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Preview: PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories



Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.



 



London mayor: Uber to blame for loss of license in city

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 14:07:10 EDT

London's mayor said Saturday that people angry about the decision by transit authorities to strip Uber of its license to operate in the city should blame the ride-hailing company itself.



The Sun rises in new play about Murdoch's tabloid revolution

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 14:06:49 EDT

Rupert Murdoch has power, wealth—and legions of detractors, who say the media mogul's tabloids and TV stations have fueled crass celebrity culture, phone hacking and fake news.



Google looking to help news outlets win subscribers

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 02:54:36 EDT

Google is seeking ways to help publishers win paying subscribers for news stories, a person close to the matter told AFP.



Federal government notifies 21 states of election hacking

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 02:53:53 EDT

The federal government on Friday told election officials in 21 states that hackers targeted their systems before last year's presidential election.



Archaeologists: More protections needed for Chaco region

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 02:53:31 EDT

Archaeologists, professors and other researchers on Friday called for more protections of an expansive area surrounding Chaco Culture National Historical Park, saying increased oil and gas development has the potential to destroy parts of the landscape that could provide a better understanding of the ancient civilization that once inhabited the region.



'Lady Beast' fights for girl gamers in Japan

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 02:53:07 EDT

In her online world, she is "Lady Beast", deftly operating her green monster Blanka in dizzying hand-to-hand streetfighting combat on the global professional gaming circuit.



Amazon signs deal to boost its restaurant delivery service

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 17:18:15 EDT

Amazon wants to deliver more burritos and hamburgers to your doorstep.



Facebook backs off plan for non-voting shares

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 17:17:38 EDT

Facebook on Friday reversed course on a plan to issue a new non-voting class of shares, avoiding a public trial in a suit filed by investors in the huge social network.



Study finds no-tillage not sufficient alone to prevent water pollution from nitrate

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 17:13:44 EDT

A new IUPUI study funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture answers a long-debated agricultural question: whether no-tillage alone is sufficient to prevent water pollution from nitrate. The answer is no.



Twitter bots for good: Study reveals how information spreads on social media

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 17:12:30 EDT

After an election year marked by heated exchanges and the distribution of fake news, Twitter bots earned a bad reputation—but not all bots are bad, suggests a new study co-authored by Emilio Ferrara, a USC Information Sciences Institute computer scientist and a research assistant professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering's Department of Computer Science.



New technique spots warning signs of extreme events

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 14:00:01 EDT

Many extreme events—from a rogue wave that rises up from calm waters, to an instability inside a gas turbine, to the sudden extinction of a previously hardy wildlife species—seem to occur without warning. It's often impossible to predict when such bursts of instability will strike, particularly in systems with a complex and ever-changing mix of players and pieces.



Algae on river flowing into Lake Erie prompts warning

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:53:39 EDT

Health officials in Ohio are telling children, pregnant women and people with certain medical conditions not to swim in the river that flows through Toledo because of an algae outbreak.



Not home? Walmart wants to walk in and stock your fridge

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:52:22 EDT

Would you be OK with letting a stranger into your house for the sake of convenience?



London ouster of Uber not justified: US commerce chief

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:52:01 EDT

The decision by London transport authorities to oust US ride-hailing firm Uber is "not really justified," US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Friday.



Russia firm unveils 'surveillance-proof' smartphone

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:51:44 EDT

For Russians who fear that someone may be eavesdropping on their phone conversations, leading IT entrepreneur Natalya Kaspersky says she has a solution.



NASA's asteroid chaser swings by Earth on way to space rock

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:51:12 EDT

NASA's asteroid-chasing spacecraft swung by Earth on Friday on its way to a space rock.



Dentistry study pinpoints role of proteins that produce pearls

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:50:51 EDT

Pearls are among nature's most beautiful creations, and have been treasured for countless centuries. Beneath one's iridescent surface lies a tough and resilient structure made of intricately arranged tiles of calcium carbonate organized by a crew of proteins that guide its formation and repair.



Fires in Australia pop up in places already burned

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:50:20 EDT

Fires that span across the Northern Territory and Western Australia appear to have broken out in areas that have already been burned in previous fires. Areas that sport "burn scars", those areas that are a darker, almost red-brown color, are surrounded by fires that are anywhere from a few hours old to 7 days old. The areas that are seven days old can be attributed to fires that spread but areas that are just a few hours old may be fires that have presumably been put out only to have them break out again.



Enhancing the sensing capabilities of diamonds with quantum properties

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:50:00 EDT

Pure diamond consists of carbon atoms in a perfect crystal lattice. But remove a few carbons and swap some others for nitrogen, and you get a diamond with special quantum-sensing properties. These properties are useful for quantum information applications and sensing magnetic fields, and as a platform for probing the mysteries of quantum physics.



NASA tracking Hurricane Maria on Bahamas approach

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:49:17 EDT

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a look at Maria's temperatures to find the strongest sides of the storm, while NOAA's GOES satellite revealed the extent of the storm in a visible image as it moved toward the Bahamas.



NASA's Terra satellite sees a very stubborn post-Tropical Cyclone Jose

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:47:10 EDT

Jose continues to bring tropical storm conditions to southern New England although the storm has become post-tropical. NASA's Terra satellite caught a view of the storm sitting almost stationary about 100 miles from Nantucket Island, Massachusetts.



First large scale study of cocaine users leads to breakthrough in drug testing

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:40:41 EDT

Scientists from the University of Surrey have developed a rapid and highly sensitive fingerprint test that can take just seconds to confirm whether someone has used cocaine.



Carmakers face billions in European CO2 fines from 2021: study

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:20:01 EDT

Big-name carmakers including Volkswagen and Fiat Chrysler face fines running into the billions for failure to meet tough new European carbon dioxide emissions limits slated for 2021, a study has found.



Russia floats out powerful nuclear icebreaker

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:13:32 EDT

Russia on Friday held a launching ceremony for a powerful nuclear icebreaker, called Sibir (Siberia), in its drive to prepare a fleet for navigating the Northern Passage and hauling goods, particularly energy, to Asian markets.



Indonesia raises Bali volcano alert to highest level

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:13:14 EDT

Indonesian authorities have raised the alert level for the Mount Agung volcano on the tourist island of Bali to the highest level, and some 10,000 villagers have left their homes around the mountain, officials said Friday.



Ancient textiles reveal differences in Mediterranean fabrics in the 1st millennium BC

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:08:58 EDT

Textiles represent one of the earliest human craft technologies and applied arts, and their production would have been one of the most important time, resource and labour consuming activities in the ancient past.



Rainbow colors reveal cell history

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:08:27 EDT

Tracing the history of individual cells in the developing organism can reveal functional differences among seemingly uniform cells. This knowledge is important for defining the characteristics of highly regenerative cells in order to target them for cellular therapies, as well as to prevent the formation of unfit cells, which compromise the overall health of the organism. The study introduced here presents a new method for tracing the history of β-cells, which perform the essential function of secreting insulin in response to glucose.



Crowning the 'King of the Crops': Sequencing the white Guinea yam genome

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:05:46 EDT

An international collaboration involving the Earlham Institute, Norwich, UK, and the Iwate Biotechnology Research Centre, Japan, has for the first time provided a genome sequence for the white Guinea yam, a staple crop with huge economic and cultural significance on the African continent and a lifeline for millions of people.



Winter cold extremes linked to high-altitude polar vortex weakening

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:05:13 EDT

When the strong winds that circle the Arctic slacken, cold polar air can escape and cause extreme winter chills in parts of the Northern hemisphere. A new study finds that these weak states have become more persistent over the past four decades and can be linked to cold winters in Russia and Europe. It is the first to show that changes in winds high up in the stratosphere substantially contributed to the observed winter cooling trend in northern Eurasia. While it is still a subject of research how the Arctic under climate change impacts the rest of the world, this study lends further support that a changing Arctic impacts the weather across large swaths of the Northern Hemisphere population centers.



Party discipline for jumping genes

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 09:59:13 EDT

Jumping genes, transposons, are part of the genome of most organisms, aggregated into families and can damage the genome by jumping. How hosts suppress the jumping is well investigated. Why they still can jump has hardly been understood so far. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna investigated for the first time in all transposons of the host organism, which properties and host environments facilitate jumping. They showed that family affiliation is more important than position.