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Updated: 2018-02-16T17:42:49Z

 



AHA Council Announces Changes to the American Historical Review

2018-02-16T17:42:49Z

At its January 3, 2018, meeting, the AHA Council voted to change some important features of the management and editorial structure of the American Historical Review (AHR). The most consequential of these was the decision, starting with the hiring of the next editor in 2021, to no longer require that the editor relocate and take up a position as a faculty member at Indiana University Bloomington (IU). Instead, the selected candidate will be able to remain at their current institution while serving as editor of the AHR. The post AHA Council Announces Changes to the American Historical Review appeared first on American Historical Association. At its January 3, 2018, meeting, the AHA Council voted to change some important features of the management and editorial structure of the American Historical Review (AHR). The most consequential of these was the decision, starting with the hiring of the next editor in 2021, to no longer require that the editor relocate and take up a position as a faculty member at Indiana University Bloomington (IU). Instead, the selected candidate will be able to remain at their current institution while serving as editor of the AHR. By widening the pool of candidates, thereby enhancing the Association’s ability to recruit the most suitable candidate for the position, the new arrangement intends to continue the long tradition of high-quality editorial leadership for the flagship journal in our discipline.  The February issue of the American Historical Review. Changes at the AHR will continue the journal’s long tradition of high-quality editorial leadership. The other important change mandates the creation of an advisory body that will provide guidance and recommendations for reviews appearing in the AHR. This new board of review editors will help guide decisions about which books and scholarly outputs are reviewed in the AHR, and will work to ensure that reviewers are qualified and reflect the diversity of the discipline. As editor Alex Lichtenstein has written in his editorial for the February issue of the journal, this body will be an “additional means of diversifying editorial practices in the journal’s ‘Reviews’ section.” The AHR’s office was moved from Washington, DC, to Bloomington, Indiana, in 1975. According to the AHA’s newsletter at the time, the “AHA Council had become increasingly concerned with costs, especially those generated by an editorial staff in Washington which has consisted primarily of professional editors.” These concerns precipitated the agreement with IU, but at the time, the Council also recognized the advantage of associating with a research university: “The Council and the Indiana history department see pedagogical advantages in relocating the Review at a major university. With faculty members as editors and graduate students comprising most of the staff, the Review will continue its traditional scholarly functions but will serve also as a major training device in scholarly editing as an alternative career to now-scarce teaching positions in history.” Given the long and fruitful relationship between the Association and IU, which has seen the Review remain the most important general journal in our discipline, the Council considered these changes very carefully and made recommendations only after a long and deliberative process. Led by Edmund Russell, who recently completed a three-year term as the AHA’s vice president for research, the Council explored a number of options for the editorial structure of the AHR. Russell said that “the most important considerations during these discussions were the necessity of achieving the AHA’s goals for the journal, and ensuring that the journal would best serve the needs of the discipline for the long term.” These needs include recruiting the best editor, enhancing intellectual leadership and creativity, diversifying review consultants, streamlining processes, and enhancing the flexibility and adaptability of the journal. Much, however, will remain the same. The existence of a sta[...]



Grant of the Week: 2018 J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award

2018-02-14T18:05:01Z

Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring the Society of American Archivists’ J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award.  The deadline for the 2018 Society of American Archivists’ J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award is coming up on February 28, 2018. Established in 1989, this award honors an individual, institution, or organization that promotes greater public awareness, appreciation, or support of archival activities or programs. The post Grant of the Week: 2018 J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award appeared first on American Historical Association. Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring the Society of American Archivists’ J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award.  The deadline for the 2018 Society of American Archivists’ J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award is coming up on February 28, 2018. Established in 1989, this award honors an individual, institution, or organization that promotes greater public awareness, appreciation, or support of archival activities or programs. The individual’s or institution’s contributions may take the form of advocacy, publicity, legislation, financial support, or a similar action that fosters archival work or raises public consciousness of the importance of archival work. Contributions should have broad, long-term impact at the regional level or beyond. Up to three awards may be given each year. Please consider nominating (or self-nominating) an individual, institution, or organization that promotes greater public awareness, appreciation, or support of archival activities or programs. Nominees must be from outside the archives profession. Individuals directly involved in archival work, either as paid or volunteer staff, or institutions or organizations directly responsible for an archival program are not eligible for this award. Nominations should be sent through the online submission system by February 28, 2018 at https://app.smarterselect.com/programs/45853-Society-Of-American-Archivists. For more information on SAA awards and the nominations process, please go to the J. Franklin Jameson Award page End: February 28, 2018 Contact: lwaggen2@uwyo.edu More Info: https://www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/section12-jameson The post Grant of the Week: 2018 J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award appeared first on American Historical Association. [...]



AHA Member Spotlight: Richard Moss

2018-02-13T14:45:02Z

Richard Moss is an associate professor of history at Harrisburg Area Community College. He lives in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and has been a member since 2006.  Richard Moss is an associate professor of history at Harrisburg Area Community College. Alma maters: BA, University of North Carolina at Asheville, 2000; MA, University of Connecticut, 2003; PhD, Purdue University, 2009 Fields of interest: modern United States, global, religion, race, and ethnicity Describe your career path. What led you to where you are today? I always loved trying to tell stories and make sense of the world through them, which led me to history at an early age. The post AHA Member Spotlight: Richard Moss appeared first on American Historical Association. Richard Moss is an associate professor of history at Harrisburg Area Community College. He lives in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and has been a member since 2006.  Richard Moss is an associate professor of history at Harrisburg Area Community College. Alma maters: BA, University of North Carolina at Asheville, 2000; MA, University of Connecticut, 2003; PhD, Purdue University, 2009 Fields of interest: modern United States, global, religion, race, and ethnicity Describe your career path. What led you to where you are today? I always loved trying to tell stories and make sense of the world through them, which led me to history at an early age. When I got to college, I learned that history was more than presidents and kings and unceasing forward progress—there was an incredible diversity of stories that I had never been exposed to, and incredible nuance to stories that I thought were familiar (the Black Freedom Struggle did not end in 1965? Who knew?). I became almost obsessed with making sense of all these new (for me) threads, ideas, figures, and worldviews, and how together they created the world we live in. I also knew I wanted to foster the same sense of discovery in others and make the past accessible, and I felt like teaching and writing were the natural choices for me. What do you like the most about where you live and work? Lancaster County is such a diverse, dynamic place. It has a proud multiethnic identity and has gotten a lot of national attention lately for the number of refugees it has welcomed. This is reflected in my classes at HACC—in any given semester I have students from Puerto Rico, Tanzania, Egypt, South Africa, Southeast Asia, and many other places, along with students whose roots here go back hundreds of years. It is so gratifying to see and hear and read their interactions with one another. I am also very proud of the open-access mission of community colleges. We accept anyone who wants to better their life, and we give up a lot of luxuries to make it affordable for them. What projects are you currently working on? Well, my first book (Creating the New Right Ethnic in 1970s America: The Intersection of Anger and Nostalgia) was recently published by Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, so I am currently working on a nap! Have your interests evolved since graduation? If so, how? Yeah, definitely. I focused on modern US history in grad school, but I have become more and more interested in global history. At HACC our most popular offering is the world history survey, and I love teaching those classes. To prep for them (and because I just wanted to), I essentially did the reading for another set of qualifying exams, which I highly recommend—it is great fun when you do not have a committee to answer to, and it has given me an entirely new perspective on how to think about and teach the past. What’s the most fascinating thing you’ve ever found at the archives or while doing research?One that stands out was a letter to Thomas Jefferson that I found as a grad student, while gathering documents on the early American explorer John Ledyard. In it, he details travelling across Russia and being arrested, detained, and deported to Poland on the order of Catherine the Great. I was actually ga[...]



History at the Office: How a Business Analyst Uses Her History Degree

2018-02-13T14:59:32Z

By Stephanie Fulbright I earned my undergraduate degrees in history and business, and while my primary interest was in history, by graduation I had burned out on academia. Looking for a change of pace, I took a job at a healthcare IT organization. As I gained more work experience, I noticed I drew on the skills I learned as a history major more frequently than the skills from my business major. I began to see how well thinking like a historian applied to my roles as a project manager and a business analyst.  Conducting historical research taught Stephanie Fulbright the skills to analyze varied sources and produce comprehensible results. The post History at the Office: How a Business Analyst Uses Her History Degree appeared first on American Historical Association. By Stephanie Fulbright I earned my undergraduate degrees in history and business, and while my primary interest was in history, by graduation I had burned out on academia. Looking for a change of pace, I took a job at a healthcare IT organization. As I gained more work experience, I noticed I drew on the skills I learned as a history major more frequently than the skills from my business major. I began to see how well thinking like a historian applied to my roles as a project manager and a business analyst.  Conducting historical research taught Stephanie Fulbright the skills to analyze varied sources and produce comprehensible results. US National Archives The terms project manager and business analyst can be used to describe a number of different jobs. In my organization, project managers are responsible for determining the steps necessary to complete a project, which is a defined set of work with a beginning and end date. Project managers work with the project team to craft a plan for getting the project done and then help ensure the work gets completed. They do not, however, directly manage any of the team members. Business analysts get involved at the start of projects and help the people requesting them articulate what they are trying to achieve and how they will know they successfully met their goals. For example, I am currently working on a project to determine if a new perinatal alerting system (for monitoring babies’ heart rates during birth) improves clinical outcomes for moms and their babies. To see if the system is in fact impacting outcomes, we need to figure out what data points are available and how to measure them in way that gives us an answer to our questions. Project managers and historians share some similar ways of thinking. First, both try to construct a logical flow of steps or events. Historians usually know something about the ending (present day, for example) and maybe something about the beginning. Historical research is often centered on figuring out what happened in the middle and how people got from there (past) to here (present). Similarly, project managers know what the end should be and need to figure out all of the steps to get from here (current state) to there (future state). To do that, project managers have to organize lots of information from lots of different sources. Each part of the project team has ideas about what needs to be done, and the project manager needs to synthesize those ideas into a coherent plan for the team to follow. For me, writing historical research papers taught me how to bring together different, and sometimes contradictory, sources into something other people could understand and follow. My training as a historian taught me how to comprehend big complex pictures and to communicate that understanding to others. I currently work as a business analyst, and like in my project management role, I have found I am thinking like a historian. For instance, I often find myself in meetings where multiple stakeholders are using the same words but it is clear they mean different things. Part of my job is to notice those discrepancies and help clarify what is being said. This awareness of nuances in language is somet[...]



Research-Oriented: Translating a History PhD into a Successful Career at a Think Tank

2018-02-08T14:34:24Z

By Ashton Merck Think tanks, also known as research institutes, advocacy organizations, and policy centers, are often described as “universities without students.” These organizations run the gamut of political orientations, thematic focus, size, and scope, but most share a common emphasis on research and writing—two core features of doctoral programs in history. Thus, working at a think tank seems like a perfect example of the kind of career outside academia that forward-thinking institutions and professional associations, including the AHA, are increasingly encouraging history PhDs to pursue. The post Research-Oriented: Translating a History PhD into a Successful Career at a Think Tank appeared first on American Historical Association. By Ashton Merck Think tanks, also known as research institutes, advocacy organizations, and policy centers, are often described as “universities without students.” These organizations run the gamut of political orientations, thematic focus, size, and scope, but most share a common emphasis on research and writing—two core features of doctoral programs in history. Thus, working at a think tank seems like a perfect example of the kind of career outside academia that forward-thinking institutions and professional associations, including the AHA, are increasingly encouraging history PhDs to pursue. Those who attended the panel on “Thinking like a Historian at a Think Tank” at the 2018 AHA annual meeting, however, received far more than a pitch to work for think tanks. Instead, panelists offered refreshingly pragmatic advice for students who want to leverage a PhD in history into a fulfilling career.  Former Secretary of State John Kerry speaks at a policy conference at the Center for American Progress, a think tank that employs historians. Wikimedia Commons The panel was composed of three history PhDs from three very different think tanks: Stephanie Young, from the RAND Corporation; Philip Wolgin, from the Center for American Progress (CAP); and Ted Bromund, from the Heritage Foundation. Brian Balogh, history professor at the University of Virginia, moderated the conversation. Audience members soon learned that “working at a think tank” meant something slightly different for each panelist. Aside from differences in their political leanings, each think tank has its own institutional culture, which shapes the type of work analysts do on a day-to-day basis. Young explained how RAND analysts join interdisciplinary teams to solve a specific problem for clients. By contrast, Bromund described his activities at the Heritage Foundation as relatively self-directed, with the freedom to choose his own projects and develop his own timeline. Wolgin characterized the Center for American Progress as an “action tank,” in which analysts translate their research into policy advocacy in a short amount of time. The panelists also reminded the audience of an important distinction between research jobs at think tanks and research in an academic setting: at the “university without students,” there is no tenure. Think tank positions—especially those that are purely research-oriented—remain highly contingent on the availability of funding. In fact, think tank researchers spend part of their time fundraising their salaries, whether through traditional grant writing or by developing and maintaining relationships with donors and foundations. The panelists observed how historians have some key advantages over social scientists, particularly in their capacity to synthesize large amounts of information and craft narratives. The panelists were, however, forthcoming about the extent to which their graduate work did not prepare them for the work they do now. Not surprisingly, the formalism of academic writing proved of little use when creating a PowerPoint for officials at the Department of Defense. Nor did familiarity with the nuances of historiography provide much guidance in cr[...]



Grant of the Week: Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection Library Research Fellowship Program, 2018–2019

2018-02-07T15:14:21Z

Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection Library Research Fellowship Program.  Thanks to generous ongoing funding from the Elios Charitable Foundation and additional funding from the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Foundation, the University Library at California State University, Sacramento is pleased to announce the continuation of the Library Research Fellowship Program to support the use of the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection by fellows for scholarly research in Hellenic studies while in residence in Sacramento, CA. The post Grant of the Week: Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection Library Research Fellowship Program, 2018–2019 appeared first on American Historical Association. Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection Library Research Fellowship Program.  Thanks to generous ongoing funding from the Elios Charitable Foundation and additional funding from the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Foundation, the University Library at California State University, Sacramento is pleased to announce the continuation of the Library Research Fellowship Program to support the use of the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection by fellows for scholarly research in Hellenic studies while in residence in Sacramento, CA. The Program provides a limited number of fellowships ranging from $1,000 to $4,000 to help offset transportation and living expenses incurred during the tenure of the awards and is open to external researchers anywhere in the world at the doctoral through senior scholar levels (including independent scholars) working in fields encompassed by the Collection’s strengths who reside outside a 75-mile radius of Sacramento. The term of fellowships can vary between two weeks and three months, depending on the nature of the research, and for the current cycle will be tenable from July 1, 2018-June 30, 2019. The fellowship application deadline is February 28, 2018. No late applications will be considered. Consisting of the holdings of the former Speros Basil Vryonis Center for the Study of Hellenism, the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection is the premier Hellenic collection in the western United States and one of the largest of its kind in the country, currently numbering approximately 75,000 volumes. It comprises a large circulating book collection, journal holdings, electronic resources, non-print media materials, rare books, archival materials, art and artifacts. With its focus on the Hellenic world, the Collection contains early through contemporary materials across the social sciences and humanities relating to Greece, the Balkans, the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey, and the surrounding region, with particular strengths in Byzantine, post-Byzantine, and Modern Greek studies, including the Greek diaspora. There is a broad representation of over 20 languages in the Collection, with a rich assortment of primary source materials. Since 2009 the collection has experienced particularly dramatic growth through several major gift acquisitions. For further information about the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection, visit http://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection. For the full Library Research Fellowship Program description and application instructions, see: http://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection/lrfp. Questions about the Program can be directed to George I. Paganelis, Curator, Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection (paganelis@csus.edu). End: February 28, 2018 Contact: paganelis@csus.edu More Info: http://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection/lrfp The post Grant of the Week:[...]



AHA Member Spotlight: Cassandra Newby-Alexander

2018-02-06T14:30:31Z

Cassandra Newby-Alexander is the interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts, professor of history, and director of the Joseph Jenkins Roberts Center for African Diaspora Studies at Norfolk State University. She lives in Chesapeake, Virginia, and has been a member since 2000.  Cassandra Newby-Alexander is the interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts, professor of history, and director of the Joseph Jenkins Roberts Center for African Diaspora Studies at Norfolk State University. Alma maters: BA (American government and African American studies), University of Virginia, 1980; PhD (American history), College of William and Mary, 1992 Fields of interest: African American, American, African diaspora Describe your career path. The post AHA Member Spotlight: Cassandra Newby-Alexander appeared first on American Historical Association. Cassandra Newby-Alexander is the interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts, professor of history, and director of the Joseph Jenkins Roberts Center for African Diaspora Studies at Norfolk State University. She lives in Chesapeake, Virginia, and has been a member since 2000.  Cassandra Newby-Alexander is the interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts, professor of history, and director of the Joseph Jenkins Roberts Center for African Diaspora Studies at Norfolk State University. Alma maters: BA (American government and African American studies), University of Virginia, 1980; PhD (American history), College of William and Mary, 1992 Fields of interest: African American, American, African diaspora Describe your career path. What led you to where you are today? Since high school, I have been privileged to have a series of instructors who have stimulated my interest in history in general, and African American history in particular. Although I initially thought I would pursue a career in law, I soon discovered after working as a paralegal in a prominent civil rights law firm that teaching and academe was more engaging as a career path. Since that time, all the professors I have had as an undergraduate and graduate student have contributed to my special interests because of their particular research and scholarly approaches and interpretations. While I have taken a circuitous path from paralegal to high school teacher to professor, each experience broadened my perspective and provided me with information and an expansive understanding that has been critical to my career. What do you like the most about where you live and work? I have an opportunity to work with a dedicated group of scholars from various disciplines whose interests have dovetailed with mine. My colleagues are generous in sharing their research, collaborating on various projects, and engaging students in their research. My colleagues have been supportive in organizing and hosting public programs and community outreach. What projects are you currently working on? Over the past seven years, I have worked on the 1619: Making of America programming series that has included conferences, teacher workshops, research projects, and ancillary activities. This program will be one of the signature programs for the 2019 Commemoration Commission sponsored by the Commonwealth of Virginia that focus on the arc of African American history. It will highlight their beginnings in Virginia in 1619 and interpret how it was that those who were forcibly brought from the African continent substantially imprinted their culture on America. I am also working on a book about efforts by Virginia’s African American population to seek freedom and liberty from 1619 through Reconstruction. These efforts include flight through the Underground Railroad and immigration to Liberia. Have your interests evolved since graduation? If so, how? Yes, my interests have evolved as I have blended my historical research with public programming. I am passionately committed to translating h[...]



The Graduate: Introducing a New Series on AHA Today

2018-02-05T17:00:39Z

Welcome to the new AHA Today series on graduate life! The Graduate aims to provide a platform for students to discuss the issues they face, reflect on the unique experiences of pursuing a graduate degree in history (trials and triumphs alike), and make proposals for how we—as students, professionals, and as a discipline—can come together to address the challenges of graduate education.  The Graduate hopes to build an inclusive grad student community that connects historians across fields, range of experiences, geography, and type of institution. The post The Graduate: Introducing a New Series on AHA Today appeared first on American Historical Association. Welcome to the new AHA Today series on graduate life! The Graduate aims to provide a platform for students to discuss the issues they face, reflect on the unique experiences of pursuing a graduate degree in history (trials and triumphs alike), and make proposals for how we—as students, professionals, and as a discipline—can come together to address the challenges of graduate education.  The Graduate hopes to build an inclusive grad student community that connects historians across fields, range of experiences, geography, and type of institution. I’m a sixth-year PhD student in the history department at the University of Southern California. My research focuses on fundamentalist Protestants, capitalism, and higher education in 20th-century Los Angeles. I also have a master’s in history from the University of York in the United Kingdom, where I originally hail from. With one foot almost out the door, I’ve been spending a lot of time reflecting on graduate study, both on my own experiences and those of my colleagues. I’ve also been trying to find ways to engage public audiences with my work, and recently wrote a blog post for AHA Today. The idea for this series emerged from conversations with the AHA Today editor, and the recognition that, despite the thousands of graduate students currently enrolled in history programs across the United States alone, we lack common platforms to discuss our professional lives. When she suggested that I head a column on graduate life, I jumped at the opportunity. It is my goal that this series is frank in its treatment of graduate life, and that it does not shy away from controversial topics. Too often, graduate students believe that in order to succeed, they must maintain an image of relentless productivity. To admit to frustration, exhaustion, or worry, particularly to faculty but sometimes even to other students, often seems the “wrong tactic” or even outright risky. Graduate life can be isolating enough even when all the plates are spinning nicely. But when it goes wrong, it can go very wrong indeed. And, if anything, the challenges facing graduate students in our discipline appear to be multiplying. Whether it is the latest grim report on the academic job market or the recent proposal, albeit unsuccessful, to eliminate graduate tuition waivers, the current moment does not appear to be an auspicious one for graduate study in history. Recent events, however, have also, in my view, proven the intrinsic value of graduate education in history. We graduates—whatever our field, time period, or area of specialization—are developing a firm understanding of the complexity and origins of contemporary global problems. And we make a difference any time we bring those skills to bear inside or outside of the academy. Amid the dispiriting developments facing the discipline of history in recent times, The Graduate will, I hope, prove to be a space where we graduate students can have a productive dialogue about what the degree is doing for us, what is going right about our graduate education, and how we can make the most of our time in graduate school. As I conclude my sixth (and, fingers cro[...]



Students in the Trenches: Using Operation War Diary to Teach the First World War

2018-02-01T14:46:01Z

By Susan Corbesero About a half hour into tagging frontline records in the Operation War Diary project, the room of high school sophomores erupted. “Rats! These trenches are filled with them.” “That’s not so bad; the officer here is talking about trench foot.” “It looks like 95 soldiers died on just this one day!” “My battalion doesn’t seem to move anywhere.” “Oh no! This unit is heading to Ypres.” As an educator, I could not have found the moment more gratifying. The post Students in the Trenches: Using Operation War Diary to Teach the First World War appeared first on American Historical Association. By Susan Corbesero About a half hour into tagging frontline records in the Operation War Diary project, the room of high school sophomores erupted. “Rats! These trenches are filled with them.” “That’s not so bad; the officer here is talking about trench foot.” “It looks like 95 soldiers died on just this one day!” “My battalion doesn’t seem to move anywhere.” “Oh no! This unit is heading to Ypres.” As an educator, I could not have found the moment more gratifying. My classroom had transformed into a history lab where students were deepening their understanding of the First World War, honing their historical skills, and contributing to an impressive crowdsourcing campaign to make the diaries of British soldiers on the Western Front accessible to scholars, researchers, and the wider public.  Operation War Diary (OWD) was launched in 2014 by the National Archives, the Imperial War Museums, and Zooniverse to mark the centenary of the global conflict. Operation War Diary (OWD) was launched in 2014 by the National Archives, the Imperial War Museums, and Zooniverse to mark the centenary of the global conflict. The collection contains over one million digitized images of the war diaries of British and Indian troops, offering a fascinating glimpse into the units’ day-to-day activities. Operation War Diary asks public volunteers or “citizen historians” to tag the diaries with a range of variables including dates, places, types of activity, names, and casualties. The records of several divisions are available for annotation, including infantry, cavalry, ambulance, artillery, engineers, machine gun, veterinary, and regional units. The Imperial War Museums harvests the tagged and categorized information to create a permanent digital memorial—Lives of the First World War—telling the life stories of those in the British Commonwealth who contributed to the war. My goals for getting students involved in the crowdsourcing OWD project were threefold. First, the OWD class project can teach students about the unprecedented and long-lasting physical and psychological trauma wrought by a war often bypassed in US history textbooks. The unit I teach on the First World War is already robust. In addition to textbook readings and lectures, students participate in a role-playing game on the outbreak of the war, discuss war poetry readings, and analyze propaganda. The war diaries add another important dimension by telling the story of this global conflict from the perspective of participants who experienced the industrialized slaughter and its aftershocks firsthand. The project is also designed to develop students’ skills and competencies, such as “historical reading,” chronological thinking, geoliteracy, and others articulated in the AHA’s History Discipline Core. Third, I seek to engage students in the craft of actually doing history, in this case by helping to create data for historical analysis. I direct students to Richard Grayson’s recent study of the frontlines based on data from OWD as a case in point. The class project (now in its third iteration) consists of two days (2 classes, 80 minutes each) of intensive work with the war diaries. Prior to class, stude[...]



Grant of the Week: 2018 Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Program

2018-01-31T14:13:57Z

Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring the 2018 Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Program.  The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) is pleased to announce the eighth annual competition of the Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Program. This initiative places humanities PhDs in substantive roles in diverse nonprofit and government organizations, demonstrating that the knowledge and capacities developed in the course of earning a doctoral degree in the humanities have wide application beyond the academy. The post Grant of the Week: 2018 Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Program appeared first on American Historical Association. Every week, AHA Today showcases a new grant, fellowship, or scholarship of interest to historians which has been posted to our free Calendar. This week we are featuring the 2018 Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Program.  The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) is pleased to announce the eighth annual competition of the Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Program. This initiative places humanities PhDs in substantive roles in diverse nonprofit and government organizations, demonstrating that the knowledge and capacities developed in the course of earning a doctoral degree in the humanities have wide application beyond the academy. The fellowship carries an annual stipend of $67,500, health insurance coverage for the fellow, a relocation allowance, and up to $3,000 in professional development funds. In 2018, ACLS will place up to 25 PhDs as Public Fellows in the following organizations and roles: Center for Popular Democracy (Brooklyn, NY) – Strategic Research Associate Chemical Heritage Foundation (Philadelphia, PA) – Digital Engagement Manager Chicago Council on Global Affairs (Chicago, IL) – Research Associate, Global Cities Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (Madison, WI) – Global Programs Manager Council of Independent Colleges (Washington, DC) – Development Officer Environmental Law & Policy Center (Chicago, IL) – Senior Research Analyst, Transportation Innovation Innocence Project (New York, NY) – Content Strategist Lapham’s Quarterly (New York, NY) – Digital Producer Los Angeles County Arts Commission (Los Angeles, CA) – Cross Sector Analyst Los Angeles Review of Books (Los Angeles, CA) – Associate Executive Editor and Assistant Director, LARB Books MinnPost (Minneapolis, MN) – Audience Development and Engagement Manager The Moth (New York, NY) – Impact and Evaluation Officer National Immigration Law Center (Washington, DC) – Research Program Manager National Trust for Historic Preservation (Washington, DC) – Manager of Curatorial Innovation Participatory Budgeting Project (Brooklyn, NY) – Participatory Design Strategist PolicyLink (Oakland, CA) – Associate, Equitable Economy Research Public Radio International (Minneapolis, MN) – Associate Editor, Global Nation Race Forward (Oakland, CA or New York, NY) – Narrative Impact Analyst Rockefeller Archive Center (Sleepy Hollow, NY) – Outreach Program Manager Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative (Washington, DC) – Program Manager for Cultural Disaster Analysis Smithsonian Institution Office of International Relations (Washington, DC) – Global Science Officer Social Science Research Council (Brooklyn, NY) – Program Officer, Media and Democracy Project Stockholm Environment Institute – US Center (Seattle, WA) – Climate Policy Associate United Negro College Fund (Washington, DC) – Policy Analyst United Neighborhood Houses (New York, NY) – Policy Analyst Applicants must possess US citizenship or permanent resident status and have a PhD [...]