following with certain blogs sending some authors right to the best seller ranks. By having a blogger interview you and post the interview on their blog, you will potentially pique the interest of everyone who reads that particular blog. People will be more likely to visit your site and read your work, increasing your sales. Here’s a short list of book bloggers who interview authors. Find the ones that fit your genre and give them a shout:Book Bloggers Association: http://bookbloggersassociation.com/ YA Book Blog Directory: http://yabookblogdirectory.blogspot.com Eri Nelson: Wonderful Reads of the Month: http://www.wonderfulreadofthemonth.blogspot.com/Teddy Gross on Jewish-themed books: http://teddygross.blogspot.com/Morgen Bailey: http://morgenbailey.wordpress.com/blog-interviews/ 
Kate Brauning writes excellent book reviews: http://katebrauning.wordpress.com/ 
MUTT: http://www.muttonline.com
Indies Unlimited: http://www.indiesunlimited.com
Review Carnival: http://www.reviewcarnival.blogspot.com/ The Writer’s Life: http://thewriterslife.blogspot.com/ Beyond the Books: http://beyondthebooks.wordpress.com Cynsations: http://cynthialeitichsmith.blogspot.com The Next Best Book Club: http://thenextbestbookblog.blogspot.com Book Chums: http://www.bookchums.com/blogs.php Rainy of the Dark: http://www.rainyofthedark.com The Indie Exchange: http://theindieexchange.com Neal Thompson: http://www.nealthompson.com Expat Bookshop: http://www.expatbookshop.com The Writing Corner: http://www.thewritingcorner.net First Book Interviews: http://firstbookinterviews.blogspot.com/ Lena Sledge: http://www.lenasledgeblog.com/ Better World Books Blog: http://blog.betterworldbooks.com/ Proud Book Nerd: http://proudbooknerd.com I Am a Reader, Not a Writer: http://iamareadernotawriter.blogspot.com Blogging Authors: http://www.bloggingauthors.com As long as a particular blogger covers the genre you write about, most of these bloggers will be happy to interview you about your book. Some bloggers may conduct a phone interview while others will email you questions to answer. Others will invite you to submit a book synopsis, your bio, head shot, book cover and a press release. They’ll use all of this to create the blog page about you and your book. After all, it is fresh material for their site. By reaching out to a targeted list of bloggers you will be promoting yourself in online circles, which will increase your visibility and potentially increase book sales. You can also search for bloggers who interview authors by typing keywords such as “list of book bloggers” or “blogger author interviews.” If you want to track down a certain audience, you can be more specific with your Internet search and search phrases like “young adult fiction book blog.” For more in depth information about promoting your book using blogs I suggest you read “How to Blog a Book” by Nina Amir. It’s filled with useful tips and techniques that will guide you through the process.Bottom line: Finding a blogger to interview you about your work is one ‘arrow in the quiver’ of a book marketing strategy and one that can lead to new fans, publicity and increase in book sales. About Book Publicist Scott LorenzBook publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it's their first book or their 15th book. He's handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, La[...]



Top 20 Book Fairs for Summer & Fall 2013 From Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

2013-05-27T11:09:44.150-04:00

Book fairs and festivals offer authors an excellent place to interact with fellow authors and publishers, network with book industry leaders, locate the help you need, such as a publicist or book editor, and learn what’s new in the marketplace. Book fairs usually want speakers. By volunteering to speak, the author not only gains great exposure but can also add that appearance to their resume and press releases. One of my author clients was recently a member of a panel of authors at a Southern Book Festival. I issued a press release about it and added it to her accomplishments on her bio. Not only is she a respected author but she’s now an author admired by her peers. It’s these little things that all add up in the minds of reviewers and the media when they decide who they will write about. If you want to land a panel gig or speaking slot you must plan ahead; dates for panel participants, speakers and autograph sessions are usually arranged months in advance.For upcoming book events on C-SPAN2 visit: http://www.BookTV.org For more information about book events and book marketing visit http://www.book-marketing-expert.comHere’s my list of upcoming book fairs and events that are worthy of your attendance in 2013. The Book Expo of America book fair will be held in New York City, New York May 30, 2013 through June 1, 2013. http://www.bookexpoamerica.com/en/Press-and-News/Press-Releases/BookExpo-America-Announces-New-Dates-For-2013/ Printers Row Lit Fest will be held in Chicago, Illinois from June 8, 2013 - June 9, 2013. http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/books/printersrowlitfest/ The Books in Boothbay Book Fair (9th Annual) will take place June 13, 2013 in Boothbay, Maine. www.booksinboothbay.blogspot.com/ The 2013 Lit Fest Book Fair will take place June 20, 2013 through June 22, 2013 in Denver, Colorado https://lighthousewriters.org/content/2013-lit-fest-events-book-fair The Harlem Book Fair in Harlem, New York will take place July 19, 2013 through July 20, 2013. http://www.qbr.com/harlem-book-fair.aspx The Rocky Mountain Book and Paper Fair will begin August 2, 2013 and finish August 3, 2013 in Denver, Colorado http://www.rmaba.org The Martha's Vineyard Book Festival will begin August 3, 2013 and run through August 4, 2013 in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. http://mvbookfestival.com/2013_book_festival The Brooklyn Book Festival will begin September 6, 2013 and run through September 22, 2013 in Brooklyn, New York. http://www.brooklynbookfestival.org/BBF/Home The Bookmarks Festival of Books will be held in Winston-Salem, North Carolina on September 7, 2013. http://bookmarksnc.org/book-festival The Kansas Book Festival will be in Topeka, Kansas on September 7, 2013. http://kansasbookfestival.com/ The Westchester Multicultural Children's Book Festival will be September 14, 2013 in Westchester, New York. http://www.qbr.com/westchester-childrens-book-festival-1.aspx The South Dakota Festival of Books in Deadwood, South Dakota will run from September 20, 2013 to September 22, 2013. http://www.sdbookfestival.com/ The National Book Festival will take place in Washington, DC from September 21, 2013 through September 22, 2013. http://www.loc.gov/bookfest/ The Baltimore Book Festival will begin in Baltimore, Maryland on September 27, 2013 and end September 29, 2013. http://www.baltimorebookfestival.com/ The Southern Festival of Books in Nashville, Tennessee will run from October 11, 2013 through October 13, 2013. http://www.humanitiestennessee.org/programs/southern-festival-books-celebration-written-word The Iowa City Book Festival will begin October 11, 2013 and end October 13, 2013 in Iowa City, Iowa. http://www.iowacitybookfestival.org/ The Seattle Antiquarian Book Fair will begin October 12, 2013 and finish October 13, 2013 in Seattle, Washington. http://www.seattlebookfair.com The Texas Book Festival will begin October 26, 2013 and end October 27, 2013 in Austin, Texas. http://www.texasbookfestival.org/ The Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair (37th Annua[...]



Authors: Crowd Source Your Next Book Critique- New Service Does the Work

2013-04-11T06:08:14.365-04:00

I recently contacted several Amazon and GoodReads reviewers to obtain a blurb for the cover of a new book in a series. Most of the reviews were very complimentary but then I got one back that stopped me in my tracks. In that email the reviewer pointed out some flaws in both the writing and the cover. There was inconsistency in what the writer said and what the cover designer selected. Furthermore the reviewer pointed out that a couple of the characters were ‘formulaic’ and ‘underdeveloped.’ She mentioned a few other things but you get the point. And so did the writer, who thanked me and the reviewer for taking time to point out these flaws and gladly made the changes…before it was published.The point? Imagine if you could get not one, not five but 50 people to read your book before it was published and give you some feedback? Would you want that? I know that most writers would jump at the opportunity.Well, there is a new service offered by my friend Clark Covington that offers in effect a ‘crowd sourcing’ critique of your manuscript.The service called ‘Collective Intel’ doesn’t shield you from the feedback, they encourage you to embrace it, and use it to get better. The service uses a simple equation to create the Collective Intel book score.Here’s how it works: They’ll have 50 people read your book cover-to-cover. Who are these people? They are avid readers of books. Some are highly qualified editors, English Majors, proofers and even authors. They love to read books and they know a good one when they see one.Then, they have each person fill out a ten question survey ranking satisfaction of each question. For example, on a scale of 1-10 how would you rate the rate the way the author wrote about the setting in the book? On a scale of 1-10 how would you rate the relatable nature of the characters in the book, 1 for you couldn't understand who they were, and 10 for feeling like you've known them all your life?Then they take your total score (out of 500) and divide it by 50 to get your mean book score, or Collective Intel score. You are then given a total score, and a breakdown of your scores by each question so you can see how you are performing in each area pertinent to being a great writer, like setting, plot, tempo, etc. If you have a collective intel overall score of a 9, you probably have a bestseller on your hands. Conversely if you're a 3, it might be time to get back to the drawing board. This data is awesome for so many reasons, because it helps you break down what you do well, and what you need to work on, which as I've illustrated above is often totally out of sight to hardworking writers.In addition to creating collective and Question-by-Question mean scores for your book, they also provide you with each survey individually, and the notes from each reviewer on what they liked and what they didn't when it came to your book, and most importantly what they want you to work on.Think of this service as the ultimate focus group, a way to get honest feedback on your book, learn to be a better writer, and understand your audience better.Let’s face it, if you have your friends, family and workplace acquaintances read and comment on your book, are you really going to get the feedback you need to create a best-selling well rounded book? I don’t think so. That’s why this service sounds like it could really be a useful tool for all authors.Learn more and sign up here-http://palmettoreview.com/cointel.html About Book Publicist Scott LorenzBook publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books. He's handled publicity for books by CEOs, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Doctors, Lawyers, Athletes and Adventurers. Lorenz helps authors get all the publicity they deserve and more. Visit http://www.Book-Marketing-Expert.com Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at http://www.book-marketing-expert.com or contact Lorenz at[...]



32 Book Awards Authors Should Pursue for 2013

2013-04-11T06:11:39.730-04:00

“Do book awards matter?” YES!!As a book publicist I am here to inform you that yes, they absolutely do matter! In fact, one of my clients won the prestigious Los Angeles Book Festival award. That then led to a flurry of media interest, which subsequently led to a major New York agent deciding to represent the book and pitch it to all the major publishing houses. Deals are in the offing. This author, needless to say, is happy he decided to enter. Pursuing and winning book awards will give you another opportunity to reach out to the media, booksellers and agents. As a book publicist I see the media perk up when an author client has received an award. It’s the added credibility that gives them the assurance that the book is worthwhile. It takes the risk out of the equation for the producer or reporter if it’s an ‘award winning’ book. Awards also create interest in your book, which can lead to more sales and other opportunities. A book award may cause someone to stop in their tracks and consider picking up your book in a book store. A book award can give you an edge and sometimes that’s all the difference you need to propel your book into bestseller territory. If you win you can say you are an “award winning author.” Doesn’t that sound better? Of course it does, and you get a little magic that comes from a third party endorsement because an authority says your work is worthy, and that’s priceless.Most awards charge a fee to enter. Not all awards have a category for your genre and not all of these will work for every book.Here’s a list of my Top 32 book awards worthy of your consideration.1. Enter to win The 2013 Independent Book Publisher Awards. The contest is for independent, university, small press, self-publishers and independent authors throughout North America and overseas publishers who publish books intended for the American market. https://secure.independentpublisher.com/trans_entry.php?srcg=ipggl1 2. Entering the Book of the Year Awards should definitely be on your literary to-do list. Check it out here https://www.forewordreviews.com/services/book-awards/botya/ 3. Check out the National Book Critics Circle Awards and enter by December 1 http://bookcritics.org/awards/award_submissions/ 4. The Man Booker Prize for Fiction boasts that the prize is the world's most important literary award. Entery forms are due April 2 and Finished Books are due July 1 http://www.themanbookerprize.com/node/20 5. The Newbery Medal was the world’s first children’s book award. Enter before December 31 http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/newberymedal/newberyapp/newberyapplication 6. Enter to win the Caldecott Medal before December 31 for your Children’s picture book http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/caldecottmedal/caldecottapp/caldecottapplication.cfm 7. Find out how your book can earn a Hugo Award and check out science fiction’s most prestigious award details http://www.thehugoawards.org/about/ 8. Strive to be nominated and win the Nobel Prize in literature. Who can nominate? Professors of literature and of linguistics at universities and university colleges to name a few. (Another reason it pays to keep the ties your alma mater!) http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/nomination/ 9. The Edgar Allan Poe Award for books submission deadline is September 28. See how to submit your book http://www.mysterywriters.org/?q=Edgars-Info 10. FT/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year submission deadline is June 30 https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ereg/index.php?eventid=22298&categoryid=74822 11. Enter to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction before January 2013 http://www.pulitzer.org/how_to_enter 12. The National Book Award deadline is June 15. Learn how to submit your book here http://www.nationalbook.org/nbaentry.html 13. Enter the 2013 Independent Publisher Book Awards by March 2013. The “IPPY” Awards were conceived as a broad-based, unaffiliated awards program open to all members of t[...]



“What Should I Read?” Asks Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

2013-02-14T09:36:27.465-05:00

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What Should I Read? I was recently asked this question by a reporter and it really made me think about the process a book lover goes through when determining what book to buy.

It’s a great question because as a book publicist I want you to read my clients’ books of course! But how do we connect ‘you,’ the reader, to my client?

I could not do this work if I did not have a love of books as they are being published at a rate of a few hundred a day; it’s really impossible to keep up. But, that said, here are some tips for book lovers about determining what to read.

1. Get a Kindle. Then sign up for Amazon Prime. Create a wish list of the books you would like to read. Write a review about books you’ve read. Rate them 1-5 stars. Then Lo and Behold, Amazon will use an algorithm to suggest books that you might like. If you sign up for their daily email, you’ll get one from Amazon with books that are FREE that day on Kindle and others that are priced under $10. Before long you’ll have more books than you’ll have time to read and, most likely they’ll be books you’ll be interested in.

2. Then go to C-Span’s Book TV. http://www.booktv.org/schedule.aspx Each weekend, Book TV features 48 hours of nonfiction books from Saturday 8am (ET) to Monday 8am (ET). They have interviews, presentations and readings by the top authors. This is a terrific way to keep abreast of the important books of the day, and what better way to learn about a book than to hear about it directly from an author.

3. Register at GoodReads. http://www.goodreads.com They ask new visitors to tell them what titles or genres they’ve enjoyed in the past, and they’ll provide what they call ‘surprisingly insightful recommendations.’ They have 40+ genres of books listed on their home page alone and offer everything from Romance and Religion to Cookbooks and Science Fiction.

4. There are the old standards too, like the New York Times Bestseller list. You can find all kinds of books that are selling well. http://www.nytimes.com/best-sellers-books/overview.html Does that mean you should read them? Maybe. There are so many books out there that are well written and deserve to be on that list but they lack the marketing muscle to get noticed. Remember, the NY Times list does not always reflect the best books, just the bestselling books.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it's their first book or their 15th book. He's handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman's World, & Howard Stern to name a few. Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at http://www.book-marketing-expert.com or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or by phone at 734-667-2090. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist





How ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ Author Hit It Big... And ‘Mommy Porn’ Entered Daily Vernacular

2013-04-11T06:14:20.827-04:00

British author E.L. James’s erotic romance trilogy Fifty Shades of Grey, Fifty Shades Darker, and Fifty Shades Freed is the hottest topic in publishing right now. The trilogy has been featured on mommy blogs, The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Saturday Night Live, book clubs, and Amazon.com. The book’s main characters are Seattle billionaire 27-year-old control freak Christian Grey and innocent 21-year-old Anastasia Steele. Grey, a self-made entrepreneur, not only controls his wildly successful businesses, but takes the reins in the bedroom as well. With a tortured childhood fueling his dominant personality, the trilogy unravels the tumultuous relationship between Grey and Ana. So, what is it that makes this series so special that it’s flying off shelves with more than 20 million copies sold in the United States alone? James has been wildly successful and has gained massive publicity for her work through word of mouth and media outlets alike. Fifty Shades of Grey was first published in 2011 by a small Australian publisher. It generated buzz by word of mouth after it was available as an ebook. Once the book topped the American best-seller lists in early 2012, Vintage Books bought the rights to publish both the ebook and paperback for seven figures. Fifty Shades of Grey gained massive popularity on the web via “mommy blogs.” The Suburban Jungle raved about the book in her blog and explains, “…so many of us can’t put the series down. We have an inherent connection to the characters and may not even know it.” BabyCenter Blog’s Lindsay Weiss wrote a cheeky post titled “I have a ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ Hangover” in which she explains her dedication to the series. “Are they tremendously meaningful literature? No they are not. Are they even exceptionally well-written? Nope. But have they kept me up until 2am for two nights straight? Yes, they have. I can’t put them down. I can’t sleep. I’d rather read than eat. And I’m cursing the time it’s taking me to write this post because it’s taking me away from the twisted plot of the book.” Weiss’ blog post received 57 responses of women raving about the books. In an article in The Guardian, Vanessa Thrope wrote, “Mainstream publishing houses are colonising fresh territory in the next stage of an ebook revolution that is changing not only how we read, but what we read, forever. Following the success of Fifty Shades of Grey, which started out as an ebook series posted on a fan site by author EL James and has become the world's fastest-selling book, publishers are starting to move in on the profits generated by the thriving online platforms that serve unpublished writers. In July of 2012 Pearson, the owner of Penguin Books, bought one of the largest grassroots publishers, Author Solutions, based in Indiana, in the US, for £74m. (135 Million US Dollars)The idea is that Pearson will no longer have to rely on spotting ebook hits early; instead, they will own a new author's work from the first moment it appears on screen. This acquisition comes in the wake of Pearson's launch last year of Book Country, a website on which fiction authors could publish their work.”From Mommy Blogs to daytime television, Fifty Shades of Grey took the media by storm. Ellen DeGeneres featured the book on her show and Saturday Night Live did a parody of the book’s effect on women. It’s no secret that sex sells. However, James is not selling sex. In fact, she’s selling romance, which is the best-selling category in publishing. The romantic plotlines appeal much more to women, the book’s primary fan base, than sex alone. While various readers’ sexual fantasies and tastes may differ, most can agree that receiving lavish gifts would be wonderful. Grey showers Ana with foreign cars, the latest technology, an expansive closet filled with designer duds with price tags to match. James speaks to readers’ inner desires to experience a lif[...]



List of Jewish Book Fairs and Festivals for Jewish Authors or Topics of Jewish Interest

2012-10-23T06:57:04.391-04:00

Book festivals and fairs are held year round all over the world. As a book marketing specialist, I am the first to impress on authors the new and powerful marketing avenues open to all authors on the Internet – from websites and book trailers to social networks like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. While these are excellent tools when used properly, authors should never overlook opportunities to meet the reading public face-to-face.If you are a Jewish author or specialize in writing about Jewish issues, you should consider visiting some of these book fairs in the Jewish community. 1. Jewish Community Center of Greater Ann Arbor. November 4 – 18, 2012. Contact Karen Freedland, Cultural Arts and Education Director, at 734-971-0990. You can also visit http://www.jccannarbor.org/cultural-arts-education/jewish-book-festival/ 2. Jewish Book Council’s Jewish Book Month will be held November 7 - December 7, 2012. Jewish Book Month is an annual event on the American Jewish calendar dedicated to the celebration of Jewish books. It is observed during the month proceeding Hanukkah, thus the exact date changes from year to year. http://www.jewishbookcouncil.org/about/jewish-book-month.html3. Valley of the Sun JCC in Scottsdale, AZ will be hosting the Arizona Authors Speaker Series monthly from October to April. The event will take place on the 3rd Monday of each month from 1:30pm. Arizona contributes much to the literary world with authors and as a story setting. The Valley of the Sun JCC will be treated to appearances by authors who are either from, reside, or use Arizona as a locale for their books. The authors will speak about their life and writings. You need to be a Brandies member to join this group. Guests and JCC Members are welcome for a $5 fee. RSVP’s are required to Merrill Kalman: mskbflo@aol.com or 480.296.33554. Valley of the Sun JCC in Scottsdale, AZ will also be hosting “Exceptional” Characters in Books & Film, which is co-sponsored by CJSN. The event will take place the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 1:00-2:30pm and will be featuring books with protagonists with disabling conditions; our discussions will focus on the way the disability impacts the characters and the plot. http://www.vosjcc.org/SpecialEvents/CulturalArtsAndSpecialEvents5. JCC of Metro Detroit’s 61st Annual Jewish Book Fair will be held November 7 – 18, 2012. At this event, fabulous authors from all over the world will present their books. For further information, contact Dalia Keen at 248.432.5467 or email info@jccdet.org or visit http://jccdet.org6. Shalom Austin’s Austin Jewish Book Fair will be October 28 - November 4, 2012. The schedule features lectures and discussions with acclaimed writers, the annual Book Lover’s Luncheon, and an onsite bookstore in partnership with Barnes & Noble. The total cost for the Book Fair Package is: $25 JCC Member /$30 Non-member. Each individual event is: $10 JCC Member /$15 Non-member. Check out http://shalomaustin.org/bookfair for further information. 7. St. Louis JCC’s 34th Annual St. Louis Jewish Book Festival presented by Maryville University - St. Louis will be November 4-15, 2012. All author events take place at the Staenberg Family Complex unless otherwise noted. For more information, please call theSt. Louis Jewish Book Festival Hotline: 314.442.3299 or visit http://www.jccstl.com/programs/arts-culture/st-louis-jewish-book-festival/ 8. Marcus JCC Atlanta’s 21st Edition of the Book Festival of the MJCCA will be November 1-18, 2012. For 20 successful years, the Book Festival of the MJCCA has provided our community with a literary extravaganza featuring an exciting lineup of the year’s most exceptional authors, speakers, and celebrities. Please join thousands of your fellow book lovers to listen, meet, and interact with your favorite authors in a variety of forums, including author meet-and-greets, book signings, a communit[...]



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2013-04-11T06:17:31.865-04:00

Apple Genius Manual: What Authors Can Learn By Scott Lorenz Westwind CommunicationsApple is a category killer in computers, mobile phones, tablets and is playing an increasingly important role in publishing and selling ebooks on iTunes for the iPhone and iPad. We can all learn a lot from Apple so when their ‘Genius Manual’ was revealed recently, I found ways the info contained was applicable to authors.The Genius Bar is the name of Apple's in-store tech support station, which is located in Apple retail stores. The Genius Bar is the one-stop-shop for Apple users who have questions about or are having trouble with their Apple hardware or software. Can’t get your iPad to connect to WiFI? Apple’s one-on-one tech support session with a trained Apple Genius can help you fix the problem on the spot or simply better understand a product. Tech support from The Genius Bar is free of charge, but repairs and more in-depth support usually has a fee, unless your Apple product is still under warranty. Until now, it has been a well-kept secret how Apple employees are trained and what is expected of them. Gizmodo published a portion of Apple’s "Genius Training Student Workbook,” which sheds light on how to walk, talk, and behave like the perfect Apple Genius. Authors can take notes from Apple’s Genius Training Manual and put them into practice when promoting their work. According to the Gizmodo article “How To Be a Genius: This Is Apple’s Secret Employee Training Manual” by Sam Biddle, “Selling is a science, summed up with five cute letters: (A)pproach, (P)robe, (P)resent, (L)isten, (E)nd.” Simply put, you should allow fans and readers alike to open up to you about their literary wants and needs, offer them choices, open lines of communication, and seal the deal with the book of your choice. Keep abreast of what people are posting on your website, social media outlets, and forums that are in keeping with your writing style or genre. You’ll be more in tune with what people want to read and you can start a dialogue with them. Reply to their comment or mention them on Twitter. This open dialogue will draw more people to your website and earn you more publicity. Once you suggest your latest book for them to read, you will have opened the door for a new fan and a new string of publicity for yourself. Apple Geniuses “strive to inspire” so you should be doing the same. Inspire people with your work! Especially if you are an author of the self-help or lifestyle genres, you should be inspiring people with the words you write and publish. Publicize how your book has inspired people. Put quotes or stories from readers on your website, blog, and Facebook page. This will help people see that your work stands out and makes an impact on people and their lives. As an author, you’re no stranger to critique or criticism. So there is bound to be, or more likely has already been, a time when a disgruntled reader expresses their feelings on your work. Not everyone is going to love your work, but you knew that going into writing. So, when someone sends you a negative Tweet, comment, or letter in the mail, have empathy. Do not apologize for anything you’ve written. Instead, express regret that the person is experiencing a particular emotion. Something along the lines of, “I’m sorry you did not enjoy My Book as much as you were hoping to” or “I’m sorry you felt frustrated with the relationship between Him and Her in My Book” should suffice. You could also encourage the dissatisfied reader to give your work a second shot and suggest another book of yours that you feel is completely different from the piece they did not enjoy. However, tread lightly and be respectful of his or her opinion. In a Forbes article titled “The Psychological Tricks Behind Apple’s Service Secrets,” author Sebastian Bailey wrote, "Give fearless fe[...]



How Book Shepherds Can Help Authors

2012-09-22T13:05:55.962-04:00

How Book Shepherds Can Help Authors By Scott Lorenz Westwind CommunicationsI recommend authors look into hiring a book shepherd for a current or upcoming writing and publishing project. A book shepherd is someone whose expertise in books and publishing will help you throughout the entire book process. From cover art, editing, dealing with Amazon to locating a printer, a book shepherd will assist you from start to finish. I am a proponent of using a book shepherd because there are so many things to know about in the book publishing process and so much is swiftly changing its extremely difficult to keep up with it all. It takes a person with experience to guide you along the way and that’s what a book shepherd does. Hiring a guide is a concept that’s been working for humankind for thousands of years. If you were going to a foreign land and wanted to see and do as much as you could would you read a guide book or hire someone to show you? Consider yourself fortunate if you can afford a book shepherd as it is well worth the money spent.Dan Poynter recently compiled a comprehensive list of book shepherds. At the top of his list is Shel Horowitz who explains his role: “Basically, I walk unpublished writers through the process of becoming well-published authors. I start by helping them determine if they should publish traditionally, self-publish, or subsidy publish--and then help them complete all the steps for their choice, then work with them on the marketing as the book nears completion.” http://www.frugalmarketing.com/author-services.shtml Tanya Hall is a unique book shepherd in that she works for a national publisher/distributor. “So instead of working in a vacuum without any up-to-the-minute feedback on trends, pitches, etc like most book shepherds operate, I have the luxury of a sales force and team of experts behind me to guide the direction I give to my clients. Most of our clients “in development” go through an editorial project development phase, followed by any number of services ranging from design to printing to (if accepted for publication/distribution by our review committee) distribution and marketing.” For more information, visit her website http://www.greenleafbookgroup.com. Bobbie Christmas explains that her book shepherding style is rooted in an editing background. “After twenty years of editing magazines, newspapers, and corporate communications, I opened Zebra Communications in 1992 and specialized in editing books. As self-publishing grew and became an excellent way for consultants and other entrepreneurs to promote themselves and their businesses, I heard horror stories about otherwise intelligent people who made terrible decisions that cost them money and time and in the end often embarrassed them, rather than helping them get their books out to the public. I realized my clients needed more than editorial services, so I added book shepherding to my offerings.” Bobbie’s website is www.zebraeditor.com. Mike Ball, award winning syndicated columnist and author of three books, offers unique assistance to new authors from his position on the front lines of the publishing wars. “Hey, it can be complicated, time consuming and downright confusing,” says Ball. “I just helped out an elderly author who got completely flummoxed by the forms Amazon threw at him. I understand it can be a daunting task for anyone. That’ why I am happy to assist for a reasonable hourly fee.” Find Mike at http://writeittight.com or call him at 313-405-7664.Simon Warwick-Smith of www.warwickassociates.net says, “We are a one-stop shop, from cover and interior design to physical printing, and eBooks, to sales, marketing and publicity. Been in business for 20 years with a long list of satisfied clients”Rita Mills says, “I don’t much care for the term ‘book shepherd’ as I feel what I[...]



Book Marketing Strategy of the Future

2012-06-06T11:06:00.756-04:00

Book Marketing Strategy of the FutureScott LorenzWestwind CommunicationsBook MarketingWith technology being as advanced as it is, it is surprising that book marketing strategies are continuously falling short of their potential. These limitations of book marketing are even more evident when compared against a variety of other industries. No one is more aware of this concept than publishing entrepreneur, Peter Collingridge. Collingridge delivered a speech to the If Book Then conference in Milan that got the minds of marketers everywhere second guessing their current strategies. Collingridge criticizes current marketing techniques for being outdated and too reliant on, “PR and big-budget poster campaigns.” Little advancement has been made throughout the years on book marketing, causing people to rely on these obsolete tactics. However, little is known about the true impacts of these marketing strategies, and their success rates among audiences. With so much money being invested in these strategies, it seems ironic that we are unaware of their results. One way Collingridge proposes to change this industry is to become more reliant on data and empirical information, rather than gut feelings. However, until recently, this type of data has not been available. To bridge this gap, Collingridge has proposed a new type of program called Bookseer.Bookseer is a digital marketing intelligence service for publishers that will simplify and progress marketing strategies. This program collects data on the success of a book based on its rankings on a multitude on websites. Bookseer then translates this data into a current up-to-date evaluation. One of the benefits of Bookseer is that it is constantly being updated and relies on present statistics, which allows publishers to track the success of the book throughout the various marketing stages. These predictions have held up through various case studies and have proven to be a truly remarkable modernization. This program will allow publishers to see what tactics work best, and which ones do not, so that they can refine future strategies to maximize profit. However, this is only the beginning. Collingridge said, “The new market calls for investment in new skills and tools.” It is possible that once more data becomes available, and people acquire these skills, algorithms can be created to predict the success of books that have yet to even be published. This new technology and advancement in the industry will forever change the way publishers approach marketing. By allowing them to critically view their current strategies and to tailor them to increase sales, marketing strategies will be more successful now than ever before. For more information on Bookseer and Peter Collingridge follow him on Twitter at @gunzalis #bookseer or contact me. at scottlorenz@westwindcos.comSource:Book marketing analytics and a new marketing approach for publishers | Enhanced Editions. (2012, February 2). Enhanced Editions. Retrieved March 18, 2012, from http://www.enhanced-editions.com/blog/2012/02/book-promotion-analytics-and- a-new-marketing-approach-for-publishers/About the AuthorBook publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it's their first book or their 15th book. He's handled publicity for books by CEOs, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC Nightly News, The New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, Los Angeles Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Family Circle,[...]



How Amanda Hocking REALLY Did It- An Inspiration for All Authors

2013-04-11T06:19:06.423-04:00

By Scott Lorenz Westwind CommunicationsAmanda Hocking, as I’m sure you know, is a best-selling e-author on Amazon.com. Since uploading her first e-book in the spring of 2010, she has grossed about $2 million. She’s got 10 novels under her belt, all of which fall into the paranormal-romance category. The prominent entertainment company, Media Rights Capital, optioned her four-book vampire series “Trylle”. Clearly, she’s had great success self-publishing her e-books. So, it was a surprise when Hocking decided to sign with St. Martin’s Press, which is a very established publishing house. Hocking has openly explained that she suffered from depression for the vast majority of her life and turned to writing as a sort of escape. She finished her first novel at 17, titled “Dreams I Can’t Remember” and was turned down by each of the 50 agents to whom she’d sent her work. Not long thereafter, she caught a clip on YouTube of the band Blink-182’s Mark Hoppus encouraging American youth to make their dreams come true. Hocking admits having a sort of “aha” moment and realized that she could not wait for her dreams to come true. She had to put forth the effort and make them come true. In 2009, Hocking began to treat writing as a job rather than something she did for entertainment. She wrote a few more novels, sent them off to agents, and still received only rejections. In April 2010, Hocking uploaded her novel “My Blood Approves” to Amazon, then later to Smashwords, then directly on Barnes & Noble’s site. Hocking started selling books, first a few a day, then as she uploaded more of her work, she managed to sell 26 books in one day in May. These days, the author is selling 9,000 books a day. Just how did she do it? Well, the stories she writes are an obvious piece of her success. Her novels combine action and romance with a dash of quirk and topped off by Hocking’s creative style of writing. Additionally, by selling e-books, Hocking was able to sell the books for far less money compared to a traditional bookstore book. Therefore, people were more inclined to spend the 99 cents or $3.00 to read her work instead of dropping upwards of $15.00 for a book off the shelf of a trendy bookstore. Hocking has a very blasé attitude in regard to her success and rapid writing. When asked just how she manages to complete her work so quickly, Hocking responds on her blog, “I don’t know. I just write a lot and drink a lot of Red Bull.” Hocking also suggests that writing paired with reading more than she writes, was instrumental in her success. She made sure to edit her novels a great deal in order to get them just right. Learning to take criticism was useful to Hocking’s success because she was able to understand that although her books weren’t for everyone, they did have an audience. Taking a look at her blog, Hocking describes herself as an, “Obsessive tweeter. John Hughes mourner. Batman devotee. Muppet activist. Unicorn enthusiast. Fraggin Aardvarks guitarist. Author of the USA Today Bestselling Trylle Trilogy & the upcoming Watersong series.” She actively updates her blog, so her fans always have something new to read. This past October was Hocking’s second annual “Zombiepalooza!” on her blog, which ran for the entire month of October. Hocking explains that while she especially enjoys zombies, Zombiepalooza is really a celebration of all things horror and Halloween. Throughout the month, there were guest posts, giveaways, and other fun goodies, such as the “ultimate Halloween Playlist.” John Kremer recently mentioned Amanda Hocking in a seminar about blog tours. Amanda Hocking inspired him to name a particular type of blog tour a Blogpalooza. John got the name from Hocking, after her first Zombiepalooza in Octob[...]



My Top 10 Book Apps for Kids and Adults

2011-10-20T17:07:48.116-04:00

Scott Lorenz Westwind Communications Book Marketing Many books now have apps that work on iPhones or iPads and on the Android platform. Consumers can now buy the printed book, the app alone or both. Authors can capitalize on this trend by creating apps for their books or pushing their publisher to create one for them. Some apps have incredible features such as 3D effects, interactive story telling, and more. Creating an app for your book may give you a competitive advantage as well. I’ve found some book apps for both kids and adults that you’ll want to check out. Here’s my top ten: • Weird But True is an app developed by the creators of National Geographic that will keep you entertained for hours. Packed with interesting facts that will allow you to impress your friends and colleagues with newly acquired knowledge of the natural world. • 3D Classic Literature Collection lets readers enjoy their favorite American classic stories in a 3-dimensional context. Complete with high quality animation and audio, this interactive app is sure to bring your favorite stories to life to let you experience them in a way you never imagined. • Fahrenheit 451 brings Ray Bradbury’s sci-fi story off the page and into reality with narration, puzzles, auto-bookmarking, and book references to help you find your next favorite read. Enjoy this timeless classic all over again like never before. • Pocket Cocktails serves as a complete archive of all your favorite drink recipes. Entertain your friends, or just make yourself the ideal martini on your night off. Complete with how-to photos and festive holiday drink recipes, you’ll be the life of any party this season. • Jack and the Beanstalk is the perfect app to keep your kids entertained whenever you need a minute to yourself. Filled with interactive games, activities, artwork, and read-along text, it’s the ideal children’s app with an educational twist. Unlike other book apps, every page has a different surprise that will keep kids engaged and involved, all at a price that won’t break the bank. • Wizard of Oz 3D, The Experience puts a new spin on the timeless classic of Dorothy’s adventure. Enjoy L. Frank Baum’s novel in an engaging 3D interactive experience. With pop-up animation, rediscover the story and share it with friends, family, and children. Bring an old classic to life and enjoy it all over again. • Green Eggs and Ham provides children with picture/word association and other features designed to promote early literacy. Winner of the 2011 Parents’ Choice Award, its an interactive approach to learning hidden beneath a Dr. Seuss Classic. • Comics is a free app that lets comic fans keep up with their favorite strips from Marvel, DC, The Walking Dead, and many more. Kill some free time in between errands or make an evening out of it while watching your favorite superhero movies. • Nancy Drew: Shadow Ranch Lite lets users follow their favorite teen detective on her latest investigation. Choose your own path through the story and solve puzzles to help Nancy crack her latest crime. Track your progress and backtrack when you receive new clues to get on the right path! • Our Choice is an interactive app that covers the pressing issue of global warming. As viewed by Al Gore, Our Choice takes you through various charts, articles, diagrams, and other forms of media to help users grasp the seriousness of the environmental issue. Stay informed with everything going on and find ways to lessen your environmental impact. Check out the tour by Al Gore here: http://vimeo.com/22872218 Books have made a comeback in the world of entertainment with revelations such as audio versions, 3D supplements, and smartphone apps. Let me k[...]



Does Your Book Need an iPhone App?

2011-12-10T11:26:12.124-05:00

iPhone users are always looking for new apps to download; from amusing games to useful apps worthy of showing friends and colleagues. Having an app that corresponds to your book can give readers something to keep busy as well as draw in new readers. The number of iPhone apps that are linked to books is growing at an increasingly rapid rate. The number of books available on the iTunes App Store has far exceeded the number of games available. So what better way to market your book than to hop on the bandwagon and create an app for it! There are many ways you can transform your book into an app. Your app can contain anything from an excerpt of your book to a game that corresponds with the characters in your story. Sharing an excerpt can provide readers with a preview of your story and draw them into either purchasing an audio, kindle or paperback version. On the other hand, games can give readers the opportunity to interact with the characters they’ve grown to know and love from your original story. Create a game that mimics your story line in an interactive fashion or a quiz that allows readers to identify quotes from the story and assign them to the appropriate characters. Games can be especially useful for children’s storybooks seeing as how children love interactive scenarios, especially with their favorite characters. A great example of a book being transformed into an app is one created from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. Currently a top seller, the Harry Potter: Spells application allows users to learn the spells that they’ve seen in action throughout the magical series and use them to battle with other iPhone users. Apps such as this help bring the story to life in a new way for readers and will keep your story alive in their minds long after they’ve finished reading. If your book is non-fiction, there are other ways to translate it into an app. You might be interested in creating an app that emphasizes tips, key points or interesting facts from your book. For example, a popular app, Military Cadences, provides users with the words associated with the various songs and chants used in military settings. Providing this can help readers better understand the concept of your book and provide them with new information on the subject that they find interesting. The current top selling iPhone App for a book is Dora’s Ballet Adventures. Available for $2.99, users can partake in an interactive storytelling adventure and help Nickelodeon’s Dora prepare for her ballet recital. The app gets 5 star rating reviews from parents and has definitely brought publicity to it. As mentioned before, children’s books can be easily transformed into iPhone apps and are a great way for parents to keep children entertained on errands or in the car. Another thing to consider when deciding whether or not to create an iPhone app is that an app can be a great way to bring in a little extra revenue. You can charge a small fee for your app or offer it for free. By charging a small fee, you bring a little more money with each purchase/download. If you decide to offer your app for free, more people will download it and will be aware of your story. Regardless of which path you choose, you can expect to see an increase in sales, which is always a good thing.iPhone apps are a great way to bring your story to life for readers as well as draw in new readers. There are many prestigious and affordable companies that can be of service if you are looking to create an app. Contact me for details if you are interested.About the AuthorBook publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors t[...]



Top Book Awards Authors Should Pursue

2011-08-05T15:13:58.185-04:00

Do book awards matter? Absolutely YES! In fact, just recently one of my clients won the prestigious Los Angeles Book Festival award. That then led to a flurry of media interest, which then led to a major New York agent deciding to represent the book and pitch it to all the major publishing houses. Deals are in the offing. This author, needless to say, is happy he decided to enter. Pursuing and winning book awards will give you another opportunity to reach out to the media, booksellers and agents. Awards create interest in your book, which can lead to more sales and other opportunities. A book award may cause someone to stop in their tracks and consider picking up your book in a book store. A book award can give you an edge and sometimes that’s all the difference you need to propel your book into bestseller territory. If you win you can say you are an “award winning author.” Doesn’t that sound better? Of course it does, and you get a little magic that comes from a third party endorsement because an authority says your work is worthy, and that’s priceless.Most awards charge a fee to enter. Not all awards have a category for your genre and not all of these will work for every book.Here’s a list of my Top 22 book awards worthy of your consideration.Enter to win The 2011 Independent Book Publisher Awards between January 1 and March 15 at https://secure.independentpublisher.com/trans_entry.php?srcg=ipggl1 Entering the Book of the Year Awards should definitely be on your end-of-the-year to-do list. Check it out here http://www.bookoftheyearawards.com/ Check out the National Book Critics Circle Awards and enter by December 1 http://bookcritics.org/awards/award_submissions/ The Man Booker Prize for Fiction boasts that the prize is the world's most important literary award. Enter to win by July 1 http://www.themanbookerprize.com/prize/about/rules-and-entry The Newbery Medal was the world’s first children’s book award. Enter before December 31 http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/newberymedal/newberyapp/newberyapplication.cfm Enter to win the Caldecott Medal before December 31 for your Children’s picture book http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/caldecottmedal/caldecottapp/caldecottapplication.cfm IACP Cookbook Awards deadline is October 29. Check out how to enter http://www.iacp.com/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=745 Hugo Award deadline is March 26, check out science fiction’s most prestigious award details http://www.thehugoawards.org/about/ Strive to be nominated and win the Nobel Prize in literature. Who can nominate? Professors of literature and of linguistics at universities and university colleges to name a few. (Another reason it pays to keep the ties your alma mater!) http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/nomination/ The Edgar Allan Poe Award for books submission deadline is August 15. See how to submit your book http://www.mysterywriters.org/?q=Edgars-Info FT/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year submission deadline is June 30 https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ereg/index.php?eventid=22298&categoryid=74822 Enter to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction before February 2 http://www.pulitzer.org/how_to_enter The National Book Award deadline is June 15. Learn how to submit your book here http://www.nationalbook.org/nbaentry.html Submit your work by October 31 to win the Stonewall Book Award. Click for details http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/rts/glbtrt/stonewall/index.cfm The Deadline for the Autumn House Press award for fiction is June 30. Check it out here http://www.autumnhouse.org/contest-submissions/ Enter to win the Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award deadline is December 17. Click for more details ht[...]



Use Twitter to Promote Your Book

2013-04-11T06:21:31.742-04:00

Congratulations, you’ve written a book. Good for you! Now, do you think you can use 140 characters to successfully promote it? After all, what good is your book if no one (except your family) reads it? Twitter is a great tool to utilize while shamelessly promoting your book. As with most things, successful book promotion via Twitter is an art form not to be taken lightly. The first thing you need to do is create an account with a not-so-boring username. In my case I used what I do in the name @aBookPublicist, you could create something clever or about your book. Then you’ll need a picture or headshot, it better be a good one too, it’s the only image people will have of you so make it clean, clear, and simple.Twitter is reminiscent of the schoolyard playground, so play nice and make friends.Upon entering the world of Twitter, your mission is to create a following. If people aren’t reading your tweets, they won’t read your book. The best way to gain a following is to follow people. Hopefully, you’ll pique their interest so they follow you in return. It won’t hurt to do a Twitter search for the subject area of your book. If you wrote a romance novel, search topics like “love,” “relationships,” and “romance,” Follow those people, pages, or groups and maybe they’ll want to follow you. Look up magazine editors and tweet them specifically (using the @ function) to steer their attention to you and your literary masterpiece. You should make nice with the book industry folks like book store owners, book reviewers, librarians, and your wonderful friends at Westwind Communications @aBookPublicist and let them know what you’re up to by following them. If you have a new blog post, find an article about your genre, or have new information on a speaking engagement; let them know about it by tweeting it. You’re an author. You should follow other authors. That way, you can get tips on what is happening in the writing world, outside of your area of expertise. You’ll learn while you are promoting and what’s wrong with that?About writing actual tweets: You’ve written an entire book, don’t ruin it all with a bad tweet. It is important, while tweeting, that you use a catchy headline and include a link. If your tweets are stupid, boring, annoying, or uneducated, no one will read them; or worse, people will unfollow you! We simply cannot have that nonsense. So, you should be sure to use keywords that relate to you and your book, attracting “tweeps” to your page and thus gaining your book recognition. DO NOT make every single tweet a shameless self-promotion. People don’t like that. If people don’t like your tweets, that means they will not like you or your book. Tweet interesting things you come across, your genuine thoughts, and save the self-promoting tweets for about 20% of your total tweets. Since tweets are limited to 140 characters, each letter is very valuable. Use www.tinyurl.com to shrink up those lengthy links containing fascinating information. This will give you more room to convey your personal message and to add your own touch to the tweet. Once you gain a following, you should reward those who were kind enough to give a hoot about you in the first place. Reward your “twitterverse” by announcing a “giveaway” and give a prize to a follower selected at random. You could make them earn their prize, perhaps by re-tweeting a tweet of yours. Remember how I said be nice and make friends? Well, Karma will help you survive in the land of social media. Re-tweet posts from people you follow. They’ll probably be flattered and thus, more inclined to re-tweet the things you post; especially if they’re interesti[...]



Doctors Should Write A Book to Get Speaking Gigs

2011-04-28T21:58:16.021-04:00

As a doctor, it is important to gain speaking engagements to promote yourself and your practice to both your peers and to gain new patients. Here are the top ten things you can do to get more speaking dates. 1. You need a terrific website that is informative and grabs the viewer’s attention as soon as they click to your page. A website is one of the first things someone who is interested in you will check out. If they like it they’ll contact you, if not they won’t. Your website is the perfect place to post a video of you at a speaking engagement or feature an article you’ve written. One way to insure your website is as good or better than others is to benchmark it against websites of your competitors or practitioners in your same field. It is also important for your website to look professional. In order to achieve a clean, professional look hire a web designer who is familiar with medical marketing to design your website. The days of doing it yourself are over. 2. Patient testimonials are a useful marketing tool and can be easily added to your website. Testimonials can be acquired by asking your patients. Simply ask them questions and videotape their responses. Once you have a few testimonials, edit and compile the videos and upload them to your website and YouTube.3. Doctors who publish articles get asked to speak. My clients are invited to speak on a regular basis because their articles are discovered online. How? A conference organizer who is looking for a speaker on a particular topic will search the Internet for someone demonstrating that expertise. If you have an article on that topic they can find you. It’s that simple. When writing articles, it is important to understand that you have two main audiences. First, you have patients. Second, you have your peers. Your patients are not going to understand the serious medical lingo that your peers might. One solution to this issue is to develop two different websites; one for patients and one for your fellow doctors. With a peer-friendly website, you can add the more technical articles and information. On your patient-friendly website, you can put things in layman’s terms which patients will understand and appreciate. 4. Position yourself as an expert in your particular medical field. One option is to add the word “expert” after the topic you are expert in. For example, one of my doctor clients is a “propofol expert.” If someone were to search a topic of interest online and add the word “expert” to their search, the experts in that area would show up in the search results. Go ahead try - it. Search on “propofol expert.” You’ll find Dr. Barry Friedberg. By finding your specific expertise and promoting it via articles and press releases, when people need an expert in your field, you will be sure to pop up in their Internet search. You can also get yourself listed as an expert by visiting www.expertclick.com or www.authorsandexperts.com. 5. Writing a book is an excellent way to publicly demonstrate your expertise. The most common approach is to write a book proposal and then find an agent who will present your proposal to a publisher who will publish your work. A different approach is to compile past articles you’ve written and then self-publish your book. Visit www.Book-Marketing-Expert.com for ideas on publishing and promoting your book. Whichever route you choose, your book will show the media that you are serious about the work you do. 6. Now that you have your book written and published, what do you do with it? The answer? Promote it! You can either promote the book yourself or hire a PR firm to get the word out and promote the boo[...]



Once You Know What Literary Agents Want, It's Easy To Land One

2013-04-11T06:41:16.920-04:00

As a book publicist, I am frequently asked by my author clients about how to find a literary agent. While I know several agents and work with agents and their publishers, it’s not really what I do as my focus is publicity.But, from time to time, I find someone who can really help out my clients and I’ve found that person.His name is Jeff Rivera.Rivera is a highly-respected book publishing professional who interviews high profile power players such as Janet Evanovich, Jeff Kinney, Seth Godwin, Philippa Gregory and James Patterson for numerous publications. Rivera has assisted more than 100 aspiring writers in taking that first step of crafting the right query letter and has a 100 percent track record of getting top agents to request their manuscript.Rivera points out there's a difference between writing a book and writing a compelling pitch letter and that difference must begin first with a shift in the author’s mindset. “Once you know what literary agents want, it's rather easy to land an agent,” says Rivera. Here are some examples of legitimate platforms suggested by Rivera that will have literary agents licking their chops:• An opt-in mailing list of people who read your information regularly.• If you are regularly on television• If you have a web series with at least 10,000 views each episode• If you are a public speaker• If you are a journalist with a column of loyal readers• If you have a regular radio, podcast or internet radio show with a significant audience• If you've self-published a number of books before and sold at least 5000 copies of each• If you have a website with thousands of unique visitors each day• If you're the president of a large association or charity• If you're a celebrity already in another industryRivera has told me stories about authors who ruin their chances of ever getting an agent by self-sabotaging their own success. An example is a client who had a wonderful storyline but needed to hire an editor to professionally edit his book so the manuscript would be as ready as possible to show an agent. Rivera recommended hiring an editor but the client refused. “It was a serious mistake,” says Rivera. “His manuscript had tremendous potential but it needed more than a band-aid, it needed double-bypass surgery.”I agree fully with Jeff’s point. Authors must remember to listen closely when talking to people who deal with agents to make a living, who engage with publishing professionals daily. They know what they're talking about. Do that, and you'll be one step closer to landing an agent.In dealing with the media as a book marketing specialist, I fully understand that first impressions are important. The same is true when dealing with a book agent who receives dozens of query letters and piles of books to add to the slush pile every day. You must first catch their attention and not give them any reason to delete your email or toss your book.The bottom line: Why reinvent the wheel? Sign up with an “agent’s agent” like Jeff Rivera by dropping him a note at query@gumbowriters.com and then listen to his advice. Otherwise don’t pay professionals for advice, save your money, and hand out your surplus books as gifts to friends and family…ok that’s a little harsh…but I am trying to get your attention.About Book Publicist Scott LorenzBook publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types [...]



Authors: Hire An Agent’s ‘Agent’ to Sell Your Book

2011-01-31T07:49:00.955-05:00

Landing an agent for your book is more difficult now than ever before. You have to know exactly what to say and how to say it in your query letter to beat out your competition and to increase your chances of ever getting signed.As a professional book publicist, (www.book-marketing-expert.com) I am frequently asked to find an agent for my clients. While I know many agents and publishers and work with them, it’s not what I do. But, from time to time, I find someone who can really help out my clients and I’ve found that person. His name is Jeff Rivera, founder of Gumbo Writers based in New York City.Rivera has been featured or mentioned in the Los Angeles Times, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal, New York Observer, Fast Company, TMZ, NPR, Billboard Magazine, Huffington Post, and many other publications. Rivera interviews high profile power players such as Janet Evanovich, Jeff Kinney, Seth Godwin, Philippa Gregory and James Patterson for Mediabistro’s “Galley Cat” considered the publishing world’s TMZ.Jeff’s query writing service is the #1 service of its kind. He crafts the perfect query letter for you, then selects the right literary agents to pitch to and sends the query out to them. Jeff guarantees at least 10 top agents will request your manuscript or book proposal. Jeff says this has worked successfully for more than 100 clients. That’s remarkable when you think that many writers cannot get even one literary agent to request their work, let alone read it. His record is over 200 agents requesting one client’s work. For one of my clients he got 19 requests. I was astounded and so was my client.“Most aspiring writers have shot their chances of ever being represented by a literary agent before the agent has even had a chance to read their query letter,” explains Rivera. “Why? Because agents and people like me who work in the book publishing industry, know in two-seconds flat who is professional and who is not, just by a simple glance at their query letter.”Rivera, who has ghost written countless successful query letters for clients, stresses that first impressions are everything and that there are a few common mistakes aspiring writers make over and over again that block them from being taken seriously. “It's really unfortunate because there are some very talented writers out there but writing a query letter is a whole other art,” adds Rivera.As a book publicist and book marketing expert who deals daily with the media, I learned a long time ago that a common mistake in crafting pitch letters is making them too long. The same is true of query letters to an agent. A query letter should be no more than half a page. You have to know exactly what agents want to hear, what they're looking for. Tell them only that and end the letter right there! Keep it short, keep it sweet and you'll be one step closer to landing an agent.The next key to a successful pitch letter to the media and a successful query letter to an agent is the first sentence. Here are some ways to grab an agent’s attention in the very first sentence:• Start with a question that makes them ponder• Talk about a dramatic moment in your personal life that connects with the book you've written• Tell them immediately about your platform• Compliment them on a specific recent sale• Tell them who referred youRemember that referrals are an aspiring author’s best friend. If you can find someone the literary agent knows to recommend you, or at least someone who will allow you to use their name in an introduction, you’ll be ten steps ahead of everyone else. When someon[...]



Authors: Rename Your Book For a Second Life

2013-04-11T06:30:02.765-04:00

Throughout the ages books have been renamed, given a new copyright date as a result, and found new life and success.There are several reasons to rename a book such as adding a subtitle to be friendlier to search engines. Another important reason is to get a new copyright date because many book critics will not review an old book and reviewers often define an “old” book as one with a copyright of more than a year old. Margaret Mitchell first gave the title “Pansy,” the original name for Scarlett O’Hara, to her epic novel. That title was dropped as soon as MacMillan convinced Mitchell to rename her main character. She then considered the titles of “Tote the Weary Load” and “Tomorrow is Another Day,” the latter being taken from the last line in her novel. When MacMillan objected to these two titles, Mitchell reconsidered and suggested “Gone With The Wind.”Sometimes just a minor tweak in the title will pay off big, such as “Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone” being renamed “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” “Philosopher’s Stone” was the first novel in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling when it was first published in London in 1997. The next year it was republished in America with the “Sorcerer’s Stone” change made in the title and it reached the New York Time’s best-selling fiction list in August 1999.Other examples of books that were re-titled include:• “The Last Man in Europe” to “1984”• “The Dead Un-Dead” to “Dracula”• “Catch 18” and “Catch 11” to “Catch 22”• “Atticus” to “To Kill a Mockingbird”• “First Impressions” to “Pride and Prejudice”• “Fiesta” to “The Sun Also Rises”• “Strike” to “Atlas Shrugged”• “Mistress Mary” to “The Secret Garden”I think you get the point. Tanya Hall of Greenleaf Book Group (www.greenleafbookgroup.com) tells of the renaming of a book that made a big difference for Greenleaf: “Gregg Crawford approached us seeking distribution services for his book, ‘Execute or Be Executed’, originally published in 2006,” says Tanya. “We saw potential in the book but it definitely needed to be repackaged and re-titled to stand out in the crowded business genre. Gregg agreed to our suggestions, and the end result was ‘The Last Link: Closing the Gap That is Sabotaging Your Business’ which was published in March, 2007 by Greenleaf Book Group Press and became our first New York Times bestseller.”Many of the authors with whom I work do not subtitle their book which is a big mistake. A subtitle allows for a book title to contain more searchable terms which, in this day of search engine optimization, is a major consideration. Remember that people use Google, Bing and Yahoo! to search for information they need immediately - help that fills their needs, wants and desires. You want to be their Answer. Authors should always be open to suggestions made by editors and publishers. You may love your title but the publishing company that makes millions of dollars each year selling books knows a lot more about titles that sell than you do. So be ready to rename your book if that new title will attract more readers and sell more books. If in doubt, ask Margaret Mitchell, or J.K. Rowling, or Ernest Hemingway, or George Orwell or ….. Want to rename your book? Bounce an idea off me at: scottlorenz@westwindcos.com.About the AuthorBook publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors[...]



Jess Todtfeld, former FOX News producer and President of Success in Media Interviews Yours Truly, Scott Lorenz

2013-04-11T06:36:05.900-04:00

Jess Todtfeld, former FOX News producer and President of Success in Media (www.SuccessInMedia.com) interviewed Scott Lorenz, President of Westwind Communications Public Relations about his thoughts on PR and the ever changing landscape of promoting a book, product or service. The in-depth interview is one of 15 such interviews with leading experts that Todtfeld is making available in the new The Ultimate Insider's Toolkit for PITCHING THE MEDIA. The “toolkit” offers insider’s tips and techniques for getting your story publicized and is available at his web site. www.PRmarketingInsider.com Jess Todtfeld: All right. PR in the 21st century media is the topic today here on the Speaking Channel. My special guest is Scott Lorenz. He runs Westwind Communications, a PR and marketing firm in Plymouth, Michigan. Scott helps doctors and authors and lawyers, entrepreneurs to help them get all the publicity that they deserve and more. Jess Todtfeld: Today we’re talking about the ‘and more” which is the 21st century media, meaning the old school ways are okay, but there’s so many more choices that PR professionals are not necessarily leveraging, in my opinion – which is why I invited Scott to be on here today. So Scott, welcome. Let’s jump right in. You are not only sending the old style press release out to radio and TV and print locations, you are doing more is that true?Scott Lorenz: That’s correct. I honestly can’t remember the last time I mailed some press releases out, although we do that on occasion. When we ship a new book out, we’ll put press releases in with the book.Jess Todtfeld: It’s funny that you say that – and I’m a former TV producer and boy, I would get stacks and stacks of mail. And I hate to say, because it’s very wasteful – most of it would get thrown out because it was confusing.Scott Lorenz: Let’s talk about direct mail for a minute – you’ve got to be able to compel people receiving the mail to rip it open because there’s something fantastic inside. And you’ve got to convey that in the message on the outside of the envelope, for starters.Jess Todtfeld: Right.Scott Lorenz: The problem is that that old school is kinda going by the wayside. However, what is interesting, though, now I think, is because so many people use electronic media and they’ve gone away from faxes and direct mail, that you can actually get a little bit more attention with direct mail with the right piece because publicists are not using it as much anymore – funny as that sounds.Jess Todtfeld: That’s interesting, and I know you said there’s a number of different directions. You don’t just see your firm as a PR firm but as a PR and marketing firm.Scott Lorenz: Right.Jess Todtfeld: You employ marketing methods?Scott Lorenz: Yes. PR is really a sales job. You are actually selling something. We are selling a client to a member of the media, and we’re selling it on the phone, we’re selling it by e mail, whatever methodology we use, face to face, but it’s a sales job. So I come from that marketing and sales side of things, and that’s probably why I’m so effective in the PR field, because of that background. I’m not a journalist, okay, and often times I find that journalists who enter this field exit it quickly because of the fact they’re really not salespeople, they are journalists and they have a different skill set and mindset.Jess Todtfeld: I’m glad to hear you say that, because as a media trainer when I work with clients I’ll always sit there and sa[...]



How Cookbook Authors Can Do a Great Cooking Segment on TV

2013-04-11T06:39:09.670-04:00

http://www.sanfranciscobookreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/cooking_tv.pngAuthors of cook books have an advantage over traditional authors because they can employ a TV appearance to increase book sales. One of the best ways for cookbook authors to get this extra exposure is to demonstrate their capabilities by showcasing recipes and talent on an in-studio cooking segment on television.A lot of things can go wrong on a live in-studio cooking demo. Here are some tips to insure that your cooking segment is great.Most importantly find out how much time you have to work with. There’s a big difference between a 2 ½ minute segment and 3 ½ minutes. My advice is to plan on a 2 ½ minute segment. Ask yourself what can you do in that time period and plan accordingly. Anticipate and have strategies to deal with interruptions. Practice by setting up a camera in your kitchen so you can film and time your process. Don’t do a lot of talking during the segment. You are there to demonstrate how to prepare a certain dish and that’s what your audience and host expects of you. So keep the words down.Remember that there are three groups that you need to satisfy – the producer, the audience, and yourself. The producers are looking for interesting/compelling television; your job is to make them look great. The audience wants to learn something. What’s their takeaway? What will you do to make their lives better? Among your goals is to point people to your website. A great way is to offer a free item like a recipe or appetizer in your restaurant. Once they sign up for the free item, use their email address for future marketing.It’s very important to find out in advance about the capabilities of the studio kitchen. Some studio kitchens look good on TV but the stove may not even be hooked up! Come with a prepared cooked version of your dish that can be displayed ahead of time and have another ready for the demonstration. It’s always a good idea to bring some extra samples for the crew. I’ve never see them turn down food! Outdoor segments, such as barbequing, really go well in the summer because that’s what audience members do in the summer. For the fall, a Tailgate segment is great.Here are some practical tips for that great cooking segment:• The camera loves food that sizzles, bubbles, and flames. Keep that in mind when selecting the dish you will prepare. Can your dish be prepared and plated in the allotted time? Pre-cook the dish halfway if necessary to meet the time limit.• If there are promotional screen graphics provide the producer with the information several days before the shoot.• Make a packing list of all the gear you need to cook off premise. Double-check your list and pack efficiently. Arrive at the studio 45 minutes before air time. Bring a cart to transport your gear and ingredients from the car to the studio quickly and efficiently.• Digital TV cameras can be unforgiving so bring some make-up to apply in the studio. • The camera loves color so bring some colorful ingredients as well as a seasonal table decoration.• Upon first arriving at the cooking set, check all burners to make sure they work.• Be set up 15 minutes before air time. Walk in front of the cooking table and scan what the camera will record. Is the tablecloth on straight? Are all ingredient labels faced outward? Are the ingredients balanced in uniform fashion?• Provide the host with a list of suggested questions. This will help the host stay focused and on track and will help prevent any ri[...]



Why Your Book Cover is Like a Highway Billboard

2010-09-28T06:33:56.769-04:00

Your book cover is like a highway billboard. How’s that? It’s simple. Just as people are driving past a billboard at 70 MPH, shoppers in a book store are walking by your book sitting on a table at the same relevant speed. Like a billboard, if you first don’t catch their attention you’ll never deliver the message. http://www.book-marketing-expert.com That’s one reason billboards use images to get the attention and then the words to make the sale. What are common images? Attractive women, followed by muscular and attractive men. They don’t call romance books bodice rippers for nothing and the photos or illustrations on books in that genre leave no doubt in your mind about what’s inside. But that can’t be said about most other books. That’s why that image is important real estate that must be used to convey to the potential buyer just what’s in that book. What is the correct image? One that does not need any explanation. If your image needs an introduction… then it’s not the right choice. How can you find out? Just show it to people. Ask them what they think the book is about by looking at the cover image. Ideally the image does the talking by itself.While we often hear “You can’t judge a book by its cover,” everybody – book buyers, reviewers, media and consumers alike – most certainly do judge a book by its cover.Choose your title carefully. The best highway billboards are 5-7 words in total because motorists are flying by and cannot comprehend too much information. The human mind cannot comprehend words at a glance so why fight it? Putting too many words in the title is the equivalent of trying to take a drink out of a fire hose! If you want to have a fighting chance give them a short sweet title and subtitle. Be brief.Blurbs. Blurbs are those short two to three sentences of compliment that books have on their back covers. The best blurbs are from well known experts in the field, famous people, authors who have read the book and have provided positive comments. There’s only room for a few so you have to edit out repetitive blurbs and keep the best ones for the cover. If you are in love with all your blurbs, than print them in full on the last inside pages of the book.One reason the task becomes so daunting and painful is that authors too often wait until the end of the process, instead of nearer the beginning, to think through book cover design.As a book publicist and book marketer I cannot caution authors enough – do not underestimate the importance of a book cover’s design. Not only do potential book buyers judge a book by its cover but so do members of the media. Many reporters receive dozens of books every day! Do you really think they read the book flap and your pitch? Ha! Here are some important items to consider when making decisions on book cover design:1. Use a subhead to create more description. If you have a 10-word title, you have not properly named the book in the first place.2. Check with Google on the words that are most searched on your topic. To do this, type in the word that best describes your book in the search box and then see what the next most important or popular words are in that list. That ranking is very relevant marketing- wise so try to use those words in your title or subtitle.3. Visit book stores and look at the covers of all types of books. What catches your eye? Look at the book face and look at the spines. Which ones are readable and why? 4. Will it play on Amazon? Go to Amazon.com, B[...]



15 Tips for Great Book Cover Design by Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

2010-06-05T10:20:49.227-04:00

By Scott LorenzWestwind CommunicationsBook MarketingAfter their book is written and editors sign off on the final rewrite, authors often turn their attention to what will become one of their most agonizing tasks in the entire process – deciding on a book cover design.One reason the task becomes so daunting and painful is that authors too often wait until the end of the process, instead of nearer the beginning, to think through book cover design.As a book publicist and book marketer I cannot caution authors enough – do not underestimate the importance of a book cover’s design. Not only do potential book buyers judge a book by its cover but so do members of the media. I have personally seen a major book reviewer for a large magazine hold a client’s book, run her fingers over the cover and say, “I’ve not heard of this author or publisher, but this book looks very nicely done, tell me more about.” Conversely, I’ve heard a reviewer quickly respond “We don’t review self-published books,” because the cover screamed cheap! While we often hear “You can’t judge a book by its cover,” everybody – book buyers, reviewers, media and consumers alike – most certainly do judge a book by its cover.Here are some important items to consider when making decisions on book cover design:• Use a subhead to create more description. If you have a 10-word title, you have not properly named the book in the first place.• Check with Google on the words that are most searched on your topic. To do this, type in the word that best describes your book in the search box and then see what the next most important or popular words are in that list. That ranking is very relevant marketing- wise so try to use those words in your title or subtitle.• Visit book stores and look at the covers of all types of books. What catches your eye? Look at the book face and look at the spines. Which ones are readable and why? • Will it play on Amazon? Go to Amazon.com, BN.com, Borders.com and search on competitive books in your space. Notice the book covers that catch your eye and the ones that do not. If your cover does not show up well in an Amazon thumbnail then you are going to lose sales.• Contrast. Don’t let your graphic designer get started without keeping contrast in mind. The reason black ink works so well on white paper is because it produces the best contrast possible. Yellow ink on green paper in a small font simply does not work. • How does your book look in black and white? Not every publication will be printing it in color.• Font size. Many designers are young with great eyesight. But your buyer may not be able to read the tiny font some designers insist upon using. Be practical.• The spine. Can you read it from five feet away? If not, neither can browsers in a book store.• Blurbs. Keep them relevant and short. The best highway billboards are 5-11 words because motorists are driving by at 70 m.p.h. Guess what? Consumers are driving by your book sitting on a table at the same relevant speed. The human mind cannot comprehend too many words at a glance. So give them short, sweet blurbs. If you are in love with your blurbs, than print them all in full on the last inside pages of the book.• Consider including a mention on the cover of a forward written by a famous person. “Forward by Barack Obama” or “Forward by Oprah Winfrey” or “Forward by Best Selling Author John Grisham.”• Do not overlook creating content[...]



Should Authors Self Publish Their Books Online?

2010-04-07T12:51:55.469-04:00

Authors who want to publish their work online will want to pick up a copy of ePublish by Steve Webber. ePublish is a step-by-step instruction manual that shows authors how to publish their work on all forms of electronic devices. From Amazon’s Kindle to iPhones and other platforms, ePublish discusses the “how to” and the “ins and outs” of each. It also suggests services which can help you publish your book electronically if you do not have the time, skill or patience to do it yourself. With this book as your guide almost anybody could publish a book electronically in a few hours.Why publish electronically? It’s only a matter of time before it’ll be the preferred choice among readers because it offers a multitude of advantages. Weber points out that ebook readers can click to a link on the pages to an Internet discussion group or multimedia files with audio and video, not to mention that authors can update their work online. Try doing that with a printed book!Weber also scopes out some new web sites offering services to authors. In an ever changing publishing world it helps to have someone like Weber find the best stuff, try it out and then write about it. It’s worth the price for that info alone. It’s like having a personal guru at your disposal. One such site he uncovered is called titlez.com which allows users to instantly retrieve historic and current Amazon rankings on competitors’ book and create 7-90 day reports. More importantly you can use this tool to research your next book or create a book marketing plan using the info gathered. You can compile a list of related books, comparing and contrasting sales figures and rankings, all for free while it’s in beta testing. Weber has gems like these and hundreds of others inside the pages of ePublish.Weber also delves into book marketing strategies such as giving away the first chapters of the book online through Amazon, blogs or elsewhere to stimulate early e-sales.ePublish is only 109 pages but its chock full of good solid insight into the most exciting thing to hit book publishing since Guttenberg invented moveable type. This is another terrific book by Steve Weber who is expert at cutting out unnecessary clutter and fluff. I highly recommend this book. For a list of my  "Favorite Book Marketing Books" check out this link to a complete list: http://www.westwindcos.com/releases/My_Favorite_Books_on_Book_Marketing_and_Promotion_Every_Author_Must_Read.htmAbout Book Publicist Scott Lorenz Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and book marketing firm with a special knack for working with individuals and entrepreneurs to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz has handled public relations and marketing for numerous authors, doctors, lawyers, inventors and entrepreneurs. As a book marketing expert Lorenz is called upon by top execs and bestselling authors to promote their books. Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at http://www.book-marketing-expert.com or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or by phone at 734-667-2090[...]



'Become a Real Self Publisher' by Michael N. Marcus is a Must Read For First Time Authors or New York Times Bestselling Authors

2012-12-20T10:44:35.463-05:00



If you want the roadmap on how to become a successful author and publisher then “Become a Real Self-Publisher” by Michael N. Marcus is the book for you. In a pull-no-punches style Marcus cuts to the chase in the often confusing and treacherous book publishing and book marketing game.

As a writer and successful publisher of books for more than 30 years Marcus speaks from personal experience. He implores authors to become real publishers and not customers of vanity presses or companies that publish on demand which Marcus says does not exist. Why? Nobody publishes on demand; they “print” on demand, he says.

Marcus compares and contrasts publishing options including: LULU, Outskirts Press, Infinity Publishing, Amazon, Author House, Book Surge, Xlibris, Lightening Source and traditional publishing in a “no-holds- barred” approach. I find his approach refreshing because so many authors I speak to as a book publicist really need someone like Marcus, who has no hidden agenda, to tell it like it is.

Besides discussing the benefits and pitfalls about every type of publishing option in the marketplace, Marcus also offers tips on what to do if you get a bad review. Says Marcus, “Don’t let a bad review ruin your day or your life. Some reviewers have hidden agendas like working on a competing book.” Marcus points out that it is rare that 100% of a review is bad and that there are usually a few sentences that can be pulled for the purpose of helping you sell more books.

“Become a Real Self-Publisher” also includes a list of publishing terms authors need to know about such as: ARC (advance reader copy) and POD (print on demand ) ...as well as places authors don’t want to see like the Slush Pile which is that place where unsolicited manuscripts end up awaiting an evaluation by a publisher or agent.

“Become a Real Self-Publisher” by Michael N. Marcus is a must read for all authors whether they are first time authors or on the New York Times bestseller list. It’s written in a serious but entertaining style with a little humor tossed in. I highly recommend it.
 
For more of my 'favorite books on book marketing' check out http://www.westwindcos.com/