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Pet Dog Kennel Owning A Black Norwegian Elkhound





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Pet Dog Kennel Now Even Mans Best Friend Is Feeling The Pinch

Fri, 31 Jul 2009 01:54:00 +0000

It seems, however, that even "mans best friend" is beginning to feel the pinch. Animal charities are reporting a big increase in stray and abandoned animals with families forced to give up their pets to make their money go further.





For the first time, Battersea Dogs Home reported recently that they had almost reached full capacity with many more dogs and other animals being brought into the home. Another charity - The Dogs Trust - in an article for The Times newspaper reported a similar story.





Previously, the trend was for a post Christmas increase in strays, when the cuddly puppy or the sweet kitten grew and maybe started to lose the novelty value. This year, the increase has come at least a month early. In 2007, Battersea took in 5,335 dogs over the year. This year they have had 6,430 - and over 80 per cent of these were strays.





Battersea think this is simply as a result of the economic downturn or credit crunch. New legislation also means that it is also more difficult to return strays to their owners. Chief Executive of Battersea said people who had lost their dogs were not necessarily looking for them because of the financial pressures they are under.





She added that Battersea and other local rescue centres would rather people contacted them if finances mean you are unable to keep your pet, rather than allowing them to roam or simply dumping them on the streets which can result in accidents and injury or even the death of the animal.





The Dogs Trust, based in west London said that it can now take up to six months to rehome a dog, rather than the three months it used to take, again due to the financial climate. The trust offers some tips to owners to save money - for example - if possible, buy dog food in bulk from pet specialist stores, try feeding your dog on dry food instead of tinned. Pet insurance can save you huge amounts of money on vets' bills, and your dog will get by very well without a diamante collar or a waterproof coat!





Local authorities are now responsible for strays, not the police as previously. This is as a result of the Clean Neighborhood and Environment Act. If your dog goes missing, a quick call to your local Council office could see you being reunited with them in time for tea.





How the figures add up - To keep a medium sized dog will cost between 710 and 810 pounds per year. This covers - food (150 pounds), deworming and defleaing (50 pounds), grooming (100 pounds), kennel fees for 2 weeks (140 pounds), Neutering cost (between 150 and 250 pounds) and pet insurance (120 pounds). Pet insurance could save you many hundreds of pounds in the event of your pet needing surgery, treatment after an accident, or if it develops a chronic illness. This all adds up to a staggering 13,000 pounds over the lifetime of your dog.

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Pet Dog Kennel

Pet Dog Kennel

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pet dog kennel: Pet Dog Kennel

pet dog kennel: Pet Dog Kennel

Article Source: www.articlesnatch.com




Pet Dog Kennel Owning A Black Norwegian Elkhound

Fri, 31 Jul 2009 01:53:00 +0000

Being one of the oldest dog breeds in the world, the Norwegian Elkhound dog breed has archeological remains which verify its existence from as long ago as 6,000 years ago. The dog had a variety of different jobs in its native Norway, which included herding, hunting game and guarding. The Norwegian Elkhound is a breed recognized by the American Kennel Club, the United Kennel Club and the Kennel Club of Great Britain. The Grey Norwegian Elkhound is born black in color, but within a matter of weeks the coat becomes gray colored with varying shades of light silver and black over different parts of the body. If the dog shows any base or overall coat color other than gray, it is grounds for being penalized and disqualified from the show ring.



The Federation Cynologique Internationale is the entity which provides registration for the breed; however, it also recognizes another separate breed, with a coat coloring entirely black. There is not a lot of information known about the black breed, and it is actually rare to see the dog outside of Scandinavia. The black cousin is not as old as its gray counterpart, the breed first showed up around the early 1800's, in Norway. Like the gray version, the black variety is a descendant of the Spitz breed which was used for a variety of jobs including guarding, herding and hunting. The black version is a smaller dog, but more agile; due to the dog being black in color they are easier to spot in the snowy Norwegian landscape.



The Black Elkhound is a hunter by nature and at heart; most often used as a companion when hunting for large game. The dog excels at hunting and tracking, being an adept problem solver in many different situations. The Black Elkhound however, does not make an ideal family pet for those who do not enjoy being in the great outdoors and hunting; however, the dog does form tight bonds with his or her master and is a loving and loyal companion. The breed does encounter problems with other dogs if not properly socialized at a young age, so this is important to bear in mind before bringing the dog into a home with other pets.



Though smaller in structure than a Grey Elkhound, the Black Elkhound is a strong and powerful dog, with a tenacious temperament and strong personality. The dog is actually more determined and strong-minded than its grey cousin, with a high level of intelligence. Some dog experts believe the Black Elkhound is not an ideal pet for a first-time dog owner because it can be a difficult breed to train without consistent firmness and experience. Due to the dog being very smart, a potential owner needs to have a firm grasp of the proper training techniques required to train the dog. A majority of the dogs in the Elkhound family do well when enrolled in an obedience class at an early age. Another consequence of owning a dog of this intelligence level is that the dog requires constant stimulation. This breed is by no means suited for indoor living and craves being in the outdoors, exploring the rugged terrain doing what they love so much.

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Pet Dog Kennel

Pet Dog Kennel


This article is part of the Norwegian Elkhound collection on GreatDogSite, the web's best resource for information on dogs.

pet dog kennel: Pet Dog Kennel

pet dog kennel: Pet Dog Kennel

Article Source: www.articlesnatch.com