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Preview: PRI: RadioWest

RadioWest Podcasts



A radio conversation where people tell stories that explore the way the world works. Produced by KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City and hosted by Doug Fabrizio.



Last Build Date: Sat, 03 Dec 2016 07:18:55 +0000

 



The Nutcracker

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 18:00:00 +0000

The dance scholar Jennifer Fisher says that The Nutcracker, at least in North America, has become as "regular as clockwork." Some may find it cliche and for some it may be obligatory. But Fisher argues that Tchaikovsky's piece is one of the most powerful traditions in the world of ballet and that it tells us a lot about the values we share. Friday, Doug talks to Fisher and Ballet West CEO and Artistic Director Adam Sklute about The Nutcracker and the place it holds in our culture. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/12/rw120216.mp3




A Conversation with Pierre-Richard Prosper

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Salt Lake City resident Pierre-Richard Prosper is the son of Haitian immigrants, a former district attorney in Los Angeles at the height of the gang violence there, and he was the lead prosecutor in the first trial for genocide and rape as war crimes. Those are just a few of his stories, but in many ways they’ve shaped his view of the world. Prosper believes deeply in the law’s ability to right wrongs that we could have prevented in the first place. He joins us Thursday to talk about his fascinating life.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/12/rw120116.mp3




Casanova

Wed, 30 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

The name Casanova is synonymous with seduction and sexuality. And while biographer Laurence Bergreen says that Giacomo Casanova’s favorite place was a brothel, it might surprise you that his second favorite was a library. The 18th century Venetian was born in poverty. He was intent on working up the social ladder though and saw sex as both pleasure and a “weapon of class destruction.” Thursday, Bergreen joins Doug to talk about Casanova’s writing and philosophy … as well as his 120+ lovers.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/12/rw113016.mp3




American Heiress

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Tuesday, our guest is author Jeffrey Toobin, who’s written a book about the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst. Hearst was 19 and heir to her family’s fortune when the “Symbionese Liberation Army” took her, and it soon seemed that she had adopted their incoherent, revolutionary cause. We’ll explore the controversy over Hearst’s involvement in their crimes, the atmosphere that gave birth to the SLA, and why Toobin says the story sheds light on a time when America was on the brink of a nervous breakdown. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw112916.mp3




The Lion in the Living Room

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Lions were once feared as the king of jungle. But their influence on the world and in nature now pales in comparison to the diminutive, purring, and demanding house cat. In a new book, the journalist Abigail Tucker, investigates the natural and cultural history of house cats. Despite their ubiquity in modern life, she says, we know very little about what cats are, how they came to live among us, and why we love these furry freeloaders. Tucker joins us Monday to talk about the lions in our living rooms.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw112816.mp3




Would It Kill You to Stop Doing That?

Fri, 25 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Modern American manners leave much to be desired. People answer their cell phones in the middle of meals, they shush loudly in movie theaters and even clip their toenails on the train. Henry Alford wanted to learn a little more about 21st century etiquette, so he went to Japan, AKA the Fort Knox of good manners, interviewed etiquette experts and even played a game called "Touch the Waiter." Friday, Doug talks with Alford about how we behave and how we could behave better. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw112516.mp3




The Real Story of the Pilgrims

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

In a documentary for the PBS series American Experience, filmmaker Ric Burns tells the tale of a small group of extreme people whom history and myth record as the founders of a new nation. The Pilgrims faced countless challenges when they came to the New World in 1620. The fact of their survival and success is not only commemorated every November, it also exists in the very myth of America’s origins. Thanksgiving Day, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with Burns to winnow fact from fiction about the Pilgrims. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw112416.mp3




The Lost Art of Natural Navigation

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Nowadays, there are all kinds of devices to help us find our way through the world. But before all that stuff, before even cartography, humankind was navigating with nature as the guide. The adventurer Tristan Gooley is committed to recovering and teaching the lost arts natural navigation. Rocks, trees, grass, ducks, puddles, clouds, and the wind are all compass hands to him. Gooley joins us Wednesday to share what he’s learned about natural navigation and the joys of learning nature’s subtle signs.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw112316.mp3




The Erotic Mormon Image

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

19th century Utah photographer Charles Ellis Johnson was a son-in-law of Brigham Young with access to the state’s elite. He trained his camera on the LDS Temple and leaders like the prophet Wilford Woodruff. So what should we make of his brisk mail-order business of “spicy girls”? Art historian Mary Campbell says at a time when most Americans thought of the Saints in terms of the “barbarity” of polygamy, Johnson’s erotic photography helped make Mormons mainstream. Tuesday, she joins us to explain.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw112216.mp3




Helping Children Succeed

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

A few years ago, Paul Tough wrote a book about research showing that character traits like grit, self-control, and optimism are critical to a child’s success. Tough’s latest book builds on that research by explaining how to put it into practice. He argues that a child’s home and school environments are the principle barriers to his or her success. Improve the environment, Tough says, and you can improve the child. He joins us Monday to explain his theory of helping children succeed. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw112116.mp3




The Gene

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Friday, the writer and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee is our guest. He’s written a book that tells the epic tale of our quest to unravel the human genome. It’s the story of a long lineage of scientists—from Mendel, to Darwin, Watson, Crick, and countless others—and their efforts to understand the workings of the very threads of our existence. But how, Mukherjee wonders, can we best apply that knowledge? And what does it mean to be human when we can read and write our own genetic information? (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw111816.mp3




The Debate Over the Electoral College

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Last week’s presidential election marked the fifth time that there was a split on the popular and electoral college vote. Of course, it wasn’t the first time it’s happened in the early years of 21st century, and that’s got a lot of people are asking: why do we have an electoral college? How’d we end up with this obscure voting method? Defenders argue it’s a cornerstone of the American republic, while opponents counter that it doesn’t value each vote equally. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides of the debate.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw111716.mp3




Justice Clarence Thomas and the Future of the Supreme Court

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

President-elect Donald Trump could potentially appoint enough Supreme Court justices to create a conservative majority unmatched in 80 years. Law professor RonNell Andersen Jones says that leaves Justice Clarence Thomas poised to be the “granddaddy of the conservative wing of the court.” So Wednesday, Jones joins us, along with scholar Amy Wildermuth, to talk about Thomas’ personality, his jurisprudence, and the contradictions Jones says make him one of the most interesting justices in generations.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw111616.mp3




One Big Union

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Tuesday, we’re talking about a new play that explores the trial and execution of labor activist Joe Hill. Playwright and legal scholar Debora Threedy says whether Hill was guilty or not, he didn’t get a fair trial. Her play looks at what went wrong, the efforts to save him, the complicated politics of his case, and how Hill’s words live on in music more than a century after his death. Threedy and researcher Jeremy Harmon join us to talk about the production. It’s called ONE BIG UNION.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw111516.mp3




The Attention Merchants

Mon, 14 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Wherever you turn these days, commercials, sponsored social media, and other advertising efforts await your attention. The influential thinker Tim Wu says we have the “attention merchants” to thank for that. In a new book, Wu argues that the concerted efforts of advertisers to attract our attention at every opportunity has made us more distracted and less focused than ever before. Wu joins us Monday to explore the rise of the attention merchants and the human costs of their efforts.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw111416.mp3




Transcending Partisanship

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

In Donald Trump’s Presidential victory speech, he struck a tone that some found hard to believe after the vitriolic race. He called on Republicans, Democrats, and independents to “come together as one united people.” But if you’ve been on social media recently, you know that’s a tall order. So Thursday, we’re looking at the state of polarization in the country and the internet’s effect on our political views. We’ll also talk to activists who are imagining a “Reunited” America.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw111016.mp3




Utah and the 2016 Election

Wed, 09 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

It’s finally arrived: November 9th, the day after Election Day 2016. Wednesday, we’ll examine all that happened in Utah during this tumultuous election cycle and ask where we go from here and what a Donald Trump presidency could mean for the Beehive State. A panel of pundits will join Doug to talk about the rise of a third-party presidential candidate, the results of down-ballot races, and much more.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw110916.mp3




Why Empathy Matters

Tue, 08 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Tuesday, we're offering a mid-day reprieve from election coverage with a conversation about empathy. The philosopher Roman Krznaric suggests you forget the idea that it’s some fluffy, feel-good concept. Krznaric argues that empathy is radical and dangerous, because it offers the possibility of real change. He also says it’s not a concept to reserve for the down and out. To really address the world’s empathy deficit, we must equally apply it to our neighbors and to people in power. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw110816.mp3




Science Vs

Mon, 07 Nov 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Monday, we’re offering a break from the political hubbub and talking about an awesome podcast called Science Vs. It’s created and hosted by the young Australian journalist Wendy Zukerman. In each episode, she pits a scientific fad against scientific facts. She’s tackled stuff like organic food, gun control, fracking, and, perhaps most memorably, the female G-spot. Zukerman will join us to talk about using facts, heart, and humor to confront the uninformed opinions we’re all at least a little guilty of.


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw110716.mp3




On Trails

Fri, 04 Nov 2016 17:00:00 +0000

In 2009, while thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths beneath our feet. On every scale of life on earth, he says, trails form that “reduce an overwhelming array of choices to a single expeditious route.” But how do they form? Why do some paths improve while others disappear? How does order emerge from chaos? Moor joins us Friday to explore how pathways serve as an essential guiding force for trailblazers and trail followers, alike. [Rebroadcast]


Media Files:
http://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/11/rw110416.mp3