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Updated: 2014-10-03T00:55:27.591-07:00

 



Lolita

2009-03-27T01:33:24.391-07:00

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Yuki Nakato Lolita Dress from The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Cuteeee~~~~~~~~O(∩_∩)O



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2008-05-02T10:06:15.388-07:00

Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or N'hants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). It has borders with Warwickshire, Leicestershire, Rutland, Cambridgeshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire (including the Borough of Milton Keynes), Oxfordshire, and Lincolnshire (England's shortest county boundary: 19 metres). The county town is Northampton. Northamptonshire has often been called the county of "squires and spires" due to its wide variety of historic buildings and country houses. The county has also been described as "England's Pancreas", most notably by the popular presenter Alan Titchmarsh in has 2007 series The Nature of Britain. This is due to its shape and location within the UK, and because it is regularly overlooked, especially compared to neighbouring Warwickshire, known as "The Heart of England". Northamptonshire's county flower is the Cowslip. Peter Bone (C) Tim Boswell (C) Brian Binley (C) Philip Hollobone (C) Phil Hope (L)/(Co-op) Sally Keeble (L) South Northamptonshire Northampton Daventry Wellingborough Kettering Corby East Northamptonshire Geography These are the main settlements in Northamptonshire with a town charter, a population over 5,000, or otherwise notable. For a complete list of settlements see List of places in Northamptonshire Brackley, Braunston, Brixworth, Corby Daventry, Desborough Kettering Long Buckby Naseby, Northampton Oundle Pitsford Raunds, Rothwell, Rushden Silverstone Towcester, Thrapston Weedon Bec, Wellingborough Places The Soke of Peterborough, including the City of Peterborough, was historically associated with Northamptonshire as the county diocese is focused upon the cathedral there. Under the Local Government Act 1972 Peterborough became a district of Cambridgeshire. Peterborough Main article History of Northamptonshire Pre-Celtic and Celtic peoples settled in the region, and there are some traces of Roman settlements and roads. Most notably the Watling Street passed through the county, and there was an important Roman settlement called Lactodorum on the site of modern day Towcester. There were other Roman settlements at the site of Northampton, and along the Nene Valley near Raunds. After the Romans left, the area became part of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia, and Northampton functioned as an administrative centre. The area was overrun by the Danes (Vikings) in the 9th century and briefly became part of the Danelaw, but was later re-claimed by the Saxons. Consequently, it is one of the few counties in England to have both Saxon and Danish town-names and settlements. The county was first recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1011), as Hamtunscire: the scire (shire) of Hamtun (the homestead). The "North" was added to distinguish Northampton from the other important Hamtun further south: Southampton. Later, Rockingham Castle was built for William the Conqueror and was used as a Royal fortress until Elizabethan times. The now-ruined Fotheringhay castle was used to imprison Mary, Queen of Scots before her execution. In 1460, during the Wars of the Roses, the Battle of Northampton took place and King Henry VI was captured. During the English Civil War Northamptonshire strongly supported the Parliamentarian cause, and the Royalist forces suffered a crushing defeat at the Battle of Naseby in 1645 in the north of the county. King Charles I was later imprisoned at Holdenby House. In the 18th and 19th centuries, parts of Northamptonshire became industrialized. Northampton and its surrounding areas, gained a sizeable shoe making and leather industry and by the end of the nineteenth century it was almost definitely the boot and shoe making capital of the world. And in the north of the county a large ironstone quarrying industry developed. In the 20th century, during the 1930s, the town of Corby was established as a major centre of the steel industry. Much of Northamptonshire nevertheless remains largely rural. After the Second World War Northampton and Corby were designated as new towns.[...]



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2008-05-01T09:22:42.405-07:00

Walcheren is a former island in the province of Zeeland in the Netherlands at the mouth of the Scheldt estuary. It lies between the Oosterschelde in the north and the Westerschelde in the south and is roughly the shape of a rhombus. The two sides on the side of the North Sea consist of dunes; the rest of its coastline is made up of dykes. Middelburg ("Middleborough") lies at its centre; this city is the provincial capital and Vlissingen 9 km to the south is the main harbour. The third municipality is Veere. Originally, Walcheren was an island, but polders and a dam across the Sloe strait have connected it to the (former) island of Zuid-Beveland, which in turn has been connected to the North Brabant mainland. History Already in Roman days, the island was the point of departure for ships going to England and it had a temple of the goddess Nehalennia who was popular with those who wished to brave the waters of the North Sea. The Romans called it "Wallacra". Walcheren was the seat of the Danish Viking Harald, who conquered the present Netherlands together with his compatriate Rorik (or Rurik) in the 9th century. One fringe theory has it that it was the island described by Ibn Rustah as the seat of the khagan of the Rus'. Starting on July 30, 1809 a British armed force of 39,000 men landed on Walcheren, the Walcheren Campaign, with a view to assisting the Austrians in their war against Napoleon, and attacking the French fleet moored at Flushing (Vlissingen). The expedition was a disaster - the Austrians had already been defeated at the Battle of Wagram and were suing for peace, the French fleet had moved to Antwerp, and the British lost over 4,000 men to a disease called "Walcheren Fever", thought to be a combination of malaria and typhus. The force was withdrawn in December. During World War II, the area was fought over in 1940 by Dutch and German troops. The area was again contested in 1944 during the Battle of the Scheldt in the Battle of Walcheren Island. The 2nd Canadian Infantry Division cleared South Beveland to the east and approached the island on 31 October 1944. The plan was to cross the Slooe Channel, but leading troops of the 5th Canadian Brigade found that assault boats were useless in the deep much of the channel. The only route open was the 40 metre wide Walcheren Causeway, a mile-long land bridge from South Beveland to the Island. The Canadian Black Watch sent a company across on the evening of 31 October but were stopped. The Calgary Highlanders sent two companies over in succession, the second attack opening up a bridgehead on the island. The Highlanders were eventually thrown back, having lost 64 killed and wounded. Le Regiment de Maisonneuve relieved them on the causeway, followed by the Glasgow Highlanders of the British Army. Meanwhile, on November 1, 1944, the British Special Service Brigade landed on the western end of the island in order to silence the German coastal batteries looking out over the Scheldt, which was the key opening shipping lanes to Antwerp. The amphibious assault (Operation Infatuate) proved a success and by November 8 all German resistance on the island had been overrun. [...]



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2008-04-30T10:32:17.328-07:00

The Indo-Iranian language group constitutes the easternmost extant branch of the Indo-European family of languages. It consists of four language groups: the Indo-Aryan, Iranian, Nuristani, and Dardic. The term Aryan languages is also used to refer to the Indo-Iranian languages . The speakers of the Proto-Indo-Iranian language, the hypothetical Proto-Indo-Iranians, are usually associated with the late 3rd millennium BC Sintashta-Petrovka culture of Central Asia. Their expansion is believed to have been connected with the invention of the chariot. The contemporary Indo-Iranian languages form the largest sub-branch of Indo-European, with more than one billion speakers in total, stretching from Europe (Romani) and the Caucasus (Ossetian) to East India (Bengali and Assamese). SIL in a 2005 estimate counts a total of 308 varieties, the largest in terms of native speakers being Hindustani (Hindi and Urdu, ca. 540 million), Bengali (ca. 200 million), Punjabi (ca. 80 million), Marathi and Persian (ca. 70 million each), Gujarati (ca. 45 million), Pashto (40 million), Oriya (ca. 30 million), Kurdish and Sindhi (ca. 20 million each). Subdivisions Indo-European topics Iranian Group: Indo-Aryan Group: Dardic languages (sometimes also classified as Indic): Nuristani languages: Eastern Iranian Northeastern Avestan (extinct) Scythian (extinct) Saka (extinct) Ossetian Sogdian (extinct) Yaghnobi Bactrian (extinct) Southeastern Pashto Pamiri Western Iranian Northwestern Dari language of Zoroastrians Balochi Gilaki Kurdish Talysh Zazaki Southwestern ("Persid") Old Persian (extinct) Middle Persian (extinct) New Persian Tajik Bukhori Luri / Bakhtiari Tat Vedic Sanskrit Sanskrit Pāli Central Zone Hindustani Hindi Urdu Romani/Romany Eastern Zone (Magadhan Prakrit languages) Angika Assamese Bengali Bhojpuri Magadhi Maithili Oriya Northern Zone (Pahari languages) Nepali Northwestern Zone Punjabi Sindhi Khojki Kutchi Rajasthani Southern Zone Dhivehi / Mahl Sinhala Western Zone Gujarati Konkani Marathi Dameli Domaaki Gawar-Bati Kalsha-mun Kashmiri Khowar Kohistani Ningalami Pashayi Palula Shina Shumashti Ashkunu (Ashkun) Kamkata-viri (Bashgali) Vasi-vari (Prasuni) Tregami Kalasha-ala (Waigali) [...]



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2008-04-29T10:38:01.472-07:00

Fort Ross is a former Russian settlement in what is now Sonoma County, California in the United States. It is a unique site that has recently been the subject of intensive archaeological investigation, and is designated as a National Historic Landmark. Most of the existing buildings on the site are reconstructions. The only original structure remaining is Rotchev House, the residence of the last manager. The exact origin of the toponym "Ross" is unknown but it is generally considered to be a poetical shortened version of "Rossiya," which is "Russia" in Russian. History Ivan Alexandrovich Kuskov, a skillful Russian-American Company administrator, served for 22 years in Alaska. He was the founder of Fort Ross and was its colonial administrator from 1812 to 1821. List of all administrators of the Fort Ross colony: Ivan A. Kuskov, 1812—1821 Karl J von Schmidt, 1821—1824 Paul I. Shelikhov, 1824—1830 Peter S. Kostromitinov, 1830—1838 Alexander G. Rotchev, 1838—1841 Other meanings 1784 — Russians settle at Kodiak Island, Alaska. 1799 — Russians establish a post at Sitka, Alaska. 1806–1811 — Nikolai Rezanov, representing the Russian-American Company, visits the Presidio of San Francisco and susequently recommends to the Company that a settlement in California be established to supply the Alaskan colonies with food. Ivan Kuskov explores the coast of Alta California. 1812 — Kuskov brought 25 Russians and 80 native Alaskans to the California coast and established Fort Ross. 1821 — Kuskov leaves Fort Ross and is replaced by Karl Schmidt. 1824 — Schmidt leaves Fort Ross and is replaced by Paul Shelikhov. 1830 — Shelikhov leaves Fort Ross and is replaced by Peter Kostromitinov. 1838 — Kostromitinov leaves Fort Ross and is replaced by Alexander Rotchev. 1841 — Rotchev sells Fort Ross to John Sutter. 1906 — The San Francisco earthquake nearly destroys Fort Ross. 1916 — Fort Ross is restored. 1970 — A fire at Fort Ross again nearly destroys the former settlement. 1971 — Fort Ross is once again restored. Buildings [...]



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2008-04-27T08:47:02.491-07:00

This article is part of the series: Politics and government of Sweden Alliance for Sweden (Swedish: Allians för Sverige) is a political alliance in Sweden. It consists of the four centre-right parties in the Riksdag. Although it was formed while in opposition, it achieved a majority in the general election of 17 September 2006, forming the current coalition government. Constitution King: Carl XVI Gustaf Parliament Speaker: Per Westerberg Members Government Prime Minister: Fredrik Reinfeldt Cabinet Ministries Agencies Supreme Court Counties Governors Administrative Boards Councils Municipalities Sami Parliament Elections: 2002 - 2006 - 2010 Referendums Political parties Foreign relations EU Politics Membership of the Alliance Swedish politics has been dominated by the Social Democratic Party for over 70 years. They have been in government for all but nine years (summer of 1936, 1976-1982, 1991-1994) since 1932. The opposition parties decided that this was partly because they did not present a clear and viable alternative government. At a meeting held in the Centre Party leader Maud Olofsson's home in the village of Högfors, the four party leaders decided to form an alliance. The meeting ended on 31 August 2004 with the presentation of a joint declaration outlining the principles under which the four parties intended to fight the election [1]. A year later a similar meeting was held at Christian Democrat leader Göran Hägglund's home in Bankeryd, resulting in the affirmation of the alliance and another declaration [2]. The Alliance in government Sweden general election, 2006 Government of Sweden Cabinet of Fredrik Reinfeldt [...]



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2008-04-26T08:07:11.411-07:00

Scots law This article is part of the series: Courts of Scotland Administration Scottish Executive Justice Department Cabinet Secretary for Justice Scottish Court Service College of Justice Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission Scottish Prison Service Civil courts Privy Council House of Lords Court of Session Lord President Lords of Session Sheriff Court Sheriff Criminal courts High Court of Justiciary Lord Justice-General Lords Commissioner of Justiciary Sheriff Court Sheriff Principal Sheriff District Court Justice of the Peace Special courts Court of the Lord Lyon Lord Lyon King of Arms Children's Hearings Criminal justice Lord Advocate Crown Office Advocate Depute Procurator Fiscal Advocates and solicitors Faculty of Advocates Advocate Law Society of Scotland Solicitor-Advocate Solicitor Arthur Campbell Hamilton, Lord Hamilton, PC (born Glasgow, 10 June 1942), is Scotland's most senior judge. He was chosen as Lord Justice General and Lord President of the Court of Session in November 2005, succeeding Lord Cullen. Arthur Campbell Hamilton was born in Glasgow and attended Glasgow High School. He studied at the University of Glasgow, Worcester College, Oxford University and Edinburgh University, where he gained an LLB in 1967. He was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1968 and became a QC in 1982. He was an Advocate Depute (1982–1985), Chairman of the Medical Appeals Tribunals (1988–1992) and President of the Pensions Appeal Tribunal (Scotland) (1992–1995). Over several months in 1992–1993, during the indisposition of the Sheriff Principal of Tayside, Central and Fife, he acted as a temporary Sheriff Principal in that sheriffdom. From 1988 to 1995 he was a Judge of Appeal of the Courts of Appeal of Jersey and Guernsey. In 1995 he was appointed as a Senator of the College of Justice. Between 1997-2000 he was a full-time commercial judge dedicated to commercial business and responsible for oversight of that aspect of Court of Session business. In January 2002 he was appointed as a Judge of the Inner House of the Court of Session where he sat principally on appellate business. On 24 November 2005, the Scottish Executive announced that he would succeed Lord Cullen as Lord Justice General and Lord President of the Court of Session. He took up office on 2 December. He took full-time sick leave from April 2006, prompting emergency legislation (the Senior Judiciary (Vacancies and Incapacity) (Scotland) Act 2006) to be passed through the Scottish Parliament in June. He has since returned to work, without the need for the legislation to be invoked. [...]



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2008-04-25T09:47:43.890-07:00

Best Supporting Actress 1974 Murder on the Orient Express 1982 A Woman Called Golda Best Actress - Miniseries 1983 A Woman Called Golda Ingrid Bergman (help·info) (pronounced [ˈbærjman] in Swedish, but usually [ˈbɝgmən] in English, IPA notation) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award-winning and two-time Emmy Award-winning Swedish actress. She also won the Tony Award for Best Actress in the first Tony Award ceremony in 1947. She is ranked as the fourth greatest female star of all time by the American Film Institute. Biography Bergman, named after Princess Ingrid of Sweden , was born in Stockholm, Sweden on August 29, 1915 to a Swedish father, Justus Samuel Bergman, and a German mother, Friedel Adler Bergman. When she was three years old, her mother died. Her father passed away when she was thirteen. She was then sent off to live with an aunt, who died of heart complications only six months later. Afterwards she was raised by another aunt and uncle, who had five children. At the age of 17, Ingrid Bergman auditioned for and was accepted to the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm. During her first summer break, she was hired at a Swedish film studio, which consequently led to her leaving the Royal Dramatic Theater to work in films full time, after having attended for only one year. Her first film role after leaving the Royal Dramatic Theater was a small part in 1935's Munkbrogreven (She had previously been an extra in the 1932 film Landskamp). On July 10, 1937, at the age of 21, she married a dentist, Petter Lindström (who would later become a neurosurgeon). On September 20, 1938, she gave birth to a daughter, Pia Lindström. After a dozen films in Sweden (including En kvinnas ansikte which would later be remade as A Woman's Face with Joan Crawford) and one in Germany, Bergman was signed by Hollywood producer David O. Selznick to star in the 1939 English language remake of her 1936 Swedish language film, Intermezzo. It was an enormous success and Bergman became a star, described as "Sweden's illustrious gift to Hollywood". Some things that set her apart from other female stars in Hollywood at that time were that she did not change her name, her appearance was entirely natural with little to no makeup, and that she was one of the tallest leading ladies. Early years: 1915-1938 After completing one last film in Sweden and appearing in three moderately successful films in the United States, Bergman joined Humphrey Bogart in the 1942 classic film Casablanca, which remains her best known role. That same year, she received her first Academy Award nomination for Best Actress for For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943), which was also her first color film. The following year, she won the Academy Award for Best Actress for Gaslight (1944). She received a third consecutive nomination for Best Actress with her performance as a nun in The Bells of St. Mary's (1945). Bergman had been considered for the role of Mother Maria-Veronica in 1944's The Keys of the Kingdom, but the part ultimately went to Rose Stradner, who was then the wife of the film's producer, Joseph Mankiewicz. Later, she would receive another Best Actress nomination for Joan of Arc (1948), an independent film produced by Walter Wanger and initially released through RKO. Bergman had championed the role since her arrival in Hollywood, which is one of the reasons she had played it on the Broadway stage in Maxwell Anderson's Joan of Lorraine. Partly because of the scandal with Rossellini, the film, based on the Anderson play, was not a big hit, and received disastrous reviews. It was subsequently shorn of 45 minutes, and it was not until its restoration to full length in 1998 and its 2004 appearance on DVD that later audiences could see it as it was intended to be shown. Bergman also starred in the Alfred Hitchcock films Spellbound (1945),[...]



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2008-04-24T11:39:01.613-07:00

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Jonathan Wilkes (born August 1, 1978 in Baddeley Green, Stoke-on-Trent) is an English television presenter, actor and musician. Wilkes is arguably as famous as a celebrity footballer as he is for his performance skills, in addition to being best-known as the best friend of singer Robbie Williams.

Performing arts
Wilkes' television career was launched after he won the Cameron Mackintosh Young Entertainer of the Year award in 1996. This led to television work on the BBC Choice (now BBC Three) programme Hype. He soon signed a three-year contract with ITV, fronting You've Been Framed for one series and Love on a Saturday Night. Also a singer, he signed to Innocent Records in 2001 and released "Just Another Day", which charted in many European countries. Recently, he has turned to stage acting and has appeared in recent theatre productions of Grease and The Rocky Horror Show, as well as appearing in Mother Goose - a record-breaking pantomime at The Regent Theatre, in his home town of Stoke-on-Trent. Following record-breaking sales for Mother Goose, Jonathan returned to The Regent Theatre the following year (2006-2007) to appear in Aladdin. Sales for this pantomime surpassed even the previous year and it became the biggest selling show ever at the Stoke-on-Trent theatre.
He joined Robbie Williams on his 2006 Close Encounters Tour, singing two songs (Me and My Shadow and Strong), as well as playing a game of football with Robbie on stage.




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2008-04-23T10:01:56.293-07:00

This article is about playthings. For other uses of the term, see Toy (disambiguation). A toy is an object used in play. Toys are usually associated with children and pets, but it is not unusual for adult humans and some non-domesticated animals to play with toys. Many items are manufactured to serve as toys, but items produced for other purposes can also be used as toys. A child may pick up a household item and 'fly' it around pretending that it is an airplane, or an animal might play with a pinecone by batting at it, chasing it, and throwing it up in the air. Some toys are intended primarily as collector's items and are not to be played with. The origin of toys is prehistoric; dolls representing infants, animals, and soldiers, as well as representations of tools used by adults are readily found at archaeological sites. The origin of the word "toy" is unknown, but it is believed that it was first used in the 14th century. Toys and play in general are an important part of the process of learning about the world and growing up. The young use toys and play to discover their identity, help their bodies grow strong, learn cause and effect, explore relationships, and practice skills they will need as adults. Adults use toys and play to form and strengthen social bonds, teach the young, remember and reinforce lessons from their own youth, exercise their minds and bodies, practice skills they may not use every day, and decorate their living spaces. Toys are more than simple amusement, and they and the way they are used profoundly influence most aspects of life. History Toys, like play itself, serve multiple purposes in both humans and animals. They provide entertainment while fulfilling an educational role. Toys enhance cognitive behavior and stimulate creativity. They aid in the development of physical and mental skills which are necessary in later life. One of the simplest toys, a set of simple wooden blocks is also one of the best toys for developing minds. Andrew Witkin, director of marketing for Mega Brands told Investor's Business Daily that, "They help develop hand-eye coordination, math and science skills and also let kids be creative." Toys for infants often make use of distinctive sounds, bright colors, and unique textures. Through play with toys infants begin to recognize shapes and colors. Repetition reinforces memory. Play-Doh, Silly Putty and other hands-on materials allow the child to make toys of their own. Educational toys for school age children of often contain a puzzle, problem-solving technique, or mathematical proposition. Often toys designed for older audiences, such as teenagers or adults demonstrate advanced concepts. Newton's cradle, a desk toy designed by Simon Prebble, demonstrates the conservation of momentum and energy. Not all toys are appropriate for all ages of children. Some toys which are marketed for a specific age range can even harm the development of children in that range. Toys in child development Certain toys, such as barbies and toy soldiers, are often perceived to be more acceptable for one gender then the other. It has been noted by researchers that, "Children as young as 18 months display sex-stereotyped toy choices". Toys and gender With toys comprising such a large and important part of human existence, it makes sense that the toy industry would have a substantial economic impact. Sales of toys often icrease around holidays where gift-giving is a tradition. Some of these holidays include Christmas, Easter, Saint Nicholas Day and Three Kings Day. In 2005, toy sales in the United States totaled about $22.9 billion. Issues and events such as power outages, supply of raw materials, supply of labor, and raising wages that impact areas where factories are located often have an enormous impact on the toy industry in importin[...]



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2008-04-22T08:59:19.278-07:00

Structure The EITC is the largest poverty reduction program in the United States. Almost 21 million American families received more than $36 billion in refunds through the EITC in 2004. These EITC dollars had a significant impact on the lives and communities of the nation's lowest paid working people, lifting more than 5 million of these families above the federal poverty line.. Impact It is difficult to measure the cost of the EITC to the Federal Government. At the most basic level, federal revenues are decreased by the lower, and often negative, tax burden on the working poor for which the EITC is responsible. In this basic sense, the cost of the EITC to the Federal Government was more than $36 billion in 2004. At the same time, however, this cost may be at least partially offset by several factors: 1) any new taxes (such as payroll taxes paid by employers) generated by new workers drawn by the EITC into the labor force, 2) any reductions in entitlement spending that result from individuals being lifted out of poverty by the EITC (the poverty line is sometimes a watermark for eligibility for state and federal benefits), and 3) taxes generated on additional spending done by families receiving earned income tax credit. 4) Not to mention a potential reduction in crime and other more indirect factors. Cost Millions of American families who are eligible for the EITC do not receive it, leaving billions of additional tax credit dollars unclaimed. Research by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and Internal Revenue Service indicates that between 15% and 25% of households who are entitled to the EITC do not claim their credit, or between 3.5 million and 7 million households. The average EITC amount received per family in 2002 was $1,766. Using this figure and a 15% unclaimed rate would mean that low-wage workers and their families lost out on more than $6.5 billion, or more than $12 billion if the unclaimed rate is 25%. Many nonprofit organizations around the United States, sometimes in partnership with government and with some public financing, have begun programs designed to increase EITC utilization by raising awareness of the credit and assisting with the filing of the relevant tax forms. In addition, the EITC is a major driver for the walk-in, storefront tax industry, which includes such well-known companies as H&R Block, Jackson Hewitt, and Liberty Tax. These companies frequently offer loan products such as Refund Anticipation Loans ("RALs"). Such loans have been criticized for being over-promoted and for such practices as "cross-collection." [1] [2] (The loans are sometimes not as easy to be approved for as the advertising implies. Customers denied the next-day loans are then required to accept the two-week loan products, in which they still end up paying the bulk of the fees. "Cross-collection" occurs when the loan-issuing bank, such as Santa Barbara Bank & Trust or HSBC in recent years, engages in debt collection for other companies, notably credit card companies. This practice is often not adequately disclosed.) EITC and United States Military Servicemembers Taxation in the United States Speenhamland system Guaranteed minimum income Negative income tax [...]



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2008-04-21T08:36:34.397-07:00

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The Gateway Clipper Fleet is a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-based fleet of riverboats. The fleet cruises the three rivers of Pittsburgh- the Monongahela, the Allegheny, and the Ohio. The fleet is named after the city of Pittsburgh, which in earlier times was known as the "Gateway to the West" [1]. The original riverboat was the Gateway Clipper, which set sail in 1958. By the mid-1960s, the fleet was composed of three craft, the Gateway Clipper, the Party Liner, and the Good Ship Lollipop. Today there are five watercraft in the fleet: the 1,000-passenger Majestic; the 600-passenger Party Liner; the 400-passenger Keystone Belle; the 300-passenger Liberty Belle; and the 150-passenger Good Ship Lollipop (formerly known as the City of Champions until 1982). The Party Liner is a barge that is pushed by a towboat named the Gateway Liner [2].
The Gateway Clipper Fleet offers many types of cruises, from day trips for school groups to formal dinner cruises. Shuttle service to PNC Park and Heinz Field is available on days of Pittsburgh Pirates, Pittsburgh Steelers, and Pitt Panthers home games. The fleet is believed to be the largest inland riverboat fleet in the United States. The fleet formerly was moored at the Monongahela Wharf, but currently it is moored at Station Square.




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2008-04-20T08:11:37.712-07:00

Notable buildings The headquarters of Newry and Mourne District Council are in Newry. The area has a majority nationalist population, leading to a council dominated by Sinn Féin and the Social Democratic and Labour Party, but there are some Ulster Unionist and Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) councillors and one councillor from the Green Party. Administration The English version of the name of the city comes from the original Irish Iúr Chinn Trá (in older spelling, Iubhar Chinn Trábha), which translates as "the yew at the head of the strand", which relates to an apocryphal story that Saint Patrick planted a yew tree there in the 5th century. In modern Irish the full name of the town is rarely used; instead it is abbreviated to An tIúr. The town was established in 1144 with the building of a monastery, although there is strong evidence of continual human habitation in the area for several millennia. The monastery only lasted until 1162, when it was burned to the gound, and later replaced by a cistercian monastery. This monastery itself was later converted to a collegiate church in 1543, before being surrendered to the crown in 1548. Sir Nicholas Bagenal, Marshal of the Army in Ireland, took over the site around 1550, later building a castle there. The remains of the original Cistercian Monastery were still standing when Bagenal acquired the land and it may well have been the Abbot's House that Bagenal proclaimed as his Castle. The site was said to consist of a 'church, steeple, and cemetery, chapter- house, dormitory and hall, two orchards and one garden, containing one acre, within the precincts of the college'. The remains of Bagenal's Castle can be found today on Castle Street, near to the LIDL store, on what was once the site of McCann's Bakery. A rental roll dated 1575, provides a unique insight into life in the town at the time. It listed the names of the tenants in 'The High Street', 'Tenements within the Fort' and The Irish Street without the Fort'. These three distinct areas also appear in a map of the same time, along with a drawing of the castle. During the Williamite War, the forces of King James II set fire to the town in 1689, while retreating from William. It is said that only six houses and the castle survived the inferno. The town was rebuilt shortly afterwards, and its fortunes changed dramatically. Within decades it had the busiest port in Ulster and in 1742, had the first summit level canal in the British Isles. This led to a further period of economic prosperity, evidence of which can be seen in the many fine buildings and public places that can still be seen today. History Newry saw a number of violent incidents during the conflict known as the Troubles. For more information see The Troubles in Newry, which includes a list of all the fatal incidents that happened in Newry during the Troubles. See also: The Troubles in Killeen, for information on incidents at the border and customs post at Killeen on the border with the Republic of Ireland and close to Newry. The British Army moved in during the 1950s and have been there ever since. However, in 2003, the hilltop watch towers started being taken down and in 2005 the main base in Bessbrook started to be dismantled. The Troubles John Mitchel, a 19th century Irish patriot who inspired the Young Ireland Movement, is buried in the Old Meeting House cemetery in the town. Danny McAlinden won the bronze medal for boxing (Heavyweight) at the 1966 Commonwealth Games in Kingston, Jamaica. Later he became British and Commonwealth Heavyweight champion. He was born in Newry in 1947. Matthew Russell, SJ. Irish Jesuit, poet and editor. Russell was born in Newry in 1834. He entered the Jesuit Order and was ordained to th[...]



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2008-04-19T09:47:48.348-07:00

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Aside from the approximately 2,646 United States casualties, 327 foreign nationals also perished. The following is a list of their nationalities.
Excludes the 19 perpetrators and at least some cases of dual-citizenship.

Argentina: 4
Venezuela: 1



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2008-04-18T10:37:24.941-07:00

Homer is the mascot of the Atlanta Braves. He has a baseball shaped head and is the brother of Rally. Some fans have noted that Homer looks like the mascot of the New York Mets, Mr. Met. Others call Homer a knockoff of Mr. Red, since the Cincinnati Reds mascot originated (at least in graphic form) before Mr. Met. Before having the baseball head however, Homer was the personifacation of the old "Screaming Warrior" logo the Braves used before dropping it in 1988 due to political correctness. Homer's full name is Homer the Brave. This is meant to sound like "home of the brave", the last words of the National Anthem. Ballparks – South End Grounds • Congress Street Grounds • South End Grounds • Fenway Park • Braves Field • Milwaukee County Stadium • Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium • Turner Field Culture – Chief Noc-A-Homa • Homer • Rally • Tomahawk Buzzcut • War Chant Rivalries – Braves-Mets rivalry Important Figures – Henry Aaron • Bobby Cox • Eddie Mathews • Dale Murphy • Phil Niekro • Johnny Sain • Warren Spahn • Ted Turner Retired Numbers – 3 • 21 • 35 • 41 • 42 • 44 1914 • 1957 • 1995 1877 • 1878 • 1883 • 1891 • 1892 • 1893 • 1897 • 1898 • 1914 • 1948 • 1957 • 1958 • 1991 • 1992 • 1995 • 1996 • 1999 [...]



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2008-04-17T10:45:00.338-07:00

Bash is a Unix shell written for the GNU Project. The name of the actual executable is bash. Its name is an acronym for Bourne-again shell, a pun on the name of the Bourne shell (sh) (i.e. "Bourne again" or "born again"), an early and important Unix shell written by Stephen Bourne and distributed with Version 7 Unix circa 1978. Bash was created in 1987 by Brian Fox. In 1990 Chet Ramey became the primary maintainer. Bash is the default shell on most Linux systems as well as on Mac OS X and it can be run on most Unix-like operating systems. It has also been ported to Microsoft Windows within the Cygwin POSIX emulation environment for Windows, to MS-DOS by the DJGPP project and to Novell NetWare. Released under the GNU General Public License, Bash is free software. Features When Bash starts, it executes the commands in a variety of different scripts. When Bash is invoked as an interactive login shell, it first reads and executes commands from the file /etc/profile, if that file exists. After reading that file, it looks for ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login, and ~/.profile, in that order, and reads and executes commands from the first one that exists and is readable. One can force this behavior for a non-interactive shell with the --login option. The --noprofile option may be used to inhibit this behavior. When a login shell exits, Bash reads and executes commands from the file ~/.bash_logout, if it exists. When an interactive shell that is not a login shell is started, Bash reads and executes commands from ~/.bashrc, if that file exists. This may be inhibited by using the --norc option. The --rcfile file option will force Bash to read and execute commands from file instead of ~/.bashrc. When Bash is started non-interactively, to run a shell script, for example, it looks for the variable BASH_ENV in the environment, expands its value if it appears there, and uses the expanded value as the name of a file to read and execute. Bash behaves as if the following command were executed: but the value of the PATH variable is not used to search for the file name. If Bash is invoked with the name sh, it tries to mimic the startup behavior of historical versions of sh as closely as possible, while conforming to the POSIX standard as well. When invoked as an interactive login shell, or a non-interactive shell with the --login option, it first attempts to read and execute commands from /etc/profile and ~/.profile, in that order. The --noprofile option may be used to inhibit this behavior. When invoked as an interactive shell with the name sh, Bash looks for the variable ENV, expands its value if it is defined, and uses the expanded value as the name of a file to read and execute. Since a shell invoked as sh does not attempt to read and execute commands from any other startup files, the --rcfile option has no effect. A non-interactive shell invoked with the name sh does not attempt to read any other startup files. When invoked as sh, Bash enters POSIX mode after the startup files are read. When Bash is started in POSIX mode, as with the --posix command line option, it follows the POSIX standard for startup files. In this mode, interactive shells expand the ENV variable and commands are read and executed from the file whose name is the expanded value. No other startup files are read. Bash attempts to determine when it is being run by the remote shell daemon, usually rshd. If Bash determines it is being run by rshd, it reads and executes commands from ~/.bashrc, if that file exists and is readable. It will not do this if invoked as sh. The --norc option may be used to inhibit this behavior, and the --rcfile option may be used to for[...]



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2008-04-16T09:31:52.932-07:00

For the mountain chain, see Zambales Mountains. For the ethnic group, see Sambal people. Zambales is a province of the Philippines located in the Central Luzon region. Its capital is Iba. Zambales borders Pangasinan to the north, Tarlac and Pampanga to the east, and Bataan to the south. The province lies between the South China Sea and the Zambales Mountains. With a land area of 3,700 km, Zambales is the second largest among the six provinces of Central Luzon. It has a population density of 170 people per square kilometer², one of the lowest in the country. The province is noted for its mangoes, which are among the sweetest in the world. It is most abundant from January to April. Zambales is served by the Subic Bay International Airport, which is located in the municipality of Subic, south of the provincial capital. Subic Bay Freeport Zone is host to many tourist attractions which include casinos, beach resorts, parks, beachside huts and cottages and historical artifacts. Demographics and culture Main articles: Ilocano language, Sambal language, and Tagalog language Language Economy Geography Zambales has two pronounced seasons: dry from October to June, and wet from July to September. Climate Zambales lies on the western shores of Luzon island, between the Zambales Mountains and the South China Sea. Its shoreline is very ragged, and features many coves and inlets. The mountain range on the eastern part of the province occupies about 60% of its total land area. Subic Bay, in the southernmost part of the province, provides a natural harbor, and was chosen as the location of an American naval base. The peak of Mount Pinatubo lies on the intersection of the boundaries between Zambales, Pampanga, and Tarlac. This volcano, once considered dormant, erupted violently in 1991. Physical Zambales is subdivided into 13 municipalities and 1 city. Olongapo City is a highly urbanized city and administers itself autonomously from the province. City: Olongapo Political The area now occupied by Zambales was first explored by the Spanish in 1572, led by Juan de Salcedo. Among the earliest towns founded were Masinloc (1607), Iba (1611), and Santa Cruz (1612). Masinloc became the province's first capital. However, the capital was moved between among the three towns during its history before settling in Iba, due to its strategic location. The first civil governor of Zambales during the American era was the Honorable Potenciano Lesaca from 1901-1903. The province's name came from the word zambal, which is a Hispanized term for Sambali. Zambal refers to the language spoken by the early Austronesian inhabitants of the place. A contending version states that the name was derived from the word samba, meaning worship, because the Spanish supposedly found the native inhabitants to be highly superstitious; worshiping the spirits of their ancestors. [...]



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2008-04-15T08:43:26.830-07:00

The post of Governors-General of Korea (Korean: 조선총독, Hanja: 朝鮮總督, Japanese: 朝鮮総督) served as the chief representative of the Japanese government in Korea while it was held as the Japanese colony of Chōsen from 1910 to 1945. The seat of the Japanese colonial government was the Japanese General Government Building, completed in 1926. According to Korean legal thought, de jure sovereignty was not transferred to the Emperor of Japan with the forced end of the Joseon dynasty, such that the Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea became the de jure government of the Korean people from 1919 to 1948, and the foreign governors merely exercised de facto rule for the period. After the Japanese defeat in World War II Korea came under US and Soviet control. After 1948, power passed to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the Republic of Korea. Residents-General Governor-General of Taiwan Rulers of Korea List of Korea-related topics Anti-Japanese sentiment in Korea Japanese militarism Japanese nationalism Anti-Japanese sentiment Sōshi-kaimei Governor-General of Karafuto Governor-General of Kwantung Governor-General of South Pacific Mandate [...]



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2008-04-14T09:15:34.572-07:00

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Siding Spring Observatory near Coonabarabran, Australia, part of the Research School of Astronomy & Astrophysics (RSAA) at the Australian National University (ANU), incorporates the Anglo-Australian Telescope along with a collection of other telescopes owned by the Australian National University, the University of New South Wales, and other institutions. The observatory is situated 1165 metres or 4000 feet above sea level in the Warrumbungle National Park on Mount Woorat also known as Siding Spring Mountain.
There is a visitors gallery and exhibition area open to the public which also incorporates a coffee shop cafe and souvenir shop called the Exploratory. This Centre is open Monday to Friday from 9.30 am to 4 pm and weekends and public holidays from 10 am.




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2008-04-13T09:25:41.987-07:00

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Harvey Morrison Penick (October 23, 1904April 2, 1995) was a well-known golf pro and instructor.
He began his golf career as a caddy at Austin Country Club at age eight. He became the club's assistant pro five years later, and was promoted to head professional in 1923, a role which he remained in until 1973.
Penick was the Golf Coach at the University of Texas from 1931 - 1963, and coached Tom Kite. In 1989 Penick was honored by the PGA of America as Teacher of the Year. He authored Harvey Penick's Little Red Book, which is the highest selling golf book ever published.
During his final illness, he gave lessons from his deathbed to longtime student Ben Crenshaw. The day after serving as a pallbearer at Penick's funeral, Crenshaw played in The Masters, and wept after sinking the winning putt. In the post-tournament interview, Crenshaw said: "I had a 15th club in my bag," a reference to Penick. (The "15th club" reference is based on the golf rule that limits a player to carrying 14 clubs during a round.)




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2008-04-12T08:26:25.868-07:00

Manufacturing and manufacturing systems Manufacturing Factory Craft production English system of manufacturing American system of manufacturing Mass production Batch production Job production Just In Time manufacturing Toyota Production System Lean production Computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) Mass customization Theories of production Taylorism Fordism Theory of Constraints Lean Manufacturing Productivity Productivity Benchmarking Changeover Cost accounting Experience curve effects (learning curve effects) Lot size and run length Operations research Scheduling and queuing theory Throughput accounting Time and motion study Production engineering Industrial and manufacturing engineering Reverse engineering Value engineering Production technology Assembly line Industrial robot Computer-aided manufacturing Computer Integrated Manufacturing Production equipment control Computer numerically controlled Distributed Control System Fieldbus control system Programmable logic controllers Conveyor belt Advanced Planning & Scheduling Scheduling (production processes) Machinery Woodworking machinery Metalworking machinery Textile machinery Equipment manufacturer Process improvement Process Systems analysis Quality Quality control Six Sigma Total Quality Management Certification Processes and Awards ISO 9000 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (US) Canada Awards for Excellence (National Quality Insitute) (Canada) Deming Prize (Japan) Joseph M. Juran Medal (US) Japan Quality Control Medal (Japan) The economics of production Production theory basics Production, costs, and pricing Production function Production possibility frontier Logistics Supply chain Supply chain management Procurement or purchasing Inventory Inventory management Economic order quantity Just In Time Product design Rapid prototyping Computer-aided design (CAD) New product development Research and development Toolkits for user innovation [...]



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2008-04-11T08:16:55.427-07:00

Charlie Rose is an American television interview show, with Charlie Rose as executive producer, executive editor, and host. The show is syndicated on PBS. Rose interviews well-known thinkers, writers, politicians, athletes, entertainers, business leaders, scientists, and other newsmakers. Rose sits with his guests in the stillness of his studio, across his trademark round, oak-hewn table and silhouetted against a distinctive, and oft-imitated, inky-black background. A new one-hour episode airs nearly every weeknight. According to its website, only Rose and his guests are allowed in the studio during taping. This is accomplished by the use of robotic cameras. The show premiered on September 30, 1991. It is presented by WNET, where it first aired as a local program. Funding for the show is primarily provided by donations from various corporations and charitable foundations. In 2007, the video archive of past interviews has been added to the website for free viewing. Guest hosts Guests have included: King Abdullah II Ryan Adams Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete Madeleine Albright Christiane Amanpour Secretary-General Kofi Annan Richard Armitage Lance Armstrong President Bashar al-Assad Prime Minister José María Aznar Christian Bale Anne Bancroft Ehud Barak Daniel Barenboim Ellen Barkin Cecilia Bartoli Jeff Bezos Juliette Binoche Björk Pierre Boulez David Bowie Sir Richard Branson Paul Bremer Thierry Breton Tom Brokaw William F. Buckley Warren Buffett President George W. Bush Michael Caine Jim Carrey President Jimmy Carter Henri Cartier-Bresson Dick Cavett Lynne Cheney Noam Chomsky Tom Clancy Hillary Rodham Clinton President William Jefferson Clinton Stephen Colbert Prime Minister Manmohan Singh James C. Collins James Conlon Anderson Cooper Francis Ford Coppola Sofia Coppola Billy Corgan Bob Costas Michael Crichton Tom Cruise Mark Cuban Mario Cuomo Roméo Dallaire Claire Danes Richard Dawkins Jared Diamond Michael Dell Judi Dench Catherine Deneuve Robert De Niro Johnny Depp Leonardo Dicaprio Joan Didion Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck Maureen Dowd Plácido Domingo Robert Duvall Clint Eastwood Michael Eisner Ahmet Ertegün Prime Minister Laurent Fabius Oriana Fallaci Colin Firth Renee Fleming Harrison Ford Michael J. Fox Morgan Freeman Leonie Frieda Milton Friedman Thomas Friedman Diane von Fürstenberg John Eliot Gardiner Janeane Garofalo Bill Gates Melinda Gates Peter Gelb Valery Gergiev William Goldman Jane Goodall Al Gore Stephen Jay Gould David Graeber Andy Grove David Hare Tom Hanks Seymour Hersh David Hockney Dustin Hoffman Philip Seymour Hoffman Richard Holbrooke Sir Anthony Hopkins Robert Hughes Isabelle Huppert Peter Jackson Phil Jackson Mick Jagger Steve Jobs Magic Johnson Angelina Jolie Walid Jumblatt Ryszard Kapuscinski Diane Keaton Larry King Henry Kissinger Joe Klein Bernard-Henri Levy Karl Lagerfeld Lang Lang Ang Lee Spike Lee Jay Leno Justine Levy Jerry Lewis James Lipton George Lucas David Lynch Yo-Yo Ma Lorin Maazel Robert MacNeil Kurt Masur Ian McEwan Norman Mailer Nelson Mandela Dave Matthews Robert McNamara Sam Mendes Zubin Mehta Michael Moore Toni Morrison Bill Moyers President Hosni Mubarak President Pervez Musharraf Riccardo Muti Anne-Sophie Mutter V. S. Naipaul Edward Norton Bill Nighy Barack Obama Haley Joel Osment Conan O'Brian Peter O'Toole Bill O'Reilly Seiji Ozawa Camille Paglia Robert Parker Richard Perle Yitzhak Perlman Harold Pinter George Plimpton Brad Pitt Natalie Portman Secretary Colin Powell Andre Previn Prime Minis[...]



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2008-04-10T08:00:54.702-07:00

This is a list of wars and man-made disasters by death toll. Some events overlap categories. See also: List of battles and other violent events by death toll For natural disasters see: List of natural disasters by death toll Wars and armed conflicts This section lists campaigns either aimed at or resulting in significant mortality of noncombatants, excluding victims of collateral damage from war. Noncombatant killings The CPPCG defines genocide in part as "acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group". The following is a list of genocides or alleged genocides that appear in the article genocides in history Genocide 1,000,000-1,400,000 - Belzec extermination camp, (by Nazi Germany, located in Belzec Poland, 1942-1943) 350,000 - Majdanek extermination camp, (by Nazi Germany, located in Lublin Poland, 1942-1944) 300,000 - Chelmno extermination camp, (by Nazi Germany, located in Chelmno Poland, 1941-1943) 260,000 - Sobibór extermination camp, (by Nazi Germany, located in Sobibor Poland, 1942-1943) 55,000 - Neuengamme concentration camp, (by Nazi Germany, located by Hamburg, Germany, 1938-1945) Man-made famines This section lists tolls from the systematic practice of human sacrifice or suicide. For notable individual episodes, see Human sacrifice and mass sucide. Footnotes Other lists organized by death toll Other lists with similar topics Topics dealing with similar themes List of natural disasters by death toll List of battles and other violent events by death toll List of accidents and disasters by death toll List of United Kingdom disasters by death toll Most prolific murderers by number of victims List of wars | List of battles | List of invasions List of massacres | List of terrorist incidents | List of riots List of disasters | List of historic fires | List of famines List of earthquakes | List of notable tropical cyclones List of rail accidents Lists of accidents and incidents on commercial airliners Mass murder | Genocide | Democide Famine | Infectious diseases Genocide in history Mass deaths and atrocities of the twentieth century Most lethal battles in world history United States casualties of war Invasion and occupation of Iraq casualties [...]



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2008-04-09T09:39:59.639-07:00

Tony Danza (born Anthony Salvatore Iadanza April 21, 1951 in Brooklyn, New York), is an American actor best known for starring in two popular TV series, Taxi and Who's the Boss?, as well as appearing in the Academy Award-winning motion picture, Crash. He also hosted his own talk show, The Tony Danza Show. Filmography Taxi (1978) (series) ... Tony Banta Murder Can Hurt You (1980) ... Pony Lambretta Single Bars, Single Women (1984) ... Dennis Who's the Boss? (1984) (series) ... Tony Micelli Doing Life (1986) ... Jerry Rosenberg Freedom Fighter (1988) ... Vic Ross The Whereabouts of Jenny (1991) ... Rowdy Patron Baby Talk (1991) (series) (voice) ... Baby Mickey Campbell Dead and Alive: The Race for Gus Farace (1991) ... Constible Farace The Mighty Jungle (1994) (series) (voice) ... Vinnie, the Alligator Deadly Whispers (1995) ... Tom Acton Hudson Street (1995) (series) ... Tony Canetti Sinatra: 80 Years My Way (1995) ... Cameo Freakazoid! (1996) ... Cameo Reference Bob Hope: Laughing with the Presidents (1996) ... Co-host North Shore Fish (1996) ... Sal 12 Angry Men (1997) ... Juror #7 The Tony Danza Show (1997) (series) ... Tony DiMeo The Garbage Picking Field Goal Kicking Philadelphia Phenomenon (1998) ... Barney Gorman Noah (1998) ... Norman Waters The Practice (1999) Family Law (2000) ... Joe Celano Miss America Pageant (2001) ... Host The Tony Danza Show (2004 – 2006) (talk show) ... Host All My Children (2005) (guest) ... Hotel Mgr. [...]



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2008-04-08T08:15:13.250-07:00

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Main article: Merchant ship