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Preview: Yeah, suck it, I do read the paper.

Yeah, suck it, I do read the paper.



Jenn. Thirtysomething. Illinois. #StillWithHer A collection of thoughtsicles and mind grapes. I love television, among other things.



 



This interview is a balm for the soul.

Fri, 12 Jan 2018 21:52:01 -0600

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This interview is a balm for the soul.




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Sat, 23 Dec 2017 15:48:51 -0600

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Rockwell Kent (1882–1971), Moonlight, Winter, c. 1940. Oil on...

Fri, 22 Dec 2017 11:52:09 -0600

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Rockwell Kent (1882–1971), Moonlight, Winter, c. 1940. Oil on linen, 8 × 34 1/8 in. (71.1 × 86.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.




Open up, ma'am. Lower the drawbridge.

Fri, 22 Dec 2017 09:57:33 -0600

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Open up, ma'am. Lower the drawbridge.




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Wed, 20 Dec 2017 21:28:14 -0600

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No formal Favorite Shows list for 2017 because the final season...

Tue, 19 Dec 2017 07:55:24 -0600

No formal Favorite Shows list for 2017 because the final season of The Leftovers aired this year and for me, nothing came even remotely close to touching it. There would be a fairly large gap between this show at #1 and whatever shows I chose to fill the other slots that a list doesn’t feel like an appropriate way to mark the year in TV. Every episode of this final season felt like a finale in its own way, and the whole season was masterfully written, directed, and acted. Justin Theroux, Amy Brenneman, and Carrie Coon all destroyed me several different times over the course of the season. It was also gorgeously shot, unexpectedly and darkly funny, and the music and score were excellent. Caroline Framke said of one episode that it was the kind of episode she wished she had saved her best adjectives for, and that’s how I feel about the entire season – it deserves all the best adjectives.I will always love that one of the darkest shows I’ve ever watched was so full of compassion for its characters and ended on such a hopeful note. And that a story that started out with such a huge, earth-shattering event ended on such a small, intimate scale – a love story about two people finding each other again. For all of Damon Lindelof’s insistence that there would be no easy answers on this show (and there never were), The Leftovers team somehow managed to produce one of the most perfect, emotionally satisfying finales I’ve ever had the pleasure of experiencing (watching Carrie Coon deliver that monologue feels like a privilege). There aren’t always easy answers in life either, so why would I want them from this show, which is so much about about grief, loss, the human condition, and how big, small, wonderful, horrible, and confusing life can be.Simply saying The Leftovers is my favorite show of the year feels like I’m underselling it because I connected with this show so deeply. That The Leftovers even existed on television for three seasons somehow feels like a dream and miracle. It’s one of my favorite shows ever, and I know I’ll go back to it again and again. I’ll end with this, from Margaret Lyons. I’ve posted it before, but it continues to sum up my feelings about this show so perfectly:“One time on the El in Chicago, I saw a man finish his book, clap the cover closed, draw the book to his chest, close his eyes and inhale deeply, like a mom in a fabric-softener commercial. He had a serene look on his face, as though he were thinking, “Now that was a book.” That’s how I felt at the end of HBO’s imaginative, operatic “The Leftovers.” Now that was a show.”Other Shows I Loved This Year: 555, The Americans, American Vandal, At Home with Amy Sedaris, Baskets, Better Call Saul, Better Things, Big Little Lies, Big Mouth, Black-ish, Bob’s Burgers, BoJack Horseman, Broad City, Casual, Catastrophe, Chewing Gum, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, The Crown, Dear White People, The Deuce, Difficult People, Fargo, Fresh Off the Boat, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, Girls, GLOW, The Good Place, Great News, The Handmaid’s Tale, Insecure, The Keepers, Late Night with Seth Meyers, Love, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Master of None, Mindhunter, Mr. Robot, Nathan For You, One Mississippi, Playing House, Please Like Me, Queen Sugar, Search Party, SMILF, Stranger Things, Superstore, Transparent[...]



"With its didgeridoos, alternate universes, Biblical exegeseses, horny-lion cults on boats, and that..."

Mon, 18 Dec 2017 19:50:21 -0600

“With its didgeridoos, alternate universes, Biblical exegeseses, horny-lion cults on boats, and that sob-inducing soundtrack, “The Leftovers” was easily the best thing I saw this year. It had what critics crave: wit, beauty, joy, surprise, originality, the thrill of disorientation, strong emotion, big laughs, great performances, and wonderful music. What was it about? The end of the world. Death in general. Suicide and divorce. It was a show about grief that felt like pure joy. I looked forward to every episode, more than any other show.”

- Emily Nussbaum, “Definitely Not a Top Ten List: The Best TV Shows of 2017”



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Sun, 17 Dec 2017 19:36:32 -0600

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I’m here.

Sun, 17 Dec 2017 13:21:23 -0600

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I’m here.




Alan Sepinwall Picks The Top 20 TV Series Of 2017

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 09:04:58 -0600

Alan Sepinwall Picks The Top 20 TV Series Of 2017:

1. The Leftovers (HBO)

This has been my show of the year — of the decade, maybe, depending on how we count things like Mad Men and Breaking Bad that debuted in the ’00s — from the moment the series finale ended with me reduced to a puddle of happy tears, or maybe even from the moment when the show paired its opening credits with the Perfect Strangers theme as an unexpected payoff to a minor running gag, then turned the whole thing tragic with a deadly serious guest appearance by Mark Linn-Baker as himself. The eight-episode final season was a miracle from its beginning, featuring a musical dramatization of the Great Disappointment of the Millerite movement that required no knowledge of the Seventh-day Adventist church to hit home, to its end, with Carrie Coon’s Nora Durst delivering a monologue that explained either everything about the series or nothing, depending on your skepticism level, but somehow mended the heartbreak that spanned decades and universes between her and Justin Theroux’s Kevin Garvey. And the middle — which included a Tasmanian lion sex boat party (not an exaggeration), a dark meditation on suicide, a near-fatal walk across the Australian Outback, and a presidential penis scanner — was remarkable, too, in every respect. It was a knockout, week after week, minute after minute — comedy and tragedy and science fiction and horror and religious allegory all rolled into a beautifully written, directed, and acted collection of television — and will hopefully be discovered and spoken of with awe for years to come.

But as I put together this list, and thought back on the year that’s about to end, I couldn’t help noticing how unwittingly The Leftovers turned out to be the show of 2017 not only for its staggering quality, but because so many of its ideas wound up thematically mirroring the history we’re all living through: a fundamentally broken world that has ceased to make sense for too many people in it, where violence pops up with shocking regularity, trust in institutions has vanished like it went away in the Sudden Departure, and optimism seems a luxury few can afford, featuring an irrational old man insisting he alone can fix everything, and a president some people fear could literally blow up the planet for irrational, selfish reasons. Years from now, if someone were to ask me not what happened in 2017, but what it felt like — not just in the moments of utter confusion and despair, but the ones of unexpected mirth, joy, and sheer disbelief (good or bad) at what we’re seeing — I might just hand them this season.

The Leftovers chooses hope in the end, not only with Kevin and Nora, but with its entire world, which manages to hang together and move on after nobody expects it to. May the same thing happen for us starting in 2018, preferably without a naked French sailor setting off a nuclear explosion to destroy a sea monster, or a lion eating God — two things that actually happened, and made perfect emotional sense, on this amazing, amazing show.




Hey! Wanna dance?

Sun, 10 Dec 2017 18:16:01 -0600

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Hey! Wanna dance?




What a drip.

Tue, 05 Dec 2017 19:57:31 -0600

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What a drip.




Carrie Coon for Glamour, December 2017

Sat, 02 Dec 2017 17:32:05 -0600

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Carrie Coon for Glamour, December 2017




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Sat, 02 Dec 2017 15:46:28 -0600

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Amy Sedaris Is The Weirdo The World Needs Right Now

Tue, 28 Nov 2017 10:15:11 -0600

Amy Sedaris Is The Weirdo The World Needs Right Now:

At Home with Amy Sedaris, Sedaris’s latest project, is an expansion of an oeuvre that mixes discomfort and queasiness with Sedaris’s signature charm and unceasing positivity. The show, which premiered at the end of October on TruTV, is a cross between sketch comedy and how-to guide for hosting. Tonally, it’s like if Twin Peaks were on TLC. Each 24-minute episode features three or four segments loosely based around the ideas of hosting, crafting, and cooking. (They also include discussions of death, depression, poverty, and shellfish-based cocktails.) It’s derangement under the guise of wholesome entertainment.

“I like going back to that kind of entertaining rather than trying to talk about prescription drugs or alcoholism or incest. We did that with Strangers,” Sedaris said. “It’s still messed up a little bit, but I wanted that wholesome feel to it. That’s challenging.”

It’s also the kind of show that could have only come from Sedaris’s brain, where everything is saturated in candy colors and seemingly unmoored from any particular era or moment in time. This is arguably true of Sedaris as well. She isn’t on Twitter; her studio doesn’t have a phone or a television or a visible laptop; she only recently got a cell phone, or a “cellular,” as she calls it. “I was best man at Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux’s wedding,” she said. (Theroux, who makes an appearance in one episode of At Home, is a close friend.) “I went to LA and I had to get Uber because I don’t drive, and I was forced to get a phone. I don’t even know my number. Even when the phone rings, I panic.”

In a world where politics has now fully dominated the social discourse, and in which so many celebrities have been consistently and personally disappointing, Sedaris’s work offers a surrealist reprieve from all things “topical” and plunges the viewer into a world where, delightfully and briefly, nothing really matters. It’s the kind of comedy that isn’t guided by pop culture or current events. Instead, she creates a space that’s highly detailed and specific, where everything is about organized chaos. If you want to disengage from the world right now, a visit to her universe might be just what you need.

– Scaachi Koul




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Mon, 27 Nov 2017 07:52:24 -0600

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Gang, gang, gang, I’m sorry. I’m sorry. I’m sorry. But this is...

Sat, 25 Nov 2017 11:40:29 -0600

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Gang, gang, gang, I’m sorry. I’m sorry. I’m sorry. But this is not looking good, okay? Drew, you buying a bus ticket to leave Montreal, and the fact that you bludgeoned the guy that your girlfriend was cheating on you with? I’m sorry, that is so sketch. Okay? Add that to the fact that we stuffed a guy in a closet, and left him there for hours while we went out to dinner? I mean it is so so so so sketch.




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Sat, 25 Nov 2017 11:15:50 -0600

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So dig this. I’m in the kitchen with Aunt Vi, right? She cooking...

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 13:29:02 -0600

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So dig this. I’m in the kitchen with Aunt Vi, right? She cooking up her smothered chicken. You know you like that. And we talking about what I’m gonna name you. She tells me a story about the first time she realized her name was a color. A little girl saw her name on a crayon at school. Said she felt special her name could make something so pretty. The color violet. So I thought about that…and there was one that was perfect, just like the color violet. And it rhymes with my mama’s name – True. I could name you after the two ladies in my life who always believed in me no matter what. Just like I believe in you. No matter what.




I loved the second season of Better Things just as much as I...

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 21:02:00 -0600

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I loved the second season of Better Things just as much as I loved the first (a lot, and deeply), and this great piece by Todd VanDerWerff sums up my feelings about the show as a whole, including Louis C.K.’s involvement with it. I also appreciated these pieces from Alan Sepinwall and Danette Chavez, which also grapple with C.K’s involvement but focus more on the season finale.