Subscribe: Comments on Stevey's Blog Rants: The Next Big Language
http://steve-yegge.blogspot.com/feeds/8645635298682876445/comments/default
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
big language  big  code  don  javascript  language  languages  lines code  lines  nbl  perl  programming  syntax  thing  web  write 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Comments on Stevey's Blog Rants: The Next Big Language

Comments on Stevey's Blog Rants: The Next Big Language





Updated: 2017-12-07T20:34:02.689-08:00

 



ECMAScript 4But I think they should remove the "Sc...

2007-12-22T21:36:00.000-08:00

ECMAScript 4

But I think they should remove the "Script" and just call it "Ecma" since it will be more than a simple scripting language.

Despite that fact that Steve says it sounds like someone clearing their throat, it makes sense to alot of us and doesn't sound so "cool" that management will run scared from it. Probably should throw an 'X' in there somewhere.

eXma? Sounds like a disease though.

I guess you could just call it JavaScript 2 but then you can't drop the "Script" portion.

After working in a reporting environment that used JavaScript as their scripting language I still have nightmares where power users that suddenly thought they were programmers refer to the language simply as "Java". Sooo...not the case.

I was thinking Ruby or Groovy until I read this post. Okay, maybe not Groovy unless they come up with a "management friendly" version of the name (Neal Ford's idea is ebXl or 'Enterprise Buisness Execution Language' I think).

I'm down with ECMAScript4 as NBL since I just started using ActionScript3 in Flex UI development. Nice language. A pleasant break from Java and static typing. Although still seems to be missing some stuff.

I like the way ES4 is going. I think they will fix some of the things I wish JavaScript/AS3 would do more like Ruby. I'm no Ruby expert, but if I thought I'd get a chance to do it regular at my day job, I'd focus on it more. But all static 'bashing' aside, I still like a language where I can chose to be static when it makes sense. I don't know how comfortable I'd be if I had to "run with scissors" all the time.



F#

2007-09-24T22:46:00.000-07:00

F#



My Vote is on Haskell......you can all laugh, but ...

2007-09-24T14:32:00.000-07:00

My Vote is on Haskell

...


...you can all laugh, but Haskell is neat :-)... there's a kind of natural readability in a functional langage that supports infix operators.

It would also be nice to see erlang take off, and I'd like to say this is possible with the kind of programming problems muticore processors will introduce later (to the mainstream).

However, neither of these languages will actually become popular in the grand arena of commercial development because neither of them are C++.



N00bz, clearly it -is- JS2.Because he says so here...

2007-08-17T14:56:00.000-07:00

N00bz, clearly it -is- JS2.

Because he says so here: http://blip.tv/file/319044/



The NBL should be in a position to create any fram...

2007-08-08T07:12:00.000-07:00

The NBL should be in a position to create any framework for any domain, not just web apps.

This is clearly not JS or PHP. Very hardcoded specifically for web.

Perl and Python are too "hard-coded" and don't take the soft DSL approach to designing the framework.

The winner seems to be Ruby...again.



"The classic example is SML, which is so fanatical...

2007-07-11T16:45:00.000-07:00

"The classic example is SML, which is so fanatically typed that you're guaranteed never to get a runtime exception, because you will never get your goddamn program to compile."

That's very funny!

Lonnie Best
www.lonniebest.com



Visual Basic?(I picked the worst answer I could fi...

2007-07-06T09:31:00.000-07:00

Visual Basic?

(I picked the worst answer I could find. Correct me if there's a worse.)



Not sure why anyone hasn't mentioned Lua.Fantastic...

2007-07-02T05:40:00.000-07:00

Not sure why anyone hasn't mentioned Lua.

Fantastic language.

Though, I wouldnt currently pick it as the NBL just yet.



John Lam's guess is Javascript. (via http://www.iu...

2007-06-25T09:43:00.000-07:00

John Lam's guess is Javascript. (via http://www.iunknown.com/2007/06/steve-yegge-por.html)



I would have to agree with Parveen - most of the r...

2007-05-21T04:17:00.000-07:00

I would have to agree with Parveen - most of the readers seems to be web developers here.

I think NBL needs:
1. C-like syntax.
2. Huge framework.
3. Fast execution.
4. Good abstraction.
5. Tool support.
6. Platform independence.

The only language that seems to fit the bill is c# 3.0. It got c-like syntax (no kidding :).

Huge framework: MS is developing new libraries for .net for everything from game programming (XNA) to web-applications (WPF/E or Silverlight and ajax-support).

Fast execution: c# got pointers so you can easily interop with c-libraries or write highly optimized code. The 2% of your application that takes 50% of the execution time can easily be rewritten using unsafe code so you'll end up with c++-speed.

Good abstraction: c# got delegates, interfaces, structs, classes, operator-overloading, etc. With LINQ it will also get better threading. People are working on PLINQ which will make multi-core programming even easier.
The only thing c# lacks is macros, nested methods and tuples.

Tool support: Visual Studio/SharpDevelop, NUnit, dotTrace, NCoverExplorer etc.

Platform independence: c# is an ecma standard. There are c# compilers for linux, macosx, etc.

Just my €0.02.



I don't agree with rule #1 (C syntax). Bad thing w...

2007-05-19T04:29:00.000-07:00

I don't agree with rule #1 (C syntax). Bad thing will not remain bad. It will be trashed off. Thesedays killer app is not a kind of PC Package SW. iPod or iPhone(?) can be the killer-app candidate. I mean embedded system SW is getting more important. They are still made with C. But, Hertz NeverLost GPS receiver was made with Ada. I think there exist the possiblity of future. :)



I don't know, what will be your Next Big Language,...

2007-05-16T01:10:00.000-07:00

I don't know, what will be your Next Big Language, but I'm quite sure, my NBL has a name Rebol3



Ed Borskiy, You are an idiot when it comes to comp...

2007-05-10T13:17:00.000-07:00

Ed Borskiy, You are an idiot when it comes to computer processors!!! INTEL'S IMPLEMENTATION OF X86-64 IS A CLONE AMD-64



Someone has already put Apollo out there, so in li...

2007-05-02T07:30:00.000-07:00

Someone has already put Apollo out there, so in light of very recent news, let me be the first (only?) to throw Silverlight in the ring as well.



Ravi, Smalltalk isn't strongly typed, and yet duri...

2007-04-28T09:42:00.000-07:00

Ravi, Smalltalk isn't strongly typed, and yet during the 80's and 90's had the most advanced IDE features. Features such as Eclipse's refactoring for Java are lovingly and knowingly borrowed from the ST RefactoringBrowser.



You just won't get a world class IDE with all the ...

2007-04-26T11:46:00.000-07:00

You just won't get a world class IDE with all the features without strong typing. The main reason strong typing exists is for tools, not for developers.



haXe for sure!

2007-04-01T00:54:00.000-07:00

haXe for sure!



+1 for haXe !

2007-03-29T07:12:00.000-07:00

+1 for haXe !



JasonBunting, write a parser for ANSI C in ten lin...

2007-03-27T22:46:00.000-07:00

JasonBunting, write a parser for ANSI C in ten lines of code (in any lang). No dice? Write a C# or JavaScript parser in 10 lines of code...

Write a Smalltalk parser in 10 lines of code. Now, we are getting closer to to something that isn't intractable.

Now write a parser for Lisp in 10 lines of code. What you need 10 lines?

Lisp has no syntax (all those stupid parens are an AST) and Smalltalk's syntax is incredibly small and regular.

The complexity is for code treating code as data, no for programmers writing code at design time.

I think the NBL will be knuth's WEB system. Finally the power of TEX and Pascal in one super-powerful system.

Oh and there is no NBL, unless someone wants to spend the market $$$. I am getting sick of those Bruce Eckels web ads though...



Oh, and Erlang is going to eventually get more res...

2007-03-27T11:52:00.000-07:00

Oh, and Erlang is going to eventually get more respect and adherents as we move into the future. It may not be the *next* big language, but it might be the one after that. :P



I don't care to sift through the comments on this ...

2007-03-27T11:50:00.000-07:00

I don't care to sift through the comments on this one, but I just wanted to take issue with the whole statement that C-style syntax is complicated. Are you smoking crack? How is it any more complicated than anything else? I write C# and JavaScript all day long and never feel like the syntax is a problem.

Languages should be judged on how easily you can express what it is you are actually trying to do; code is a means to an end, and the better it expresses the means in a way that the simplest of people can understand it, the better the language is. The syntax should be a side-effect of that goal and not an end in itself.



Although it has yet to really take off, I thought...

2007-03-08T13:57:00.000-08:00

Although it has yet to really take off, I thought Martin Oderskys experiment with Scala was an interesting way of lowering the barrier to entry to functional programming for java developers.

It introduces alot of ideas from FP and borrows the erlang concurency model.

In addition it runs on the JVM and .NET platforms, with all attendant advantages.

It's my candidate for the next big thing.

That last point may help Scala (or another new candidate) spread quickly. It's not all about the best solution, marketing and accessibility are important as well.



I don't have a clue what the next programming popu...

2007-03-05T20:05:00.000-08:00

I don't have a clue what the next programming populace would be using. I am off to checkout tamarin, the current ECMA and the future one. Always wanted to pickup some more browser scripting know-how for yet another Greasemonkey hack. This articles comments inspire me to checkout Javascript 2.0.



Probably C++0x.

2007-03-03T16:55:00.000-08:00

Probably C++0x.



This sounds very much like Perl6.I has grammar mod...

2007-03-02T08:44:00.000-08:00

This sounds very much like Perl6.

I has grammar modification built in.

It has static typing as a simple attribute in the variable's declaration.

It runs on Pugs and Parrot, will be natively compilable, and there are efforts to run in on JVM and .Net as well. Heck, much of the new thing sin Perl6 can even be run on Perl5 with some extra modules.

Performance is a primary goal.

The object syntax will be much more like other languages than Perl5's was.

Concurrency is one of the stated goals.

There is some final syntax work going on. There's final work on the VM and compiler to support everything. It's conceivable that it'll be less than two years for that to get finished to production standards.

The VM acts as a backend for other languages, too. Compilers for Ruby, PHP, Python, and other languages are being written that target Parrot. This is partly to get other languages to port to the same places as Perl and to allow multiple languages to use each other's libraries directly. It's also partly, at this stage, to find edge cases and issues that any particular single language's compiler to Parrot may or may not catch.