Subscribe: What Would A Dog Do
http://whatwouldadogdo.blogspot.com/atom.xml
Added By: dogman2 Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
beef  consumers  contact  dog  dogs  food  listeria monocytogenes  lot  pet  pets  product  products  recall  salmonella 
Rate this Feed
Rating: 4.7 starRating: 4.7 starRating: 4.7 starRating: 4.7 starRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: What Would A Dog Do

What Would A Dog Do





Updated: 2017-09-24T12:52:39.814-07:00

 



Loving Pets Voluntarily Recalls Limited Lot Numbers of Air-Puffed Dog Treats Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk

2017-06-16T14:45:52.864-07:00

 Loving Pets of Cranbury, NJ is voluntarily recalling a limited number of dog treats because of the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after havingcontact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.The lot numbers included are:Loving Pets Barksters™Item #5700 Sweet Potato and Chicken UPC 842982057005 - Lot # 021619Item #5705 Brown Rice and Chicken UPC 842982057050 - Lot 021419Loving Pets Puffsters™ Snack ChipsItem #5100 Apple and Chicken UPC 842982051003 - Lot 051219, 112118, 112918, 012719, 012519, 013019Item #5110 Banana and Chicken UPC 842982051102 - Lot 112218, 112818, 112918, 013119Item #5120 Sweet Potato and Chicken UPC 842982051201 - Lot 112818, 020119Item #5130 Cranberry and Chicken UPC 842982051300 - Lot 020319, 112918, 020219Whole Hearted™Item #2570314 Chicken and Apple Puff Treats UPC 800443220696 - Lot 121418, 121918, 122318, 010419, 010619, 010519No illnesses, injuries or complaints have been reported.The possible Salmonella contamination was due to a single finished ingredient that was supplied to Loving Pets from a USA based supplier. This possible contamination was discovered by Loving Pets' internal quality assurance team and was identified through the company's standard quality control testing procedures and internal food safety program. Loving Pets produces its treats in small batches, in order to offer the highest quality and control in safety.To ensure the safety of its products, Loving Pets decided to be extra cautious and recall a wider range of lot numbers (noted above) so that no possible contaminated product is available on the market.Consumers may return any bag of treats with any of these aforementioned lot numbers to the retailer where the product was originally purchased. For additional information, please visit www.LovingPetsProducts.com or call 866-599-PETS (7387).[...]



Party Animal Recalls Dog Food Due To Potential Presence of Pentobarbital

2017-04-27T14:18:08.755-07:00

 The safety of pets is and always will be our first priority. We sincerely regret the reports of the discomfort experienced by the pet who consumed this food. As pet parents ourselves, we take this matter seriously. On April 13, a retailer in Texas notified us that their customer had presented samples of our 13-ounce-can Cocolicious Beef & Turkey dog food (Lot #0136E15204 04, best by July 2019) and 13-ounce-can Cocolicious Chicken & Beef dog food (Lot #0134E15 237 13, best by August 2019) to a testing lab, and that the results had tested positive for pentobarbital. We have requested those results.When we were notified, we immediately tracked the lot numbers of the food in question and determined that the food had been manufactured and distributed in 2015. We then contacted the two probable retailers that had sold the customer the food and asked them to isolate all remaining cans from these lots. If pet parents have cans with either of those lot numbers in their possession, they should return them to the place of purchase and will of course receive a full refund.We also requested that the retailers send all of the cans from those lots to us so that we can forward them on to an accredited independent laboratory for independent testing. We expect to receive the receive the results in 7 to 10 days. We first saw the formal report from the lab at Texas A&M regarding the customer’s samples, today, April 17.Out of an abundance of caution, we are retrieving the remainder of these two lots nationwide. We are working with our distributors and retailers to determine if any additional beef-flavored products manufactured during this 2015 production period remain on shelves and, if so, to retrieve them from shelves, immediately, as well.Party Animal wishes to emphasize that we have submitted many recent lots of our beef flavors for testing and all have tested negative for any pentobarbital. We have also had extensive discussions with our manufacturer regarding the potential cause of the reported contamination of the 2015 lots, and we will continue with such discussions even as we await testing results for the 2015 lots. In order to ensure adherence to our commitment to the safety of pets, we are also actively re-examining our manufacturing processes.[...]



EuroCan Manufacturing Voluntarily Recalling Barnsdale Farms® Pig Ears Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk

2017-03-22T22:15:58.273-07:00

 EuroCan Manufacturing is voluntarily recalling Lot Number 84 consisting of it's individually shrink-wrapped, 6-pack, 12-pack and 25-pack bags of Barnsdale Farms®, HoundsTooth® and Mac's Choice® Pig Ears because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare provider.Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.The pig ears were distributed throughout the United States and Canada. The pig ears were packaged as individually shrink-wrapped, 6-pack, 12-pack and 25-pack bags in the Barnsdale Farms®, Barnsdale Farms®-Select, Houndstooth® and Mac's Choice® brands. The lot number being recalled is 84. No illnesses of any kind have been reported to date. The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing revealed the presence of Salmonella in the product. The company has suspended distribution of the product while FDA and the company continue their investigation as to the source of the problem. Consumers who have purchased any of the above-described Barnsdale Farms® pig ears should return product to the place of purchase for a refund. Consumer with questions may contact the company Monday – Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time at (888) 290-7606.[...]



Wellpet Voluntarily Recalls a Limited Amount of One Recipe of Canned Topper For Dogs Due to Potential Elevated Levels of Naturally Occurring Beef Thyroid Hormone

2017-03-17T19:08:16.160-07:00

 WellPet has initiated a voluntary recall of a limited amount of one canned topper product due to potential elevated levels of naturally occurring beef thyroid hormone.Recalled Product Details:Wellness 95% Beef Topper for Dogs – 13.2 ozBest-By Dates of 02 FEB 19, 29 AUG 19 and 30 AUG 19, located on the bottom of the can      Three best-by date codes of one recipe have the potential to contain elevated levels of naturally occurring beef thyroid hormone. Elevated levels may affect a dog’s metabolism and can be associated with anxiousness, increased thirst, increased urinary output and weight loss. However, with prolonged consumption these symptoms may increase in severity and may include vomiting, diarrhea, and rapid or difficulty breathing. Although multiple studies indicate that, for the vast majority of pets, symptoms are reversible once the pet stops eating product with elevated thyroid hormone, if your pet has consumed this product and has exhibited any of these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.The recipe is a mixer or topper and is intended for intermittent or supplemental feeding only; the likelihood of a dog being affected is remote. Even though the chance of a dog being affected is unlikely, WellPet is voluntarily recalling this recipe with these three best-by dates. No other Wellness products are affected. Affected products were distributed at pet specialty retailers throughout North America and online.Although the WellPet Consumer Affairs team has received no reports of any health problems to date as a result of feeding this recipe, the FDA advised WellPet of three dogs that were affected. WellPet immediately initiated an investigation, and based on follow-up research, decided to recall the lots in question. The dogs are now fully recovered and doing well.“Please know that safeguarding the health and wellbeing of pets is of the utmost importance to us,” said Camelle Kent, chief executive officer of WellPet, the maker of Wellness products. “We fully intend on maintaining the trust you have placed in us to keep your pets healthy and happy, and are removing this product as part of our ongoing commitment to quality and food safety.”If you have any of the 13.2 oz recipe with these three best-by dates, please email WellPet at wecare@wellpet.com or call 1-877-227-9587. For more information, please visit WellPet’s website for a letter from the CEO.Wellness 95% Beef Topper for Dogs – 13.2 oz, Can UPC: 0 76344 89450 6[...]



Against The Grain Pet Food Voluntarily Recalls One Lot of Pulled Beef Due to Potential Adulteration with Pentobarbital

2017-02-15T10:08:30.045-07:00



Out of an abundance of caution, Against the Grain Pet Food is voluntarily recalling one lot of Against the Grain Pulled Beef with Gravy Dinner for Dogs that was manufactured and distributed in 2015.
The 12 oz. Against the Grain Pulled Beef with Gravy Dinner for Dogs that is being voluntarily recalled, due to the potential presence of pentobarbital, has an expiration date of December 2019, a lot number of 2415E01ATB12, and the second half of the UPC code is 80001 (which can be found on the back of the product label).
Oral exposure to pentobarbital can cause side effects such as drowsiness, dizziness, excitement, loss of balance, nausea nystagmus (eyes moving back and forth in a jerky manner), inability to stand and coma.
Note: To-date, no complaints have been reported to Against the Grain for this single lot number nor any of Against the Grain’s pet foods, since the company was founded.
In 2015, this one lot of product was distributed to independent pet retail stores in Washington and Maryland, though it has been verified that this lot is no longer on any store shelves. This voluntary recall only affects one specific lot of food.
Consumers may return any can with the aforementioned lot number, to their place of purchase and receive a full case of Against the Grain food for the inconvenience. For any questions, customers may contact the company at 708-566-4410 between 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM Central Time, Monday - Friday.(image)



Arizona Man Sentenced to Prison for Trafficking in Pet Products with Counterfeit Labels

2017-02-07T00:32:24.901-07:00


 An Arizona man was sentenced today to serve 37 months in prison for trafficking in pet products with counterfeit labels into the United States. 
Acting Assistant Attorney General Kenneth A. Blanco of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division; U.S. Attorney Kenneth Magidson of the Southern District of Texas; Special Agent in Charge E. Spencer Morrison of the Food and Drug Administration – Office of Criminal Investigations (FDA-OCI) Kansas City, Kansas, Field Office and Special Agent in Charge Mark Dawson of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations’ (ICE-HSI) Houston Office made the announcement. 
Allen Smith, 50, of Phoenix, Arizona, was sentenced today by U.S. District Judge David Hittner of the Southern District of Texas.  In addition to his prison term, Smith was ordered to pay $867,150 in restitution and to forfeit $42,269 worth of illicit proceeds.  
According to admissions made in connection with his plea, Smith was responsible for aiding and abetting the trafficking of over $1 million worth of veterinary products that were not manufactured for the U.S. market into the United States for distribution under false labels, including Frontline and Frontline Plus products manufactured by Merial Pharmaceutical Company (Merial) and Advantage and K9 Advatix products manufactured by Bayer.  Smith intentionally trafficked in the products to deceive retail stores and consumers into believing that the products had received necessary Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) authorization to be manufactured for and approved for sale in the United States.
The FDA-OCI, HSI and the EPA investigated the case.  Assistant Deputy Chief John H. Zacharia of the Criminal Division’s Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS) and Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Lowery of the Southern District of Texas are prosecuting the case.  The U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Central District of California and the CCIPS Cybercrime Lab provided significant assistance. 


(image)



Evanger’s Voluntarily Recalls Hunk of Beef Because Of Pentobarbital Exposure in one Batch of Food

2017-02-04T19:18:50.800-07:00

 Out of an abundance of caution, Evanger’s Dog & Cat Food of Wheeling, IL is voluntarily recalling specific lots of its Hunk of Beef product because of a potential contaminant Pentobarbital, which was detected in one lot of Hunk of Beef Au Jus.Pentobarbital can affect animals that ingest it, and possibly cause side effects such as drowsiness, dizziness, excitement, loss of balance, or nausea, or in extreme cases, possibly death.The specifically-identified lot numbers (as detailed below) of cans of 12-oz Hunk of Beef being voluntarily recalled were distributed to retail locations and sold online in the following States: Washington, California, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, and were manufactured the week of June 6 – June 13, 2016.Although pentobarbital was detected in a single lot, Evangers is voluntarily recalling Hunk of Beef products that were manufactured the same week, with lot numbers that start with 1816E03HB, 1816E04HB, 1816E06HB, 1816E07HB, and 1816E13HB, and have an expiration date of June 2020. The second half of the barcode reads 20109, which can be found on the back of the product label.The subject recall affects 5 lots of food that were produced from its supplier’s lot of beef, which is specifically used for the Hunk of Beef product and no other products. To date, it has been reported that five dogs became ill and 1 of the five dogs passed away after consuming the product with lot number 1816E06HB13. Evanger’s is proactively issuing a recall voluntarily so as not to risk potential exposure to pentobarbital in the product.  All Evanger’s suppliers of meat products are USDA approved. This beef supplier provides us with beef chunks from cows that are slaughtered in a USDA facility. We continue to investigate how this substance entered our raw material supply.Because we source from suppliers of meat products that are USDA approved, and no other products have had any reported problems, we are not extending the recall to other supplier lots. This is the first recall for Evanger’s in its 82 years of manufacturing. Although it has been verified that little or no product remains on store shelves, if consumers still have cans with the aforementioned lot numbers, he or she should return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-847-537-0102 between 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM Central Time, Monday - Friday.[...]



FDA Warns of Illnesses and Deaths in Pets Exposed to Prescription topical (human) cancer treatment: Fluorouracil

2017-01-23T12:32:53.883-07:00

 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is alerting pet owners, veterinarians, health care providers and pharmacists that pets are at risk of illness and death when exposed to the topical cancer medication Fluorouracil Cream USP 5% (5-FU.) intended for use in people. Fluorouracil may also be marketed under the brand names Carac, Effudex and Fluoroplex. People using this medication should use care when applying and storing the medication if they are also in a household with pets, as even very small amounts could be dangerous to these animals.The FDA has received reports of five dogs that became ill and died after accidentally ingesting the topical cream. In one case, two dogs began playing with a tube of Fluorouracil and one punctured the tube before their owner could retrieve it. Within 2 hours, the dog that punctured the tube began vomiting, experienced seizures, and died 12 hours later. In a separate case, a dog located his owner’s tube of Fluorouracil and ingested its contents. The owner realized the dog had ingested the medication and rushed him to the veterinarian. The veterinarian attempted treatment, but the dog’s condition declined over three days and he was ultimately euthanized.Although the FDA has not to date received any reports involving cats, they are also expected to be extremely sensitive to Fluorouracil cream. If an owner applies Fluorouracil cream to an afflicted area and touches their cat, the cat may accidentally ingest the medication when grooming itself and suffer adverse events.The FDA recommends that people who use Fluorouracil take care to prevent their pets from accidentally ingesting the medication.Store all medications safely out of the reach of pets.Safely discard or clean any cloth or applicator that may retain medication and avoid leaving any residues of the medication on hands, clothing, carpeting or furniture.Consult your health care provider on whether it is appropriate to cover the treated area.If you are using topical medications containing Fluorouracil and your pet becomes exposed, consult a veterinarian immediately.If your pet shows signs such as vomiting, seizing or other illness, seek immediate veterinary care for your pet and be sure to provide the details of the exposure.Veterinarians who have patients who show signs such as vomiting, seizing or other illness should ask whether anyone in the household has used topical chemotherapy containing Fluorouracil.Health care providers who prescribe topical cancer medications containing Fluorouracil and pharmacists who fill these prescriptions should advise patients with pets to take care to prevent exposure of the pet to the medication.Pet owners and veterinarians can also report any adverse events to the FDA, by following the link to the Form FDA 1932a.  [...]



Blue Ridge Beef Recalls Product Because of Possible Health Risk

2017-01-19T18:17:24.319-07:00

 Blue Ridge Beef is voluntarily recalling one (1) of its frozen products due to their potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria can affect animals eating the product. There is a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surface exposed to these products.Healthy people infected with Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting,diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.The affected products are sold in 2 lb chubs and can be identified with the following manufacturing codes:Lot #103 mfd12716 Turkey with bone UPC code 854298001887  The affected Products were distributed to retail stores in the following states:NC  SC   GA   FLAbout ListeriaListeria can affect animals eating the product and there is a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surface exposed to these products.Healthy people infected with Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare provider. Consumers should also follow the simple handling tips on the package.What caused the RECALLThis recall was initiated with FDA inspection and sampling of the product. This recall is being made with the knowledge of the US Food and Drug Administration.What to doConsumers who have purchased the above lot of turkey for dogs are urged to stop feeding them and return products to the place of purchase for a full refund. Or dispose of them immediately. Those with questions can email the company atblueridgebeefga@yahoo.com.[...]



CESAR® Classics Filet Mignon Flavor Recall

2016-10-10T07:01:07.876-07:00

At CESAR®, we care about all dogs, and their safety and well-being is extremely important to us. For that reason, we have initiated a voluntary recall of a limited number of CESAR® Filet Mignon Flavor wet dog food products due to a potential choking risk from small pieces of plastic which entered the food during the production process. CESAR® Classics Filet Mignon can be purchased individually, as well as in flavor variety multipacks. The Lot Codes listed below are the only affected products. All other CESAR® products can be safely consumed.Select packages of this product may contain small pieces of plastic, which entered the food during the production process. We encourage consumers who have purchased affected product to discard the food or return it to the retailer for a full refund or exchange. While a small number of consumers have reported finding the plastic pieces, we have not received any reports of injury or illness associated with the affected product.At Mars Petcare, we take our responsibility to pets and their owners seriously and are working with all of our distributors and retail customers to ensure the recalled products are no longer sold and are removed from inventory. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused by this recall.  Please see detailed information on the affected products below. You can also reach us at 1-800-421-6456 if you have questions.Products AffectedCESAR® Classics Filet Mignon FlavorHow to Identify the Best Before and Lot Code on Your Lid:Each product will have a lot code printed on the side of the tray that begins with 631FKKC or 631GKKC and best before date that falls between 08/04/18 and 08/05/18. The CESAR® Classics Filet Mignon Flavor can also be found in variety packs with the following lot codes:632D14JC, 633B24JC, 634A14JC, 634A24JC, 634B14JC, 634B24JC, 634E14JC, 635A24JC, 635B14JC, 636D24JC, 636E14JC.Lot Code is indicated by the red box below:[...]



Radagast Pet Food Recalls Four Lots Of Frozen Rad Cat Raw Diet Products

2016-06-25T00:59:49.290-07:00

Radagast Pet Food, Inc. Is Voluntarily Recalling Four Lots Of Frozen Rad Cat Raw Diet® Due To Possibly Salmonella And Listeria Monocytogenes Health Risk    Radagast Pet Food, Inc.  has announced a voluntary recall of four lots of frozen Rad Cat Raw Diet products, sold in 8oz., 16oz., and 24oz. tubs, and free 1oz sample cups, due to the potential to be contaminated with Salmonellaand/or Listeria monocytogenesSalmonella and Listeria monocytogenes can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.Pets with Salmonella or Listeria monocytogenes infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.The FDA third party contracted lab found two lots of Grass-Fed Beef tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes, one lot of Free-range Chicken tested positive forListeria monocytogenes, and one lot of Free-range Turkey tested positive forSalmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. As a precautionary measure, we are voluntarily recalling three products produced in these four lots.All affected lot codes 62384, 62361, 62416, and 62372 and Best By dates are located on the lid of all products packaged in tubs and on the bottom of the sample cups.The following recalled products were distributed in western Canada and all US States except in HI and MS. BrandUPCSize Lot Number Best By Date Rad Cat Raw DietGrass-Fed Beef 851536001241 8oz 62384 2/6/2017  Rad Cat Raw DietGrass-Fed Beef 851536001258 16oz 62384 2/6/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietGrass-Fed Beef 851536001265 24oz 62384 2/6/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietGrass-Fed Beef Sample 1oz 62384 2/6/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietGrass-Fed Beef 851536001241 8oz 62361 1/8/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietGrass-Fed Beef 851536001258 16oz 62361 1/8/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietGrass-Fed Beef 851536001265 24oz 62361 1/8/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietGrass-Fed Beef Sample 1oz 62361 1/8/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietFree-Range Chicken 851536001036 8oz 62416 3/14/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietFree-Range Chicken 851536001043 16oz 62416 3/14/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietFree-Range Chicken 851536001050 24oz 62416 3/14/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietFree-Range Chicken Sample 1oz 62416 3/14/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietFree-Range Turkey 851536001005 8oz 62372 1/21/2017 Rad Cat Raw DietFree-Range Turkey 851536001012 16oz 62372 1/21/2017Rad Cat Raw DietFree-Range Turkey85153600102924oz623721/21/2017Consumer information:Please do not return any of these recalled products to the retailer and dispose in a secure garbage receptacle. For refund claims, fill out al[...]



Blue Buffalo Dog Food Recall of May 2016

2016-06-03T19:50:08.443-07:00

Blue Buffalo Dog Food Recall of May 2016



 Blue Buffalo representatives claim that these conditions are only present in a single batch that was manufactured between one 2-hour period. Customers with effected bags are encourage to return them to place of purchase and receive a full refund. The products in question are reportedly in 30 pound bags with a “best by” date of April 11, 2017. Questions can be addressed to Blue Buffalo’s Customer Service at 855-201-4331.(image)



Smallbatch Pets Inc. Voluntarily Recalling Frozen Dog Duckbatch Sliders

2016-03-28T11:29:48.544-07:00

Smallbatch Pets Inc. Voluntarily Recalls Frozen Dog Duckbatch Sliders Due to Possible Salmonella and Listeria Monocytogenes Health Risk  Smallbatch Pets Inc. is voluntarily recalling one lot of frozen dog duckbatch sliders due to their potential to be contaminated with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.Healthy people infected with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella andListeria monocytogenes can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.Pets with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.No pet or consumer illnesses from this product have been reported to date. However, because of their commitment to safety and quality, Smallbatch Pets is conducting a voluntary recall of this product. Consumers should also follow the Simple Handling Tips published on the Smallbatch Pets package, when disposing of the affected product.The potentially affected lots of dog duckbatch sliders were distributed to retail pet food stores in States CA, CO, OR, WA through pet food retailers/distributors. Eighty cases of this product were sold between the dates of 2/23/16 – 3/10/16.The affected products are sold frozen in 3lbs. bags. The products affected by this recall are identified with the following manufacturing codes:LOT #Best By DateUPCCO2701/27/17713757339001 The "Best By" date is located on the back of the package below the seal.This recall was initiated after routine testing by the Food and Drug Administration of a 3lb bag of dog duckbatch sliders, that was collected at a distributor, revealed the presence of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.This recall is being made with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.Consumers who have purchased the above lots of dog duck sliders are urged to stop feeding them and return product to place of purchase for a full refund or dispose of them immediately.We do apologize for any inconvenience and for all consumer questions, please call us at 888-507-2712, Monday - Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM PST or email us atinfo@smallbatchpets.com.[...]



Fromm Family Pet Food Recalls Their 12 oz. Cans Of New Gold Canned Dog Food

2016-03-23T14:11:31.748-07:00

 Read the post from their web page:                           RECALL NOTICE  Dear Valued Customers and Pet Parents:Fromm Family Pet Food has discovered through our own analysis that 12 oz. cans of our new Gold canned dog food pates do not contain recommended levels of vitamins and minerals. They may contain elevated levels of Vitamin D. We are recalling these products out of an abundance of caution.The impact of the excess Vitamin D should be seen only when dogs have eaten these products as their exclusive meals for an extended period of time. We would expect to see a reduction in appetite. We have not received any reports of this or any other health problems, but recommend that you not feed these products to your dog if you have of the following 12 oz. cans:12 oz. Gold Chicken Pate Dog can case code#11893, individual can upc : 72705 1189212 oz. Gold Chicken & Duck can case code #11895, individual can upc: 72705 1189412 oz. Gold Salmon & Chicken Pate can case code #11891, individual can upc: 72705 11890These cans were shipped to distributors during the limited time frame from December 2015 through February 2016. If you have any of the above cans, please return them to the place of purchase or any Authorized Fromm Retailer for return to Fromm Family Foods. To find an Authorized Fromm Retailer near you, please visitfrommfamily.com/retailers or call (800) 325-6331. There are no other Fromm products affected by this recall, and this effort is being undertaken in coordination with the FDA.Please see the product labels above to see if any food you have is subject to this recall. If you have any questions, please contact Fromm Family Pet Foods at (800) 325-6331. We very much appreciate your attention to this announcement and, as a family business, look forward to earning your trust every day.Sincerely,Tom NiemanPresidentFromm Family Foods[...]



Have You Read The New Updated Guidelines About Rabies

2016-03-18T09:20:09.681-07:00

  Rabies is a fatal viral zoonosis and serious public health problem.1 All mammals are believed to be susceptible to the disease, and for the purposes of this document, use of the term animal refers to mam- mals. The disease is an acute, progressive encephalitis caused by viruses in the genus Lyssavirus.2 Rabies virus is the most important lyssavirus globally. In the United States, multiple rabies virus variants are main- tained in wild mammalian reservoir populations such as raccoons, skunks, foxes, and bats. Although the Unit- ed States has been declared free from transmission of canine rabies virus variants, there is always a risk of reintroduction of these variants.3–7 The rabies virus is usually transmitted from animal to animal through bites. The incubation period is highly variable. In domestic animals, it is generally 3 to 12 weeks, but can range from several days to months, rarely exceeding 6 months.8 Rabies is communicable during the period of salivary shedding of rabies virus. Experimental and historic evidence documents that dogs, cats, and ferrets shed the virus for a few days prior to the onset of clinical signs and during illness. Clinical signs of rabies are variable and include inappetance, dysphagia, cranial nerve deficits, abnormal behavior, ataxia, paralysis, altered vocalization, and seizures. Progression to death is rapid. There are currently no known effective rabies antiviral drugs. The recommendations in this compendium serve as a basis for animal rabies prevention and control programs throughout the United States and facilitate standardization of procedures among jurisdictions, there by contributing to an effective national rabies control program. The compendium is reviewed and revised as necessary, with the most current version replacing all previous versions. These recommendations do not supersede state and local laws or requirements. Prin ciples of rabies prevention and control are detailed in Part I, and recommendations for parenteral vaccination procedures are presented in Part II. All animal ra- bies vaccines licensed by the USDA and marketed in the United States are listed and described in Appendix 1, and contact information for manufacturers of these vaccines is provided in Appendix 2. Modifications of note in this updated version of the compendium, compared with the previous ver- sion,9 include clarification of language, explicit encouragement of an interdisciplinary approach to ra- bies control, a recommendation to collect and report at the national level additional data elements on rabid domestic animals, changes to the recommended management of dogs and cats exposed to rabies that are ei- ther unvaccinated or overdue for booster vaccination, reduction of the recommended 6-month quarantine period for certain species, and updates to the list of marketed animal rabies vaccines.

 Download the article here.





(image)



Purina Voluntary Recalls 10-oz. Tubs Of Beneful Prepared Meals

2016-03-11T18:53:30.776-07:00

Purina Wet Dog Food 10-oz. Tub Voluntary RecallClick on image to enlargeWe’re pet owners and pet lovers, too. For that reason, when we discovered through our own internal quality tests that some of our 10-oz. wet dog food tubs may not contain the recommended level of added vitamins and minerals, we took action and voluntarily recalled the product at retail.This includes select wet dog food 10-oz. tubs under the Beneful Prepared Meals, Beneful Chopped Blends and Pro Plan Savory Meals brands. See a full list of included products by “Best Before” date and production code ranges here.Although most of the recalled product contains all of the vitamins and minerals your dog needs, we recommend that you discard any of the affected product you may have, and we’ll issue you a refund.We’re here to ensure you have the best possible consumer experience, so call us at 1-800-877-7919 with any questions you may have or to request a refund. We know your pet is important to you, and they’re important to us, too.Canadian consumers should visit purina.ca/voluntaryrecall for information about the Canadian products included in the recall. Questions and Answers1. What products are included in this voluntary recall?The voluntary recall only includes the following brands with both a “Best Before” date range of June 2017 to August 2017 and production code range starting with the first four digits of 5363 to 6054. See a full list of products here.Beneful Prepared Meals Wet Dog Food 10-oz. Tubs (all varieties)Beneful Chopped Blends Wet Dog Food 10-oz. Tubs (all varieties)Pro Plan Savory Meals Wet Dog Food 10-oz. Tubs (limited to five varieties).No other Purina products or sizes are included.2. Why did you recall this product?We discovered through our own internal quality tests that some 10-oz. wet dog food tubs may not contain the recommended level of added vitamins and minerals, so we took action and issued a voluntary recall of the product at retail.3. How do I know if my product is included in this voluntary recall?Dog owners should check both the "Best Before" date and production code on the bottom of each 10-oz. tub and contact Purina at 1-800-877-7919 for a refund if they have an affected tub or may have purchased the affected product(s) (see listhere).4. What should I do if I have the recalled product?If you have any of the affected product on-hand, please discontinue feeding the food to your dog and discard it. If you have a 10-oz tub that is not listed as part of the recall, you can and should continue feeding it to your dog. We’ll be happy to give you a refund.5. What if I fed the recalled product to my dog?We’re conducting this voluntary recall as a precaution for those dogs who may have eaten the affected product as their only meal for more than several weeks. Anytime you have questions about your pet’s health, contact your veterinarian. 6. Are any other Purina products are affected?No other Purina products or sizes are affected.7. Where were the recalled products produced?The affected items were produced in only one Purina facility on one production line in St. Joseph, Missouri, and were sold in the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico.8. When can I buy these products again?We’re working to get these products back on store shelves as soon as we possibly can.[...]



What To Do If A Dog Is Having A Seizure

2016-02-10T10:29:03.056-07:00

What To Do If A Dog Is Having A Seizure -- Recommendations by MedVet Chicago's Veterinary Neurologist about Canine Epilepsy Epilepsy is a seizure disorder that occurs in humans and dogs. 1 in 26 Americans will develop epilepsy, 1 in 5 Dogs will too. MedVet Medical & Cancer Centers for Pets is participating in promoting International Epilepsy Day on Monday, February 8.  Epilepsy is a seizure disorder that occurs in humans and dogs. MedVet Medical & Cancer Centers for Pets is participating in promoting International Epilepsy Day on Monday, February 8th. This is an annual event to promote awareness of epilepsy worldwide. Epileptic seizures can vary from brief and very subtle trembling to long periods of vigorous shaking and disrupt lifestyles for affected people and their canine best friends. Similar to people with epilepsy, the cause is unknown in most dogs, although more serious problems, such as trauma, infections or cancers also occur.According to the American Epilepsy Society, 1 in 26 Americans will develop epilepsy in their lifetime adding more than 200,000 new epilepsy cases annually to the 3 million already living with the condition in the US. According to Dr. Michael Podell, MSc, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM (Neurology), head of the Neurology and Neurosurgery department at MedVet Chicago and Affiliate Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery, Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago, “the prevalence of epilepsy in dogs in the U.S. may range from 0.55 percent to 5 percent.” That could mean that about two million dogs are affected.Dr. Michael Podell of MedVet Chicago states, “There is no cure for epilepsy. Living with epilepsy can be extremely difficult not only for the humans and dogs that have the disease but also for the caregivers. Unlike other diseases, a long period of normal activity may occur between the seizure events. The focus of treatment is to balance the best quality of life for the patient and owner with optimal seizure control.” The diagnosis of epilepsy involves consultation with a board-certified veterinary neurologist who may recommend more advanced diagnostic tests such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many patients do not necessarily need more tests, but to start appropriate anticonvulsant treatment. Many of these drugs used to control seizures in humans and dogs are the same.Dr. Podell was the chair of the panel and lead author on the upcoming American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) Consensus Statement by the College of Neurology to be published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine titled: “2015 ACVIM Small Animal Consensus Statement on Seizure Management in Dogs.” Dr. Podell states that he hopes this information “helps to improve the care and treatment of epileptic dogs throughout the world.” Similar to the International League Against Epilepsy, which works to provide guidelines for best practice standards of care for epileptic people, the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force (IVETF) was recently established to work towards these same goals in veterinary medicine. Dr. Podell is one of the founding members of the IVETF, which held their inaugural meeting this past year, and has also published several consensus statements on epilepsy.About Canine Epilepsy Epilepsy is a common disease in dogs and can occur in most other animal species. The disorder is characterized by unpredictable seizures in which the brain produces sudden bursts of electrical energy. Seizures differ in movements and alternations in consciousness from subtle to severe tonic-clonic muscle movements. There is not a cu[...]



Big Dog Natural Dog Food Is Being Recall For Potentially Being Contaminated With Salmonella Or Listeria

2016-01-04T16:26:18.188-07:00

Big Dog Natural Recalls Chicken and Fish Supreme Dog Food Due to Possible Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes Health Risk   Big Dog Natural of Brick, NJ is voluntary recalling a select production lot of Big Dog Natural raw dehydrated dog food Chicken Supreme potentially contaminated withSalmonella and Fish Supreme potentially contaminated with Listeria monocytogenesthat was shipped in the week of 10/31/2015 to 11/13/2015 to online customers.Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.Healthy people infected with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.Pets with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.These products were sold directly to consumers through the company’s online website and in the US. The voluntarily recalled product include all weight volumes of the Big Dog Natural Chicken and Fish Supreme. No additional products are affected by this recall.Big Dog Natural became aware of a potential issue after receiving notification from the FDA that an investigational sample of Chicken Supreme tested positive for Salmonellaand an investigational sample of Fish Supreme for Listeria monocytogenes.Consumers should discontinue feeding the affected product and monitor their pet's health, and contact their veterinarian if they have concerns. Consumers who purchased the product can obtain a full refund or exchange by returning the product in its original packaging.Consumers with questions should contact Big Dog Natural https://www.bigdognatural.com or by calling 1-732-785-2600 (from 9am till 4pm EST).[...]



HumaneWatch.org Calls Out The Humane Society For Not Giving The Money To Animal Shelters

2015-12-30T21:19:12.034-07:00

Report: National Humane Society Snubs New Jersey Pets  Today HumaneWatch.org, a project of the nonprofit Center for Consumer Freedom, released a new report showing the Humane Society of the United States shockingly shortchanges pet shelters in New Jersey.In 2014, HSUS raised over $100 million from Americans and yet only gave 1% of this money to local pet shelters—and didn’t operate a single pet shelter itself—despite having fundraising appeals full of cats and dogs.In New Jersey, HSUS only donated $3,670.00 to help pet shelters care for animals. Instead, donor money meant to save animals went to disappointing ends. HSUS placed over $50 million into Caribbean funds last year, rather than using that money to help animals. The group settled a racketeering lawsuit for nearly $6 million. HSUS also put $4 million into its own pension plan. The organization is currently under investigation by the Oklahoma attorney general.Unfortunately, this isn’t an anomaly; HSUS has doggedly refused to give more to shelters.The full 50-state report of HSUS misuse of donor money in recent years, “Not Your Local Humane Society,” is available below or online here: http://goo.gl/zVCBvp“Well-meaning Americans are duped by manipulative HSUS ads into thinking that donations will primarily help pets, but that’s not the case at all,” commented CCF research director Will Coggin. “By giving to HSUS, their money is going to the dogs—but only figuratively.”New Jerseyans who want to make a difference for pets should do one thing: Give localDespite its name, the Humane Society of the United States is not affiliated with the scores of humane societies in town and counties across America that provide hands-on care to needy animals. Giving to HSUS means their money may be parked in offshore tax shelters, used to pay bloated overhead costs, or spent on a PETA-esque lobbying agenda.HSUS – Not Your Local Shelter 2015    HSUS - Not Your Local Shelter 2015 class="scribd_iframe_embed" data-aspect-ratio="undefined" data-auto-height="false" frameborder="0" height="600" id="doc_94339" scrolling="no" src="https://www.scribd.com/embeds/293372060/content?start_page=1&view_mode=scroll&show_recommendations=true" width="100%">    For more information, visit www.HumaneWatch.org. The Center for Consumer Freedom is a nonprofit coalition supported by restaurants, food companies, and consumers, working together to promote personal responsibility and protect consumer choices.  So why are you still donating to companies like this and not to your local non kill shelters. The Humane Society is not the only one that keeps the money for them selfs. Think about the dogs and cats next time you donate.[...]



North Pole Veterinarian Clears Reindeer For Christmas Flight

2015-12-15T16:33:54.910-07:00

 Following a health checkup at the North Pole, Santa's veterinarian has given the green light to Rudolph's red nose and the rest of the reindeer that will be traveling the world this Christmas Eve.Dr. Joe Kinnarney, president of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), visited the North Pole today to ensure that Santa's team of nine were up-to-date on their vaccinations and healthy enough to make their annual trek around the globe."After a thorough examination I can tell you that Santa's reindeer are perfectly healthy and in great shape, and ready for their flight," Dr. Kinnarney said.The reindeer's annual exam includes a health check about 10 days prior to their Christmas Eve flight to make sure they're healthy and not showing any signs of disease—such as brucellosis, tuberculosis or chronic wasting disease—that can be transmitted to other animals."Santa's reindeer need to be in tip-top shape to complete their Christmas Eve flight on time, so it's vital that they receive a pre-trip veterinary exam to make sure they are free of any injuries that might slow them down," Dr, Kinnarney said. "Because the reindeer will be visiting all corners of the globe, we need to make sure they are up to date on their vaccinations and free of disease so they don't pick up or spread any infections to other animals around the world."   allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="214" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0rMHfD-2JSA?rel=0" width="380"> In addition to presents for children around the world, Santa is required to bring with him an official "North Pole Certificate of Animal Export" that allows him to freely cross borders and ensure health officials that his reindeer are no threat to animal or public health.Dr. Kinnarney will make a follow-up trip to the North Pole on Christmas Eve to provide a pre-flight checkup and to inspect the reindeer upon their return on Christmas morning.For kids who want to help the reindeer on their journey, Dr. Kinnarney recommended leaving a plate of graham cracker reindeer cookies, their favorite snack, for Santa to feed them between stops.Dr. Kinnarney's work is consistent with the role veterinarians play every day to ensure the health of animals, people and the environment across the globe. Far from just being "dog and cat doctors," veterinarians work with all kinds of species, in all types of environments, to make the world a healthier place for all forms of life.While unavailable for comment due to his busy work schedule, Santa issued a statement, saying, "Without my reindeer there simply would be no Christmas. Proper veterinary care ensures that, year in and year out, my team and I are able to deliver presents to boys and girls around the world. Dr. Kinnarney is definitely on the 'nice list' again this year."For more information on Dr. Kinnarney's role as North Pole Veterinarian, including answers to kids' questions about reindeer, visit avma.org/holiday.For more information about the role veterinarians play in global health, or to schedule an interview with Dr. Kinnarney about his role as North Pole Veterinarian, contact Michael San Filippo, AVMA senior media relations specialist, at 847-285-6687 (office), 847-732-6194 (cell), or msanfilippo@avma.org.The AVMA, founded in 1863, is one of the oldest and largest veterinary medical organizations in the world. More than 86,500 member veterinarians worldwide are engaged in a wide variety of professional activities. Visit www.avma.org for more information[...]



Stella & Chewy's Voluntarily Recalling Frozen Dinners Due To Possible Listeria

2015-12-15T16:14:13.492-07:00

Stella & Chewy's Voluntarily Recalls Frozen Dinner Morsel Products Due to Possible Health Risk  Stella & Chewy's is voluntarily recalling four of its products sold in the U.S. and Canada due to concerns of a possible presence of Listeria monocytogenes. The recall affects a total of 990 cases (964 cases in the U.S and 26 cases in Canada). The recall was prompted by a positive test confirming Listeria monocytogenes in Stella's Super Beef Dinner Morsels for Dogs 8.5 oz. frozen bags, lot #165-15, "Use by 6-25-2016", during routine surveillance testing by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.Listeria is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.As a precautionary measure, Stella & Chewy's is voluntarily recalling all products from Lot # 165-15, which includes:Product DescriptionSizeUPCLot #Use ByFrozen Stella's Super Beef Dinner Morsels for Dogs8.5 oz.186011 001554165-156/25/2016Frozen Stella's Super Beef Dinner Morsels for Dogs4 lb.186011 001370165-156/25/2016 & 6/26/2016Frozen Duck Duck Goose Dinner Morsels for Cats1.25 lb.186011 001455165-156/25/2016Moreover, while the below listed product has not tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes, in an abundance of caution, we are also recalling the following products which may have come into contact with the affected lot:Product DescriptionSizeUPCLot #Use ByFrozen Chick Chick Chicken Dinner Morsels for Cats1.25 lb.186011 001448160-157/2/2016Frozen Chick Chick Chicken Dinner Morsels for Cats1.25 lb.186011 001448152-157/2/2016Retailers and consumers can find the full product recall list and additional information at: http://www.stellaandchewys.com/stella-chewys-recall-notice/.Consumers should look at the product descriptions, UPCs, lot numbers, and "Use By" dates on each bag for an exact match to determine if it is subject to the recall. Anyone who has purchased these products are instructed to dispose of the food or return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.[...]



Bravo Chicken Blend Diet For Dogs & Cats Recall Due To Possible Salmonella

2015-12-11T15:58:55.409-07:00

Bravo Recalls Select Chicken and Turkey Pet Foods Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk.  Bravo Pet Foods of Manchester, CT is recalling a select lot of Bravo Chicken Blend diet for dogs & cats with a best used by date of 11/13/16 due to concerns of the possible presence of Salmonella . Out of an abundance of caution, Bravo is also recalling three additional items that did not test positive for Salmonella , but were manufactured on the same day. Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers. Always use proper caution when handling raw foods.Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.These products were sold to distributors, retail stores, internet retailers, and directly to consumers in the U.S.The following product is being voluntarily recalled because of the possible presence of Salmonella .ProductItem #SizeBest Used by DateUPCBravo Blend Chicken diet for dogs & cats - chub21-1022 lb.(32oz.) chub11-13-16829546211028The recall was initiated after routine testing of a 2 lb. chub of Bravo Chicken Blend diet for dogs and cats (Item #21-102) by the Colorado State Department of Agriculture, collected at a single retailer, revealed the presence of Salmonella . Two hundred and one cases of this product were sold to distributors, retail stores, and directly to consumers in the U.S. between 11/21/14 and 1/15/15.Out of an abundance of caution, Bravo is also recalling three additional items that did not test positive for Salmonella , but were manufactured on the same day: 250 cases of Bravo Blend Chicken diet for dogs & cats – 5 lb. chubs only, 8 cases of Bravo Blend Turkey diet for dogs & cats – 8 oz. patties only and 60 cases of Bravo Balance Turkey diet for dogs – 4 oz. patties only.These products DID NOT test positive for Salmonella , but are also being voluntarily recalled out of an abundance of caution.ProductItem #SizeBest Used by DateUPCBravo Blend Chicken diet for dogs & cats - chub21-1055 lb. (90 oz.) chub11-13-16829546211059Bravo Blend Turkey diet for dogs & cats - patties31-5085 lb. bag of 8 oz. patties11-13-168829546315085Bravo Balance Turkey diet for dogs - patties31-4013 lb. bag of 4 oz. patties11-13-16829546314019No additional products are affected by this recall. The company has received no reports to date of illness in either people or animals associated with these products.All products tested negative by a third party inde[...]



NEW RESEARCH REVEALS BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH FELINE GUM DISEASE FOR THE FIRST TIME

2015-11-25T15:47:18.005-07:00

 Studies reveal the differences in species of bacteria found in cat and human plaque and pave the way for more effective treatment for one of the most commonly diagnosed health problems in cats  Gum disease is one of the most commonly diagnosed health problems in cats, yet relatively little was understood about the bacteria associated with it – until now. Two collaborative studies have been conducted by researchers from the WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition together with expert veterinary dentists and the Harvard affiliated Forsyth Institute. The work, published in Veterinary Microbiology in February 2015 and PLOS ONE today, sheds new light on feline gum disease, identifying the most common bacterial species associated with health and disease in cats for the first time.Using the latest DNA sequencing technologies, researchers identified 267 bacterial species present in feline dental plaque and built a database detailing the differences between bacterial populations in healthy cats and those in cats with gum disease. “This knowledge is a first step in understanding the potential for improving oral health of cats through dietary interventions that target disease-associated bacteria.” said Dr. Ian Davis, Oral Health Researcher at WALTHAM, part of Mars Petcare. The studies also revealed that the bacterial species in feline plaque were more similar to those observed in canine plaque than to those found in humans.  This suggests that interventions targeted at bacteria which cause oral disease in humans are unlikely to be effective in cats, and there is more potential to learn from interventions that work well in dogs. Dr. Davis added “It’s important for pet owners to know that cats are just as susceptible to gum disease as dogs and understand the importance of maintaining a good oral hygiene routine; ideally including tooth brushing and dental treats or a specific dental diet”.   The latest study, published today in PLOS ONE, can be downloaded by clicking on this link http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0136986.[...]



Blue Buffalo Voluntarily Recalls Wilderness Wild Chews Bones

2015-11-25T15:38:56.710-07:00

Blue Buffalo Voluntarily Recalls One Lot of Cub Size Wilderness Wild Chews Bones Due to Potential Salmonella Health Risk    Product Distributed Since November 19 Through PetSmart Stores in 9 States; No Illnesses ReportedBlue Buffalo Company is voluntarily recalling one production lot of Cub Size Wilderness Wild Chews Bones. This is being done in an abundance of caution, as the product has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.Salmonella can affect animals eating the product and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare provider.Pets with Salmonella infections may have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Other clinical signs may include lethargy, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.The product was distributed starting November 19, 2015 in PetSmart stores located in the following 9 states: California, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington. The recalled product comes individually shrink-wrapped in plastic with the UPC number 840243110087 printed on a sticker affixed to the product, and an expiration date of November 4, 2017, printed as “exp 110417” on the shrink-wrap. Consumers should look at the UPC Code and expiration date on the product package to determine if it is subject to the voluntary recall.The voluntary recall is limited to the following product and production lot:Product Name    Cub Size Wilderness Wild Chews BoneUPC Code          840243110087 Expiration Date November 4, 2017    Routine testing at the manufacturing site revealed the presence of Salmonella in the product. No illnesses have been reported to date and no other Blue Buffalo products are affected.Consumers who have purchased the product subject to this recall are urged to dispose of the product or return it to the place of purchase for full refund.Consumers with questions may contact Blue Buffalo at: 888-641-9736 from 8 AM to 5 PM Eastern Time Monday through Friday and the weekend of November 28, 2015, or by email at Bluebuffalo4260@stericycle.com for more information.[...]



Blue Buffalo Recalling A Limited Production Of Blue Kitty Yums Chicken Recipe Cat Treats

2015-11-09T12:51:29.233-07:00

Blue Buffalo Company, Ltd. Voluntarily Recalls Limited Production of Kitty Yums Chicken Recipe Cat Treats Due to the Presence of Propylene Glycol  Blue Buffalo Company, Ltd. is voluntarily recalling a limited production of Blue Kitty Yums Chicken Recipe Cat Treats that may contain low levels of propylene glycol, which is not permitted by the FDA for use in cat food.Cats reacting to high doses of propylene glycol may exhibit signs of depression and may have a loss of coordination, muscle twitching, and excessive urination and thirst. If your cat has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.The affected product was distributed nationwide in the US and Canada through pet specialty stores and e-commerce.The product is packaged in a 2 oz., plastic stand up pouch. Only these specific code dates of this product are involved:Blue Kitty Yums Tasty Chicken Recipe, UPC: 859610007820 - Best If Used By: April 24, 2016.Blue Kitty Yums Tasty Chicken Recipe, UPC: 859610007820 - Best If Used By: July 24, 2016.    No other BLUE pet foods or treats are involved in this recall.The FDA tested product in response to a single consumer complaint and found propylene glycol in one bag of our cat treats in the impacted lot. To date we have had no other reports of incidents related to our cat treats. Out of an abundance of caution, we are voluntarily recalling all product manufactured in the same lot as the subject bag.Consumers who have purchased the product being recalled may return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact Blue Buffalo at: 888-667-1508 from 8 AM to 5 PM Eastern Time Monday through Friday and the weekend of November 7, 2015 or by email at BlueBuffalo5883@stericycle.com for more information.About Blue BuffaloBlue Buffalo, based in Wilton, CT, is a pet products company that makes natural foods and treats for pets.[...]