Subscribe: Comments for The Red Notebook
http://blog.friendsofdarwin.com/comments/feed/
Preview: Comments for The Red Notebook

Comments for The Friends of Charles Darwin



Charlie is our Darwin



Last Build Date: Tue, 17 Apr 2018 19:06:42 +0000

 



Comment on Coming Soon: The Friends of Charles Darwin newsletter by Jont

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 19:06:42 +0000

Great! Have just discovered your site from a link on Pharyngula. Am also looking forward to the newsletter!



Comment on Coming Soon: The Friends of Charles Darwin newsletter by Frank C Pearson

Mon, 02 Apr 2018 05:29:41 +0000

Very glad you are starting a newsletter. Looking forward to the first issue. Thank you very much.



Comment on Was Darwin a vegetarian? by Richard Carter, FCD

Tue, 13 Mar 2018 12:52:00 +0000

I don’t know about mammals in particular, but the most famous story of Darwin ‘discovering’ a species as he was eating it was his discovery of the bird that became known as Darwin's rhea. Darwin was aware that there were two different species of these flightless birds in South America, and had unsuccessfully tried to collect a sample of the rarer, smaller species (which he believed to be a new species to science, although it later turned out somebody else had already collected it). Then, in January 1844, Darwin was happily tucking into a bird shot for lunch by HMS Beagle's artist Conrad Martens, when he realised it was the very species he’d been trying to collect. He managed to preserve a few of the pieces that hadn’t been eaten.



Comment on Was Darwin a vegetarian? by Chris

Mon, 12 Mar 2018 16:55:15 +0000

I'm rather late to this party but interesting (to me at least) question for you: I once knew a mammalian biologist (a biologist of mammals rather than a biologist who was a mammal, although I seem to remember that the latter also applied) in Oxford who mentioned to me that Darwin had "discovered" a considerable number of species of mammals "by eating them". This was in the context of a conversation on the edibility of mammals in general. I assume that he meant CD had eaten them after examining them etc. It's easy to imagine that on a long voyage, especially without modern methods of preservation, one might elect to eat even a new discovery rather than have it decompose. I just wondered whether you are aware of any evidence of this or whether it was just speculation.



Comment on Weather-forecasting frogs by Janos feher

Sun, 31 Dec 2017 05:31:33 +0000

This is a well known piece of folklore in Eastern Europe. (Hungary). I've tried it with my wife, but its always wrong.



Comment on End of an era by Michael Barton

Wed, 27 Sep 2017 16:15:40 +0000

I am happy to have a crisp Darwin tenner!



Comment on If humans evolved from monkeys, how come there are still monkeys? by William Conroy

Tue, 25 Jul 2017 03:24:03 +0000

Wow how fasinating and get more info of the new world monkeys. Thanks a lot.



Comment on If humans evolved from monkeys, how come there are still monkeys? by Richard Carter, FCD

Sat, 06 May 2017 09:05:18 +0000

Evolution is descent with inherited variation. The fact that we and modern apes and monkeys are not all the same species, but are both descended from a common ancestor, means that evolution occurred.



Comment on If humans evolved from monkeys, how come there are still monkeys? by Tom

Tue, 02 May 2017 00:06:28 +0000

There is a difference between evolving and being a descendant.



Comment on If humans evolved from monkeys, how come there are still monkeys? by Richard Carter, FCD

Fri, 14 Apr 2017 10:00:15 +0000

We did indeed evolve from apes. Indeed, depending on how you choose to define an ‘ape’, you could say that we humans are apes. But, as I make clear in the article and diagram, the apes (including humans) evolved from ‘monkeys’ (according to some people's chosen definition of the word).