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Podcast - Revision history



Revision history for this page on the wiki



Last Build Date: Wed, 26 Apr 2017 10:11:56 GMT

 



MrOllie: Reverted 1 edit by Xodus900 (talk) to last revision by McGeddon. (TW)

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 15:20:21 GMT

Reverted 1 edit by Xodus900 (talk) to last revision by McGeddon. (TW) ← Previous revision Revision as of 15:20, 13 April 2017 Line 39: Line 39:       Concurrently, [[CNET]], [[This Week in Tech]], and later [[Bloomberg Radio]], the [[Financial Times]], and other for-profit companies provided podcast content, some using podcasting as their only distribution system.   Concurrently, [[CNET]], [[This Week in Tech]], and later [[Bloomberg Radio]], the [[Financial Times]], and other for-profit companies provided podcast content, some using podcasting as their only distribution system. −   − The longest running weekly Podcast of any kind is "The Bruce Mitchell Audio Show", published on major Pro Wrestling News outlet PWTorch.com.         === IP issues in trademark and patent law ===   === IP issues in trademark and patent law === [...]



Xodus900 at 15:15, 13 April 2017

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 15:15:42 GMT

← Previous revision Revision as of 15:15, 13 April 2017 Line 39: Line 39:       Concurrently, [[CNET]], [[This Week in Tech]], and later [[Bloomberg Radio]], the [[Financial Times]], and other for-profit companies provided podcast content, some using podcasting as their only distribution system.   Concurrently, [[CNET]], [[This Week in Tech]], and later [[Bloomberg Radio]], the [[Financial Times]], and other for-profit companies provided podcast content, some using podcasting as their only distribution system.   +   + The longest running weekly Podcast of any kind is "The Bruce Mitchell Audio Show", published on major Pro Wrestling News outlet PWTorch.com.       === IP issues in trademark and patent law ===   === IP issues in trademark and patent law === [...]



McGeddon: Reverted 1 edit by 50.204.63.38 (talk) to last revision by ClueBot NG. (TW)

Mon, 10 Apr 2017 17:23:50 GMT

Reverted 1 edit by 50.204.63.38 (talk) to last revision by ClueBot NG. (TW) ← Previous revision Revision as of 17:23, 10 April 2017 Line 5: Line 5:   A '''podcast''' is an [[episode|episodic]] series of [[digital media]] [[Computer file|files]] which a user can set up so that new episodes are automatically [[download]]ed via [[web syndication]] to the user's own local computer or [[portable media player]].{{cite web|url=http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/podcast |title=Podcast – Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary |publisher=Merriam-webster.com |date=2012-08-31 |accessdate=2014-06-29}}   A '''podcast''' is an [[episode|episodic]] series of [[digital media]] [[Computer file|files]] which a user can set up so that new episodes are automatically [[download]]ed via [[web syndication]] to the user's own local computer or [[portable media player]].{{cite web|url=http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/podcast |title=Podcast – Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary |publisher=Merriam-webster.com |date=2012-08-31 |accessdate=2014-06-29}}     − The word arose as a [[portmanteau]] of "[[iPod]]" (a brand of media player) and "[[broadcast]]". Thus, the files distributed are typically litty in [[digital audio|audio]] or [[video]] formats, but may sometimes include other file formats such as [[Portable Document Format|PDF]] or [[ePub]]. + The word arose as a [[portmanteau]] of "[[iPod]]" (a brand of media player) and "[[broadcast]]". Thus, the files distributed are typically in [[digital audio|audio]] or [[video]] formats, but may sometimes include other file formats such as [[Portable Document Format|PDF]] or [[ePub]].       The distributor of a podcast maintains a central list of the files on a [[server (computing)|server]] as a [[web feed]] that can be accessed through the [[Internet]]. The listener or viewer uses special [[client (computing)|client]] [[application software|application]] [[software]] on a computer or media player, known as a [[List of podcatchers|podcatcher]], which accesses this web feed, checks it for updates, and downloads any new files in the series. This process can be automated so that new files are downloaded automatically, which may seem to the user as though new episodes are broadcast or "[[Push technology|pushed]]" to them. Files are stored locally on the user's device, ready for [[Online and offline|offline]] use.{{cite web|url=http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k1967&pageid=icb.page23750 |title=Podcast Production |publisher=President and Fellows of Harvard College |accessdate=2009-08-21 |quote="episodes of a particular podcast"}}{{cite web|url=http://apollopodcast.com/ |title=Apollo Productions | Podcast Production |publisher=apollopodcast.com |date= |access-date=2011-10-24}} Podcasting contrasts with [[webcast]]ing or [[Streaming media|streaming]] which do not allow for offline listening, although most podcasts may also be streamed on demand as an alternative to download. Many podcast players (apps as well as dedicated devices) allow listeners to adjust the playback speed.   The distributor of a podcast maintains a central list of the files on a [[server (computing)|server]] as a [[web feed]] that can be accessed through the [[Internet]]. The listener or viewer uses special [[client (computing)|client]] [[application software|application]] [[software]] on a computer or media player, known as a [[List of podcatchers|podcatcher]], which accesses this web feed, checks it for updates, and downloads any new files in the series. This process can be automated so that new files are downloaded automatically, which may seem to the user as though new episodes are broadcast or "[[Pus[...]



50.204.63.38 at 17:18, 10 April 2017

Mon, 10 Apr 2017 17:18:03 GMT

← Previous revision Revision as of 17:18, 10 April 2017 Line 5: Line 5:   A '''podcast''' is an [[episode|episodic]] series of [[digital media]] [[Computer file|files]] which a user can set up so that new episodes are automatically [[download]]ed via [[web syndication]] to the user's own local computer or [[portable media player]].{{cite web|url=http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/podcast |title=Podcast – Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary |publisher=Merriam-webster.com |date=2012-08-31 |accessdate=2014-06-29}}   A '''podcast''' is an [[episode|episodic]] series of [[digital media]] [[Computer file|files]] which a user can set up so that new episodes are automatically [[download]]ed via [[web syndication]] to the user's own local computer or [[portable media player]].{{cite web|url=http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/podcast |title=Podcast – Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary |publisher=Merriam-webster.com |date=2012-08-31 |accessdate=2014-06-29}}     − The word arose as a [[portmanteau]] of "[[iPod]]" (a brand of media player) and "[[broadcast]]". Thus, the files distributed are typically in [[digital audio|audio]] or [[video]] formats, but may sometimes include other file formats such as [[Portable Document Format|PDF]] or [[ePub]]. + The word arose as a [[portmanteau]] of "[[iPod]]" (a brand of media player) and "[[broadcast]]". Thus, the files distributed are typically litty in [[digital audio|audio]] or [[video]] formats, but may sometimes include other file formats such as [[Portable Document Format|PDF]] or [[ePub]].       The distributor of a podcast maintains a central list of the files on a [[server (computing)|server]] as a [[web feed]] that can be accessed through the [[Internet]]. The listener or viewer uses special [[client (computing)|client]] [[application software|application]] [[software]] on a computer or media player, known as a [[List of podcatchers|podcatcher]], which accesses this web feed, checks it for updates, and downloads any new files in the series. This process can be automated so that new files are downloaded automatically, which may seem to the user as though new episodes are broadcast or "[[Push technology|pushed]]" to them. Files are stored locally on the user's device, ready for [[Online and offline|offline]] use.{{cite web|url=http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k1967&pageid=icb.page23750 |title=Podcast Production |publisher=President and Fellows of Harvard College |accessdate=2009-08-21 |quote="episodes of a particular podcast"}}{{cite web|url=http://apollopodcast.com/ |title=Apollo Productions | Podcast Production |publisher=apollopodcast.com |date= |access-date=2011-10-24}} Podcasting contrasts with [[webcast]]ing or [[Streaming media|streaming]] which do not allow for offline listening, although most podcasts may also be streamed on demand as an alternative to download. Many podcast players (apps as well as dedicated devices) allow listeners to adjust the playback speed.   The distributor of a podcast maintains a central list of the files on a [[server (computing)|server]] as a [[web feed]] that can be accessed through the [[Internet]]. The listener or viewer uses special [[client (computing)|client]] [[application software|application]] [[software]] on a computer or media player, known as a [[List of podcatchers|podcatcher]], which accesses this web feed, checks it for updates, and downloads any new files in the series. This process can be automated so that new files are downloaded automatically, which may seem to the user as though new episodes are broadcast or "[[Push technology|pushed]]" to them. Files are stored[...]



ClueBot NG: Reverting possible vandalism by 50.204.63.38 to version by MainlyTwelve. Report False Positive? Thanks, ClueBot NG. (3001697) (Bot)

Mon, 10 Apr 2017 17:17:19 GMT

Reverting possible vandalism by 50.204.63.38 to version by MainlyTwelve. Report False Positive? Thanks, ClueBot NG. (3001697) (Bot) ← Previous revision Revision as of 17:17, 10 April 2017 Line 7: Line 7:   The word arose as a [[portmanteau]] of "[[iPod]]" (a brand of media player) and "[[broadcast]]". Thus, the files distributed are typically in [[digital audio|audio]] or [[video]] formats, but may sometimes include other file formats such as [[Portable Document Format|PDF]] or [[ePub]].   The word arose as a [[portmanteau]] of "[[iPod]]" (a brand of media player) and "[[broadcast]]". Thus, the files distributed are typically in [[digital audio|audio]] or [[video]] formats, but may sometimes include other file formats such as [[Portable Document Format|PDF]] or [[ePub]].     − The distributor of a podcast maintains a central list of stuff + The distributor of a podcast maintains a central list of the files on a [[server (computing)|server]] as a [[web feed]] that can be accessed through the [[Internet]]. The listener or viewer uses special [[client (computing)|client]] [[application software|application]] [[software]] on a computer or media player, known as a [[List of podcatchers|podcatcher]], which accesses this web feed, checks it for updates, and downloads any new files in the series. This process can be automated so that new files are downloaded automatically, which may seem to the user as though new episodes are broadcast or "[[Push technology|pushed]]" to them. Files are stored locally on the user's device, ready for [[Online and offline|offline]] use.{{cite web|url=http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k1967&pageid=icb.page23750 |title=Podcast Production |publisher=President and Fellows of Harvard College |accessdate=2009-08-21 |quote="episodes of a particular podcast"}}{{cite web|url=http://apollopodcast.com/ |title=Apollo Productions | Podcast Production |publisher=apollopodcast.com |date= |access-date=2011-10-24}} Podcasting contrasts with [[webcast]]ing or [[Streaming media|streaming]] which do not allow for offline listening, although most podcasts may also be streamed on demand as an alternative to download. Many podcast players (apps as well as dedicated devices) allow listeners to adjust the playback speed. − [[server (computing)|server]] as a [[web feed]] that can be accessed through the [[Internet]]. The listener or viewer uses special [[client (computing)|client]] [[application software|application]] [[software]] on a computer or media player, known as a [[List of podcatchers|podcatcher]], which accesses this web feed, checks it for updates, and downloads any new files in the series. This process can be automated so that new files are downloaded automatically, which may seem to the user as though new episodes are broadcast or "[[Push technology|pushed]]" to them. Files are stored locally on the user's device, ready for [[Online and offline|offline]] use.{{cite web|url=http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k1967&pageid=icb.page23750 |title=Podcast Production |publisher=President and Fellows of Harvard College |accessdate=2009-08-21 |quote="episodes of a particular podcast"}}{{cite web|url=http://apollopodcast.com/ |title=Apollo Productions | Podcast Production |publisher=apollopodcast.com |date= |access-date=2011-10-24}} Podcasting contrasts with [[webcast]]ing or [[Streaming media|streaming]] which do not allow for offline listening, although most podcasts may also be streamed on demand as an alternative to download. Many podcast players (apps as well as dedicated devices) allow listeners to adjust the playback speed.         Some have labeled podcasting as a [[Technological convergence|conver[...]



50.204.63.38 at 17:17, 10 April 2017

Mon, 10 Apr 2017 17:17:00 GMT

← Previous revision Revision as of 17:17, 10 April 2017 Line 7: Line 7:   The word arose as a [[portmanteau]] of "[[iPod]]" (a brand of media player) and "[[broadcast]]". Thus, the files distributed are typically in [[digital audio|audio]] or [[video]] formats, but may sometimes include other file formats such as [[Portable Document Format|PDF]] or [[ePub]].   The word arose as a [[portmanteau]] of "[[iPod]]" (a brand of media player) and "[[broadcast]]". Thus, the files distributed are typically in [[digital audio|audio]] or [[video]] formats, but may sometimes include other file formats such as [[Portable Document Format|PDF]] or [[ePub]].     − The distributor of a podcast maintains a central list of the files on a [[server (computing)|server]] as a [[web feed]] that can be accessed through the [[Internet]]. The listener or viewer uses special [[client (computing)|client]] [[application software|application]] [[software]] on a computer or media player, known as a [[List of podcatchers|podcatcher]], which accesses this web feed, checks it for updates, and downloads any new files in the series. This process can be automated so that new files are downloaded automatically, which may seem to the user as though new episodes are broadcast or "[[Push technology|pushed]]" to them. Files are stored locally on the user's device, ready for [[Online and offline|offline]] use.{{cite web|url=http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k1967&pageid=icb.page23750 |title=Podcast Production |publisher=President and Fellows of Harvard College |accessdate=2009-08-21 |quote="episodes of a particular podcast"}}{{cite web|url=http://apollopodcast.com/ |title=Apollo Productions | Podcast Production |publisher=apollopodcast.com |date= |access-date=2011-10-24}} Podcasting contrasts with [[webcast]]ing or [[Streaming media|streaming]] which do not allow for offline listening, although most podcasts may also be streamed on demand as an alternative to download. Many podcast players (apps as well as dedicated devices) allow listeners to adjust the playback speed. + The distributor of a podcast maintains a central list of stuff   + [[server (computing)|server]] as a [[web feed]] that can be accessed through the [[Internet]]. The listener or viewer uses special [[client (computing)|client]] [[application software|application]] [[software]] on a computer or media player, known as a [[List of podcatchers|podcatcher]], which accesses this web feed, checks it for updates, and downloads any new files in the series. This process can be automated so that new files are downloaded automatically, which may seem to the user as though new episodes are broadcast or "[[Push technology|pushed]]" to them. Files are stored locally on the user's device, ready for [[Online and offline|offline]] use.{{cite web|url=http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k1967&pageid=icb.page23750 |title=Podcast Production |publisher=President and Fellows of Harvard College |accessdate=2009-08-21 |quote="episodes of a particular podcast"}}{{cite web|url=http://apollopodcast.com/ |title=Apollo Productions | Podcast Production |publisher=apollopodcast.com |date= |access-date=2011-10-24}} Podcasting contrasts with [[webcast]]ing or [[Streaming media|streaming]] which do not allow for offline listening, although most podcasts may also be streamed on demand as an alternative to download. Many podcast players (apps as well as dedicated devices) allow listeners to adjust the playback speed.       Some have labeled podcasting as a [[Technological convergence|converged medium]] bringing together audio, the web, and [[portable media player]]s, as well as a [[Disruptive i[...]



MainlyTwelve: space

Sat, 01 Apr 2017 02:02:22 GMT

space ← Previous revision Revision as of 02:02, 1 April 2017 Line 90: Line 90:   === Oggcast ===   === Oggcast ===   An '''oggcast''' is a podcast recorded and distributed exclusively in the [[Vorbis|Ogg vorbis]] audio codec and/or other similarly free codecs.{{cite web|url=https://djere.com/node/183 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20120426072050/https://djere.com/node/183 |dead-url=yes |archive-date=2012-04-26 |title=The Definition of An Oggcast |publisher=Djere.com |date=2011-12-25 |accessdate=2012-02-10}} For example, a podcast distributed both in the non-free [[MP3]] format and the free Ogg Vorbis format would not technically meet the definition of an oggcast. In contrast, a podcast distributed in both the Ogg Vorbis and [[Speex]] codecs would meet the strict definition of an oggcast. The term oggcast is a combination of the word "ogg" from the term Ogg Vorbis, and the syllable "cast", from "broadcast".   An '''oggcast''' is a podcast recorded and distributed exclusively in the [[Vorbis|Ogg vorbis]] audio codec and/or other similarly free codecs.{{cite web|url=https://djere.com/node/183 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20120426072050/https://djere.com/node/183 |dead-url=yes |archive-date=2012-04-26 |title=The Definition of An Oggcast |publisher=Djere.com |date=2011-12-25 |accessdate=2012-02-10}} For example, a podcast distributed both in the non-free [[MP3]] format and the free Ogg Vorbis format would not technically meet the definition of an oggcast. In contrast, a podcast distributed in both the Ogg Vorbis and [[Speex]] codecs would meet the strict definition of an oggcast. The term oggcast is a combination of the word "ogg" from the term Ogg Vorbis, and the syllable "cast", from "broadcast". −         The exact timeline of the term oggcast is uncertain. However, ''[[The Linux Link Tech Show]]'', one of the longer running Linux podcasts still in production, has a program in the Ogg Vorbis format in its archives from January 7, 2004.{{cite web|url=http://tlltsarchive.org/archives/tllts_14-01-07-04.ogg |title=MP3 file |publisher=Tlltsarchive.org |accessdate=2013-11-05}} Given that a stable release of Ogg Vorbis did not appear until July 19, 2002,{{cite web|author=|url=http://www.afterdawn.com/news/archive/3149.cfm |title=OGG Vorbis 1.0 officially released|date=2002-07-19|accessdate=2009-06-04}} it is very likely that the term oggcast was coined sometime between 2002 and 2004.   The exact timeline of the term oggcast is uncertain. However, ''[[The Linux Link Tech Show]]'', one of the longer running Linux podcasts still in production, has a program in the Ogg Vorbis format in its archives from January 7, 2004.{{cite web|url=http://tlltsarchive.org/archives/tllts_14-01-07-04.ogg |title=MP3 file |publisher=Tlltsarchive.org |accessdate=2013-11-05}} Given that a stable release of Ogg Vorbis did not appear until July 19, 2002,{{cite web|author=|url=http://www.afterdawn.com/news/archive/3149.cfm |title=OGG Vorbis 1.0 officially released|date=2002-07-19|accessdate=2009-06-04}} it is very likely that the term oggcast was coined sometime between 2002 and 2004. [...]



GreenC bot: Rescued 3 archive links; remove 3 links. Wayback Medic 2.1

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 06:41:27 GMT

Rescued 3 archive links; remove 3 links. Wayback Medic 2.1 ← Previous revision Revision as of 06:41, 30 March 2017 Line 50: Line 50:       ==== Apple trademark protections ====   ==== Apple trademark protections ==== − On September 26, 2004, it was reported that [[Apple Inc.|Apple]] had started to crack down on businesses using the string "POD", in product and company names. Apple sent a [[cease and desist]] letter that week to Podcast Ready, Inc., which markets an application known as "myPodder".{{cite web|url=http://www.podcastready.com/info.php?section=8&page=41 |title=Podcast Ready Cease and Desist |publisher=Podcast Ready Lawyers for Apple contended that the term "pod" has been used by the public to refer to Apple's music player so extensively that it falls under Apple's trademark cover.{{cite news|author=Brian Heater |url=http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2343732,00.asp |title=Apple's Legal Team Going After "Pod" People |publisher=PCMag.com |date= |accessdate=2012-12-17}} Such activity was speculated to be part of a bigger campaign for Apple to expand the scope of its existing [[iPod]] trademark, which included trademarking "IPOD", "IPODCAST", and "POD".{{cite web|url=http://www.macrumors.com/2006/09/25/podcast-trademark-controversy/ |title=Podcast Trademark Controversy |publisher=Macrumors.com |date=2006-09-25 |accessdate=2012-07-20}} On November 16, 2006, the Apple Trademark Department stated that Apple does not object to third-party usage of "the generic term" "podcast" to refer to podcasting services and that Apple does not license the term. However, no statement was made as to whether or not Apple believed they held rights to it.{{cite web|url=https://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=309396084&size=l |title=Apple letter |publisher=Flickr.com |date= |accessdate=2012-07-20}} + On September 26, 2004, it was reported that [[Apple Inc.|Apple]] had started to crack down on businesses using the string "POD", in product and company names. Apple sent a [[cease and desist]] letter that week to Podcast Ready, Inc., which markets an application known as "myPodder".{{cite web|url=http://www.podcastready.com/info.php?section=8&page=41 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20061005015828/http://www.podcastready.com:80/info.php?section=8&page=41 |dead-url=yes |archive-date=2006-10-05 |title=Podcast Ready Cease and Desist |publisher=Podcast Ready Lawyers for Apple contended that the term "pod" has been used by the public to refer to Apple's music player so extensively that it falls under Apple's trademark cover.{{cite news|author=Brian Heater |url=http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2343732,00.asp |title=Apple's Legal Team Going After "Pod" People |publisher=PCMag.com |date= |accessdate=2012-12-17}} Such activity was speculated to be part of a bigger campaign for Apple to expand the scope of its existing [[iPod]] trademark, which included trademarking "IPOD", "IPODCAST", and "POD".{{cite web|url=http://www.macrumors.com/2006/09/25/podcast-trademark-controversy/ |title=Podcast Trademark Controversy |publisher=Macrumors.com |date=2006-09-25 |accessdate=2012-07-20}} On November 16, 2006, the Apple Trademark Department stated that Apple does not object to third-party usage of "the generic term" "podcast" to refer to podcasting services and that Apple does not license the term. However, no statement was made as to whether or not Apple believed they held rights to it.{{cite web|url=https://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=309396084&size=l |tit[...]



Jim1138: Reverted edits by 223.24.132.247 (talk): Unexplained removal of content (HG) (3.1.22)

Mon, 27 Mar 2017 05:04:57 GMT

Reverted edits by 223.24.132.247 (talk): Unexplained removal of content (HG) (3.1.22)

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