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Preview: Comments on The Flying Trilobite: Art Monday: Migrations - final workflow

Comments on The Flying Trilobite: Art Monday: Migrations - final workflow





Updated: 2017-07-10T16:20:12.681-04:00

 




2009-05-21T10:16:03.682-04:00

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This is a beautiful blog! I really like it, check ...

2009-05-21T10:15:56.385-04:00

This is a beautiful blog! I really like it, check out my blog at http://mellowzone.blogspot.com



Thanks Peter! Y'know, I have never been to Europe...

2009-05-19T06:27:00.000-04:00

Thanks Peter! Y'know, I have never been to Europe. *sigh*

I've read that some artists, like the excellent Jon Foster, paint in oil and manipulate digitally and print and paint again...you can add a bit of extra paint to the "final" printout and be assured you have one true "original" fit for selling. So it is possible.

Da Vinci would have likely taken the whole scanner apart to see how it worked and then drawn all the pieces and worked on hypothesis for their mechanisms.

When that's completed, I believe he would have added it to a portrait of a noble couple to denote fertility and reproduction. ;-)



The banner looks great, Glendon! Love the colour ...

2009-05-18T23:29:00.000-04:00

The banner looks great, Glendon! Love the colour of the Med... Reminds me of lying the days away in southern France and Greece.

This new way of creating art - digitally... Is it a shame there isn't a final piece you can touch and put up on the wall? I guess the touch of a button prints it out, but as an oil painter, don't you miss the texture and true colours?

What would Da Vinci have done with a scanner?



Of course naples yellow, Traumador! But naples yel...

2009-05-18T22:15:00.000-04:00

Of course naples yellow, Traumador! But naples yellow red is a bit different.

Thanks for the offer of the program, too. So far I think I'm okay. I am getting used to Gimp right now, and hope to get CS4 Photoshop in the next couple of months. It'll be nice to have something from this century.



i have a panarama piece of software (moderately sm...

2009-05-18T16:29:00.000-04:00

i have a panarama piece of software (moderately small... might be transferrable via google) that might cover you in the meantime for merging multiple scans (though they have to be the same size... for some reason the program won't touch even slightly cropped pictures)

when you mentioned getting the bird's colour right i held my breath waiting for it... and wasn't disappointed... naples yellow LOL



That sounds pretty awesome. I will have to try th...

2009-05-18T12:24:00.000-04:00

That sounds pretty awesome. I will have to try that, Sean. Enlarging the possible work would be great.

I'm looking forward to a new(er) computer over the next couple of months, and then Photoshop CS4. I checked, and I don't seem to have Photomerge on this old clunker.

This is something I look forward to. I plan on rubbing my hands together maniacally when I'm able to do this.

Thanks man!



I'm gonna have to try that black and white paint t...

2009-05-18T11:42:00.000-04:00

I'm gonna have to try that black and white paint trick.

Here's a trick for you in exchange. You mention being limited by the size of your scanner. Photoshop now has a nifty way around that limitation.

Scan your large image in sections, each section having about a 20% overlap with another. Give your images similar titles distinguished by number -- migrations.001.psd, migrations.002.psd, etc.

Then go to File on the menu bar, then to Automate, then to Photomerge. Click on Photomerge and you'll get a window that will let you select your partial scans by clicking the Browse button. Once they're selected, click OK.

At that point Photoshop will tile your scans together perfectly.

Each partial scan is on a different layer in the finished composition, so if you find visible edges caused by different gray tones on the scans you can re-arrange the layers or use an airbrushed eraser or mask to perfect the final image.

Since I found out about this feature I've been using it a lot. I've even scanned in a couple of my old life drawings. It's really nifty.