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Remember the good old Days, when we could just sit down and listen to a good ole' story, the days of glory and honor, come join us at the living room and listen to some fun times. How we could let our hair down and relax.



Published: Sat, 10 Dec 2016 08:08:55 +0000

 



George Burns with Bill Goodwin and Purple tiger Diet as our sponsor

Wed, 20 Nov 2013 20:22:19 +0000

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William Nettles Goodwin, known as Bill Goodwin (July 28, 1910 - May 9, 1958),[1] was for many years the announcer and a recurring character of the Burns and Allen radio program, and subsequently The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show on television from 1950-1951. Upon his departure, he was replaced by Harry von Zell.

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Red Skelton Careless Driving with Radioamerica

Sat, 16 Mar 2013 15:31:28 +0000

V3 Diet pills | Voyager health Technologies | Order V3 Diet Red Skelton, born Richard Bernard Skelton, was an American comedian who was best known as a top radio and television star from 1937 to 1971. Skelton's show business career began in his teens as a circus clown and went on to vaudeville, Broadway, films, radio, TV, night clubs and casinos, all while pursuing another career as a painter. On October 7, 1941, Skelton premiered his own radio show, The Raleigh Cigarette Program, developing a number of recurring characters including punch-drunk boxer "Cauliflower McPugg," inebriated "Willy Lump-Lump" and "'Mean Widdle Kid' Junior," whose favorite phrase ("I dood it!") soon became part of the American lexicon. That, along with "He bwoke my widdle arm!" (or other body part) and "He don't know me vewy well, do he?" all found their way into various Warner Bros. cartoons. Skelton himself was referenced in a Popeye cartoon in which the title character enters a haunted house and encounters a "red skeleton." The Three Stooges also referenced Skelton in Creeps (1956): Shemp: "Who are you?" Talking Skeleton: "Me? I’m Red." Shemp: "Oh, Red Skeleton."   Ready to try V3 for yourself? scroll down below and buy the 225.00 package and get the 6 bottles, or you can get any of the higher packages, --V3 wholesale option--- Rather pay the LOWER Wholesale prices for your V3? Voyager Health members always save up to 40% on V3! CLICK HERE to become a Voyager Health V3 Member! If so, CLICK HERE to visit our main Voyager Health V3 ordering and product information website! CLICK HERE TO ORDER V3 If you have any questions, call us toll free at: 1.800.706.0162 --V3 wholesale option--- Rather pay the LOWER Wholesale prices for your V3? Voyager Health members always save up to 40% on V3! CLICK HERE to become a Voyager Health V3 Member! New Package specials for 2013 order them now Our most popular V3 at wholesale package Item #: VOY004 - V3 Diet 6-PAK Consisting of 6 V3 Weight Management System 30-Capsule Bottles. Only $37.50 per bottle! *when purchased by the 6-PAK *Sign up now and receive up to 40% off this order, plus all future V3 orders. In addition, you'll receive your own website and a Voyager Health Welcome Package! [...]


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speed_gibson_370306_010_barny_flies_the_mystery_plane

Tue, 16 Nov 2010 16:09:30 +0000

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This quick easy download takes your skills to the next level and beyond, with no stress and zero aggravation. http://internetcoachpro.com For the first time ever learning is actually fun quick and very easy. A huge library of the world's best free software is also included! Speed Gibson of the International Secret Police was a radio adventure series written by Virginia Cooke. It was centered on the adventures of Speed Gibson, a fifteen year old pilot who, through his uncle Clint Barlow, becomes a member of the International Secret Police. Speed was described as “a typical American boy: interested in short wave radio, aviation and most of all - The International Secret Police . More of the FRee Otr Visit http://radioamerica.podomatic.com Are you needing to Promote your Business Please Send HD Video With Talk Fusion


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Fibber Mcgee And Molly 310600 Smackout fibber-molly

Tue, 09 Nov 2010 18:18:17 +0000

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Fibber McGee and Molly was a popular radio show during the era of classic, old-time radio. It was one of the longest-running comedies in the history of classic radio in the United States. The series premiered on NBC in 1935 and remained popular until its demise in 1959, long after radio had ceased to be the dominant form of entertainment in American popular culture.


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Jimmy Stewart as The Six_Shooter_540624_Myra_Barker

Sat, 06 Nov 2010 18:46:49 +0000

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This quick easy download takes your skills to the next level and beyond, with no stress and zero aggravation. http://internetcoachpro.com For the first time ever learning is actually fun quick and very easy. A huge library of the world's best free software is also included! The Six Shooter was a weekly old-time radio program in the USA. It was created by Frank Burt, who also wrote many of the episodes, and lasted only one season of 39 episodes on NBC (Sept. 20, 1953-June 24, 1954). Through March 21, 1954 it was broadcast Sundays at 8 p.m. Beginning April 1, 1954 through the final episode it was on Thursdays at 8 p.m. Also Visit http://radioamerica.biz


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Blondie alexander-the-actor Free Otr

Fri, 05 Nov 2010 15:04:03 +0000

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Get your Free Tutor Software now http://internetcoachpro.com Blondie was a radio situation comedy adapted from the long-run Blondie comic strip by Chic Young. The radio program had a long run on several networks from 1939 to 1950. After Penny Singleton was cast in the title role of the feature film Blondie (1938), co-starring with Arthur Lake as Dagwood, she and Lake repeated their roles December 20, 1938, on The Bob Hope Show. The appearance with Hope led to their own show, beginning July 3, 1939, on CBS as a summer replacement for The Eddie Cantor Show. However, Cantor did not return in the fall, so the sponsor, Camel Cigarettes chose to keep Blondie on the air Mondays at 7:30pm. Camel remained the sponsor through the early WWII years until June 26, 1944. In 1944, Blondie was on the Blue Network, sponsored by Super Suds, airing Fridays at 7pm from July 21 to September 1. The final three weeks of that run overlapped with Blondie's return to CBS on Sundays at 8pm from August 13, 1944, to September 26, 1948, still sponsored by Super Suds. Beginning in mid-1945, the 30-minute program was heard Mondays at 7:30pm. Super Suds continued as the sponsor when the show moved to NBC on Wednesdays at 8pm from October 6, 1948, to June 29, 1949. For all your Health Need Visit http://allnaturalhealthyliving.com


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Free Old Time Radio Duffys Tavern

Tue, 02 Nov 2010 17:30:07 +0000

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http://radioamerica.biz Market your Business with Talk Fusion Video http://myprofitbuilder.org Duffy's Tavern, an American radio situation comedy (CBS, 1941-1942; NBC-Blue Network, 1942-1944; NBC, 1944â??1951), often featured top-name stage and film guest stars but always hooked those around the misadventures, get-rich-quick-scheming, and romantic missteps of the title establishment's malaprop-prone, metaphor-mixing manager, Archie, played by the writer/actor who co-created the show, Ed Gardner. The final show on radio was broadcast on December 28, 1951. For your Free Smart media Tools http://internetcoachpro.com


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Frontier Town- Free old time Radio

Wed, 24 Feb 2010 05:26:53 +0000

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FBI collection

Wed, 21 Oct 2009 23:58:48 +0000

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gunsmoke 56-10-21_Till Death Do Us

Tue, 03 Jun 2008 18:21:06 +0000

Gunsmoke is an American radio and television Western drama series created by director Norman MacDonnell and writer John Meston. The stories take place in and around Dodge City, Kansas, during the settlement of the American West. The radio version ran from 1952 to 1961 and, according to John Dunning[1], amongst old-time radio fans, "Gunsmoke is routinely placed among the best shows of any kind and any time." The television version ran from 1955 to 1975 and is the longest running prime time drama and the second-longest running prime time fictional program in U.S. television history, its record surpassed only by the Disney anthology television series and Hallmark Hall of Fame. Care for some needed energy try Whitelightning http://www.acaiplusenergy.com


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1-11-16_ep012_Serviceman_for_Thanksgiving- The Great Gildersleeve

Wed, 21 Nov 2007 04:08:56 +0000

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(image) The Great Gildersleeve (1941-1957), initially written by Leonard L. Levinson, [1] was arguably the first spin-off program in broadcast history. Built around a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis ("You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catch phrase). But he also became a popular enough windbag that Kraft Foods — looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary's Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve (the character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode of that show revealed his middle name as Philharmonic) as the central, slightly softened, and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family.


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A Date with judy

Sun, 25 Mar 2007 17:40:43 +0000

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A Date with Judy was an American radio program during the 1940s. It was a teenage comedy that began as a summer replacement for Bob Hope's show, sponsored by Pepsodent and airing on NBC from June 24 to September 16, 1941, with 14-year-old Ann Gillis in the title role. Dellie Ellis portrayed Judy when the series returned the next summer (June 23–September 15, 1942). Louise Erickson took over the role the following summer (June 30–September 22, 1943) when the series, sponsored by Bristol Myers, replaced The Eddie Cantor Show. Louise Erickson continued as Judy for the next seven years, as the series, sponsored by Tums, aired from January 18, 1944 to January 4, 1949. As the popularity of the radio series peaked, Jane Powell starred as Judy in the MGM movie, A Date with Judy (1948). Co-starring with Powell were Elizabeth Taylor, Wallace Beery, Robert Stack, and Carmen Miranda. Ford Motors and Revere Cameras were the sponsors for the final season of the radio series on ABC from October 13, 1949 to May 25, 1950. A Date with Judy was also a comic book (based on the radio program) published by National Periodical Publications from October-November 1947 to October-November 1960.

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The Jimmy Durante Show

Sat, 24 Mar 2007 14:14:39 +0000

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Big-nosed and boisterous, Durante was a vaudeville favorite who remained a hit in the early days of radio and TV. Originally a saloon piano player, he combined his ragged musical talents with a rumpled charm and endless jokes about his nose, a mighty instrument which earned him the nickname "Schnozzola" or just "the Schnoz." The 1935 stage musical Jumbo paired Durante with an elephant and boosted his career; he was a popular guest on the radio shows of stars like Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, and eventually hosted his own shows as well. Durante's dese-and-dose New York accent was much parodied by impressionists of the day. He had a musical hit with the novelty tune "Inka Dinka Doo" and his famous sign-off phrase was "Goodnight, Mrs. Calabash, wherever you are."

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Marx Brothers Radio America Sunday Show

Sat, 24 Mar 2007 04:37:35 +0000

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The Marx Brothers were a team of sibling comedians that appeared in vaudeville, stage plays, film, and television. Born in New York City, the Marx Brothers were the sons of Jewish immigrants from different parts of Germany (Plattdeutsch was the boys' first language). Their mother, Minnie Schönberg, hailed from Dornum in East Frisia, Germany, and their father Simon "Frenchie" Marrix (whose name was anglicized to Sam Marx) from Alsace, now a part of France. The family lived in the Upper East Side of New York City between the Irish, German and Italian Quarters.

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Jack Benny - Radio Americas Tuesdays Show

Tue, 20 Mar 2007 18:26:48 +0000

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Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. He was one of the biggest stars in classic American radio and was also a major television personality. Benny may have been the first standup comedian, as the term is known, as well as one of the first to work with what became the situation comedy. He was renowned for his flawless comic timing and (especially) his ability to get laughs with either a pregnant pause or a single expression, such as his signature exasperated "Well!". In hand with his dear friend and great "rival" Fred Allen — their long-running "feud" was one of the greatest running gags in comedy history — Benny helped establish a basic palette from which comedy since has rarely deviated, no matter how extreme or experimental it has become in their wake.

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RadioAmeirca's Tuesdays Show Life Of riley 480103

Wed, 14 Mar 2007 04:12:45 +0000

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The Life of Riley was one of several blue-collar, ethnic sitcoms popular in the 1950s. Chester A. Riley was the breadwinner of an Irish-American nuclear family living in suburban Los Angeles. Although most of the program took place within the Riley household, his job as an airplane riveter sometimes figured prominently in weekly episodes. Riley's fixed place in the socio-economic structure also allowed for occasional barbs directed at the frustrations of factory employment and at the pretensions of the upper classes. After The Life of Riley was canceled, blue-collar protagonists like Riley would not reappear until premiered in the 1970s. A pilot for The Life of Riley starred Herb Vigran and was broadcast on NBC in 1948. Six month later, the series appeared on NBC with Riley played by Gleason; however, Riley's malapropisms and oafish behavior were poorly suited to Gleason's wisecracking nightclub style. Bendix, who had played Riley on radio and in a movie version, was originally unable to play the part on television due to film obligations. When he did assume the role, however, he became synonymous with the character.

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Disorder in the court - The Three Stooges

Mon, 12 Mar 2007 14:12:50 +0000

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Disorder in the Court (1936) The stooges are witnesses at a trial where their friend, a dancer at a nightclub where they are musicians, is accused of murder. The stooges manage to disrupt the proceedings but save the day when they discover the real murderer's identity

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Duffs Tavern -44--03-07 Radio Americas Monday Edition

Mon, 12 Mar 2007 04:15:56 +0000

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Duffy's Tavern, an American radio situation comedy (CBS, 1941-1942; NBC-Blue Network, 1942-1944; NBC, 1944-1952), often featured top-name stage and film guest stars but always hooked those around the misadventures of the title establishment's malaprop-prone manager, Archie, played by the writer/actor who created the show, Ed Gardner. In the show's familiar opening, "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling," either solo on an old-sounding piano or by a larger orchestra, was interrupted by the ring of a telephone and Gardner's New Yorkese accent as he answered, "Duffy's Tavern, where the elite meet to eat. Archie the manager speakin'. Duffy ain't here---oh, hello, Duffy." Duffy, the owner, was never heard (or seen, when a film based on the show was made in 1945 or when a bid to bring the show to television was tried in 1954). But Archie always was---bantering with Duffy's man-crazy daughter, Miss Duffy (played by several actresses, beginning with Gardner's real-life first wife, Shirley Booth); with Eddie, the waiter/janitor (Eddie Green); and, especially, with Clifton Finnegan (Charlie Cantor), a likeable soul with several screws loose and a knack for falling for every other salesman's scam. The show featured many high-profile guest stars, including Fred Allen, Mel Allen, Nigel Bruce, Bing Crosby, Boris Karloff, Veronica Lake,Peter Lorre, Tony Martin, Gene Tierney, Arthur Treacher and Shelley Winters. As the series progressed, Archie sllipped in and out of a variety of quixotic, self-imploding plotlines---from writing an opera to faking a fortune to marry an heiress. Such situations mattered less than did the show's quietly clever depiction of earthbound-but-dreaming New York city life and its individualistic, often bizarre characters.

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Green Hornet - Oliver Perry Radio Americas Sunday Edition

Sun, 11 Mar 2007 20:44:55 +0000

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The series detailed the adventures of Britt Reid, debonair newspaper publisher by day, crime-fighting masked hero at night, along with his sidekick, Kato, a Filipino of Japanese descent. A widespread urban legend has been the claim that the show's writers switched from one nationality to the other immediately after the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, but the first disappeared well before direct U. S. involvement in the war, and the latter was not initially given until much later, with nothing more specific than "Oriental" being said in the interim. (When the characters were used in the first of a pair of movie serials, the politically perceptive producers of 1939 had Kato's nationality given as Korean.) Britt Reid is a blood relative of The Lone Ranger. The character of Dan Reid, who appeared on the Lone Ranger program as the Masked Man's nephew, was also featured on the Green Hornet as Britt Reid's father, making the Green Hornet the grand-nephew of the Lone Ranger. Originally, the show was to be called "The Hornet", but the name was changed to "The Green Hornet" so that it could be copyrighted. The color was chosen because green hornets were reputed to be the angriest. Jim Jewell directed the series until 1938. Jewell's sister, Lee Allman (Lenore Jewell Allman) wanted to play a part in a radio series at WXYZ so Jim had her written into The Green Hornet. She was the only actress to play Lenore Case, Britt Reid's secretary, during the entire run of the series. "Casey" was aware of her boss's double life, but only in the later years of the run. Similarly, another well known confidante, Police Commissioner Higgins, did not come into existence until near the end of the series.

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The Great Gildersleeve - Radio America's Saturday Program

Sat, 10 Mar 2007 04:57:22 +0000

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The Great Gildersleeve (1941-1957) was arguably the first spin-off program, as well as one of the first true situation comedies (as opposed to sketch programs) in broadcast history. Built around a character who had been a staple on the classic radio sit-com, Fibber McGee and Molly, The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off, and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis ("You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catch phrase). But he also became a popular enough windbag that Kraft Foods — looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary's Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve (the character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode of that show revealed his middle name as Philharmonic) as the central, slightly softened, and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family.

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Superman 1941 - Radio America's Tuesdays Show

Tue, 06 Mar 2007 19:09:41 +0000

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In addition to his landmark radio work, Bud Colyer was the first person to portray Superman in motion pictures, once again lending his voice when the Man of Steel made his big-screen debut in animated cartoons. These innovative science fiction spectaculars remain among the most technically polished examples of the "short film" art form. Launched in September 1941 with the release of the initial entry, Superman, the cartoons were produced by Max Fleischer. The Fleischer studio was initially based in New York and was famous for its rambunctios, rough-and-ready presentation of characters like Betty Boop and Popeye. The studio had just relocated to an enlarged modern facility in Florida. Joe Shuster drew the model sheets for Lois Lane, Clark Kent, and Superman. The first cartoon was received to critical acclaim and was nominated for an Academy Award. The Superman shorts look like feature films, complete with tracking shots and a stunning variety of camera angles, each of which necessitates a new background. Artists duplicate real illumination, molding the characters with light and dark, and providing them with dramatic shadows. The films move at an accelerating pace, with cuts coming faster and faster toward the climaxes, propelled by Sammy Timberg's dynamic musical scores. Special effects involving fires, rays, and explosions set the screen ablaze. The second cartoon, The Mechanical Monsters, was released near the end of 1941. It features Superman battling an army of gigantic, flame-spewing, flying robots in a series of sensational scenes. Later special effects extravaganzas include The Bulleteers, in which an airborn torpedo smashes through the skyscrapers of Metropolis, and The Magnetic Telescope, in which an astronomer's harebrained invention sends an asteroid hurtling earthward. When not struggling with mad scientists, Superman takes on ferocious forces of nature like gorillas (in Terror on the Midway) or dinosaurs (The Arctic Giant). In 1942 Paramount Studios acquired Fleischer Studios and gave it the new name of "Famous Studios." They produced the last 8 of the 17 shorts and continued the series until 1943.


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GunSmoke Radio America's Friday Radio Program

Sun, 04 Mar 2007 03:37:41 +0000

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Gunsmoke is a long-running American radio and television Western drama created by director Norman MacDonnell and writer John Meston. The stories took place in and around Dodge City, Kansas, during the settlement of the American West. The radio version ran from 1952 to 1961 and is commonly regarded as one of the finest radio dramas of all time. The television version ran from 1955 to 1975 and is the second longest running prime time fictional television program, its record surpassed only by the Disney anthology television series, which, though essentially the same in every incarnation, has appeared on TV under several titles.


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CC_1914_03_02_FilmJohnny Charlie Chaplin

Sat, 03 Mar 2007 20:19:42 +0000

Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month click here Visit the Radio America Store web site. Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Charlie Chaplin was born on April 16 1889, in East Street, Walworth, London. His parents, both entertainers in the Music Hall tradition, separated before he was three. The 1891 census shows his mother, Hannah, living with Charlie and his older brother in Barlow Street, Walworth. As a child he lived with his mother in various addresses in and around Kennington Road in Lambeth, such as 3 Pownall Terrace, Chester Street and 39 Methley Street. His father Charles Chaplin Senior, who was of Roma ancestry, was an alcoholic and had little contact with his son, though Chaplin and his brother briefly lived with him and his mistress, whose name was Louise, at 287 Kennington Road (which address is now ornamented with a plaque commemorating Chaplin's residence here) when his mother was on a bout of mental illness and was admitted to the Cane Hill Asylum at Coulsdon. Louise sent the young Chaplin to Kennington Road school. Chaplin's father died when Charlie was twelve, leaving him and his older half-brother, Sydney Chaplin, in the sole care of his mother. A serious condition in the larynx ended their mother’s career as a singer and her first crisis was when she was performing "La Cantina" at the Aldershot theatre, mainly frequented by rioters and soldiers, one of the worst places to perform. Lily was badly injured by the objects the audience mercilessly threw at her and she was booed off the stage. Backstage, she cried and argued with her manager. In the meantime, Chaplin went on stage alone and started singing a very well known tune at that time (Jack Jones). At the early age of five, he attracted a constant stream of coins that the very same difficult and ruthless audience hurled at the talented artist, born before their very eyes. Hannah Chaplin suffered from schizophrenia, and was again admitted to the Cane Hill Asylum. Chaplin had to be left in the workhouse at Lambeth, London, moving after several weeks to the Central London District School for paupers in Hanwell. The young Chaplin brothers forged a close relationship to survive. They gravitated to the Music Hall while still very young, and both proved to have considerable natural stage talent. Chaplin's early years of desperate poverty were a great influence on the characters and themes of his films and in later years he would re-visit the scenes of his childhood deprivation in Lambeth. Unknown to Charlie and Sydney until years later, they had a half-brother through their mother, Wheeler Dryden, who was raised abroad by his father. He was later reconciled with the family, and worked for Chaplin at his Hollywood studio. Chaplin's mother died in 1928 in Hollywood, seven years after being brought to the U.S. by her sons. Although baptised in the Church of England, Chaplin was an agnostic for most of his life. [2] [...]


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1914_02_09_MabelsStrangePredicament charlie chaplins sat at the movies

Sat, 03 Mar 2007 15:37:07 +0000

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1915_08_09_TheBank Charlie Chaplin friday at the movies

Sat, 03 Mar 2007 14:46:49 +0000

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45-04-06 Espionage - This is Your FBI

Fri, 02 Mar 2007 21:04:26 +0000

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This Is Your FBI was a radio crime drama which aired in the United States on ABC from April 6, 1945 to January 30, 1953. FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover gave it his endorsement, calling it "the finest dramatic program on the air." Producer-director Jerry Devine was given access to FBI files by Hoover, and the resulting dramatizations of FBI cases were narrated by Frank Lovejoy (1945), Dean Carleton (1946-47) and William Woodson (1948-53). Stacy Harris had the lead role of Special Agent Jim Taylor. Others in the cast were William Conrad, Bea Benaderet and Jay C. Flippen. The show was created by producer-director Jerry Devine, a former comedy writer for Kate Smith and Tommy Riggs, who had turned his scripting talents to radio thrillers like Mr. District Attorney. This is Your FBI received the full cooperation of J. Edgar; Hoover gave Devine carte blanche to closed cases in the Bureau’s files for inspiration in writing the show’s weekly dramatizations. They were prefaced, of course, with the Dragnet-like disclaimer “All names used are fictitious and any similarity thereof to the names of persons or places, living or dead, is accidental.” (This led Jim Cox, author of Radio Crime Fighters, to observe: “Some listeners must have pondered that for a while—‘So did these events happen or not?’”) Debuting over ABC Radio on April 6, 1945, This is Your FBI broadcast from New York in its early run (1945-47), showcasing the talents of New York radio veterans like Mandel Kramer, Karl Swenson, Santos Ortega, Elspeth Eric, Joan Banks, and Frank Lovejoy (who narrated many of the shows). In 1948, though, the program relocated to Hollywood, and with the move established a regular weekly character in Special Agent Jim Taylor, a representative of all of the Bureau’s special agents, played by actor Stacy Harris.


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Frankentein Radio Program

Mon, 26 Feb 2007 22:35:13 +0000

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Eighteen-year-old Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein as her entry in an informal horror-writing competition with her husband, poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron and Dr. John Polidori. Her famous gothic story, often recognized as “the first modern science fiction novel,” went on to become the most famous horror story of all time. Frankenstein was first filmed by Thomas Edison in 1910 and by James Whale in 1931 (with Boris Karloff becoming a major Hollywood star with his portrayal of the monster). Frankenstein 02-20-44 by Mary Shelley. Starring Arthur Vinton (Professor Waldman). Dr. Victor Frankenstein creates a living being from animal parts, but the tortured creature returns and demands a mate for companionship. • Frankenstein 06-07-55 by Mary Shelley, adapted for radio by Antony Ellis (producer/director); Lucien Moraweck (composer); Wilbur Hatch (conductor); Larry Thor (announcer). Starring Stacy Harris (Victor Frankenstein); Herb Butterfield (James); Vivi Jannis (Elizabeth); Barney Phillips (Frankenstein’s monster). A young scientist creates a living creature from the dead, but his creation haunts the village and eventually destroys its maker.


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Marx Brothers Radio America Sunday Show

Sun, 25 Feb 2007 21:17:24 +0000

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The Marx Brothers were a team of sibling comedians that appeared in vaudeville, stage plays, film, and television. Born in New York City, the Marx Brothers were the sons of Jewish immigrants from different parts of Germany (Plattdeutsch was the boys' first language). Their mother, Minnie Schönberg, hailed from Dornum in East Frisia, Germany, and their father Simon "Frenchie" Marrix (whose name was anglicized to Sam Marx) from Alsace, now a part of France. The family lived in the Upper East Side of New York City between the Irish, German and Italian Quarters.


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Gasoline Alley

Sun, 25 Feb 2007 05:04:20 +0000

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There were several radio adaptations. Gasoline Alley during the 1930s starred Bill Idelson as Skeezix Wallet with Jean Gillespie as his girlfriend Nina Clock. Jimmy McCallon was Skeezix in the series that ran on NBC from February 17 to April 11, 1941, continuing on the Blue Network from April 28 to May 9 of that same year. The 15-minute series aired weekdays at 5:30pm. Along with Nina (Janice Gilbert), the characters included Skeezix's boss Wumple (Cliff Soubier) and Ling Wee (Junius Matthews), a waiter in a Chinese restaurant. Charles Schenck directed the scripts by Kane Campbell. The syndicated series of 1948-49 featured a cast of Bill Lipton, Mason Adams and Robert Dryden. Sponsored by Autolite, the 15-minute episodes focused on Skeezix running a gas station and garage, the Wallet and Bobble Garage, with his partner, Wilmer Bobble. In New York this series aired on WOR from July 16, 1948 to January 7, 1949


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Death Valley Days 1936

Sat, 24 Feb 2007 16:29:15 +0000

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Death Valley Days was a long-running American radio and television anthology about true stories of the old American West, particularly the Death Valley area. It was created in 1930 by Ruth Woodman and ran on radio until 1945. It ran from 1952 to 1975 as a syndicated television show. The 558 television stories, which had different actors, were introduced by a host. The longest-running was "The Old Ranger" from 1952-1965, played by Stanley Andrews. The hosts following were actors Ronald Reagan, Robert Taylor, John Payne, Dale Robertson and Merle Haggard. During his time as host, Reagan also frequently appeared in the program as a performer. It has been rerun under other names and with other hosts, since the hosting segment at the beginning and the end could be easily reshot with another performer with no effect on the story. Alternate hosts and titles have included Frontier Adventure (Dale Robertson), The Pioneers (Will Rogers, Jr.), Trails West (Ray Milland), Western Star Theatre (Rory Calhoun) and Call of the West (John Payne). The last title was also often applied to the series' memorable, haunting theme music. Under the Death Valley Days title, the program was invariably sponsored by Pacific Coast Borax Company, which during the program's run changed its name to U.S. Borax Company following a merger. Advertisements for the company's best-known products, 20 Mule Team Borax, a laundry additive, and Boraxo, a powdered hand soap, were often done by the program's host. Death Valley was the scene of much of the company's borax mining operations. The "20-Mule Team Borax" consumer products division of U.S. Borax was eventually bought out by the Dial Corporation, which as of 2006 still manufactures and markets them. U.S. Borax continued to mine and refine the borates and maintained Dial as one of its customers. In 2006, Rio Tinto, the parent company of U.S. Borax. Inc., decided to merge USB with two of its other holdings, Dampier Salt and Luzenac Talc, to form Rio Tinto Minerals and has moved its corporate headquarters to Denver, Colorado. Death Valley Days is, judging from sheer number of episodes broadcast, by far the most successful syndicated television Western, the most successful television Western ever in the half-hour format, and arguably the most successful syndication of any genre in the history of the U.S. television market (Baywatch had a larger international market among U.S.-produced syndicated programs.)


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Box 13 Radio America's Monday Program

Mon, 19 Feb 2007 16:11:00 +0000

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Box 13 was a syndicated radio series about the escapades of newspaperman-turned-mystery novelist Dan Holliday, played by film star Alan Ladd. Created by Ladd's company, Mayfair Productions, Box 13 premiered August 22, 1948, on Mutual's New York flagship, WOR, and aired in syndication on the East Coast from August 22, 1948, to August 14. 1949. On the West Coast, Box 13 was heard from March 15, 1948 to March 7, 1949. To seek out new ideas for his fiction, Holliday ran a classified ad in the Star-Times newspaper where he formerly worked. "Adventure wanted, will go anywhere, do anything -- Box 13." The stories followed Holliday's adventures when he responded to the letters sent to him by such people as a psycho killer and various victims. Sylvia Picker appeared as Holliday's scatterbrained secretary, Suzy, while Edmund MacDonald played police Lt. Kling. Supporting cast members included Betty Lou Gerson, Frank Lovejoy, Lurene Tuttle, Alan Reed, Luis Van Rooten and John Beal. Vern Carstensen, who directed Box 13 for producer Richard Sanville, was also the show's announcer. Among the 52 episodes in the series were such mystery adventures as "The Sad Night," "Hot Box," "Last Will And Nursery Rhyme," "Hare And Hounds," "Hunt And Peck," "Death Is A Doll," "Tempest In a Casserole" and "Mexican Maze." The dramas featured music by Rudy Schrager. Russell Hughes, who had previously hired Ladd as a radio actor in 1935 at a $19 weekly salary, wrote the scripts, sometimes in collaboration with Ladd. The partners in Mayfair Productions were Ladd and Bernie Joslin, who had previously run the chain of Mayfair Restaurants.


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The War Of The Worlds -Orson Welles RadioAmerica Sunday Program

Mon, 19 Feb 2007 04:06:38 +0000

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The most famous radio broadcast of all time is still considered to be "The War of the Worlds", by Orson Welles and the Mercury Theater on the Air, October 30, 1938. Produced by John Houseman, it caused a near-panic, and lots and lots of press coverage. It also spurred legislation banning the "news" format from radio drama for years following. And although Orson Welles himself said they had no idea they were causing such an uproar, he actually knew it was happening and was thrilled with all the attention. The script, by the late Howard Koch (who also won an Academy Award for the screenplay of "Casablanca"), was actually titled "The Invasion From Mars", but was based on H.G. Wells' novella. The story goes like this: That October evening most Americans tuned in to the "The Edgar Bergen-Charlie McCarthy Show", which was the most popular radio show of the time. Twelve minutes into the show they went to their usual musical break. At that point many people changed the channel, and came upon reporter Carl Philips in the field near Grover's Mills, New Jersey. By the time the break came, with the announcement that this was just a play, most of them had already gone off screaming. The "War" became famous, and the Bergen-McCarthy Show opposite it seems to have vanished. "The War of the Worlds" story itself has been performed on radio many times since 1938, in a variety of formats. Gordon Payton claims to have 25 different audio versions of the story. The NBC Network anthology series Dimension X and X Minus One each offered a few alien invasion stories. (See "The Embassy", "The Seventh Order", "The Last Martian", and "Zero Hour", for example.


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African Queen - Humphrey Bogart

Sat, 17 Feb 2007 23:17:54 +0000

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The African Queen is a story of survival and how two mismatched people pull together. These people, Charlie and Rose, learn to accommodate each other and function together to achieve a goal: Get a boat down a treacherous jungle river. They are civilians who are caught in enemy territory at the beginning of World War I. Rose is a crisp, prim, and proper minister’s sister. Charlie is a irreverent, unsophisticated somewhat crude mechanic. On the surface level The African Queen is a love story of sorts and a tale of revenge. Rose wants to blow up a German gunboat down river because the Germans destroyed the mission and her brother died after being overwhelmed by the strain of the loss and the conditions of the jungle. Charlie just wants to get out of harms way but reluctantly goes along with her even though he thinks what she wants to do is "crazy" and believes it’s impossible to get a boat down the river. In the course of this venture they become closer and develop affection for each other as they respond to hardship and danger. In watching The African Queen it is important to realize that blowing up the gunboat is a story gimmick. This gives Charlie and Rose a challenging goal and a reason to do something dangerous. It also heightens the tension between Rose and Charlie, creating a situation that helps us to realize something important about the character and qualities of these two and how they learn to tolerate and get along with each other. What makes The African Queen such an important and popular movie is its fundamental story: Two people, who are basically strangers, learn to function together and care for each other as they contend with very unpleasant realities during a difficult, unwanted ordeal.


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Abbott & Costello

Sat, 17 Feb 2007 15:35:33 +0000

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The Abbott and Costello Show was heard on radio throughout the 1940s. They began by hosting a summer replacement series for Fred Allen on NBC in 1940, then joined Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy on The Chase and Sanborn Hour in 1941. During the same period, two of their films, Buck Privates and Hold That Ghost, were adapted for radio and presented on Lux Radio Theater. On October 8, 1942 they launched their weekly NBC show, sponsored by Camel cigarettes, moving five years later to ABC, the former NBC Blue Network,). The additional cast and crew on that series included Sid Fields as the Melonheads, Artie Auerbrook as Ketsel, regulars Elvira Allman, Iris Adrian, Mel Blanc, Wally Brown, Sharon Douglas, Verna Felton, Lou Krogman, Pat McGeehan, Frank Nelson, Martha Wentworth and Benay Venuta. The featured vocalists were Amy Arnell, Connie Haines, Marilyn Maxwell, Susan Miller, Marilyn Williams, the Delta Rhythm Boys and the Les Baxter Singers with the orchestras of Skinnay Ennis, Charles Hoff, Matty Matlock, Jack Meakin, Will Osborne, Freddie Rich, Leith Stevens and Peter van Streeden. Frank Bingman, Jim Doyle, Ken Niles and Michael Roy did the announcing, Writers included Howard Harris, Hal Fimberg, Don Prindle, Ed Cherokee, Len Stern, Martin Ragaway, Paul Conlan and Ed Forman and producer Martin Gosch. Sound effects were supplied by Floyd Caton. At ABC, they also hosted a 30-minute children's radio program, the The Abbott and Costello Children's Show), which aired Saturday mornings with vocalist Anna Mae Slaughter and announcer Johnny McGovern.


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Monday afternoon Radio America Show - Ozzie & Harriet

Mon, 12 Feb 2007 18:40:10 +0000

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When Skelton was drafted, Ozzie Nelson was prompted to create his own family situation comedy. The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet launched on CBS October 8, 1944, making a mid-season switch to NBC in 1949. The final years of the radio series were on ABC (the former NBC Blue Network) from October 14, 1949, to June 18, 1954. In an arrangement that amplified the growing pains of American broadcasting, as radio "grew up" into television (as George Burns once phrased it), the Nelsons' deal with ABC gave the network itself the right to move the show to television whenever it wanted to do it---they wanted, according to the Museum of Broadcast Communications, to have talent in the bullpen and ready to pitch, so to say, on their own network, rather than risk it defecting to CBS (where the Nelsons began) or NBC. Their sons, David and Ricky, did not join the cast until five years after the radio series began. The two boys felt frustrated at hearing themselves played by actors and continually requested they be allowed to portray themselves. Prior to April 1949, the role of David was played by Joel Davis (1944-45) and Tommy Bernard, and Henry Blair appeared as Ricky. Since Ricky was only nine years old when he began on the show, his enthusiasm outstripped his ability at script reading, and at least once he jumped a cue, prompting Harriet to say, "Not now, Ricky." Other cast members included John Brown as Syd "Thorny" Thornberry, Lurene Tuttle as Harriet's mother, Bea Benaderet as Gloria, Janet Waldo as Emmy Lou, and Dick Trout as Roger. Vocalists included Harriet Nelson, the King Sisters, and Ozzie Nelson. The announcers were Jack Bailey and Verne Smith. The music was by Billy May and Ozzie Nelson. The producers were Dave Elton and Ozzie Nelson. [1]


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Gasoline Alley

Sun, 11 Feb 2007 22:18:36 +0000

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There were several radio adaptations. Gasoline Alley during the 1930s starred Bill Idelson as Skeezix Wallet with Jean Gillespie as his girlfriend Nina Clock. Jimmy McCallon was Skeezix in the series that ran on NBC from February 17 to April 11, 1941, continuing on the Blue Network from April 28 to May 9 of that same year. The 15-minute series aired weekdays at 5:30pm. Along with Nina (Janice Gilbert), the characters included Skeezix's boss Wumple (Cliff Soubier) and Ling Wee (Junius Matthews), a waiter in a Chinese restaurant. Charles Schenck directed the scripts by Kane Campbell. The syndicated series of 1948-49 featured a cast of Bill Lipton, Mason Adams and Robert Dryden. Sponsored by Autolite, the 15-minute episodes focused on Skeezix running a gas station and garage, the Wallet and Bobble Garage, with his partner, Wilmer Bobble. In New York this series aired on WOR from July 16, 1948 to January 7, 1949.


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Jimmy Durante Show

Mon, 05 Feb 2007 15:14:59 +0000

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James Francis Durante, better known as Jimmy Durante, (February 10, 1893 – January 29, 1980) was an American singer, pianist, comedian and actor, whose distinctive gravel delivery, comic language butchery, jazz-influenced songs, and large nose — his frequent jokes about it included a frequent self-reference that became his nickname: "Schnozzola" — helped make him one of America's most familiar and popular personalities of the 1920s through the 1970s. A product of working-class New York, Durante dropped out of school in the eighth grade to become a full-time ragtime pianist, working the city circuit and earning the nickname "Ragtime Jimmy," before he joined one of the first recognizable jazz bands in New York, the Original New Orleans Jazz Band. Durante was the only member of the group who didn't hail from New Orleans. His routines of breaking into a song to use a joke, with band or orchestra chord punctuation after each line became a Durante trademark. In 1920, the group was renamed Jimmy Durante's Jazz Band. Durante became a vaudeville star and radio attraction by the mid-1920s, with a music and comedy trio called Clayton, Jackson and Durante. By 1934, he had a major record hit, his own novelty composition "Inka Dinka Doo," and it became his signature song for practically the rest of his life. A year later, Durante starred in the Billy Rose stage musical, Jumbo, in which a police officer stopped him while leading a live elephant and asked him, "What are you doing with that elephant?" Durante's reply, "What elephant?", was a regular show-stopper.


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The Avengers

Sun, 04 Feb 2007 22:31:44 +0000

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The Avengers burst in the door of spy and super-hero adventure drama on South African radio in 1971, starring Donald Monat as John Steed, and Diane Appleby as the wonderful Emma Peel. It was based on the fine British TV series, which was very popular from the start in the UK, and is an excellent example of radio's adaptation of the television medium...as it had done with movies all along.


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King Kong 1938

Sun, 04 Feb 2007 13:46:45 +0000

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King Kong was a great Box office success, as it became the highest grossing film of 1933 and the fifth highest grossing film of the 1930's. An impressive feat considering King Kong came out during one of the worst years of the Great Depression. Due to popular demand King Kong was re-released numerous times through the years. * In 1938 King Kong was re-released for the first time, but suffered some censorship. The Hays Office (in accordance with stiffer decency rules) removed a few scenes from the film that were considered too violent or obscene. These include: * The Brontosaurus biting the men to death in the swamp * Kong peeling Ann Darrow's clothing off of her. * Kong's violent attack on the native village * Kong biting a New Yorker to death * Kong dropping a women to her death after mistaking her for Ann Darrow. * In 1942 King Kong was re-released again to great Box Office success. However it was altered again by censors as various scenes were darkened to 'minimize gore". * In 1952 King Kong saw its greatest release to date. Not only did it gross more money then any of its other releases, but it brought in more money then most new "A-List" pictures did that year. Due to this success, Warner Brothers was inspired to make a giant monster film of its own called The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms. This movie in turn ended up kicking off the "giant monster on the loose" film boom of the 1950s. * King Kong was sold to television in early 1956 and pulled in an estimated 80% of all households with televisions in the New York area that week. In summer of 1956, King Kong was re-released theatrically (mainly drive-ins) based on its great TV success. * In the late 1960s, all the censored scenes that were cut back in 1938 were found, and restored back into the film. Janus Films gave the restored King Kong a brief theatrical re-release in 1971. This was the first time since its original run in 1933 that King Kong was seen in its complete form.


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Lum & Abner - The new Blood

Fri, 02 Feb 2007 00:06:16 +0000

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No show was more listened to in rural America than Lum and Abner (1935-1953) A large part of America was rural during its run. On the air for over twenty-two years (the first few years on local radio), it was the situation comedy second only to Fibber McGee and Molly in popularity. Lum (played by Chester Lauck) and Abner (Norris Goff) exemplified the small town, rural Americans so many people strongly identified with, and their homespun, gentle humor struck a familiar but somehow surprisingly funny note in people, keeping them tuned in week after week. Partners Lum and Abner owned the Jot `Em Down Store and Library, a kind of jumble shop, selling everything from lye soap to stoves to used books - a little bit of this, a little bit of that - in the fictitious town of Pine Ridge, Arkansas. By 1936, the show had become so popular, the town of Waters, Arkansas, officially changed its name to Pine Ridge. Frequent customers hanging around Lum and Abner's potbelly stove were such country characters as Grandpappy Peabody, Snake Hogan, and Cedric We Hunt (all played by Lauk), and Dick Huddleston, the town postmaster, Doc Miller, and Squire Skimp (played by Goff). Others heard on the show from time to time were Zasu Pitts, Cliff Arquette, Edna Best, Cornelius Peeples, and Andy Devine.


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Dragnet - Big Grandma

Tue, 30 Jan 2007 21:48:34 +0000

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I would like to take this time to thank every one for listening to Radio America We have been on podomatic now for 1 year and a few weeks. We have just surpassed 210,000 downloads. And we truly want to thank everyone , to celebrate our 1 year anniversary and download. We are offering a special if you buy 3 cds you get the 4th free, that a total of 200 shows for $15.00 which includes shipping

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Dragnet was a popular, influential and long-running radio and television police procedural about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a dragnet for any system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects.


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Abbott & costello - Hunting Season

Sun, 28 Jan 2007 19:47:44 +0000

I would like to take this time to thank every one for listening to Radio America We have been on podomatic now for 1 year and a few weeks. We have just surpassed 210,000 downloads. And we truly want to thank everyone , to celebrate our 1 year anniversary and download. We are offering a special if you buy 3 cds you get the 4th free, that a total of 200 shows for $15.00 which includes shipping clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 please include on the special msg on order that you are coming from podomatic. Again Thanks for making Radio America # 1 in Comedy for this long Thanks Abbott and Costello is the name of an American comedy duo made up of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello William "Bud" Abbott and Lou Costello first worked together in 1935 at the Eltinge burlesque theater on 42nd Street in New York. Costello (1906-1959) had become a comic after failing as a movie stunt double and extra. Abbott (1897-1974) had been in burlesque since 1916, first as a cashier, then a producer and finally a performer. Throughout the late 1930s, Abbott and Costello built their act by adapting and improving upon dozens of old burlesque sketches, including "Who's on First?" In 1938 they received national exposure for the first time by performing on the radio show The Kate Smith Hour, which lead to a Broadway musical, "The Streets of Paris," the following year, and then, in 1940, a contract with Universal. Abbott and Costello released their first film in 1940 entitled, One Night in the Tropics. Although Abbott and Costello were only filling supporting roles in the film, they stole the film with their classic routines. This led to a long-term contract with the studio and their second film, "Buck Privates," 1941 secured their place as movie stars. They made over 30 films between 1940 and 1956, and were among the most popular and highest-paid entertainers in the world during World War II. They also hosted a weekly radio program from 1942-49. In 1951 the team made its TV debut as rotating hosts on the Colgate Comedy Hour. The following year they launched their own half-hour series, The Abbott and Costello Show 1952 to 1954). Abbott and Costello split up in 1957, after troubles with the Internal Revenue Service that forced both men to sell off much of their assets and the rights to their films. Costello died in 1959 before his one solo film, Thirty-Foot Bride of Candy Rock, was released. In the late 1960s, Abbott lent his voice to a Hanna-Barbera cartoon series based on the team[...]


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Burns & Allen 1938

Sun, 28 Jan 2007 15:24:05 +0000

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Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen was born into a show business family; after being educated at Star of the Sea Convent School in girlhood, she teamed in vaudeville with her sister, Bessie, in 1909. She met George Burns and the two immediately launched a new partnership—but they did not click until Burns cannily flipped the act around: after a Hoboken, New Jersey performance in which they tested the new style for the first time, Burns's hunch proved right. Gracie was the better laugh-getter, especially with the "illogical logic" that informed her responses to Burns's prompting comments or questions. Allen's half of the act was known generally as a "Dumb Dora" act, named after a very early film of the same name that featured a scatterbrained female protagonist, but her "illogical logic" style was several cuts above the Dumb Dora stereotype, as was Burns's understated straight man. The twosome worked the new style tirelessly on the road, building a following, and finally playing the vaudevillian's dream: the Palace in New York. They fell in love along the way and married in Cleveland, Ohio on January 7, 1926—somewhat daring for those times, considering Burns's Jewish and Allen's Irish Catholic upbringing.[2] (For her part, Allen also endeared herself to her in-laws by adopting his mother's favourite phrase, used whenever the older woman needed to bring her son back down to earth: "Nattie, you're a nice boy," using a diminutive of his given name. When Burns's mother died, Allen comforted her grief-stricken husband with the same phrase.)


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Africian queen

Sun, 28 Jan 2007 05:30:39 +0000

I would like to take this time to thank every one for listening to Radio America We have been on podomatic now for 1 year and a few weeks. We have just surpassed 210,000 downloads. And we truly want to thank everyone , to celebrate our 1 year anniversary and download. We are offering a special if you buy 3 cds you get the 4th free, that a total of 200 shows for $15.00 which includes shipping clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 please include on the special msg on order that you are coming from podomatic. Again Thanks for making Radio America # 1 in Comedy for this long Thanks Bogie is an actor who continues to rank near the top on everybody's list. What is not generally known is that he made many appearances on radio after he moved his act from Broadway to Hollywood. In 1930 he got a contract with Fox and his feature film debut was in a 1930 short "Broadway's Like That", co-starring Ruth Etting and Joan Blondell. Fox released him after two years. After another five years of stage and minor film roles, he broke through with "The Petrified Forest" in 1936. Leslie Howard was starring in the movie, and threatened to quit unless Bogie, his fellow actor from the Broadway production, played Duke Mantee in the film version with him. Bogie named one of his sons Leslie in gratitude for this big break.In fact, many of Bogart's radio appearances were versions of the great films he did, but often he did guest spots or played characters that weren't from films. These performances are not known to the millions of younger fans that weren't lucky enough to hear radio as it happened. This collection give everybody the chance to hear that great Bogart voice again, and enjoy just how special his acting was. Incidentally, while serving in the U.S. Navy after getting kicked out of Andover Academy, he was wounded in the shelling of the USS. Leviathan. The resulting partial facial paralysis caused by his wounds gave him that signature vocal and facial style he is known for. Bogart on the radio, circa 1940Lux Radio Theater was the premier Hollywood radio show, and featured themajor stars in their film roles. We have several of Bogie's greatest roles here, including a rehearsal for Bullets or Ballots. (That's the 1936 crime film classic with Edward G. Robinson and Joan Blondell). Screen Guild Players did[...]


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Celebrate 50 years of radio

Sat, 27 Jan 2007 15:12:25 +0000

I would like to take this time to thank every one for listening to Radio America We have been on podomatic now for 1 year and a few weeks. We have just surpassed 210,000 downloads. And we truly want to thank everyone , to celebrate our 1 year anniversary and download. We are offering a special if you buy 3 cds you get the 4th free, that a total of 200 shows for $15.00 which includes shipping clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 please include on the special msg on order that you are coming from podomatic. Again Thanks for making Radio America # 1 in Comedy for this long Thanks Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals (programs) to a number of recipients ("listeners" or "viewers") that belong to a large group. This group may be the public in general, or a relatively large audience within the public. Thus, an Internet channel may distribute text or music world-wide, while a public address system in (for example) a workplace may broadcast very limited ad hoc soundbites to a small population within its range. The sequencing of content in a broadcast is called a schedule. With all technological endevours a number of technical terms and slang are developed please see the list of broadcasting terms for a glossary of terms used. Television and radio programs are distributed through radio broadcasting or cable, often both simultaneously. By coding signals and having decoding equipment in homes, the latter also enables subscription-based channels and pay-per-view services. A broadcasting organisation may broadcast several programs at the same time, through several channels (frequencies), for example BBC One and Two. On the other hand, two or more organisations may share a channel and each use it during a fixed part of the day. Digital radio and digital television may also transmit multiplexed programming, with several channels compressed into one ensemble. When broadcasting is done via the Internet the term webcasting is often used. In 2004 a new phenomenon occurred when a number of technologies combined to produce Podcasting. Podcasting is an asynchronous broadcast/narrowcast medium. One of the main proponents being Adam Curry and his associates the Podshow. Broadcasting forms a very large segment of the mass media. Broadcasting to a very narrow range of audience is called narrowcasting. The term "broadcast" was coined by early radio engineers from the midwestern United States. "Bro[...]


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Box 13 Double Trouble

Sat, 27 Jan 2007 03:31:05 +0000

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Alan Walbridge Ladd (September 3, 1913 – 29 January 1964) was an American film actor. He was famous for his emotionless demeanor and small stature (reports of his height vary from 5'2" to 5'9", with 5'6" being the most generally accepted today). In just about all of his films he played either the hero or a bad guy with a conscience. Ladd was born in Hot Springs, Arkansas to English immigrant parents, and died in Palm Springs, California of an overdose of alcohol and sedatives at the age of 50. After first becoming a star with his performance as a hitman with a conscience in This Gun for Hire (1942), he became most famous for his starring role as a gunfighter in the classic 1953 western Shane. Veronica Lake was an ideal co-star; as she was so petite, 4' 11½" (1.51 m), she made him seem taller than he really was. Ladd also made Quigley's Top 10 Stars of the Year List 3 times, 1947, 1953 and 1954. In 1954 he starred along side Peter Cushing and Patrick Troughton in The Black Knight. Ladd also worked in radio, most notably the syndicated series Box 13. This series ran from 1948 to 1949 and was produced by Ladd's own company, Mayfair Productions. He was sometimes listed as Allan Ladd in credits. His son Alan Ladd, Jr. became a motion picture executive and producer. Another son David Ladd was married to Charlie's Angels star Cheryl Ladd. Alan Ladd was married to silent film actress Sue Carol, who was also his manager. Actress Jordan Ladd is his granddaughter. On his passing in 1964, Ladd was entombed in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California. Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month

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Box 13

Thu, 25 Jan 2007 01:54:38 +0000

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Alan Walbridge Ladd (September 3, 1913 – 29 January 1964) was an American film actor. He was famous for his emotionless demeanor and small stature (5'5"/165 cm tall). In just about all of his films he played either the hero or a bad guy with a conscience. Ladd was born in Hot Springs, Arkansas to English immigrant parents, and died in Palm Springs, California of an overdose of alcohol and sedatives at the age of 51. After first becoming a star with his performance as a hitman with a conscience in This Gun for Hire (1942), he became most famous for his starring role as a gunfighter in the classic 1953 western Shane. Veronica Lake was an ideal co-star; as she was so petite, 4' 11½" (1.51 m), she made him seem taller than he really was. Ladd also made Quigley's Top 10 Stars of the Year List 3 times, 1947, 1953 and 1954. In 1954 he starred along side Peter Cushing and Patrick Troughton in The Black Knight. Ladd also worked in radio, most notably the syndicated series Box 13. This series ran from 1948 to 1949 and was produced by Ladd's own company, Mayfair Productions. He was sometimes listed as Allan Ladd in credits. His son Alan Ladd, Jr. became a motion picture executive and producer. Another son David Ladd was married to Charlie's Angels star Cheryl Ladd. Alan Ladd was married to silent film actress Sue Carol, who was also his manager. Actress Jordan Ladd is his granddaughter. On his passing in 1964, Ladd was entombed in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.


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Gunsmoke 520524

Sun, 21 Jan 2007 00:07:56 +0000

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Gunsmoke was a long-running American old-time radio and television Western drama created by director Norman MacDonnell and writer John Meston. The stories took place in or about Dodge City, Kansas, during the settlement of the American West. The radio version ran from 1952 to 1961, and is commonly regarded as one of the finest radio dramas of all time; the television version ran from 1955 to 1975 and still holds the record for the longest-running U.S. prime time fictional television program.


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Blondie

Sat, 20 Jan 2007 15:10:58 +0000

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Blondie was a radio situation comedy adapted from the long-run Blondie comic strip by Chic Young. The radio program had a long run on several networks from 1939 to 1950. After Penny Singleton was cast in the title role of the feature film Blondie (1938), co-starring with Arthur Lake as Dagwood, she and Lake repeated their roles December 20, 1938, on The Bob Hope Show. The appearance with Hope led to their own show, beginning July 3, 1939, on CBS as a summer replacement for The Eddie Cantor Show. However, Cantor did not return in the fall, so the sponsor, Camel Cigarettes chose to keep Blondie on the air Mondays at 7:30pm. Camel remained the sponsor through the early WWII years until June 26, 1944. In 1944, Blondie was on the Blue Network, sponsored by Super Suds, airing Fridays at 7pm from July 21 to September 1. The final three weeks of that run overlapped with Blondie's return to CBS on Sundays at 8pm from August 13, 1944, to September 26, 1948, still sponsored by Super Suds. Beginning in mid-1945, the 30-minute program was heard Mondays at 7:30pm. Super Suds continued as the sponsor when the show moved to NBC on Wednesdays at 8pm from October 6, 1948, to June 29, 1949.


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The Shadow 1938- 01-08

Fri, 19 Jan 2007 04:18:54 +0000

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Pulp magazine publisher Street and Smith decided that instead of advertising their magazines on newsstands, they would try something new: radio. In 1930, they sponsored a weekly show called the Detective Story Hour featuring adaptations of mystery stories from their magazine of the same name. The shows were first announced, then later narrated by a strange and shadowy figure named - appropriately - The Shadow. The voice was done by James La Curto, and later Frank Readick Jr. Much to Street and Smith's amazement, it was the narrator that became more popular than the show. Audiences were requesting for "that Shadow Detective Magazine". Walter B. Gibson was soon hired to write what would become one of the most successful pulp novel series in the 1930s and 1940s. In the meantime, The Shadow remained a narrator for other radio show such as Blue Coal Radio Revue and Love Story Hour (another Street and Smith magazine) during 1931-1932. During 1932, he had gotten his own show, but still remained a narrator.


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marx Brothers

Wed, 17 Jan 2007 05:41:25 +0000

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American comedy team that was popular on stage, screen, and radio for 30 years. They were celebrated for their inventive attacks on the socially respectable and upon ordered society in general. Five Marx brothers became entertainers: Chico Marx (original name Leonard Marx; b. March 22, 1887, New York, New York, U.S.—d. October 11, 1961, Hollywood, California), Harpo (original name Adolph…


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440914 Squire To Take Lum's- Lum & Abner

Mon, 15 Jan 2007 15:07:30 +0000

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Lum and Abner, an American radio comedy which aired as a network program from 1932 to 1954, became an American institution in its low-keyed, arch rural wit. One of a series of 15-minute serial comedies that dotted American radio at its height as America's number one home entertainment—others included Amos 'n' Andy, Easy Aces, The Goldbergs, and Vic and Sade—Lum and Abner included various elements of each but yielded something as singular as the others and became somewhat more of an institution. The creation of co-stars Chester Lauck (who played Columbus "Lum" Edwards) and Norris Goff (Abner Peabody), Lum and Abner was as low-keyed as Easy Aces, as cheerfully absurdist as Vic and Sade, and raised The Goldbergs ethnic focus by amplifying the protagonists' regional identities. As the co-owners of the Jot 'em Down Store in the then-fictional town of Pine Ridge, Arkansas, who were always stumbling upon moneymaking ideas only to get themselves fleeced by nemesis Squire Skimp, before finding one or another way to redeem themselves, Lum and Abner played the hillbilly theme with deceptive cleverness: the hillbillies just knew the slickers were going to get theirs, sooner or later, and either didn't mind or knew more than they let on that the slickers getting theirs was a matter of fortunate circumstance.


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GunSmoke

Mon, 15 Jan 2007 05:51:48 +0000

clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month 24 hour radio streaming MacDonnell and Meston wanted to create a radio Western for adults, in contrast to the prevailing juvenile fare such as The Lone Ranger or The Cisco Kid. Gunsmoke was set in Dodge City, Kansas during the thriving cattle days of the 1870s. Dunning notes that "The show drew critical acclaim for unprecedented realism." He also writes that among old-time radio fans, "Gunsmoke is routinely placed among the best shows of any kind and any time." (Dunning, 304) The show's cast, writing and sound effects have received much praise. The radio series, which first aired April 26, 1952, and ran until June 18, 1961, on CBS, starred William Conrad as Marshal Matt Dillon, Howard McNear as the ghoulish, brittle Doc Charles Adams, Georgia Ellis as Kitty Russell and Parley Baer as Dillon's assistant (but not his deputy) Chester Proudfoot. (On the television series, Doc's first name was changed to Galen, and Chester's last name was changed to Goode.) Chester's character had no surname until "Proudfoot" was ad libbed by Baer during a rehearsal early on, while Doc Adams was named after cartoonist Charles Addams. In a 1953 interview with Time, MacDonnell declared, "Kitty is just someone Matt has to visit every once in a while. We never say it, but Kitty is a prostitute, plain and simple." (Dunning, 304) William Conrad was actually one of the last actors who auditioned for the role of Marshal Dillon. He was already one of radio's busiest actors and had a powerful and distinctive baritone voice. Though Meston championed him, MacDonnell thought that Conrad might be overexposed. During his audition, however, Conrad won over MacDonnell after reading just a few lines. The show was distinct from other radio westerns, as the dialogue was often slow and halting, and due to the outstanding sound effects, listeners had a nearly palpable sense of the prairie terrain where the show was set. The effects were subtle but multilayered and utilized very well, given the show's spacious feel. Dunning writes, "The listener heard extraneous dialogue in the background, just abo[...]


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The War of The worlds

Fri, 12 Jan 2007 01:45:16 +0000

clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month Radio Listeners in Panic, Taking War Drama as Fact Many Flee Homes to Escape 'Gas Raid From Mars'--Phone Calls Swamp Police at Broadcast of Wells Fantasy This article appeared in the New York Times on Oct. 31, 1938. A wave of mass hysteria seized thousands of radio listeners between 8:15 and 9:30 o'clock last night when a broadcast of a dramatization of H. G. Wells's fantasy, "The War of the Worlds," led thousands to believe that an interplanetary conflict had started with invading Martians spreading wide death and destruction in New Jersey and New York. The broadcast, which disrupted households, interrupted religious services, created traffic jams and clogged communications systems, was made by Orson Welles, who as the radio character, "The Shadow," used to give "the creeps" to countless child listeners. This time at least a score of adults required medical treatment for shock and hysteria. In Newark, in a single block at Heddon Terrace and Hawthorne Avenue, more than twenty families rushed out of their houses with wet handkerchiefs and towels over their faces to flee from what they believed was to be a gas raid. Some began moving household furniture. Throughout New York families left their homes, some to flee to near-by parks. Thousands of persons called the police, newspapers and radio stations here and in other cities of the United States and Canada seeking advice on protective measures against the raids. The program was produced by Mr. Welles and the Mercury Theatre on the Air over station WABC and the Columbia Broadcasting System's coast-to-coast network, from 8 to 9 o'clock. The radio play, as presented, was to simulate a regular radio program with a "break-in" for the material of the play. The radio listeners, apparently, missed or did not listen to the introduction, which was: "The Columbia Broadcasting System and its affiliated stations present Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre on the Air in 'The War of the Worlds' by H. G. Wells." They also failed to associate the program with the n[...]


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Abbott & costello

Sun, 07 Jan 2007 18:34:16 +0000

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William Alexander Abbott (born October 6, 1897 in Asbury Park, N.J.) was already an experienced 'straight man' when he first met his partner Louis Francis Cristillo (born March 6, 1906 in Paterson, N.J.) on the burlesque circuit. In 1936 the duo teamed up and became a much in demand act. However, it wasn't until an appearance on the Kate Smith Radio Hour, performing what would soon become their most famous sketch "Who's On First," that Bud Abbott & Lou Costello were to experience true stardom and a Hollywood career. Signed by Universal in 1939, Bud & Lou were hailed by the studio as "The New Kings Of Comedy," and went on to produce a decade of box office hits.


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Red Skelton Sunday Night dinner

Mon, 25 Dec 2006 19:31:57 +0000

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Red Skelton Show Cast Red Skelton David Rose Orchestra Red Skelton Red Skelton Red Skelton Seeing Red : The Skelton in Hollywood's Closet by Wes D. Gehring, Steve Bell - Book TV Greatest Shows DVD 1950s TV's Greatest Shows - 12 Shows - 3 DVDs Includes Red Skelton Red Skelton Show Tidbits The Red Skelton Show began on radio in 1941 and was a success but television was the medium which best showcased the huge talents of Red Skelton. Radio didn't allow for Skelton to demonstrate his gift for pantomine and sight gags. The show always featured a guest star and some skits. Musical guests performed and one of the first TV appearances of the Rolling Stones was on Red Skelton. But it was for the wonderful characters Skelton created that people tuned in. Among those characters: Clem Kadiddlehopper Freddy Freeloader The Mean Widdle Kid Sheriff Deadeye Willy Lump Lump Cauliflower McPugg Bolivar Shagnasty San Fernando Red Skelton always closed his show with "God Bless." Passings Red Skelton died in 1997 of pneumonia. Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month


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Alan young Show - Rose Bowl Float 461277

Thu, 21 Dec 2006 02:01:34 +0000

clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month Alan Young (born November 19, 1919) is an actor best known for his television role opposite a talking horse, Mister Ed. Mr Young was born in North Shields,Tyne and Wear, England, and had the given name of Angus, he was raised in Edinburgh, Scotland and in Canada. He grew to love radio when bedbound as a child because of severe asthma, and became a radio broadcaster on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. In 1944, he made the leap to American radio with The Alan Young Show, NBC's summer replacement for Eddie Cantor. Following a move to ABC in the fall (1944-46), he returned to NBC (1946-49). His television version of The Alan Young Show began in 1950. After the show's cancellation, Young appeared in supporting parts in films such as The Time Machine (1960). His most popular venture, however, was Mister Ed, a CBS television show which ran from 1961 to 1966. He played the owner of a talking horse which would talk to no one but him. Alan Young learned the radio craft in Canada and broke into American Radio after being fired from his first Canadian show Stag Party after asking for pay higher than the $15 per week he was earning. After working on a summer show for Eddie Cantor, Young earned his own show, The Alan Young Show, combining situation comedy and hilarious gags. He ventured into TV with television version The Alan Young Show which won him an Emmy in 1951. Then along came a talking horse. Mister Ed premiered in 1961. George Burns, producer of the show, was behind the decision to cast Young. Said George, "Alan was the type of man that a horse would want to talk to."[...]


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Twilightzone - Still Valley

Wed, 20 Dec 2006 19:22:47 +0000

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Throughout the 1950s, Rod Serling had established himself as one of the hottest names in television, equally famous for his success in writing televised drama as he was for criticizing the medium's limitations. His most vocal complaints concerned the censorship frequently practiced by sponsors and networks. "I was not permitted to have my Senators discuss any current or pressing problem," he said of his 1957 production "The Arena", intended to be an involving look into contemporary politics. "To talk of tariff was to align oneself with the Republicans; to talk of labor was to suggest control by the Democrats. To say a single thing germane to the current political scene was absolutely prohibited... In retrospect, I probably would have had a much more adult play had I made it science fiction, put it in the year 2057, and peopled the Senate with robots. That would probably have been more reasonable and no less dramatically incisive."


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A Christmas Carol - 1931- Dicken Radio plays

Wed, 20 Dec 2006 18:58:58 +0000

clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month Lisa Laco, Host: Well we're going to talk about Charles Dickens right now because Charles Dickens is ever foremost in our minds this week as we get ready to read Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol this weekend here in Thunder Bay. When he was about ten years old poverty forced him to take a job in a factory to provide for his family. Now he was so ashamed of his time there that he never told anyone about it, but he couldn't hide the secret totally. According to Philip the experience surfaces in the actions and the attitudes of many of Charles Dickens, especially in Ebenezer Scrooge from A Christmas Carol . Philip Allingham is a professor in the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay; he's also a Dickens scholar. CBC reporter Cathy Alex asked him what inspired Charles Dickens to write A Christmas Carol . Philip V. Allingham, Faculty of Education, Lakehead University, Dickens Scholar: He was fascinated by German ghost stories; in fact, he had written himself one in the middle of Pickwick Papers in 1836. In the fall of 1843 he was invited to go to Manchester, where he saw a good deal of urban poor, prostitution, other social ills. He and a number of other Victorian reformers including Cobden and Disraeli were to speak and so he heard all the tales of horror in industrial society. He saw a great deal of it; he stayed with his sister whom he loved very much--remember Scrooge's relationship with his sister. And his sister had a little boy who was lame; he probably had what we call now Pot's disease, tuberculosis of the bone, if you can imagine. So there is Tiny Tim, who was originally by the way called "Tiny Fred" after Dickens' younger brother, but "Tiny Fred" doesn't really make it does it. So in proof he corrected that to "Tiny Tim." He also[...]


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Bing Crosby special along with the Marx Bros

Sat, 16 Dec 2006 18:45:37 +0000

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were a team of sibling comedians that appeared in vaudeville, stage plays, film and television. Born in New York City, the Marx Brothers were the sons of Jewish immigrants from different parts of Germany. (Plattdeutsch was the boys' first language.) Their mother, Minnie Schönberg, originally hailed from Dornum in East Frisia, Germany, and their father Simon "Frenchie" Marrix (whose name was anglicized to Sam Marx) from Alsace, now a part of France. The family lived in the Upper East Side of New York City between the Irish, German and Italian Quarters. Contents


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A Christmas Carol - 1939- Dicken Radio plays

Tue, 12 Dec 2006 23:58:40 +0000

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A Christmas Carol (full title: A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas) is Charles Dickens' "little Christmas Book" first published on December 19,] 1843 and illustrated by John Leech. The story met with instant success, selling six thousand copies within a week. Originally written as a potboiler to enable Dickens to pay off a debt, the tale has become one of the most popular and enduring Christmas stories of all time. In fact, contemporaries of the time noted that the popularity of the story played a critical role in redefining the importance of Christmas and the major sentiments associated with the holiday. Few modern readers realize that A Christmas Carol was written during a time of decline in the old Christmas traditions. "If Christmas, with its ancient and hospitable customs, its social and charitable observances, were in danger of decay, this is the book that would give them a new lease," said English poet Thomas Hood in his review in Hood's Magazine and Comic Review (January 1844, page 68).


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Adventures of Mr toad

Mon, 11 Dec 2006 19:10:16 +0000

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Classic Radio Pictures

The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad is an animated feature produced by Walt Disney Studios and released to theaters on October 5, 1949 by RKO Radio Pictures. It is the eleventh animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. This film was the final of Disney's 1940s "package films" (feature films comprised of two or more short subjects instead of a single feature-length story). Beginning with the next animated feature release, Cinderella, his studio would return to the feature-length stories that low income and World War II had caused a drought of during the 1940s.


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Bing Crosby _ Its a White Christmas special

Sun, 10 Dec 2006 22:33:48 +0000

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Crosby's biggest musical hit was his recording of Irving Berlin's "White Christmas" which he introduced through a 1941 Christmas-season radio broadcast and the movie Holiday Inn. Bing's recording hit the charts on 3 October 1942, and rose to #1 on 31 October, where it stayed for 11 weeks. In the following years Bing's recording hit the top-30 pop charts another 16 times, even topping the charts again in 1945 and January of '47. The song remains Bing's best-selling recording, and the best-selling single and best selling song of all time . In 1998 after a long absence, his 1947 version hit the charts in Britain, and as of 2006 remains the North American holiday-season standard. According to Guinness World Records, Bing Crosby's White Christmas has "sold over 100 million copies around the world, with at least 50 million sales as singles."


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Lux Radio Theater- Snow White

Sat, 09 Dec 2006 00:52:50 +0000

clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month Lux Radio Theater, one of the genuine classic radio anthology series (NBC Blue Network (1934-1935); CBS (1935-1955), adapted first Broadway stage works, and then (especially) films to hour-long live radio presentations. It quickly became the most popular dramatic anthology series on radio, running more than twenty years. The program always began with an announcer proclaiming, "Ladies and gentlemen, Lux presents Hollywood!" Cecil B. DeMille was the host of the series each Monday evening from June 1, 1936, until January 22, 1945. On one occasion, however, he was replaced by Leslie Howard. Lux Radio Theater strove to feature as many of the original stars of the original stage and film productions as possible, usually paying them $5,000 an appearance to do the show. It was when sponsor Lever Brothers (who made Lux soap and detergent) moved the show from New York to Hollywood in 1936 that it eased back from adapting stage shows and toward adaptations of films. The first Lux film adaptation was The Legionnaire and the Lady, with Marlene Dietrich and Clark Gable, based on the film Morocco. That was followed by a Lux adaptation of The Thin Man, featuring the movie's stars, Myrna Loy and William Powell. Many of the greatest names in film appeared in the series, most in the roles they made famous on the screen, including Abbott and Costello, Lauren Bacall, Lucille Ball, Ingrid Bergman, Humphrey Bogart, Charles Boyer, Claudette Colbert, Gary Cooper, Joseph Cotton, Bing Crosby, Dan Duryea, Ava Gardner, Cary Grant, Bob Hope, Vivien Leigh, Agnes Moorehead, Vincent Price, Donna Reed, Fran[...]


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Bing_Crosby_Broadcasts_50-12-20_ChristmasShow

Fri, 08 Dec 2006 03:31:29 +0000

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Harry Lillis "Bing" Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. Arguably the first true multi-media star, Bing Crosby's influence on popular culture and popular music is enormous -- from 1934 to 1954 he held a nearly unrivaled command of record sales, radio ratings and motion picture grosses. He is usually considered to be a member of popular music's "holy trinity" of ultra-icons, alongside Elvis Presley and The Beatles1, and is currently the most electronically recorded human voice in history (Schwartz, 1995) [1] Crosby is also credited as being the major inspiration for most of the male singers that followed him, including the likes of Frank Sinatra, Perry Como and Dean Martin. Tony Bennett summed up Crosby's impact, stating, "Bing created a culture. He contributed more to popular music than any other person - he moulded popular music. Every singer in the business has taken something from Crosby. Every male singer has a Bing Crosby idiosyncrasy." 1


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DateWithJudy_460409

Tue, 05 Dec 2006 23:35:45 +0000

clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Affordable Web Hosting & Podcasting $5.99 A month A Date with Judy was an American radio program during the 1940s. It was a teenage comedy that began as a summer replacement for Bob Hope's show, sponsored by Pepsodent and airing on NBC from June 24 to September 16, 1941, with 14-year-old Ann Gillis in the title role. Dellie Ellis portrayed Judy when the series returned the next summer (June 23–September 15, 1942). Louise Erickson took over the role the following summer (June 30–September 22, 1943) when the series, sponsored by Bristol Myers, replaced The Eddie Cantor Show. Louise Erickson continued as Judy for the next seven years, as the series, sponsored by Tums, aired from January 18, 1944 to January 4, 1949. As the popularity of the radio series peaked, Jane Powell starred as Judy in the MGM movie, A Date with Judy (1948). Co-starring with Powell were Elizabeth Taylor, Wallace Beery, Robert Stack, and Carmen Miranda. Ford Motors and Revere Cameras were the sponsors for the final season of the radio series on ABC from October 13, 1949 to May 25, 1950. A Date with Judy was also a comic book (based on the radio program) published by National Periodical Publications from October-November 1947 to October-November 1960.[...]


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Great_Gildersleeve/411109 ep011 Birdie Quits

Mon, 04 Dec 2006 22:33:50 +0000

clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Affordable Web Hosting & Podcasting $5.99 A month Classic Radio Pictures Enjoy The Blues Visit The Uncleshag Gospel Round Up The Great Gildersleeve (1941-1957) was arguably the first spin-off program, as well as one of the first true situation comedies (as opposed to sketch programs) in broadcast history. Built around a character who had been a staple on the classic radio sit-com, Fibber McGee and Molly, The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off, and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis ("You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catch phrase). But he also became a popular enough windbag that Kraft Foods — looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary's Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve (the character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly) as the central, slightly softened, and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family. Premiering on NBC on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGee's Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late sister's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lur[...]


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Dwight D. Eisenhower Hawaii Statehood Proclamation Speech - 1959 (August 21, 1959)

Tue, 28 Nov 2006 04:07:25 +0000

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August 21, 1959 - President Eisenhower signed an executive order proclaiming Hawaii the 50th state of the union. August 24, 1959 - Three days after Hawaiian statehood, Hiram L. Fong was sworn in as the first Chinese-American U.S. senator, while Daniel K. Inouye was sworn in as the first Japanese-American U.S. representative.


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Radio America's - The Great Gildersleeve - Thanksgiving Story

Thu, 23 Nov 2006 03:52:40 +0000

By 1852, Hale's campaign succeeded in uniting 29 states in marking the last Thursday of November as "Thanksgiving Day." Finally, after a 40-year campaign of writing editorials and letters to governors and presidents, Hale's passion became a reality. On September 28, 1863, Sarah Josepha Hale wrote a letter to President Lincoln and urged him to have the "day of our annual Thanksgiving made a National and fixed Union Festival." On October 3, 1863, President Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday in November as a national day "of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father." Here is the text of Lincoln's proclamation: By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation. The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere exc[...]


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The great Gildersleeve 1941-10-26_ep009_A_Visit_from_Oliver

Tue, 21 Nov 2006 05:03:22 +0000

clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month Classic Radio Pictures Enjoy The Blues Visit The Uncleshag Gospel Round Up The Great Gildersleeve (1941-1957) was arguably the first spin-off program, as well as one of the first true situation comedies (as opposed to sketch programs) in broadcast history. Built around a character who had been a staple on the classic radio sit-com, Fibber McGee and Molly, The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off, and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis ("You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catch phrase). But he also became a popular enough windbag that Kraft Foods — looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary's Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve (the character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly) as the central, slightly softened, and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family. Premiering on NBC on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGee's Wistful Vista to Summerfiel[...]


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Radio America's The great gildersleeve Investigating the city

Mon, 20 Nov 2006 23:23:13 +0000

clickhere Visit the Radio America Store web site.Buy your 50 mp3 for &5.00 Affordable Web Hosting $5.99 A month Classic Radio Pictures Enjoy The Blues Visit The Uncleshag Gospel Round Up The Great Gildersleeve (1941-1957) was arguably the first spin-off program, as well as one of the first true situation comedies (as opposed to sketch programs) in broadcast history. Built around a character who had been a staple on the classic radio sit-com, Fibber McGee and Molly, The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off, and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis ("You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catch phrase). But he also became a popular enough windbag that Kraft Foods — looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary's Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve (the character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly) as the central, slightly softened, and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family. Premiering on NBC on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGee's [...]


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