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XML - Revision history



Revision history for this page on the wiki



Last Build Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 04:43:43 GMT

 



SporkBot: Remove template per TFD outcome

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 05:21:41 GMT

Remove template per TFD outcome ← Previous revision Revision as of 05:21, 17 November 2017 Line 129: Line 129:       ===International use===   ===International use=== − {{ChineseText|example}}{{Contains Armenian text|example}}{{CyrillicText|example}} + {{Contains Armenian text|example}}{{CyrillicText|example}}   XML 1.0 (Fifth Edition) and XML 1.1 support the direct use of almost any [[Unicode]] character in element names, attributes, comments, character data, and processing instructions (other than the ones that have special symbolic meaning in XML itself, such as the less-than sign, "<"). The following is a well-formed XML document including [[Chinese character|Chinese]], [[Armenian alphabet|Armenian]] and [[Cyrillic script|Cyrillic]] characters:   XML 1.0 (Fifth Edition) and XML 1.1 support the direct use of almost any [[Unicode]] character in element names, attributes, comments, character data, and processing instructions (other than the ones that have special symbolic meaning in XML itself, such as the less-than sign, "<"). The following is a well-formed XML document including [[Chinese character|Chinese]], [[Armenian alphabet|Armenian]] and [[Cyrillic script|Cyrillic]] characters:     [...]



Derek R Bullamore: Filled in 5 bare reference(s) with reFill ()

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 16:08:37 GMT

Filled in 5 bare reference(s) with reFill () ← Previous revision Revision as of 16:08, 16 November 2017 Line 103: Line 103:   The Unicode character set can be encoded into bytes for storage or transmission in a variety of different ways, called "encodings". Unicode itself defines encodings that cover the entire repertoire; well-known ones include [[UTF-8]] and [[UTF-16]].{{cite web|url=http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2003/04/26/UTF|title=Characters vs. Bytes|website=Tbray.org|accessdate=16 November 2017}} There are many other text encodings that predate Unicode, such as [[ASCII]] and [[ISO/IEC 8859]]; their character repertoires in almost every case are subsets of the Unicode character set.   The Unicode character set can be encoded into bytes for storage or transmission in a variety of different ways, called "encodings". Unicode itself defines encodings that cover the entire repertoire; well-known ones include [[UTF-8]] and [[UTF-16]].{{cite web|url=http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2003/04/26/UTF|title=Characters vs. Bytes|website=Tbray.org|accessdate=16 November 2017}} There are many other text encodings that predate Unicode, such as [[ASCII]] and [[ISO/IEC 8859]]; their character repertoires in almost every case are subsets of the Unicode character set.     − XML allows the use of any of the Unicode-defined encodings, and any other encodings whose characters also appear in Unicode. XML also provides a mechanism whereby an XML processor can reliably, without any prior knowledge, determine which encoding is being used.{{cite web|url=http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml/#sec-guessing|title=Autodetection of Character Encodings}} Encodings other than UTF-8 and UTF-16 are not necessarily recognized by every XML parser. + XML allows the use of any of the Unicode-defined encodings, and any other encodings whose characters also appear in Unicode. XML also provides a mechanism whereby an XML processor can reliably, without any prior knowledge, determine which encoding is being used.{{cite web|url=http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml/#sec-guessing|title=Autodetection of Character Encodings|website=W3.org|accessdate=16 November 2017}} Encodings other than UTF-8 and UTF-16 are not necessarily recognized by every XML parser.       ===Escaping===   ===Escaping===   XML provides ''[[Escape sequence|escape]]'' facilities for including characters that are problematic to include directly. For example:   XML provides ''[[Escape sequence|escape]]'' facilities for including characters that are problematic to include directly. For example: − * The characters "<" and "&" are key syntax markers and may ''never'' appear in content outside a [[CDATA]] section. It is allowed, but not recommended, to use "<" in XML entity values.http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/REC-xml-20081126/#NT-AttValue + * The characters "<" and "&" are key syntax markers and may ''never'' appear in content outside a [[CDATA]] section. It is allowed, but not recommended, to use "<" in XML entity values.{{cite web|url=http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/REC-xml-20081126/#NT-AttValue|title=Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.0 (Fifth Edition)|website=W3.org|accessdate=16 November 2017}}   * Some character encodings support only a subset of Unicode. For example, it is legal to encode an XML document in ASCII, but ASCII lacks code points for Unicode characters such as "é".   * Some character encodings support only a subset of Unicode. For example, it is legal to encode an XML document in ASCII, but ASCII lacks code points for Unicode characters such as "é".   * It might not be possible to type the character on the author's machine.   * It might not be possible to type the character [...]



Derek R Bullamore: Improved referencing

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 16:06:23 GMT

Improved referencing

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AnomieBOT: Dating maintenance tags: {{Linkrot}}

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 15:26:46 GMT

Dating maintenance tags: {{Linkrot}}

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Doomdorm64 at 13:26, 16 November 2017

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 13:26:43 GMT

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137.97.13.86: /* Key terminology */

Sun, 12 Nov 2017 18:54:31 GMT

‎Key terminology ← Previous revision Revision as of 18:54, 12 November 2017 Line 57: Line 57:   Further guidelines for the use of XML in a networked context appear in RFC 3470, also known as IETF BCP 70, a document covering many aspects of designing and deploying an XML-based language.   Further guidelines for the use of XML in a networked context appear in RFC 3470, also known as IETF BCP 70, a document covering many aspects of designing and deploying an XML-based language.     − ==Key Terminology== + ==Key terminology==   The material in this section is based on the XML Specification. This is not an exhaustive list of all the constructs that appear in XML; it provides an introduction to the key constructs most often encountered in day-to-day use.   The material in this section is based on the XML Specification. This is not an exhaustive list of all the constructs that appear in XML; it provides an introduction to the key constructs most often encountered in day-to-day use.     [...]



137.97.13.86: /* Key Terminology */

Sun, 12 Nov 2017 18:53:13 GMT

‎Key Terminology ← Previous revision Revision as of 18:53, 12 November 2017 Line 57: Line 57:   Further guidelines for the use of XML in a networked context appear in RFC 3470, also known as IETF BCP 70, a document covering many aspects of designing and deploying an XML-based language.   Further guidelines for the use of XML in a networked context appear in RFC 3470, also known as IETF BCP 70, a document covering many aspects of designing and deploying an XML-based language.     − ==Key terminology== + ==Key Terminology==   The material in this section is based on the XML Specification. This is not an exhaustive list of all the constructs that appear in XML; it provides an introduction to the key constructs most often encountered in day-to-day use.   The material in this section is based on the XML Specification. This is not an exhaustive list of all the constructs that appear in XML; it provides an introduction to the key constructs most often encountered in day-to-day use.     [...]



Uli.bethke: Added important and widely applied use cases for XML

Fri, 03 Nov 2017 18:42:35 GMT

Added important and widely applied use cases for XML ← Previous revision Revision as of 18:42, 3 November 2017 Line 44: Line 44:       Hundreds of document formats using XML syntax have been developed,{{cite web|url= http://xml.coverpages.org/xmlApplications.html|title= XML Applications and Initiatives}} including [[RSS]], [[Atom (standard)|Atom]], [[SOAP]], [[SVG]], and [[XHTML]]. XML-based formats have become the default for many office-productivity tools, including [[Microsoft Office]] ([[Office Open XML]]), [[OpenOffice.org]] and [[LibreOffice]] ([[OpenDocument]]), and [[Apple Computer|Apple]]'s [[iWork]]{{Citation needed|reason= No source for the information.|date=May 2017}}. XML has also provided the base language for [[communication protocol]]s such as [[Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol|XMPP]]. Applications for the [[Microsoft]] [[.NET Framework]] use XML files for configuration. Apple has an implementation of a registry based on XML.{{cite web|url= http://www.appleexaminer.com/MacsAndOS/Analysis/PLIST/PLIST.html|title= appleexaminer.com: "PLIST files"|publisher= The Apple Examiner}}   Hundreds of document formats using XML syntax have been developed,{{cite web|url= http://xml.coverpages.org/xmlApplications.html|title= XML Applications and Initiatives}} including [[RSS]], [[Atom (standard)|Atom]], [[SOAP]], [[SVG]], and [[XHTML]]. XML-based formats have become the default for many office-productivity tools, including [[Microsoft Office]] ([[Office Open XML]]), [[OpenOffice.org]] and [[LibreOffice]] ([[OpenDocument]]), and [[Apple Computer|Apple]]'s [[iWork]]{{Citation needed|reason= No source for the information.|date=May 2017}}. XML has also provided the base language for [[communication protocol]]s such as [[Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol|XMPP]]. Applications for the [[Microsoft]] [[.NET Framework]] use XML files for configuration. Apple has an implementation of a registry based on XML.{{cite web|url= http://www.appleexaminer.com/MacsAndOS/Analysis/PLIST/PLIST.html|title= appleexaminer.com: "PLIST files"|publisher= The Apple Examiner}}   +   + Most industry data standards, e.g. [[Health Level 7|HL7]], [[OpenTravel Alliance|OTA]], NDC, [[FpML]], [[MISMO]] etc. are based on XML and the rich features of the XML schema specification. [https://sonra.io/2017/11/03/library-xml-data-standards/ Many of these standards] are quite complex and it is not uncommon for a specification to comprise several thousand pages.   +   + In publishing, [[Darwin Information Typing Architecture|DITA]] is an XML industry data standard.  XML is used extensively to underpin various publishing formats.   +   + XML is widely used in a Services Oriented Architecture (SOA). Disparate systems communicate with each other by exchanging XML messages. The message exchange format is standardised as an XML schema (XSD). This is also referred to as the canonical schema.       XML has come into common use for the interchange of data over the Internet. [[History of the Internet#Internet Engineering Task Force|IETF]] [[:RFC:3023]], now superseded by [[:RFC:7303]], gave rules for the construction of [[Internet media type|Internet Media Types]] for use when sending XML. It also defines the media types application/xml and text/xml, which say only that the data is in XML, and nothing about its [[semantics]]. The use of text/xml has been criticized{{efn-lr|Murata, Kohn & Lilley (2009), in their draft RFC to update RFC 3023 (2001) that i[...]



TimBray: Undid revision 804914386; "valid" specifically refers to presence of, and agreement with, a DTD.

Sat, 14 Oct 2017 03:47:46 GMT

Undid revision 804914386; "valid" specifically refers to presence of, and agreement with, a DTD. ← Previous revision Revision as of 03:47, 14 October 2017 Line 145: Line 145:       ==Schemas and validation==   ==Schemas and validation== − In addition to being well-formed, an XML document may be ''valid''. This means that it contains a reference to a [[Document Type Definition]] (DTD) or [[XML schema]] defining the allowable content, and that its elements and attributes are declared in the definition and follow the grammatical rules for them that the definition specifies. + In addition to being well-formed, an XML document may be ''valid''. This means that it contains a reference to a [[Document Type Definition]] (DTD), and that its elements and attributes are declared in that DTD and follow the grammatical rules for them that the DTD specifies.       XML processors are classified as ''validating'' or ''non-validating'' depending on whether or not they check XML documents for validity. A processor that discovers a validity error must be able to report it, but may continue normal processing.   XML processors are classified as ''validating'' or ''non-validating'' depending on whether or not they check XML documents for validity. A processor that discovers a validity error must be able to report it, but may continue normal processing. [...]



DesmondW: /* Versions */ Fixed grammar

Wed, 11 Oct 2017 22:11:14 GMT

‎Versions: Fixed grammar ← Previous revision Revision as of 22:11, 11 October 2017 Line 260: Line 260:   There are two current versions of XML. The first (''XML 1.0'') was initially defined in 1998. It has undergone minor revisions since then, without being given a new version number, and is currently in its fifth edition, as published on November 26, 2008. It is widely implemented and still recommended for general use.   There are two current versions of XML. The first (''XML 1.0'') was initially defined in 1998. It has undergone minor revisions since then, without being given a new version number, and is currently in its fifth edition, as published on November 26, 2008. It is widely implemented and still recommended for general use.     − The second (''XML 1.1'') was initially published on February 4, 2004, the same day as XML 1.0 Third Edition,{{cite web|url=http://www.w3.org/TR/2004/REC-xml-20040204|title=Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.0 (Third Edition)|publisher=W3.org|accessdate=22 August 2010}} and is currently in its second edition, as published on August 16, 2006. It contains features (some contentious) that are intended to make XML easier to use in certain cases.{{cite web|url=http://www.w3.org/TR/xml11/#sec-xml11|title=Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.1 (Second Edition) , Rationale and list of changes for XML 1.1|accessdate=20 January 2012|publisher=W3C}} The main changes are to enable the use of line-ending characters used on [[EBCDIC]] platforms, and the use of scripts and characters absent from Unicode 3.2. XML 1.1 is not very widely implemented and is recommended for use only by those who need its unique features.{{cite book|last=Harold|first=Elliotte Rusty|title=Effective XML|publisher=Addison-Wesley|year=2004|pages=10–19|url=http://www.cafeconleche.org/books/effectivexml/|isbn=0-321-15040-6}} + The second (''XML 1.1'') was initially published on February 4, 2004, the same day as XML 1.0 Third Edition,{{cite web|url=http://www.w3.org/TR/2004/REC-xml-20040204|title=Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.0 (Third Edition)|publisher=W3.org|accessdate=22 August 2010}} and is currently in its second edition, as published on August 16, 2006. It contains features (some contentious) that are intended to make XML easier to use in certain cases.{{cite web|url=http://www.w3.org/TR/xml11/#sec-xml11|title=Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.1 (Second Edition) , Rationale and list of changes for XML 1.1|accessdate=20 January 2012|publisher=W3C}} The main changes are to enable the use of line-ending characters used on [[EBCDIC]] platforms, and the use of scripts and characters absent from Unicode 3.2. XML 1.1 is not very widely implemented and is recommended for use only by those who need its particular features.{{cite book|last=Harold|first=Elliotte Rusty|title=Effective XML|publisher=Addison-Wesley|year=2004|pages=10–19|url=http://www.cafeconleche.org/books/effectivexml/|isbn=0-321-15040-6}}       Prior to its fifth edition release, XML 1.0 differed from XML 1.1 in having stricter requirements for characters available for use in element and attribute names and unique identifiers: in the first four editions of XML 1.0 the characters were exclusively enumerated using a specific version of the [[Unicode]] standard (Unicode 2.0 to Unicode 3.2.) The fifth edition substitutes the mechanism of XML 1.1, which is more future-proof but reduces [[Redundancy (information theory)|redundancy]]. The approach taken in the fifth edition of XML 1.0 and in all e[...]