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RSS - Revision history



Revision history for this page on the wiki



Last Build Date: Sat, 19 Aug 2017 19:06:47 GMT

 



Wdpp: +Category:Open formats

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 10:14:32 GMT

+Category:Open formats

← Previous revision Revision as of 10:14, 18 August 2017
Line 282: Line 282:
 
[[Category:Computer file formats]]
 
[[Category:Computer file formats]]
 
[[Category:1999 introductions]]
 
[[Category:1999 introductions]]
  +
[[Category:Open formats]]



Orschiro: /* RSS to email */

Sat, 05 Aug 2017 12:30:27 GMT

‎RSS to email ← Previous revision Revision as of 12:30, 5 August 2017 Line 168: Line 168:   == RSS to email==   == RSS to email==   {{See also|PubSubHubbub}}   {{See also|PubSubHubbub}} − Some services deliver RSS to email inbox, sending updates from user's personal selection and schedules.{{cite web|url=https://blogtrottr.com/about/|title=Why Blogtrottr?|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}}{{cite web|url=https://blogtrottr.com/|title=Free realtime RSS and Atom feed to email service. Get your favourite blogs, feeds, and news delivered to your inbox.|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}} Conversely, some services deliver email to RSS readers.{{cite web|url=https://rss.com/|title=RSS Feed Reader, your tool for saving time and money at RSS.com|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}} + Some services deliver RSS to email inbox, sending updates from user's personal selection and schedules.{{cite web|url=https://blogtrottr.com/about/|title=Why Blogtrottr?|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}}{{cite web|url=https://blogtrottr.com/|title=Free realtime RSS and Atom feed to email service. Get your favourite blogs, feeds, and news delivered to your inbox.|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}} Conversely, some services deliver email to RSS readers.{{cite web|url=https://rss.com/|title=RSS Feed Reader, your tool for saving time and money at RSS.com|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}} Examples of those services include [https://blogtrottr.com Blogtrottr], [[IFTTT]] and [[Zapier]].       == RSS compared with Atom ==   == RSS compared with Atom == [...]



InternetArchiveBot: Rescuing 6 sources and tagging 0 as dead. #IABot (v1.5beta)

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 09:03:06 GMT

Rescuing 6 sources and tagging 0 as dead. #IABot (v1.5beta) ← Previous revision Revision as of 09:03, 27 July 2017 Line 61: Line 61:   Two parties emerged to fill the void, with neither Netscape's help nor approval: The [[RSS-DEV Working Group]] and [[Dave Winer]], whose [[UserLand Software]] had published some of the first publishing tools outside Netscape that could read and write RSS.   Two parties emerged to fill the void, with neither Netscape's help nor approval: The [[RSS-DEV Working Group]] and [[Dave Winer]], whose [[UserLand Software]] had published some of the first publishing tools outside Netscape that could read and write RSS.     − Winer published a modified version of the RSS 0.91 specification on the UserLand website, covering how it was being used in his company's products, and claimed copyright to the document.{{cite web |url=http://backend.userland.com/rss091#copyrightAndDisclaimer |title=RSS 0.91: Copyright and Disclaimer |author=Winer, Dave |date=2000-06-04 |publisher=UserLand Software |accessdate=2006-10-31 }} A few months later, UserLand filed a U.S. trademark registration for RSS, but failed to respond to a [[USPTO]] trademark examiner's request and the request was rejected in December 2001.{{cite web|url=http://tarr.uspto.gov/servlet/tarr?regser=serial&entry=78025336 |title='RSS' Trademark Latest Status Info |author=U.S. Patent & Trademark Office }} + Winer published a modified version of the RSS 0.91 specification on the UserLand website, covering how it was being used in his company's products, and claimed copyright to the document.{{cite web |url=http://backend.userland.com/rss091#copyrightAndDisclaimer |title=RSS 0.91: Copyright and Disclaimer |author=Winer, Dave |date=2000-06-04 |publisher=UserLand Software |accessdate=2006-10-31 |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20061110001520/http://backend.userland.com/rss091#copyrightAndDisclaimer |archivedate=2006-11-10 |df= }} A few months later, UserLand filed a U.S. trademark registration for RSS, but failed to respond to a [[USPTO]] trademark examiner's request and the request was rejected in December 2001.{{cite web|url=http://tarr.uspto.gov/servlet/tarr?regser=serial&entry=78025336 |title='RSS' Trademark Latest Status Info |author=U.S. Patent & Trademark Office }}       The RSS-DEV Working Group, a project whose members included Guha and representatives of [[O'Reilly Media]] and [[Moreover Technologies|Moreover]], produced RSS 1.0 in December 2000.{{cite web |url=http://web.resource.org/rss/1.0/spec |title=RDF Site Summary (RSS) 1.0 |author=RSS-DEV Working Group |date=2000-12-09 |accessdate=2006-10-31 }} This new version, which reclaimed the name RDF Site Summary from RSS 0.9, reintroduced support for RDF and added [[XML namespaces]] support, adopting elements from standard metadata vocabularies such as [[Dublin Core]].   The RSS-DEV Working Group, a project whose members included Guha and representatives of [[O'Reilly Media]] and [[Moreover Technologies|Moreover]], produced RSS 1.0 in December 2000.{{cite web |url=http://web.resource.org/rss/1.0/spec |title=RDF Site Summary (RSS) 1.0 |author=RSS-DEV Working Group |date=2000-12-09 |accessdate=2006-10-31 }} This new version, which reclaimed the name RDF Site Summary from RSS 0.9, reintroduced support for RDF and added [[XML namespaces]] support, adopting elements from standard metadata vocabularies such as [[Dublin Core]].     − In December 2000, Winer released RSS 0.92{{cite web |url=http://backend.userland.com/rss092 |title=RSS 0.92 Specification |author=Winer, Dave |date=2000-12-25 |publisher=UserLand Software |accessdate=2006-10-31 }} + In December 2000, Winer released RSS 0.[...]



AlexCdvp: /* Example */ Added a dash for clarity

Mon, 22 May 2017 15:49:59 GMT

Example: Added a dash for clarity

← Previous revision Revision as of 15:49, 22 May 2017
Line 93: Line 93:
 
== Example ==
 
== Example ==
   
RSS is XML formatted plain text. The RSS format itself is relatively easy to read both by automated processes and by humans alike. An example feed could have contents such as the following:
+
RSS is XML-formatted plain text. The RSS format itself is relatively easy to read both by automated processes and by humans alike. An example feed could have contents such as the following:
   
 
 



Forbes72: grammar

Tue, 02 May 2017 15:31:52 GMT

grammar ← Previous revision Revision as of 15:31, 2 May 2017 Line 22: Line 22:   }}   }}     − '''RSS''' ('''Rich Site Summary'''; originally '''[[Resource Description Framework|RDF]] Site Summary'''; often called '''Really Simple Syndication''') is a type of [[web feed]] which allows users access updates to [[online content]] in a standardized, computer-readable format. These feeds can, for example, allow a user to keep track of many different websites in a single [[news aggregator]]. The news aggregator will automatically check the RSS feed for new content, allowing the content to be automatically passed from website to website or from website to user. This passing of content is called [[web syndication]]. Websites usually use RSS feeds to publish frequently updated information, such as [[blog]] entries, news headlines, audio, video. An RSS document (called "feed", "web feed", + '''RSS''' ('''Rich Site Summary'''; originally '''[[Resource Description Framework|RDF]] Site Summary'''; often called '''Really Simple Syndication''') is a type of [[web feed]] which allows users to access updates to [[online content]] in a standardized, computer-readable format. These feeds can, for example, allow a user to keep track of many different websites in a single [[news aggregator]]. The news aggregator will automatically check the RSS feed for new content, allowing the content to be automatically passed from website to website or from website to user. This passing of content is called [[web syndication]]. Websites usually use RSS feeds to publish frequently updated information, such as [[blog]] entries, news headlines, audio, video. An RSS document (called "feed", "web feed",   "Web feeds | RSS | The Guardian | guardian.co.uk",   "Web feeds | RSS | The Guardian | guardian.co.uk",   ''The Guardian'', London, 2008, webpage:   ''The Guardian'', London, 2008, webpage: [...]



Forbes72: Improve on the lead more (more general)

Tue, 02 May 2017 15:31:21 GMT

Improve on the lead more (more general) ← Previous revision Revision as of 15:31, 2 May 2017 Line 22: Line 22:   }}   }}     − '''RSS''' ('''Rich Site Summary'''; originally '''[[Resource Description Framework|RDF]] Site Summary'''; often called '''Really Simple Syndication''') is a [[web feed]] format which allows users to access updates to [[online content]] from many different websites in a single [[news aggregator]]. The news aggregator will automatically check the RSS feed for new content, allowing the content to be automatically passed from website to website or from website to user. This passing of content is called [[web syndication]]. Websites usually use RSS feeds to publish frequently updated information, such as [[blog]] entries, news headlines, audio, video. An RSS document (called "feed", "web feed", + '''RSS''' ('''Rich Site Summary'''; originally '''[[Resource Description Framework|RDF]] Site Summary'''; often called '''Really Simple Syndication''') is a type of [[web feed]] which allows users access updates to [[online content]] in a standardized, computer-readable format. These feeds can, for example, allow a user to keep track of many different websites in a single [[news aggregator]]. The news aggregator will automatically check the RSS feed for new content, allowing the content to be automatically passed from website to website or from website to user. This passing of content is called [[web syndication]]. Websites usually use RSS feeds to publish frequently updated information, such as [[blog]] entries, news headlines, audio, video. An RSS document (called "feed", "web feed",   "Web feeds | RSS | The Guardian | guardian.co.uk",   "Web feeds | RSS | The Guardian | guardian.co.uk",   ''The Guardian'', London, 2008, webpage:   ''The Guardian'', London, 2008, webpage: [...]



Forbes72: simplify unnecessary synonyms, straighten out prose a bit

Mon, 01 May 2017 02:59:40 GMT

simplify unnecessary synonyms, straighten out prose a bit ← Previous revision Revision as of 02:59, 1 May 2017 Line 32: Line 32:   Subscribing to a website RSS removes the need for the user to manually check the website for new content. Instead, their browser constantly monitors the site and informs the user of any updates. The browser can also be commanded to automatically download the new data for the user.   Subscribing to a website RSS removes the need for the user to manually check the website for new content. Instead, their browser constantly monitors the site and informs the user of any updates. The browser can also be commanded to automatically download the new data for the user.     − [[Software]] termed "[[News aggregator|RSS reader]]", "[[News aggregator|aggregator]]", or "feed reader", which can be [[web application|web-based]], [[application software|desktop-based]], or mobile-device-based, presents RSS feed data to users. Users subscribe to feeds either by entering a feed's [[Uniform Resource Identifier|URI]] into the reader or by clicking on the browser's [[feed icon]]. The RSS reader checks the user's feeds regularly for new information and can automatically download it, if that function is enabled. The reader also provides a [[user interface]]. + RSS feed data is presented to users using software called a [[news aggregator]]. This aggregator can be built into a [[web application|website]], installed on a [[application software|desktop computer]], or installed on a [[Mobile app|mobile device]]. Users subscribe to feeds either by entering a feed's [[Uniform Resource Identifier|URI]] into the reader or by clicking on the browser's [[feed icon]]. The RSS reader checks the user's feeds regularly for new information and can automatically download it, if that function is enabled. The reader also provides a [[user interface]].       == History ==   == History == [...]



Forbes72: less technical more straightforward lead

Mon, 01 May 2017 02:51:28 GMT

less technical more straightforward lead ← Previous revision Revision as of 02:51, 1 May 2017 Line 1: Line 1: − {{lead rewrite|date=January 2017}}     {{pp-protect|small=yes}}   {{pp-protect|small=yes}}   {{Other uses}}   {{Other uses}} Line 23: Line 22:   }}   }}     − '''RSS''' ('''Rich Site Summary'''; originally '''[[Resource Description Framework|RDF]] Site Summary'''; often called '''Really Simple Syndication''') uses a family of standard [[web feed]] formats to publish frequently updated information: [[blog]] entries, news headlines, audio, video. An RSS document (called "feed", "web feed", + '''RSS''' ('''Rich Site Summary'''; originally '''[[Resource Description Framework|RDF]] Site Summary'''; often called '''Really Simple Syndication''') is a [[web feed]] format which allows users to access updates to [[online content]] from many different websites in a single [[news aggregator]]. The news aggregator will automatically check the RSS feed for new content, allowing the content to be automatically passed from website to website or from website to user. This passing of content is called [[web syndication]]. Websites usually use RSS feeds to publish frequently updated information, such as [[blog]] entries, news headlines, audio, video. An RSS document (called "feed", "web feed",   "Web feeds | RSS | The Guardian | guardian.co.uk",   "Web feeds | RSS | The Guardian | guardian.co.uk",   ''The Guardian'', London, 2008, webpage:   ''The Guardian'', London, 2008, webpage: Line 29: Line 28:   or "channel") includes full or summarized text, and [[metadata]], like publishing date and author's name.   or "channel") includes full or summarized text, and [[metadata]], like publishing date and author's name.     − RSS feeds enable publishers to [[web syndication|syndicate]] data automatically. A standard [[XML]] file format ensures compatibility with many different machines/programs. RSS feeds also benefit users who want to receive timely updates from favourite websites or to aggregate data from many sites. + A standard [[XML]] file format ensures compatibility with many different machines/programs. RSS feeds also benefit users who want to receive timely updates from favourite websites or to aggregate data from many sites.       Subscribing to a website RSS removes the need for the user to manually check the website for new content. Instead, their browser constantly monitors the site and informs the user of any updates. The browser can also be commanded to automatically download the new data for the user.   Subscribing to a website RSS removes the need for the user to manually check the website for new content. Instead, their browser constantly monitors the site and informs the user of any updates. The browser can also be commanded to automatically download the new data for the user. [...]



Sb2001: /* RSS compared to Atom */ 'compared to' changed to 'compared with' - they have different meanings

Sun, 02 Apr 2017 15:13:26 GMT

‎RSS compared to Atom: 'compared to' changed to 'compared with' - they have different meanings ← Previous revision Revision as of 15:13, 2 April 2017 Line 171: Line 171:   Some services deliver RSS to email inbox, sending updates from user's personal selection and schedules.{{cite web|url=https://blogtrottr.com/about/|title=Why Blogtrottr?|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}}{{cite web|url=https://blogtrottr.com/|title=Free realtime RSS and Atom feed to email service. Get your favourite blogs, feeds, and news delivered to your inbox.|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}} Conversely, some services deliver email to RSS readers.{{cite web|url=https://rss.com/|title=RSS Feed Reader, your tool for saving time and money at RSS.com|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}}   Some services deliver RSS to email inbox, sending updates from user's personal selection and schedules.{{cite web|url=https://blogtrottr.com/about/|title=Why Blogtrottr?|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}}{{cite web|url=https://blogtrottr.com/|title=Free realtime RSS and Atom feed to email service. Get your favourite blogs, feeds, and news delivered to your inbox.|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}} Conversely, some services deliver email to RSS readers.{{cite web|url=https://rss.com/|title=RSS Feed Reader, your tool for saving time and money at RSS.com|publisher=|accessdate=26 January 2017}}     − == RSS compared to Atom == + == RSS compared with Atom ==       Both RSS and [[Atom (standard)|Atom]] are widely supported and are compatible with all major consumer feed readers. RSS gained wider use because of early feed reader support.   Both RSS and [[Atom (standard)|Atom]] are widely supported and are compatible with all major consumer feed readers. RSS gained wider use because of early feed reader support. [...]



GreenC bot: Rescued 3 archive links; remove 1 link; reformat 3 links. Wayback Medic 2.1

Sat, 25 Mar 2017 16:50:26 GMT

Rescued 3 archive links; remove 1 link; reformat 3 links. Wayback Medic 2.1 ← Previous revision Revision as of 16:50, 25 March 2017 Line 87: Line 87:   In September 2004, Stephen Horlander created the now ubiquitous RSS icon ([[File:Feed-icon.svg|16px]]) for use in the [[Mozilla Firefox]] [[Web Browser|browser]].{{cite web|url=http://www.squarefree.com/burningedge/2004/09/26/2004-09-26-branch-builds/|title=2004-09-26 Branch builds|publisher=|accessdate=6 October 2014}}   In September 2004, Stephen Horlander created the now ubiquitous RSS icon ([[File:Feed-icon.svg|16px]]) for use in the [[Mozilla Firefox]] [[Web Browser|browser]].{{cite web|url=http://www.squarefree.com/burningedge/2004/09/26/2004-09-26-branch-builds/|title=2004-09-26 Branch builds|publisher=|accessdate=6 October 2014}}     − In December 2005, the Microsoft Internet Explorer team[http://blogs.msdn.com/rssteam/archive/2005/12/14/503778.aspx Icons: It’s still orange]{{dead link|date=November 2016}}, Microsoft RSS Blog, December 14, 2005 and + In December 2005, the Microsoft Internet Explorer team[https://web.archive.org/web/20051216113745/http://blogs.msdn.com:80/rssteam/archive/2005/12/14/503778.aspx Icons: It’s still orange], Microsoft RSS Blog, December 14, 2005 and − [[Microsoft Outlook]] team[http://blogs.msdn.com/michael_affronti/archive/2005/12/15/504316.aspx RSS icon goodness]{{dead link|date=November 2016}}, blog post by Michael A. Affronti of Microsoft (Outlook Program Manager), December 15, 2005 announced on their blogs that they were adopting Firefox's RSS icon. In February 2006, [[Opera Software]] followed suit.{{cite web|title=Making love to the new feed icon|url=http://my.opera.com/desktopteam/blog/show.dml/146296|publisher=Opera Desktop Team|accessdate=2010-07-04|date=2006-02-16}} This effectively made the orange square with white radio waves the industry standard for RSS and Atom feeds, replacing the large variety of icons and text that had been used previously to identify syndication data. + [[Microsoft Outlook]] team[https://web.archive.org/web/20051217102644/http://blogs.msdn.com:80/michael_affronti/archive/2005/12/15/504316.aspx RSS icon goodness], blog post by Michael A. Affronti of Microsoft (Outlook Program Manager), December 15, 2005 announced on their blogs that they were adopting Firefox's RSS icon. In February 2006, [[Opera Software]] followed suit.{{cite web|title=Making love to the new feed icon|url=http://my.opera.com/desktopteam/blog/show.dml/146296|publisher=Opera Desktop Team|accessdate=2010-07-04|date=2006-02-16}} This effectively made the orange square with white radio waves the industry standard for RSS and Atom feeds, replacing the large variety of icons and text that had been used previously to identify syndication data.       In January 2006, [[Rogers Cadenhead]] relaunched the RSS Advisory Board without Dave Winer's participation, with a stated desire to continue the development of the RSS format and resolve ambiguities. In June 2007, the board revised their version of the specification to confirm that namespaces may extend core elements with namespace attributes, as Microsoft has done in Internet Explorer 7. According to their view, a difference of interpretation left publishers unsure of whether this was permitted or forbidden.   In January 2006, [[Rogers Cadenhead]] relaunched the RSS Advisory Board without Dave Winer's participation, with a stated desire to continue the development of the RSS format and resolve ambiguities. In June 2007[...]