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Preview: C&I Updates

C&I Updates



New issue announcements and occasional administrative stuff for Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large



Updated: 2017-09-14T09:13:21.203-07:00

 



Cites & Insights September 2017 available

2017-09-14T09:13:21.226-07:00

The September 2017 issue of Cites & Insights (17:8) is now available for downloading at https://citesandinsights.info/civ17i8.pdf

A very personal and very short issue (12 6" x 9" pages) includes two essays:

The Front: Maybe I'm Doing it Wrong  pp. 1-4


Hat-tip to Randy Newman for the title, and--although this was written over the weekend and it's not referred to in the essay, even indirectly--to CHE for once again making my point.

Perspective: Where I Stand: OA, "Predatory," Blacklists, the Bealllists and Thought Leadership  pp. 4-12


That's not even the full title. There's a subtitle, "or why 140 characters is less than 1% of what I need to say about this cluster of topics," which relates to the Twitter "conversation" that resulted in this somewhat-redundant commentary being written.

Enjoy. Or not.




Cites & Insights 17.7 (August 2017) available

2017-07-30T10:41:35.667-07:00

The August 2017 Cites & Insights (volume 17, issue 7) is now available for downloading at https://citesandinsights,info/civ17i7.pdf

The 32-page (6" x 9", designed for online/tablet reading) issue includes:

The Front: The Summer Issues pp. 1-2

An ode to stone fruit season and a note on lack of deeper significance.

Media: Mystery Collection, Part 8 pp. 2-16

Three years in the making, this set of mini-reviews covers discs 43 through 48 of the 250-movie collection.

The Back pp. 17-31

Audio oddities: catching up with almost a year's worth of peculiarities--plus a tally of International Journals of Stuff.
What's that you say? What's on page 32? Overhead: the ongoing nearly-pointless "Pay What You Wish" and the masthead. The last page is short, and I chose not to write a couple of paragraphs to pad it.



Cites & Insights 17:6 (July 2017) available

2017-07-01T14:51:49.305-07:00

The July 2017 Cites & Insights (17:6) is now available for downloading at https://citesandinsights.info/civ17i6.pdf

This 60-page (6" x 9") issue consists of one essay:

Intersections: Economics and Access 2017 pp. 1-60

A roundup of various items relating to the cost, price, fees and other aspects of scholarly journals, with an emphasis on open access.



Cites & Insights 17.5 available: subject supplement to GOAJ2

2017-06-06T11:28:36.139-07:00

Cites & Insights 17.5 (June 2017) is now available for downloading at https://citesandinsights.info/civ17i5.pdf

 The 84-page issue (6" x 9" pages designed for online/device reading) includes:

The Front: The Countries of OAWorld 2: 2011-2016 pp. 1-11

Announcing The Countries of OAWorld 2: 2011-2016 (links at the usual place) and adding some comments on the cover--specifically, a copy of the heatmap, a table with the data used for the heatmap (combined 2015-2016 OAWorld articles per 100,000 population of each country), and another heatmap and table including APCLand articles (which mostly boosts Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands to three of the top four spots).

Intersections: Subject Supplement to GOAJ2 pp. 11-84

There won't be a separate paperback and PDF for subjects this year; this long article expands the one-page-per-subject coverage in GOAJ2 itself, adding up to six more tables and two graphs for each subject.



Cites & Insights 17:4 (May 2017) available

2017-05-19T08:13:04.447-07:00

Cites & Insights 17:4 (May 2017) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights,info/civ17i4.pdf

The 80-page issue consists of an introductory page, a final page, and the first seven chapters of GOAJ2: Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2017. It's a shorter version--unchanged but omitting sections on subjects and regions.

If you're downloading the free ebook or purchasing the $6 trade paperback (see here for links), there's no reason to read the issue: you won't learn anything more.



Cites & Insights 17:3 (April 2017) available

2017-04-06T12:55:20.530-07:00

Cites & Insights 17:3 (April 2017) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ17i3.pdf

The 32-page 6"x9" single-column issue* includes two essays:

The Art of the Beall pp. 1-20

[Hat-tip to Phil Davis for the title.] The blacklists have "disappeared," but not the blather. Almost entirely material from January 16, 2017 to April 3, 2017. And remember that a comprehensive study of journals that were on the lists and their article counts from 2012 through June 30, 2016 is available as C&I 17.1.

Libraries and Communities pp. 21-32

If the first essay's all recent material, this one's not: items date from October 2009 to May 2014. Some thoughts on libraries and/in their communities, mostly by people better qualified to write about these things than I am
*Reminder: Cites & Insights is now optimized for online/tablet reading. If you're printing it out, I recommend having your PDF software print as a booklet, which should require 8 sheets of paper. Very slightly smaller type, good paper efficiency.



Cites & Insighta 17:2 available

2017-01-03T16:35:42.992-08:00

Cites & Insights 17:2 (February 2017) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ17i2.pdf The 30-page issue (6" x 9", single column, optimized for online/tablet reading) includes:

The Front pp. 1-3

Announcing the 2016 Cites & Insights Annual and reduced prices for all C&I Annuals; also a change to CC BY (from CC BY-NC) and partial readership notes.

Technology pp. 4-18

Eleven little items spotlighting older (but still relevant) items--and an update on the bandwidth of a 747: it's now 4.7 petabits per second (New York to LA), assuming consumer media--namely a whole bunch of 4 terabyte solid state drives. (As before, the limiting factor is always weight, not space.)

The Back pp. 18-30

The annual update to The Money of Music, and eleven other items or groups of items.
The next issue will probably be on Economics and Access. When that will be...well, I've started the scan for Gold Open Access Journals 2012-2016 (that might turn out to be 2011-2016 if I can figure out how to make the tables readable), and we'll see how that goes.



Cites & Insights Number 200 available

2016-12-02T09:21:52.119-08:00

A very special Cites & Insights, Volume 17, Issue 1, whole number 200, is now available for downloading at http://cical.info/civ17i1.pdf (or at http://citesandinsights.info/civ17i1.pdf if you prefer).

The 72-page 6" x 9" issue is a monograph:

Gray OA 2012-2016: Open Access Journals Beyond DOAJ

It's the result of several months of investigation into the rest of gold OA, beyond "serious gold OA" (journals in DOAJ). I liken it to making brandy out of sour grapes, since it relies on Beall's lists as the most complete known lists of "other" OA publishers and journals [journals that are also in DOAJ--a few hundred--aren't included in the monograph].

This monograph is not available in paperback form; at 72 pages (actually 68 + front matter) it just didn't make sense. It looks at -- gulp -- more than 18,900 journals and "journals," of which 7,743 appear to have published at least one article between 1/1/2012 and 6/30/2016--and, if you're familiar with a certain article claiming 420,000 "predatory" articles in 2014 [Chapter 4 of this monograph deals with that paper], the maximum number of articles for 2014 appears to be 255,183--but only 113,996 of these were in journals on the lists at the time the article was done, and only 29,947 in journals where a legitimate case against the journal or publisher had been made.

It doesn't look like a typical issue (the first page is a book title page but with the C&I banner at the bottom of the page) and it's distinctly not typical: more effort went into this issue than into a year's worth of typical issues.



Cites & Insights 16:8 available

2016-09-13T08:24:15.428-07:00

The September/October 2016 Cites & Insights (16:8) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i8.pdf

The print-oriented two-column 8.5x11" issue is 24 pages long. If you plan to read the issue on a computer, tablet or e-reader, you may prefer the 47-page 6x9" single-column "online version" at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i8on.pdf

The content in both versions is identical.

This issue consists of a single essay:

Intersections: Ethics and Access pp. 1-24

A much shorter roundup than the previous Ethics and Access piece, still covering a lot of ground, including DOAJ, NEJM and Data Sharing, Sci-Hub, Identifying "Bad Guys," Questionable?, The Aginners, Speaking of Beall... and Miscellany.



Cites & Insights 16:7 (August 2016) available for downloading

2016-07-28T11:23:06.871-07:00

Cites & Insights 16:7 (August 2016) is now available for downloading at http://citesndinsights.info/civ16i7.pdf

The issue is 22 pages long. Those reading on a computer, tablet, etc. may prefer the 6"x9" single-column version at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i7on.pdf

The single-column version is 43 pages long.

This issue includes the following:

The Front p. 1

A quick blurb to announce The Countries of OAWorld 2011-2015, the final ebook/paperback in the Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015 trilogy.

Words: Catching Up with Books. E and P pp. 1-17

What it says--not only ebooks and [or vs.] print books but other aspects of the book marketplace.

The Back pp. 17-22

Fifteen snarky little essays, fewer than half on audiophollies.



Cites & Insights 16:6 (July 2016) available

2016-06-28T11:36:18.459-07:00

Cites & Insights 16:6 (July 2016) is now available for downloading at citesandinsights.info/civ16i6.pdf

The 2-column print version is 14 pages. If you're reading it online or on a tablet, you may prefer the 27-page 6" x 9" single-column edition.

This issue includes the following:

The Front pp. 1-2

The release of Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015: A Subject Approach and revisions to growth/shrinkage tables in both books, and a quick update on the final piece: The Countries of OAWorld, out sometime in July.

Media: Of Magazines and Newspapers pp. 2-14

It's been two years since a magazine roundup (and I repeat some of that essay, with updates) and much longer since notes on newspapers. This piece offers some stats and comments on both--neither of which is going away or going all-digital any time soon.



Cites & Insights 16:5 (June 2016) available

2016-06-01T11:34:12.686-07:00

The June 2016 issue of Cites & Insights (volume 16, issue 5) is now available for downloading.

The issue consists of a brief introduction and excerpts from Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015--roughly one-third of the book.

The link above is to the single-column 6x9" version intended for online/tablet reading, because the page size and column width are the same as the book. That version, http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i5on.pdf, is 74 pages long.

The two-column print-oriented version at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i5.pdf is 32 pages long, but some tables have very small type.

The July issue may be on a non-OA topic. If there is a July issue: I'm working on two bonus book-length supplements to the book.



Cites & Insights 16:4 (May 2016) available

2016-04-26T15:27:28.013-07:00

The May 2016 issue of Cites & Insights, volume 16 issue 4, is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i4.pdf

The issue is 13 pages long.

If you're reading it online or on a tablet, you may prefer the one-column 6"x9" edition at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i4on.pdf. That version is 26 pages long (and lacks one extraneous paragraph).

The short but meaty issue includes:

The Front p. 1

Why it's short.

Intersections: Two Worlds of Gold OA: APCLand and OAWorld pp. 2-5

A preview of some key data from Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015, offered partly because I believe it is a new and useful way of looking at gold OA and am inviting feedback (fairly soon, since I'll start on the book next week).

Policy: Google Books: The Final Chapter? pp. 6-13

The Supreme Court won't hear the Authors Guild appeal of the appeals court's decision in Google's favor. Maybe--maybe--the decade-long struggle is over. That's worth a quick roundup of Google Books items since the last roundup.



Cites & Insights 16:3 (April 2016) available

2016-03-23T16:05:14.285-07:00

The April 2016 Cites & Insights (16:3) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i3.pdf

That print-oriented version is 30 pages long.

If you're planning to read online or on an ereader, you may prefer the single-column 6" x 9" version, 59 pages long, available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i3on.pdf

While much of this issue has appeared as a series of posts in this blog, the final section of the lead essay is new, as is the fourth essay; the final section reprints 35 pages of The Gold OA Landscape 2011-2014 to serve as context for a portion of the first essay.

This issue includes:

The Front: Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015: A SPARC Project pp. 1-8

Remember the "watch this space" note in the February-March "The Front"? This is what it was about. This essay includes the key announcement, a partial list of changes from the 2011-2014 project, a partial checkpoint prepared when I was halfway through the first pass, a section asking for possible "changes for the better" in the analysis and writeup (note that this year's PDF ebook will be free and OA, since it's a SPARC-sponsored project), another section discussing the planned anonymization of the (free) spreadsheet when analysis is done--and, new to this issue, a second checkpoint prepared at the end of the first journal pass.

The Front (also): Readership Notes pp. 8-9

Notes on the most frequently downloaded issues in Volume 15 and the most frequently downloaded issues overall.

Intersections: "Trust Me": The Other Problem with Beall's Lists pp. 9-11

As far as I can tell, Jeffrey Beall provides no evidence whatsoever--not even his classic "this publisher has a funny name"--for seven out of eight journals and publishers on his 2016 lists. This piece, which has a little additional material beyond the original post, goes into some detail.

The Back pp. 11-12

Not precisely filler to get an even number of pages, but...OK, so these three mini-rants are mostly filler to get an even number of pages.

The Gold OA Landscape 2011-2014, pp. 39-73 following page 12

I'm including chapters 5 (starting dates), 6 (country of publication), 7 (segments and subjects), 8 (biology and medicine) and 9 (biology) to provide more context for my invitation to suggest better ways to analyze and present the 2011-2015 data. Please note that these pages appear precisely as they would in the PDF ebook if you're looking at the online 6" x 9" version (since the book's 6"x9"), but are reduced very slightly for the print-oriented version (to 5.5"x8.5") so that two book pages will fit on one printed page.

Next issue?

I did not label this the April-May 2016 issue. Whether there's a May issue in late April or early May, or a May-June issue later in May, depends on a number of factors having mostly to do with Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015.



Cites & Insights 16:2 (February-March 2016) available

2016-01-02T08:17:56.137-08:00

Cites & Insights 16:2 (February-March 2016) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i2.pdf

The double issue is 46 pages long.

 If you're reading online or on a tablet or other e-device, you may prefer the single-column 6"x9" version, which is 89 pages long and available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i2on.pdf

The issue includes:

The Front p. 1

A placeholder of sorts.

Intersections: Economics and Access pp. 1-46

Embargoes, costs, spending, Lingua/Glossa, flipping and more.



Cites & Insights 16:1 (January 2016) available

2015-12-02T14:48:55.806-08:00

It's an odds-and-ends issue, and what may be oddest of all is that it's still around...

The January 2016 Cites & Insights (16:1) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i1.pdf

The two-column print-oriented issue is 26 pages long. If you're reading it online or on a tablet (or whatever), you might prefer the 51-page single-column 6x9" version at http://citesandinsights.info/civ16i1on.pdf

The issue includes:

The Front pp. 1-2

Starting the Volume: notes on the annual edition of Volume 15, The Gold OA Landscape 2011-2014, and "plans" for the year.

Intersections: PPPPredatory Article Counts: An Investigation pp. 2-10

The series of four blog posts, put together and slightly edited. Why I believe the numbers in a published study of "predatory" article volume are wrong and how they might have gotten that way--with the lagniappe of a first-cut study as to how often the lists of ppppredators actually makes a case.

Media: 50 Movie Gunslinger Classics, part 2 pp. 10-19

After a mere two years, here's the second half. Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, John Wayne, George Hayes (before and after his "Gabby" persona), Yakima Canutt and many others...

The Back pp. 19-26

This year's installment of The Low and the High of It, now including portable systems, with a mere 551 to 1 ratio between the cheapest and most expensive CD-only stereo system consisting entirely of Stereophile-recommended components (only 37 to 1 for all-Class-A components) and, wait for it, 1,224 to 1 between the cheapest and most expensive CD-and-LP stereo systems. Also a baker's dozen of other items.




Cites & Insights 15:11 (December 2015) available

2015-11-02T08:27:24.059-08:00

The December 2015 issue of Cites & Insights (15:11) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i11.pdf

This issue is 58 pages long.

If you plan to read it online or on an ereader (ebook, tablet, whatever), you may prefer the single-column 6" x 9" edition, 111 pages long, at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i11on.pdf

This issue contains one essay:

Intersections: Ethics and Access 2015 pp. 1-58

No weird old tricks for reducing belly fat, but 102 items worth reading in a baker's dozen of subtopics related to ethics and access (open and otherwise)--and #25 may astonish you! Or not.

No, it's really not a listicle--otherwise I'd have to find 102 ads and free (or plagiarized) illustrations. It's a bigger-than-usual roundup, with just a little humor (and a few exclamation points--and one interrobang).



Cites & Insights 15:10 (November 2015) available

2015-10-05T09:50:24.599-07:00

Cites & Insights 15:10 (November 2015) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i10.pdf

This print-oriented two-column version is 38 pages long.

If you plan to read the issue on a tablet or computer, you may prefer the 6"x9" single column version, 74 pages long, which is available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i10on.pdf

Unlike the book-excerpt October 2015 issue, there's no advantage to the single-column version (other than its being single-column), and copyfitting has only been done on the two-column version. (As has been true for a couple of months, both versions do include links, bookmarks and visible bolding.)

This issue includes the following essays, stepping away from open access for a bit:

The Front: A Fair Use Trilogy p. 1

A few notes about the rest of the issue--and a status report on The Gold OA Landscape 2011-2014.

Policy: Google Books: The Neverending Story? pp. 1-18

Three years of updates on the seemingly endless Google Books story, which has now become almost entirely about fair use.

Policy: Catching Up on Fair Use pp. 18-24

A handful of items regarding fair use that don't hinge on Google Books or HathiTrust.

Intersections: Tracking the Elephant: Notes on HathiTrust pp. 24-38

Pretty much what the title says, and again the main thrust appears to be fair use. (The elephant? Read the essay, including a little bit of Unicode.)  



Cites & Insights 15:9 (October 2015) available

2015-09-12T16:27:36.861-07:00

The October 2015 Cites & Insights (15:9) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i9.pdf

The issue is 36 pages long--but you may find the 73-page single-column version at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i9on.pdf easier to read, and it's slightly more complete. (I had to delete columns from some tables to get them to fit into the narrower column without reducing type to 6 or 7 points, which I regarded as unreadably small.)

The issue consists of one essay:

Intersections: The Gold OA Landscape 2011-2014 pp. 1-36

This is an excerpted version of the book of the same name, including roughly half the text, none of the dozens of graphs, and about one-third of the overall content (at least by pagination).

It provides all the overall numbers for this first comprehensive study of serious gold OA publishing (where I define "serious" as "included in the Directory of Open Access Journals"), and a few examples of what's in the subject coverage--but it omits most subject details and a number of secondary aspects of the overall coverage.

It should give you a good picture of where things stand with gold open access throughout the world, not just in English-speaking (or English-publishing) countries.

While some of you (and your libraries) should and will find the book worth purchasing (I hope), this report should be enough for many of you. The only added material is a brief introductory note with links to the book site.



August-September 2015 Cites & Insights (15:8) now available

2015-08-13T10:44:23.120-07:00

More than half a million articles appeared in Gold OA journals (in DOAJ) in 2014--in more than 9,700 such journals. (The 400,000 mark was actually reached in 2012.)

That initial finding is at the heart of the lead essay in a unique issue of Cites & Insights, available in two different versions:  

Cites & Insights 15:8 (August-September 2015), the "standard" version (two-column, print-oriented), is 26 pages long and available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i8.pdf

The two-column version, designed for online or tablet reading, is 51 pages and available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i8on.pdf

What's unique is that the two versions are textually different. Both versions begin with:

The Front: About The [Nearly Complete] OA Landscape 2011-2014 pp. 1-4 (pp. 1-7 in one column version)

This essay expands on a July 26, 2015 post regarding the remainder of my full scan of DOAJ journals and what will happen with that scan--and the deadline to get an "active hyperlink" version of the final report.
The two-column version continues with:

Perspective: A Few Words, Part 2 pp. 4-26

The remainder of my little journey through publications past (omitting self published material including, ahem, Cites & Insights), covering 1995 to the present. I think it's interesting and a little fun. You might also.
The single-column version continues with:

Perspective: Some Moldy Oldies from C&I pp. 7-51

Excerpts from the very first issue of Cites & Insights and from three issues that have been downloaded less often than others.



Cites & Insights 15:7 (July 2015) available

2015-06-02T16:14:01.991-07:00

Cites & Insights 15:7 (July 2015) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i7.pdf

This odd summer issue is 20 pages long.

If you're planning to read it online or on an e-device, you may prefer the 37-page one-column 6x9" edition, available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i7on.pdf

(Thanks to a change in software support, both versions should show boldface, have working hyperlinks, and have bookmarks.)

The issue includes:

The Front: The Open Access Landscape: An Interim View pp. 1-4

There's a new ebook and book out, containing all of the Open Access Landscape subject chapters--but with more material as well. You can't buy it as such, but a small donation to Cites & Insights will get you a link to the PDF and another link to pick up the 202-page (186+xvi) paperback for $7. You can donate at the Cites & Insights home page. (Also: Chapter 16 to show what's included, and some notes about the PDF changes in this issue.)

Perspective: Thinking about Libraries and Access, Take 2 pp. 4-11

My current personal beliefs about the present and future of OA--including cases where I know what I believe and I hope I'm wrong. Also the first "Thinking about Libraries and Access" (from nine years ago) and some brief notes.

Perspective: A Few Words, Part 1 pp. 11-20

Twenty years ago (as of ALA Annual, that is), I was pleasantly surprised with an unexpected award. This "essay" consists of anywhere from a sentence to a paragraph of (nearly all) my books and articles leading up to that award--from 1976 through 1994 in pretty much chronological order. You may find it amusing. Or not.



Cites & Insights 15:6 (June 2015) available

2015-05-04T08:08:36.753-07:00

Cites & Insights 15:6 (June 2015) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i6.pdf

The print-oriented two-column version is 24 pages long. For those reading online or on an e-device, or who wish to follow links in the issue, a 46-page single-column 6x9" version is available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i6on.pdf

The June 2015 issue includes:

The Front: Making It Easy, Making It Hard: A Personal Note on Counting Articles pp. 1-4

This oddity offers some notes on OA publishers and journals that make it easier--or harder--than usual to find out how many articles appear in a journal over a given year, from the utter simplicity of MDPI, SciELO and j-stage to the utter...well, read the article.

Intersections: Who Needs Open Access, Anyway? pp. 4-24

Noting and discussing a range of commentaries by people who are either "I'm all for OA, but..." (where the but is the most important word in that phrase) or discussing ways in which others attempt to undermine OA: clearing out two years of "oa-anti" tags.



Cites & Insights 15.5 (May 2015) available

2015-04-06T08:31:36.812-07:00

The May 2015 Cites & Insights (15:5) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i5.pdf

The 2-column print-oriented version is 24 pages long.

 If you're reading it online or on an e-reader (tablet, etc.), or if you want working links, you may prefer the one-column 6x9" version (46 pages long), available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i5on.pdf This issue includes:

The Front: The Open Access Landscape pp. 1-3

Notes on the series of blog posts that began in early March 2015 and will continue through either mid-September or mid-November; the potential book that would combine those posts and add new material; and the possibility of a five-year longitudinal study of the state of gold OA (2011-2015) in 2016, if funding becomes available.

Libraries: FriendFeed, Going. LSW, Not. pp. 3-10

An elegy (of sorts) for FriendFeed, scheduled to disappear on April 9 (unless Facebook listens to InfoWorld and others and lets it keep going)--and to the Library Society of the World, which in its own informal way has meant so much to me and many others.

Social Networks: Slightly More Than 140 Characters Words Sentences Paragraphs About Twitter pp. 10-19

A possibly-amusing set of mostly-old musings by others about Twitter's inevitable decline and fall, certainly gone by now, and the decline of Western civilization--also why it's nothing but a note-taking system and the need for balance.

The Back pp. 19-24

Ten brief (and some not-so-brief) rants and amusements.



Cites & Insights 15:4 (April 2015) available

2015-03-01T18:11:53.303-08:00

Cites & Insights 15:4 (April 2015) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i4.pdf

The print-oriented version is 38 pages long; it includes boldface as applied but the links don't work.

If you're reading online or on an e-device and want working links (but no boldface), you may prefer the single-column 6x9" version at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i4on.pdf

The single-column version is 72 pages long.

This issue includes the following:

Intersections: The Economies of Open Access pp. 1-38

Publishing costs money. That's a given, although sometimes that cost is so negligible that it can be handled as departmental or library or society overhead. This roundup looks at a range of items related to the economics of journals in general and OA journals in particular, divided into ten general topics. It turns out that I have stronger feelings than I thought about this issue, so there's a fair amount of my own commentary mixed in with excerpts from various posts and articles.



Cites & Insights 15:3 (March 2015) available

2015-02-04T10:52:47.180-08:00

Cites & Insights 15:3 (March 2015) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i3.pdf

The issue is 24 pages long.

If you plan to view it online or need working hyperlinks (at the expense of boldface working--someday, I'll have a new computer and new version of Word's PDF conversion and Acrobat), the single-column 6x9" version, 46 pages long, is available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i3on.pdf

This issue includes the following:

Intersections: One More Chunk of DOAJ pp. 1-10

Because there will be a published concise version of all this stuff--out this summer from ALA's Library Technology Reports, working title "Idealism and Opportunism: The State of Open Access Journals"--I went through 2,200-odd additional DOAJ journals with English as one of the language options (but not the first one), and was able to add 1,507 more entries to my DOAJ master spreadsheet, which now includes 6,490 journals qualifying for full analysis and 811 that don't.

This essay offers some summary information on the 1,507 added journals and some overall notes on the full DOAJ set--including some new and replacement tables (there may be errors in tables 2.66 b and c and 2.67 b and c in earlier issues).

The essay also offers some details on "N" (not OA) journals, notes on very small journals, a few comments on opportunism, idealism and initiative--and the URLs for two spreadsheets offering anonymized versions of the DOAJ and Beall data.

(Note that the DOAJ spreadsheet has just been changed to shift 580 "B" journals there because of $1,000-or-more APCs to a new "A$" subgrade, since the high APC was the only issue with them. The summary text in this issue has NOT been changed to reflect this refinement; the Library Technology Reports issue will reflect the change.)

The two spreadsheeets are on figshare and licensed with the Creative Commons "BY" license, making them available for any use as long as attribution is provided. Each spreadsheet includes a data key as a second page.

Words: Books, E and P, 2014 pp. 10-24

Bringing discussions of ebooks vs. (or and) pbooks up to date from the January 2014 essay. In most cases, "and" is now the prevailing attitude as ebook sales appear to have plateaued--although of course there are still those who say print books will die Because Digital and now, oddly, a few who say ebooks will die or are dead (which I regard as equally unlikely).