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Links to articles in today's press about environmental health. Many more links available today at www.EnvironmentalHealthNews.org Search the EnvironmentalHealthNews.org archives



Published: 2017-09-21

 



Will federal safety panel ban toxic flame retardants in household products?

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

On Wednesday, the Consumer Product Safety Commission plans to vote on a petition that would ban tris and chemically related flame retardants from children's products, furniture, mattresses and household electronics.



EPA to dig up contaminated soil in Lockwood Superfund site.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

A large multimillion-dollar excavation project will begin this fall to remove potentially toxic chemicals from part of a 580-acre federal Superfund site in Lockwood, which was used for a chemical repackaging company and a tanker-cleaning operation.



Blame Henry Ford for deadly superbugs.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

The strange journey from soybean-fueled cars to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.



“Just gross”: Seattle chefs tell the governor what they think about fish farms in Washington waters.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

After last month’s catastrophe, people protest on the water and call for change.



Concern grows over effects of treated seeds on birds.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Minnesota researchers are finding cause for concern about the effects on wild birds of neonicotinoid insecticide, which has been linked to bee losses for nearly a decade.



Avoiding extinction.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Giving Mexico’s rarest porpoise, the vaquita, a fighting chance in the face of poverty, corruption, and greed.



Chemical industry ally faces critics in bid for top EPA post.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Michael L. Dourson, who has long run a premier firm for the chemical industry, is set for a confirmation hearing before a Senate panel.



Poorest London children face health risks from toxic air, poverty and obesity.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Schools in capital worst affected by air pollution are in most socially deprived areas with high levels of obesity, finds study.



Energy-efficient green buildings may emit hazardous chemicals.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Newly renovated low-income housing units in Boston earned awards for green design and building but flunked indoor air-quality tests, a new study shows.



Mexico earthquake kills hundreds, trapping many under rubble.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

A powerful earthquake struck Mexico on Tuesday afternoon, toppling buildings, killing children in a school that collapsed, rattling the capital and sending people flooding into the streets for the second time in just two weeks.



Puerto Rico is already an environmental tragedy. Hurricane Maria will make it even worse.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Last week, Puerto Rico was lucky. This week, it’s not.



Flesh-eating bacteria, cancer-causing chemicals, and mold: Harvey and Irma's lingering health threats.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Doctors are on the lookout for health problems left over by the storm.



Where eco warriors are being murdered.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

An alarming number of people are killed for trying to protect their country’s natural resources.



Growing clean cannabis to pass California's new rules.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Local grower Joseph Snow has developed a natural farming method that he says will meet California's new mandate for cannabis to be free of pesticides, fungus, and mold.



EPA labs across US face consolidation as budget cuts loom.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is consolidating research and testing laboratories to cut costs, sparking criticism the move will undercut its ability to respond to regional disasters such as Hurricane Harvey.



Building a better coral reef.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

As reefs die off, researchers want to breed the world's hardiest corals in labs and return them to the sea to multiply. The effort raises scientific and ethical questions.



EPA to allow use of dicamba next year, but with safeguards.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

The Environmental Protection Agency is aiming to allow farmers to spray the controversial weedkiller dicamba next year, but with additional rules for its use, an official with the agency said on Tuesday.



From coal to kale: Saving rural economies with local food.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Many counties are switching to oil and gas production as coal's fortunes wane, but farms, food hubs, and community kitchens may keep rural areas alive.



More than 120 birds dead at Suncor-owned Canada oil sands mine.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

More than 120 birds in Canada’s oil heartland of Alberta were killed after getting caught in a pond of oil sands byproducts operated by the country’s largest producer, Suncor Energy Inc, the local regulator said on Tuesday.



Safety agency cracks down on crude, petroleum pipeline spills.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration is cracking down on smaller violations in the crude oil, petroleum, and hazardous liquid industries to combat a slow rise in the number of pipeline accidents.



Veterans who drank poison in northern Michigan are getting a second look.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

The federal government is reopening a 16-year-old health report on the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base in Oscoda at the urging of legislators and veterans seeking coverage for illnesses they contend were caused by exposure to toxic chemicals.



Fighting for a foothold.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

White abalone are both critically endangered and crucial to their coastal ecosystems, so scientists have launched a Hail Mary effort to save them.



Pollution kills one person in Medellin, Colombia, every 3 hours: Study.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

The findings are based an analysis of death certificates associated with chronic respiratory diseases, lung cancer and strokes recorded at Colombia’s National Department of Statistics between 1980 and 2012.



Small farmers in Brazil’s Amazon region seek sustainability.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

The deforestation caused by the expansion of livestock farming and soy monoculture appears unstoppable in the Amazon rainforest in the west-central Brazilian state of Mato Grosso. But small-scale farmers are trying to reverse that trend.



The fatal toll of cheap cigarettes.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

A new study suggests that the availability of cheaper, off-brand cigarettes is associated with an increase in infant mortality.



Bored with your Fitbit? These cancer researchers aren't.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Fitness trackers come in all shapes, colors, and price tags. But for doctors and scientists studying how exercise can help people deal with disease, the landscape is much simpler. There’s Fitbit, and then there’s everyone else.



Death by hurricane: There could soon be a cure for a flesh-eating bacteria that almost just killed a man in Texas.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

Improved therapies and vaccines might be on the way.



Japanese people live longer than the rest of us – so what's their secret?

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

It’s the age old question (pun intended), and one that has given rise to an anti-ageing industry that is estimated to grow to $216.52 billion by 2021: how can we, mere mortals that we are, live longer?



These cages save baby fish.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

On developed shorelines, oyster shell “safe houses” offer sanctuary.



From oil refineries to solar plants, unions bend California climate change policies in their favor.

2017-09-20T09:00-05:00

At a time when the state is trying to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, union efforts to protect or create jobs threatens to conflict with goals to combat global warming.