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Preview: Peter O'Kelly's Reality Check

Peter O'Kelly's Reality Check



Better living through collaboration and conceptual modeling



Updated: 2017-09-24T20:22:05.824-04:00

 



Apple does right by users and advertisers are displeased | Electronic Frontier Foundation

2017-09-22T08:09:11.285-04:00

Final paragraphs

"At EFF we understand the need for sites to build a successful business model, but this should not come at the expense of people's privacy. This is why we launched initiatives like the EFF DNT Policy and tools like Privacy Badger. These initiatives and tools target tracking, not advertising. Rather than attacking Apple for serving their users, the advertising industry should treat this as an opportunity to change direction and develop advertising models that respect (and not exploit) users.

Apple has been a powerful force in user privacy on a mass scale in recent years, as reflected by their support for encryption, the intelligent processing of user data on device rather than in the cloud, and limitations on ad tracking on mobile and desktop. By some estimates, Apple handles 30% of all pages on mobile. Safari's innovations are not the silver bullet that will stop all tracking, but by stepping up to protect their users’ privacy Apple has set a challenge for other browser developers. When the user's privacy interests conflict with the business models of the advertising technology complex, is it possible to be neutral? We hope that Mozilla, Microsoft and Google will follow Apple, Brave and Opera's lead."
Apple does right by users and advertisers are displeased | Electronic Frontier Foundation



Database provider MongoDB has filed to go public | TechCrunch

2017-09-22T07:52:47.786-04:00

Tbd if MongoDB is losing enough money for a successful IPO...

"The company, which provides open-source database software that became very attractive among early-stage startups, is one of a myriad of companies that have sought to go public by building a business around selling sophisticated tools for that software. The hope is that MongoDB would be able to offer a superior experience for its open-source software and reduce the overall workload for companies that want to deploy its technology. Cloudera also went public earlier this year.

The company brought in $101.4 million in revenue in the most recent year ending January 31, and around $68 million in the first six months ending July 31 this year. In that same period, MongoDB burned through $86.7 million in the year ending January 31 and $45.8 million in the first six months ending July 31. MongoDB’s revenue is growing, and while its losses seem to be stable, they aren’t shrinking either."
Database provider MongoDB has filed to go public | TechCrunch



Read Mark Zuckerberg's full speech on how Facebook is fighting back against Russia's election interference - Recode

2017-09-22T07:26:13.298-04:00

Quite a shift from Zuckerberg: the idea that fake news on Facebook influenced the election is ‘crazy’ (The Verge, 11/10/2016)

"In 2016, people had billions of interactions and open discussions on Facebook that may never have happened offline. Candidates had direct channels to communicate with tens of millions of citizens. Campaigns spent tens of millions organizing and advertising online to get their messages out further. And we organized "get out the vote" efforts that helped as many as 2 million people register to vote who might not have voted otherwise. Many of these dynamics were new in this election, or at much larger scale than ever before in history, and at much larger scale than the interference we've found.

But we are in a new world. It is a new challenge for internet communities to deal with nation states attempting to subvert elections. But if that's what we must do, we are committed to rising to the occasion. Our sophistication in handling these threats is growing and improving quickly. We will continue working with the government to understand the full extent of Russian interference, and we will do our part not only to ensure the integrity of free and fair elections around the world, but also to give everyone a voice and to be a force for good in democracy everywhere."
Read Mark Zuckerberg's full speech on how Facebook is fighting back against Russia's election interference - Recode



Uber has a lot of reasons to settle the lawsuit with Alphabet - Recode

2017-09-22T07:19:38.435-04:00

Check the full post for a list of reasons why Uber might want to try to settle with its "investor-turned-foe"

"Outwardly, Uber appears confident it can beat Alphabet’s claims in court. But there are many reasons why the embattled company would want to settle the case. That’s especially true now after it was revealed Alphabet is seeking $2.6 billion in damages for a single trade secret it claims was stolen.

In other words, Alphabet isn’t just taking Uber for a legal ride. It wants to cause some serious damage, which some inside think is part of an effort to slow down Uber’s self-driving efforts.

But with Alphabet’s endless legal and financial resources — and determination from top execs at the company to make an example of Uber — are powerful reasons that Khosrowshahi might seek a settlement."
Uber has a lot of reasons to settle the lawsuit with Alphabet - Recode



Apple’s Latest Products Get Rare Mixed-Bag Reviews - Bloomberg

2017-09-22T07:08:58.662-04:00

For a different perspective, see iPhone 8 Is World's Fastest Phone (It's Not Even Close) (Tom's Guide)

"To be sure, Apple products have gotten bad reviews in the past, only to sell like hotcakes later. And reviewers haven't yet tested the iPhone X, which is expected to be the main object of desire when it becomes available in November. Early sales in Asia may indicate that first-adopters are holding out for the iPhone X, and that pre-orders for the iPhone 8 may be lagging behind its predecessor.

As the only models likely to be readily available in stores ahead of the holidays, the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus are great phones, but their $699 to $949 prices make them competitors for rivals' top-end models, like Samsung Electronics Co.’s Galaxy S8. The problem is that these iPhones look dated compared with Samsung’s top-end offerings, and Apple’s own forthcoming iPhone X. Perceptually, the 8-series handsets don't offer significant upgrades over last year’s models -- or even the ones before -- which are still being sold by Apple at lower prices. The main additions are new camera features, a wireless charging mechanism already present on competing phones, and faster chips."
Apple’s Latest Products Get Rare Mixed-Bag Reviews - Bloomberg



Report: Peter Thiel Up for Key Intelligence Position, Wants to Limit Google's Power (Gizmodo)

2017-09-21T07:54:51.352-04:00

Also see the source article, Is Trump Mulling Peter Thiel for a Top Intelligence Advisory Post? (Vanity Fair)
"It’s hard to say what qualifies as more disruptive than installing a brain surgeon with no infrastructure experience as head of housing, an anti-environment crusader as chief of the EPA, and putting a man who couldn’t name the Department of Energy in charge of our nuclear arsenal, but apparently, Thiel’s suggestions were pretty out there.

Some of Thiel’s pals made it through the confirmation process, like Michael Kratsios, the former chief of staff at Thiel Capital, who is now deputy chief technology officer. Others didn’t get selected but are still being considered for less-official positions that don’t require congressional oversight. That sort of position is what sources said Thiel is being courted to take on.

Three “senior White House sources,” said told Vanity Fair that Thiel has been offered the chairmanship of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board (PIAB). And as recently as this month, one source said he’s still Trump’s top pick. The board is tasked with overseeing intelligence operations and advising the president on the legalities and shortcomings of the intelligence community. Depending on the president it serves, the board has had varying levels of power. One senior official said that Trump’s iteration will be handed a ton of influence:"
Report: Peter Thiel Up for Key Intelligence Position, Wants to Limit Google's Power



The single most depressing thing about the Equifax breach - The Washington Post

2017-09-21T07:26:54.803-04:00

For a bigger-picture perspective, see The Equifax fiasco is a classic case of ‘weapon of math destruction’ (The Washington Post); for a related discussion, see the Pedro Domingos tweet "True fact: there is not a single proven case to date of discrimination by machine learning algorithms."

"It's been almost two weeks since Equifax first admitted it had been hacked in a massive breach affecting as many as 143 million consumers. Ever since, people have been begging Equifax to answer a simple question: "Am I on the list of victims?"

Much to America's dismay, Equifax has yet to provide a firm response. It's not clear when or if the country will ever get one. But the most depressing thing isn't Equifax's failure to tell consumers definitively whether they, individually, are at risk. The most depressing thing is that, at this point, the answer may not even matter.

"Once it’s out there, it’s out there," said Justin Shipe, vice president of information security at CardConnect, a payment processor."
The single most depressing thing about the Equifax breach - The Washington Post



SEC reveals it was hacked, information may have been used for illegal stock trades - The Washington Post

2017-09-21T07:12:40.462-04:00

"Mistakes were made;" tangentially, see Someone Made a Fake Equifax Site. Then Equifax Linked to It. (NYT)

"The Securities and Exchange Commission, the country’s top Wall Street regulator, announced Wednesday that hackers breached its system for storing documents filed by publicly traded companies last year, potentially accessing data that allowed the intruders to make an illegal profit.

The agency detected the breach last year, but didn’t learn until last month that it could have been used for improper trading. The incident was briefly mentioned in an unusual eight-page statement on cybersecurity released by SEC Chairman Jay Clayton late Wednesday. The statement didn’t explain the delay in the announcement, the exact date the system was breached and whether information about any specific company was targeted.

“Notwithstanding our efforts to protect our systems and manage cybersecurity risk, in certain cases cyber threat actors have managed to access or misuse our systems,” Clayton said in the statement."
SEC reveals it was hacked, information may have been used for illegal stock trades - The Washington Post



Facebook, After ‘Fail’ Over Ads Targeting Racists, Makes Changes - The New York Times

2017-09-21T06:59:30.942-04:00

A case study in managing malignant metadata

"Responding to evidence that its tools had allowed ads to be directed at users who used racist comments or hate speech in their profiles, Facebook said Wednesday that it would change how ads can be targeted.

That its ad-targeting tools could be used in such a way was “a fail” for the company, Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, said in a post. She added that Facebook would add “more human review and oversight” to its automated systems to prevent further misuse.

Ms. Sandberg, who was directly addressing the social network’s recent advertising issues for the first time, also said the company would do more to ensure that offensive content — including that which attacks people for their race or religion — could not be used to target ads."
Facebook, After ‘Fail’ Over Ads Targeting Racists, Makes Changes - The New York Times



Google Is Buying HTC’s Smartphone Expertise for $1.1 Billion - The New York Times

2017-09-21T07:15:54.203-04:00

See this Google post for more details; in other talent acquisition news, see Apple's Global Web of R&D Labs Doubles as Poaching Operation (Bloomberg)
"HTC said many of its estimated 2,000 employees affected by the deal were already working with the search giant on smartphones. Google leaned on HTC to manufacture its first Pixel smartphone, which was released last year, and is working with the company to produce the next version of the phone, which is expected to be announced on Oct. 4.

Bringing on the team from HTC is a sign that Google is doubling down on plans to produce its own hardware. Company executives have said it is important to tightly couple its artificial intelligence software, like the voice-controlled Google Assistant, with a range of devices."
Google Is Buying HTC’s Smartphone Expertise for $1.1 Billion - The New York Times



Google Pixelbook leak reveals a high-end Chromebook with stylus support - The Verge

2017-09-20T08:07:02.714-04:00

In other Google hardware news in advance of its October 4th event, see Google's miniature Home leaks ahead of Pixel event (The Verge)

"It looks like Google is bringing back the Chromebook Pixel — just under a slightly different name. Droid Life has uncovered photos and details of an upcoming Chromebook called the Google Pixelbook. It’ll be seriously high-end for a Chromebook, just like the original Pixel, but this time around, it’ll also support a stylus and flip around to function like a tablet.

The Pixelbook will reportedly come in only one color, silver, and have three different storage tiers: 128GB, 256GB, and 512GB. Those will sell for $1,199, $1,399, and $1,749 — at which point you could have easily bought five cheaper Chromebooks instead. One particular oddity: despite the high price, the Pixelbook apparently won’t ship with its stylus, called the Pixelbook Pen, which is supposed to sell for an additional $99."
Google Pixelbook leak reveals a high-end Chromebook with stylus support - The Verge



ICOs: What is an Initial Coin Offering and how does it work? - Recode

2017-09-20T07:50:03.653-04:00

Final paragraphs below; in other *coin news, Bitcoin Is Likely to Split Again in November, Say Major Players (Bloomberg)

"How governments choose to regulate this new type of transaction is one of the big outstanding questions in the field. The IRS has said that virtual currency, in general, is taxable — as long as the currency can be converted to a dollar amount.

Some expect the SEC to begin strictly clamping down on ICOs before the cash is raised. That’s already happened in other countries, most notably China — which this month banned the practice altogether. ICOs, while hosted in a certain country, are not confined to a certain jurisdiction and can be traded anywhere you can connect online.

“Ninety-nine percent of ICOs are a scam, so [China’s pause on ICOs] is needed to filter the crooks out,” tech investor Chamath Palihapitiya tweeted this month. “Next phase of ICOs will be real.”"
ICOs: What is an Initial Coin Offering and how does it work? - Recode



Apple Watch Series 3 Excels, Even if You Don’t Need Cellular - The New York Times

2017-09-20T08:03:19.583-04:00

Final paragraphs below; also see Apple Watch Series 3 with LTE Review: Missed Connections (The Verge)
"Although I think most people can skip buying the cellular model, the Apple Watch Series 3 is the first smart watch I can confidently recommend that people buy. While I don’t personally find it attractive enough to replace my wristwatch, the new Apple Watch is a well-designed, durable and easy-to-use fitness tracker for people who want analytics on their workouts and general health (R.I.P., Fitbit).

Important features like the stopwatch, calendar and Siri work quickly and reliably. And unlike its predecessors, the watch has impressive battery life — on average, I had more than 40 percent battery remaining after a full day of use.

So the final verdict? The Apple Watch Series 3 is the first sign that wearable computers are maturing and may eventually become a staple in consumer electronics."
Apple Watch Series 3 Excels, Even if You Don’t Need Cellular - The New York Times



Amazon reportedly working on Alexa-enabled 'smart glasses' (Engadget)

2017-09-20T07:20:37.038-04:00

In the meantime, Amazon already offers a smart glasses category of (likely doomed) products...

"Amazon wants to make Alexa a more formidable competitor to Google Assistant and Siri by letting you put it on your face and take it anywhere, according to a Financial Times report (paywall). The company is said to be developing a pair of normal-looking eyeglasses that tether to your smartphone and allow you hear, and presumably speak to, Alexa via a bone-conduction audio system. There won't, however, be a screen or camera on the model as with Google Glass.

Though the lack of a screen and camera would seem to neuter the glasses, dropping them would dramatically improve its battery life. And in any case, the idea is not to have Google Glass-like vision, but to give users a direct line to Alexa on a smartphone without having to open an app, as is currently the case. That would make them much more useful in a vehicle or on the street, especially if they can be incorporated into comfortable, daily-worn eyeglasses."
Amazon reportedly working on Alexa-enabled 'smart glasses'



Amazon updates the Fire HD 10 tablet with a 1080p display and a much lower price - The Verge

2017-09-19T09:29:33.962-04:00

Also see Amazon's Newest Gadget Is a Tablet That's Also an Echo (Gizmodo); tangentially, see Amazon has 76% smart home speaker U.S. market share as Echo unit sales reach 15M, new study finds (GeekWire)

"Amazon’s flagship Fire tablet is getting the display fans have been calling for next month — and a much lower price. The company said today that its new Fire HD 10 tablet will come with a 10.1-inch, 1080p display, making it the first Amazon tablet to have a display of that caliber since the Fire HDX in 2013. Pricing for the tablet starts at $150, or $80 less than the previous entry-level price of $230. The new Fire HD 10 starts shipping the week of Oct. 11th.

The new Fire HD 10 has received improved components across the board. The tablet will run on a quad-core processor for the first time, improving the tablet’s speed by 30 percent, Amazon says. Average battery life has improved from eight hours to 10. Dual speakers have Dolby Atmos support. And it has 32GB of storage in the entry-level model, up from 16GB for the previous edition. (As before, a micro-SD card slot lets you expand storage by up to 256GB. A 64GB model is also available.)"
Amazon updates the Fire HD 10 tablet with a 1080p display and a much lower price - The Verge



Your local library's eBooks now appear in Google search (Android Police)

2017-09-19T09:17:22.306-04:00

I'm guessing there's some schema.org somewhere in this picture

"Big readers on a small budget have always had a hard time. Library waiting lists can get pretty long, and sometimes titles aren't even available locally. But today Google added a new feature to its search that helps library patrons everywhere. Now the next time you search for a book title, you can see if the e-book is available to borrow from your library. 

This new feature works on both mobile and desktop and manifests simply. If you search for the title of a book, you'll see one of two things. On desktop search, there's an additional heading in the detailed results/information card on the right. But on mobile, it's buried in the Get Book tab, just under the Buy ebook card."
Your local library's eBooks now appear in Google search



Tech innovator Tim O’Reilly: Don’t fear technology, robots or the future | The Press Democrat -

2017-09-19T07:58:33.765-04:00

From a wide-ranging interview

"Now O’Reilly, 63, is turning to a much broader general audience with his latest project, a book entitled: “WTF? What’s the Future and Why It’s Up to Us.” In it, he takes what he has learned from some 40 years in the tech world and applies it to the challenges facing our economy and society, where artificial intelligence, robots and big data are changing our lives.

O’Reilly doesn’t fear the future. He writes: “Instead of using technology to replace people, we can use it to augment them so they can do things that were previously impossible.”

In an interview at his Oakland home, O’Reilly covered a wide range of topics: his business, weaning ourselves from Wall Street’s influence on our economy, sexism in the tech culture, and why he thinks ride-hailing business Uber has been over-hyped. The transcript has been edited for clarity and brevity."
Tech innovator Tim O’Reilly: Don’t fear technology, robots or the future | The Press Democrat -



Facebook’s war on free will | Technology | The Guardian

2017-09-19T07:04:51.557-04:00

From a long post "extracted from World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech by Franklin Foer;" but is it still a technocracy if deep learning systems are in charge?...

"Without knowing it, Zuckerberg is the heir to a long political tradition. Over the last 200 years, the west has been unable to shake an abiding fantasy, a dream sequence in which we throw out the bum politicians and replace them with engineers – rule by slide rule. The French were the first to entertain this notion in the bloody, world-churning aftermath of their revolution. A coterie of the country’s most influential philosophers (notably, Henri de Saint-Simon and Auguste Comte) were genuinely torn about the course of the country. They hated all the old ancient bastions of parasitic power – the feudal lords, the priests and the warriors – but they also feared the chaos of the mob. To split the difference, they proposed a form of technocracy – engineers and assorted technicians would rule with beneficent disinterestedness. Engineers would strip the old order of its power, while governing in the spirit of science. They would impose rationality and order.

This dream has captivated intellectuals ever since, especially Americans. The great sociologist Thorstein Veblen was obsessed with installing engineers in power and, in 1921, wrote a book making his case. His vision briefly became a reality. In the aftermath of the first world war, American elites were aghast at all the irrational impulses unleashed by that conflict – the xenophobia, the racism, the urge to lynch and riot. And when the realities of economic life had grown so complicated, how could politicians possibly manage them? Americans of all persuasions began yearning for the salvific ascendance of the most famous engineer of his time: Herbert Hoover. In 1920, Franklin D Roosevelt – who would, of course, go on to replace him in 1932 – organised a movement to draft Hoover for the presidency."
Facebook’s war on free will | Technology | The Guardian



Equifax Suffered a Hack Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed - Bloomberg

2017-09-19T06:50:45.935-04:00

Looking like a multifaceted IT worst-practices case study

"If the two hacks are unrelated it could be that different hacking teams had different goals. One clue has emerged that suggests one goal of the attackers was to use Equifax as a way into the computers of major banks, according to a fourth person familiar with the matter.

This person said a large Canadian bank has determined that hackers claiming to sell celebrity profiles from Equifax on the dark web -- information that appears to be fraudulent, or recycled from other breaches -- did in fact steal the username and password for an application programming interface, or API, linking the bank’s back-end servers to Equifax.

According to the person and a Sept. 14 internal memo reviewed by Bloomberg, the gateway linked a test and development site used by the bank’s wealth management division to Equifax, allowing the two entities to share information digitally."
Equifax Suffered a Hack Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed - Bloomberg



Best Buy’s Secrets for Thriving in the Amazon Age - The New York Times

2017-09-19T06:42:52.131-04:00

tl;dr: be the sole survivor in your brick-and-mortar retail category; on the other hand, Toys ‘R’ Us Files for Bankruptcy, Crippled by Competition and Debt

"Mr. Joly didn’t explicitly tell me this, but it is obvious: Best Buy has benefited from some serious good fortune.

It’s lucky that the products it specializes in selling, like big-screen TVs and high-end audio equipment, are big-ticket items that many customers still feel uncomfortable buying sight unseen from a website. It’s lucky that several large competitors have gone out of business, shrinking its list of rivals. And it’s lucky that the vendors who make the products it sells, like Apple and Samsung, have kept churning out expensive blockbuster gadgets.

“They’re at the mercy of the product cycles,” said Stephen Baker, a tech industry analyst at NPD Group. “If people stop buying PCs or they don’t care about big-screen TVs anymore, they have a challenge.”"
Best Buy’s Secrets for Thriving in the Amazon Age - The New York Times



Slack Gets Slice of SoftBank’s $100 Billion Tech Bounty - Bloomberg

2017-09-18T07:02:20.526-04:00

Few financial constraints for Slack; see Okta's Most Popular Apps Collaboration + Messaging for a related market momentum snapshot

"Slack Technologies Inc. closed a $250 million funding round led by SoftBank Group Corp.’s Vision Fund, giving it more ammunition for expansion  in an increasingly competitive market for workplace messaging services.

The financing round values the startup at $5.1 billion, up from $3.8 billion the last time. The Vision Fund is joined by Accel and other investors, Slack said Sunday. Bloomberg reported on the latest funding in July.

San Francisco-based Slack said the money is for “operational flexibility,” not for a particular use, and added that it still has much of the $591 million it already raised. The company this month announced an expansion of its service to work in German, French, Spanish and Japanese as it competes with Microsoft Corp.’s Teams and Atlassian Corp.’s HipChat service for corporate customers."
Slack Gets Slice of SoftBank’s $100 Billion Tech Bounty - Bloomberg



What Jamie Dimon Is Missing About Bitcoin - The New York Times

2017-09-18T06:54:52.715-04:00

Meanwhile, bitcoin's price is getting close to $4K again, up ~30% over the last few days...

"Mr. Dimon’s comments may have come as a surprise to the dozens of employees at his bank working on projects related to blockchain, the bookkeeping technology underpinning digital currencies. And the comments must have been especially jarring to those employees who were holding a forum for hedge funds interested in Bitcoin— whose market value stood at about $70 billion at that moment.

It’s no secret that Bitcoin and other digital currencies may dramatically fall in value at any time. How can an asset whose value jumps by 20 percent some days, and which no one can accurately value, plausibly not also suffer huge declines?

But that’s a long way from Bitcoin being a worthless fraud."
What Jamie Dimon Is Missing About Bitcoin - The New York Times



Facebook Navigates an Internet Fractured by Governmental Controls - The New York Times

2017-09-18T06:50:28.389-04:00

"It's complicated..."

"As nations try to grab back power online, a clash is brewing between governments and companies. Some of the biggest companies in the world — Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Alibaba among them — are finding they need to play by an entirely new set of rules on the once-anarchic internet.

And it’s not just one new set of rules. According to a review by The New York Times, more than 50 countries have passed laws over the last five years to gain greater control over how their people use the web.

“Ultimately, it’s a grand power struggle,” said David Reed, an early pioneer of the internet and a former professor at the M.I.T. Media Lab. “Governments started waking up as soon as a significant part of their powers of communication of any sort started being invaded by companies.”"
Facebook Navigates an Internet Fractured by Governmental Controls - The New York Times



Oracle's Q1: Cloud, great. Hardware, meh. Mergers, unlikely • The Register

2017-09-15T08:36:43.457-04:00

Also see Oracle's profit, cloud growth forecasts drag down shares (Reuters)

"Ellison also eschewed the notion of making a big acquisition to further Oracle's cloud business, saying "there is no one left to buy," and suggesting that Oracle would instead continue to rely on its in-house products.

When he wasn't talking up the cloud gains, Ellison used the earnings release to give a preview of at least one of the things Oracle will be showing off next month at its OpenWorld conference in San Francisco.

"In a couple of weeks, we will announce the world's first fully autonomous database cloud service," said Ellison. "Based on machine learning, the latest version of Oracle is a totally automated 'self-driving' system that does not require human beings to manage or tune the database.""
Oracle's Q1: Cloud, great. Hardware, meh. Mergers, unlikely • The Register



Facebook ‘Snooze’ button temporarily hides people in your feed | TechCrunch

2017-09-15T08:31:54.716-04:00

Subtle social signals

"Pages and Groups may benefit from Snooze, as it could reduce the chances of someone unliking or leaving them. But it also should inspire them not to overshare or spam, otherwise they could be put in time-out.

Facebook already constantly modulates how much you see of someone based on implicit signals, like if you Like, click, comment on or share their posts. It will surely use Snoozing as a signal that it should show you less of someone when they’re allowed to reappear. But if we’re going to spend so much of our lives browsing the News Feed curated by Facebook’s faceless algorithm, it’s nice to see the company equip us humans with more than just binary controls."
Facebook ‘Snooze’ button temporarily hides people in your feed | TechCrunch