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Preview: TERRA: The Nature of Our World *video podcast*

TERRA: The Nature of Our World *video podcast*



WELCOME! TERRA is a crossroads, a habitat, a stage, and a laboratory. Here, you will find yourself on the cutting-edge of science and at the farthest horizons of the natural world. Through the eyes of passionate independent filmmakers, you will discover t



Updated: 2014-10-02T21:45:51.943-07:00

 



FINAL EPISODE! "TEN DAYS TO PAINT THE FOREST"

2006-11-27T18:49:52.083-08:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY SERIES TWO PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY SERIES TWO FINAL EPISODE! DOWNLOAD AND PLAY SERIES TWO PART TWO DOWNLOAD AND PLAY SERIES TWO PART ONE (image) (image) (image) (image) THE TEN DAYS HAVE FINALLY COME TO A CLOSE! The final episode features the incredible algorroba tree - a true wildlife magnet! And, what are the economics of conservation? How can communities come together to protect wildlife? At long last, the finished artwork goes on display before local dignitaries and young Ecuadorians and Peruvians . . . hoping to inspire the next generation of artists and friends of the environment. We heard so much good feedback from the first three episodes in this series, so it was a no-brainer dusting off the second half of the series for a rendezvous with the growing TERRA audience. If you need a refresher course, check the original post from July! This is no ordinary biological field trip! Travel along with some of the world's foremost bird and nature artists to the incredible Chappari Reserve, among the last remaining high-altitude dry forests of South America. Previously undiscovered and majestical species come alive at the tip of a paintbrush in this rapid biological inventory of this incredibly rich and diverse part of the biosphere. This film reminds us of the age-old partnership of art and science and highlights observation, expression, and inspiration in a strategic effort to preserve one of the most fantastic places on Earth. The artist Paul Klee said “the painter should not paint what he sees, but what will be seen." In this case, we hope such brilliant creatures remain in our sights forever. Copyright 2006, Richard and Julia Kemp



WHEN DOLPHINS CRY

2006-11-10T10:37:55.750-08:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART ONE DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW (image) (image) (image) When Hardy Jones first witnessed and documented the slaughtering of dolphins in Japan in 1979, he knew he had to do something to stop it. But when the world whaling commission sanctions more dolphin killing to make up for lost whale harvests and there is the risk of offending Japanese culture and tradition, the task is not a simple one. Almost thirty years since Hardy started on his mission to save dolphins, much has been accomplished, but there is still work to be done. Copyright 2006, Hardy Jones



SPECIAL EVENT! "PART TWO & THREE: BIONEERS"

2006-11-01T17:38:54.853-08:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART THREE: BIONEERS DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART TWO: BIONEERS DOWNLOAD AND PLAY "MICHAEL FRANTI LIVE" - PART ONE: BIONEERS (image) (image) (image) (image) Like the endless stream of TRICK-OR-TREATERS in my neighborhood, the energy of Bioneers weekend is renewable - so it just keeps coming! Join us for Part Three of the journey and witness the creation of the "Boze-mandala" and hear vibrant sources talk about sustainable development, climate change, the "new" green movement, and the fusion of social justice and environmental justice. The Bioneers march on! Part Two of this series showcases the drama, the magic, and the beautiful chaos of the first half of Bioneers weekend. Is this a conference, a festival, or a "happening?" The Bioneers bring new meaning to the phrase "all walks of life." Everyone is a participant. Kids pick pumpkins, legendary authors talk from the podium, politicians mingle with idealists and local activists. Meanwhile, the experience radiates via satellite from San Rafael, CA to over twenty disparate locations around the world. But the network as a whole is stronger than any single part. Some come for ideas, others for the music, and still more for the incredible local food. The Bioneers message is clear: the future begins today. Ride with us on the zero-gravity veggie-oil Zeppelin of imagination as we take you from today's drawing board to tomorrow's reality. Copyright 2006, Jefferson Beck & Eric Bendick Northern Rockies Bioneers National Bioneers "I KNOW I'M NOT ALONE" Movie Trailer



SPECIAL EVENT! "MICHAEL FRANTI LIVE - PART ONE: BIONEERS"

2006-10-23T12:07:05.060-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY SPECIAL EVENT PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY "MICHAEL FRANTI LIVE" - PART ONE: BIONEERS (image) (image) (image) As a kickoff to the Northern Rockies Bioneers Conference held in Bozeman, Montana this week, a TERRA crew spent an afternoon with musician and filmmaker Michael Franti of Spearhead. Franti's "consciousness-raising" resonates on both the political and environmental front and he combines improvisation and activism to spread his message across the globe. Later that same evening, Franti brought the house down when he played the Wilson Auditorium in Bozeman and reminded us that inclusion, not exclusion is the only way to bring about political change. The Northern Rockies Bioneers Conference is one of over twenty Bioneers groups nationwide, which meet every year to bring together progressive communities and provide resources, tools, and inspiration to build sustainable, culturally-rich, active, and well-networked communities. Stay tuned to TERRA for a closer look at the Bioneers conference here in Bozeman, as we podcast all the action over the next few days. Copyright 2006, George Potter Northern Rockies Bioneers National Bioneers "I KNOW I'M NOT ALONE" Movie Trailer



"THE LAST RUN"

2006-10-30T16:05:29.350-08:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART ONE DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART TWO DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART THREE (image) (image) (image) "Ironically, as we work to save the salmon, it may turn out that the salmon save us." (Paul Schell, Mayor of Seattle) Salmon are an indicator species - their health closely tracks the health of the watershed to which they return. Salmon are also a keystone species, forming a critical link between forests and distant oceans. But most importantly, salmon are a symbolic species that allows us to understand the interconnected nature of the web of life. In Northern California, salmon populations are at 10% of their levels of one hundred years ago due to overwhelming pressures from logging, hydropower, and overfishing. This film brings into focus the plight of the salmon on the Klamath river and the future of the Yurok tribe who depend on the fish. Through science, we now fully understand the life-cycle of salmon, but how do we apply what we’ve learned to the everyday? PARTS ONE, TWO, & THREE NOW AVAILABLE Copyright 2006, Owen Bissell



"WORKING DOGS: ON NATURE'S TRAIL"

2006-10-30T16:05:16.166-08:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) Low-tech is the new high-tech. Take, for example, wildlife biologists who are swapping radio collars and GPS transceivers for a more sensitive instrument: a dog's nose. A dog's sense of smell is up to one thousand times more powerful than a human's. But this doesn't really explain what it means to "smell like a dog." When a human walks into a bakery, it smells generally very sweet. When a dog walks into a bakery, it smells every ingredient used in the baking process, e.g., eggs, butter, flour, sugar, and so on down to that last pinch of nutmeg. Dogs are able to differentiate smells even in incredibly minute concentrations. This innate ability, coupled with an obsessive "ball-drive," makes for an incredible partner in the fight to save endangered species. The trail is hot! Starring Finny, Carow, Peppin, Tsavo, Camas, Wicket, Alice, Megan, and Aimee of Working Dogs for Conservation. WDFC Copyright 2006, George Potter, Eric Bendick



"THE LADY ON THE DIVIDE"

2006-10-30T16:04:55.843-08:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) In December 1985, after seven years of all volunteer labor, the community of Butte, Montana, installed a figure as large as the Statue of Liberty on the Continental Divide. The statue was designed and constructed by unemployed miners during the recession following the closure of the Anaconda copper mines. What began as one man's small project dedicated to his wife, evolved into a massive undertaking that held the depressed community together. Twenty years later, this short film relives the story of "Our Lady of the Rockies" and weaves together new hopes with grim historical realities in the uncertain aftermath of a resource extraction economy. Copyright 2006, Greg Schneider, Kathy Boul



"FORBIDDEN FRUIT: The Absinthe Drinker"

2006-10-23T09:49:47.300-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) (image) Absinthe was banned in the U.S. and many other parts of the world in the early 20th century after a faulty scientific study determined it was likely to provoke hallucinations, seizures, and violence. Ninety years later, absinthe has re-emerged on the international marketplace because it has been determined, by all accounts, to be safe for consumption. Why was it banned in the first place? David Cook, a retired Neurosurgeon and occasional absinthe drinker, helps unlock the neurological mysteries of “the green fairy” and testifies about how science, ritual, and history often converge in unusual ways. The ultimate cause of the absinthe ban was political, due to the influence of winemakers and temperance advocates, not scientific. This case reveals yet another example of how “bad science” is oftentimes utilized to manipulate public opinion. Unfortunately, this is just as true today as it was 100 years ago. Though peer-reviewed sources consistently acknowledge the problems of climate change, strategic misinformation still often wins the day with the press, the public, and our legislators. Copyright 2006, Henry Harrison



"DRAG"

2006-10-23T09:51:30.943-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) Every year, less people begin cigarette smoking and more people quit . . . with one big exception: America’s college students. College students are the sole demographic group cutting across the grain, and therefore, they provide valuable incite into "smokers mind." Kari Harris, a psychologist at the University of Montana, is unraveling the "social function" of the college smoker and in doing so, she is probing into the very fabric of addiction as both a biological and cultural phenomenon. Find out what Dr. Harris has to say and listen to college smokers fire back, as DRAG explores what might be our nation’s least understood public health problem. Copyright 2006, Parker Brown



"A CORPSE GROWS IN BROOKLYN"

2006-10-23T09:51:59.893-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) Brooklyn is indeed home to many noxious smells, but perhaps the most intriguing one in recent history occurred during the peak blooming hours of the Amorphophallus titanum in the early morning of August 11th at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. The “Corpse Flower,” native to the equatorial forests of Sumatra, emits a “revolting” smell of putrefaction to attract its pollinators – carrion beetles and sweat bees – and is said to have made the first botanist who tried to paint it very ill. Nonetheless, visitors came out in droves to experience a rare natural show as mesmerizing as any modern art installation – and perhaps even to get a glimpse (and share a whiff) of the timeless beauty of evolution. Copyright 2006, Phil Buccellato & Greener Media GREENER MEDIA



"EBOLA TESTIMONIES"

2006-11-20T19:45:30.160-08:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) When zoologists in the Lossi region of central Africa noticed that some of the gorillas they were studying were becoming sick and dying, they could not have known what was to come. Within a year of the initial discovery, this mysterious disease had spread to humans and was starting to claim the lives of nearby villagers. It became known to the world as Ebola - but what was causing the disease in the great apes and how was it spreading to humans? Join Congolese filmmakers as they find the source of this devastating disease by talking to survivors and endeavor to help people in the area prevent Ebola from reoccurring in the future. Visit INCEF.org Copyright 2006, INCEF



"THE PRICE OF IVORY"

2006-10-23T09:53:02.033-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) Africans have no tradition of poaching elephants for their tusks. Modern ivory poaching has been fueled by demand from the outside . . . mostly from Western and Asian markets. This original short film, locally produced and now internationally distributed via TERRA, asks tough questions about what motivates an indigenous people to harvest a threatened and endangered species. On the other side of the coin, what are the true costs involved . . . both to local people and the forests that support them? Is this a zero-sum game? A stalemate? Or an outright slaughter? Join us for "The Price of Ivory" - the first of four locally produced African conservation documentaries. Copyright 2006, INCEF



"TEN DAYS TO PAINT THE FOREST"

2006-10-23T09:53:33.570-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART ONE DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART TWO DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART THREE (image) (image) (image) This is no ordinary biological field trip! Travel along with some of the world's foremost bird and nature artists to the incredible Chappari Reserve, among the last remaining high-altitude dry forests of South America. Previously undiscovered and majestical species come alive at the tip of a paintbrush in this rapid biological inventory of this incredibly rich and diverse part of the biosphere. This film reminds us of the age-old partnership of art and science and highlights observation, expression, and inspiration in a strategic effort to preserve one of the most fantastic places on Earth. The artist Paul Klee said “the painter should not paint what he sees, but what will be seen." In this case, we hope such brilliant creatures remain in our sights forever. Copyright 2006, Richard and Julia Kemp



"ONE MILLION DOWNLOADS"

2006-09-25T16:50:30.746-07:00

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Mahalo Danke Merci Takk Kiga Tujechhe Salomot Passibo Xie xie Arigato and Thank You - THE PRODUCERS



Just Around the Corner . . . One Million Downloads!

2006-08-08T12:28:34.376-07:00

(image) Eight-hundred thousand downloads. That's where we stand as of August 8th, 2006. Last week's total = 100,000. We are knocking on the door of 1 million. And we're just getting started. Thanks to the growing community of viewers, supporters, producers, and TERRAPHILES. Our goal is to reach 1 million downloads by August 20th, less than two weeks away. There is only one way to make that happen . . . WORD OF MOUTH ! Tell your friends, teachers, co-workers, lawyers, dentists, priests, and mailmen about us.



"SPEAKING WHITE CLAY"

2006-10-23T09:54:04.180-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY "SPEAKING WHITE CLAY" (image) (image) (image) Over the last 100 years, the American Indian Holocaust and the boarding school era nearly snuffed out the native language of Montana's White Clay tribe. Today, less than five native speakers of the White Clay language remain. Nonetheless, kids, parents and teachers at the White Clay Language Immersion School in Harlem, Montana are fighting back to reclaim their native language. In doing so, they are blending traditional Indian ways and contemporary Euro-American culture and "two fractured worlds" are coming together to form a new whole. Copyright 2006, Jaime Jelenchick



"ROOT OF THE PROBLEM"

2006-10-23T09:54:33.723-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY "ROOT OF THE PROBLEM" (image) (image) (image) Yellowstone National Park has one of the world’s most stunning natural landscapes. Tourists flock from all over the world to view its incredible wildlife and geo-thermal features. But there is something amazing about Yellowstone that few people ever notice: its "extreme" plant life. Join environmental scientist Catherine Zabinski and plant biologist Ylva Lekberg as they explore the unique and unusual flora of the world's oldest national park. Could these incredible plants hold the key to dealing with the effects of global warming? Copyright 2006, Ed Watkins



"ATLATL"

2006-10-23T09:55:07.760-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY "ATLATL" (image) (image) (image) Three alter-egos converge as (1.) Bob Perkins "the researcher", (2.) Professor William Robert Perkins "the mad scientist", and (3.) Atlatl Bob "the hunter," give a humorous and multi-faceted account of mankind's ascendant path to the top of the food chain. Though seemingly primitive, the "Atlatl and Dart System," used by humans in pre-historic times, is remarkably complex in its design. With a minimum of effort, the atlatl hurtles darts at speeds close to 100 miles per hour. In turn, this behavior speaks volumes about the sustainable ingenuity of the hunter-gatherer age. In our present age of taxes, organized religion, and agriculture, perhaps there are still important lessons that can be derived from our far distant relatives. Copyright 2006, Jeremy Roberts



"BLACK TALE: The Whirling Disease Invaders"

2006-10-23T09:55:44.540-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART ONE DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART TWO (image) (image) (image) The parasite which causes Whirling Disease is one example of the increasingly difficult problems caused by exotic species around the world. Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout has seen dramatic population declines and other native species - even otters, herons, and grizzly bear, may be at risk. The problem, caused by a parasite which came from Europe and was first introduced into the Rocky Mountains early in the 20th century, defies an easy solution. Nonetheless, researchers continue to test and apply new strategies in the hopes of restoring native populations. Copyright 2006, Kristen Glover and Stephanie Misztal



"WHERE THE WILD PARROTS ARE"

2006-10-23T09:56:24.203-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) "The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill" ignited a wave of enthusiasm around the nation and went on to become an incredible box office success. The creator of the film, Judy Irving, and one of its most vocal and colorful subjects, Mark Bittner, comment on the success of their production in this exclusive interview. If the parrots represent San Francisco's untamed backyard, does every community have its own "wild" spaces? How can local communities go from armchair conservation to the real thing . . . take Mark's advice and "start looking!" Copyright 2006, Eric Bendick



"JAPAN's LOST WOLVES"

2006-10-23T09:56:55.526-07:00

DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) Once worshiped within Japan as god-like creatures of the mountains, Japanese wolves were turned into noxious animals by socio-cultural influences causing their population to slowly dwindle. Here Brett Walker uncovers the story of Japan's lost wolves. Copyright 2004, Tracy Graziano



"OCEAN ACROBATS: The Spinner Dolphins"

2006-10-23T09:57:49.853-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW PARTS ONE AND TWO DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART ONE DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART TWO DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW PARTS THREE AND FOUR DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART THREE DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PART FOUR (image) (image) (image) Glide along through the sparkling blue waters of the South Pacific with the ocean's greatest performers - the Spinner dolphins. The show goes on underwater too where Spinners work together to eat, sleep, and keep each other safe from predators. Join scientists in Hawaii, Tahiti, and French Polynesia on a journey of a thousand bellyflops and learn how you can make a difference in the lives of these spectacular OCEAN ACROBATS - a Four-Part Series brought to you by veteran filmmaker and ocean activist Hardy Jones and www.bluevoice.org PART FOUR: In this, the final chapter of the OCEAN ACROBATS series, we are treated to rare footage of Spinner dolphins feeding at night. Though we've seen throughout the series how Spinners have used their social skills and unique physiology to survive the many challenges of ocean living, there is one predator they just can't outwit or outrun. Spinner Dolphins still face the all too common threat of finding themselves caught in a fisherman’s net. Why is this happening? And what can be done? Find out, on this episode of TERRA. Copyright 2006, Hardy Jones



"HUNTER'S HABITAT"

2006-10-23T09:58:24.773-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) Hunters and environmentalists working arm-in-arm? Why not? Joe Gukowski has hunted in Montana for over sixty years, and in that time he has developed great respect for the land and the animals. Join Joe and other members of the Gallatin Wildlife Association, a truly progressive group of conservation-minded hunters, as they bridge the gap that often exists between outdoor sportsmen and environmentalists. Copyright 2006, Tom Winston



"DR.TONI RUTH: Cougar Biologist"

2006-10-23T09:59:04.210-07:00

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DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE (image) (image) (image) Yellowstone’s Northern Range is treacherous in winter - brimming with boulders, ice, and staggering cliffs. An elusive creature calls this place home and few have what it takes to enter its lair. Join Dr. Toni Ruth as she treks where few dare to follow, and come face to face with Yellowstone’s “Ghost of the Rockies” Copyright 2006, Maria Frostic



"LEAVE IT TO BEAVERS"

2006-05-09T14:29:02.303-07:00

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(image) (image) (image) Once trapped to near extinction in North America, beavers have made a healthy comeback in most states. But what does this mean for aquatic ecosystems? Is this peculiar riverine architect a tool for good or evil? Well, it depends on who you ask. Montana scientists are researching the impacts of beavers, which have the potential for both restoration and destruction, in the hope of getting the story straight. Copyright 2006, Amanda Grue DOWNLOAD AND PLAY PREVIEW DOWNLOAD AND PLAY EPISODE