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PRI: RadioWest



Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. Listeners can join live at (801) 585-WEST or radiowest@kuer.org. The conversation continues on our on-line discussion board at www.



Published: Thu, 03 May 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2017 16:20:16 GMT

Copyright: copyright 2005 - 2009 KUER 90.1 Salt Lake City, UT
 



5/4/12: God's Jury

Thu, 03 May 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition. But not everybody really knows what it is, either. The writer Cullen Murphy has written a book about the Catholic Church's 700-year persecution of its enemies, both real and imagined. And he says the "inquisitorial impulse" lives on - in America's massive surveillance and routine use of torture in the wake of 9/11, for example. Murphy joins Doug on Friday to remind us the Inquisition isn't something safely relegated to the past (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1011176/mp3/news/podcast/228/1011176.mp3




5/3/12: Through the Lens - Bully

Thu, 03 May 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Thursday, we're joined by Lee Hirsch, director of the troubling and powerful film "Bully." It's the latest in our Through the Lens documentary series. Hirsch has said he wanted to bring the hidden lives of young people who are bullied out in the open. He spent a year following five families - including two trying to find some resolution after their sons took their own lives. We'll talk to Hirsch about the film and present free screenings at 4:35 and 7:10 at


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1011170/mp3/news/podcast/228/1011170.mp3




4/27/12: Revelations

Thu, 26 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

For many, The Book of Revelation lays out a terrifying vision for the end of days: war, famine and plague visited on the Earth. Religion scholar Elaine Pagels says that with its symbolic language, the Bible's final book has been subject to a range of interpretations though. She says it's about hope as much as fear. Pagels' latest book is called "Revelations" and Friday she joins us to explain what ancient prophecies can teach us not just about good and evil, but about humankind as a whole.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1010716/mp3/news/podcast/228/1010716.mp3




4/26/12: The 2012 Utah Caucuses

Wed, 25 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Thursday on RadioWest we're hosting a panel discussion about Utah's recent political caucuses. There's evidence that caucus delegates were more moderate this time around, and that they value experience more than in years past. That may explain why Sen. Orrin Hatch survived the caucuses, only to face his first primary since 1976. We'll also talk about the coming congressional race between Rep. Jim Matheson and Republican nominee Mia Love, and what Democrats are doing to woo Utah's Mormon voters.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1010682/mp3/news/podcast/228/1010682.mp3




4/25/12: Storyteller Kevin Kling

Wed, 25 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Wednesday, Doug is joined by storyteller and humorist Kevin Kling. Kling is perhaps best known for his commentaries on NPR. His stories are autobiographical - funny, but deeply personal. Kling shares everything from holidays in Minnesota and performing his banned play in Czechoslovakia to living with a birth defect and surviving a near fatal motor cycle accident. He joins Doug to talk about the power of story to overcome tragedy. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1010532/mp3/news/podcast/228/1010532.mp3




4/24/12: Facing the Storm - The Story of the American Bison

Mon, 23 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

The past 200 years haven't been kind to the American buffalo. Once the basis for the cultures and economies of Native Americans on the Great Plains, bison were nearly eradicated in the 19th century. Conservation efforts saved the animals from extinction, but they no longer roam freely on their old range. In a new documentary, the filmmaker Doug Hawes-Davis chronicles the history of human relations with the American bison. He and Western historian Dan Flores join Doug on Tuesday.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1010340/mp3/news/podcast/228/1010340.mp3




4/23/12: Paper Promises

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

For the past 40 years western economies have splurged on debt, but it's hardly a new phenomenon. Financial journalist Philip Coggan says that economic crises have a time-worn place in history. Governments fall, currencies lose their value and new systems emerge. In his new book, Coggan traces our attitudes towards money and debt through history. Monday, he joins us to explain what these debt cycles can teach us about our current situation and how our attitudes might be about to change again.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1010235/mp3/news/podcast/228/1010235.mp3




4/20/12: Inside Scientology

Thu, 19 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Friday, we're talking about Scientology with the journalist Janet Reitman. To its adherents, Scientology is the "fastest growing religion in the world." Its critics though call it a "cult" and even a "mafia" pointing to the hundreds of thousands of dollars that believers can pay for salvation. Reitman spent five years investigating the group and joins us to discuss her book "Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion." (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1010065/mp3/news/podcast/228/1010065.mp3




4/19/12: The Book of Love

Wed, 18 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

When the Hindu philosopher Vatsayana wrote the Kamasutra some 2000 years ago, he said that he did so in a spirit of chastity and meditation - not for the sake of passion. So how is it that the treatise has become synonymous with sexual ecstasy and acrobatic positions? The writer James McConnachie joins us to tell the story of the Kamasutra's journey from India to Victorian England and the role it has played in the West's ongoing wars over sexuality and morality.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1009998/mp3/news/podcast/228/1009998.mp3




4/18/12: The West's Withering Snowpack

Tue, 17 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Utah's famed powder snow -- snow so great it typically covers local mountains well into the summer -- faces a dim prognosis. Several recent studies suggest spring snowpack in the Mountain West is dwindling, the result of a warming climate. If the predictions hold true, in the future the region will see less snow and more rain from fewer, more intense storms. A panel of guests joins Doug on Wednesday to talk about global warming's toll on the region's snowpack and the potential side effects.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1009885/mp3/news/podcast/228/1009885.mp3




4/17/12: Is Facebook Making Us Lonely?

Mon, 16 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

In the world of Facebook, you've got immediate access to a large circle of people - from your best friend in third grade to your sister-in-law's mother. New research suggests though that we have never been lonelier or more narcissistic. In the May issue of The Atlantic, writer and culture critic Stephen Marche takes on the epidemic of loneliness in the digital age. Tuesday, he joins us for a conversation about the effect it's having on our physical and mental health.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1009800/mp3/news/podcast/228/1009800.mp3




4/16/12: Preparing for Utah's "Big One"

Mon, 16 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

There's geologic evidence of 6.5 and greater earthquakes violently shaking our region. Seismologists say it will happen again in Utah, though it's difficult to say when. We do know that there could be devastating consequences for the urban landscape. Tuesday, the state is sponsoring an earthquake drill called "The Great Utah ShakeOut," so we're taking the opportunity to rebroadcast our conversation about earthquakes and what one would mean for the Wasatch Front. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1009704/mp3/news/podcast/228/1009704.mp3




4/13/12: Fringeology

Fri, 13 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Many of us have stories of paranormal events. Strange objects in the skies, ghosts at the old hotel. When Steve Volk was a kid, odd bumps echoed through his house at night. His sisters said their sheets were pulled from their beds while they slept and that an old woman walked through the closed door of their room. Inspired by the noise his family could never trace, Volk set out to explore the world of the paranormal. Doug talks to him about his research in the field of fringeology. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1009527/mp3/news/podcast/228/1009527.mp3




4/12/12: How to Win an Election

Wed, 11 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Here's some advice for making it in politics: call in favors, promise everything and exploit your opponent's weaknesses. If you're thinking candidates just aren't what they used to be - we should tell you that these gems were given to Marcus Cicero from his brother Quintus in 64 B.C. The scholar Philip Freeman has translated a letter that lays out Quintus' guide to winning an election and Thursday, he'll join us to explain how these lessons apply to politicians of today.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1009445/mp3/news/podcast/228/1009445.mp3




4/11/12: Through the Lens - The Day My God Died

Tue, 10 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Wednesday, we continue our Through the Lens film series with the powerful documentary "The Day My God Died." It tells the story of young girls abducted from their villages in Asia and sold into the child sex trade. Anuradha Koirala, the acclaimed activist who battles the sexual exploitation of women and children will be among our guests. Then we'll screen the film at 7:00 p.m. at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1009741/mp3/news/podcast/228/1009741.mp3




4/10/12: The Ethics of Having Babies

Mon, 09 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Tuesday, we're talking about the ethical arguments for and against having children. The world's population is expected to reach eight billion by 2025 and The New Yorker's environmental journalist Elizabeth Kolbert says that when we make decisions about how many kids to have we're "determining how the world of the future will look." Kolbert will be our guide through the debate. We'll then be joined by economist Bryan Caplan who says there are a lot of good reasons to be having more kids.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1009206/mp3/news/podcast/228/1009206.mp3




4/9/12: The Best Care Possible

Sun, 08 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Monday, Doug talks to end-of-life care expert Ira Byock about his new book "The Best Care Possible." Dr. Byock says that the one thing worse than having someone we love die is having them die badly. That's why his work has steered clear of the "more-is-always-better" philosophy that results in so many Americans experiencing painful and dehumanizing deaths. We'll talk about practical solutions for reforming our health care system and why Byock is determined to put the "care" back in healthcare.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1009106/mp3/news/podcast/228/1009106.mp3




4/6/12: Making It In America

Fri, 06 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

In the last decade, almost 6 million manufacturing jobs in America disappeared. Still, the U.S. remain either the number 1 or 2 manufacturer in the world. The journalist Adam Davidson went to the factory of Standard Motor Products in South Carolina to find out how the U.S. has remained a global leader in manufacturing even as fewer and fewer of us hold factory jobs. Davidson wrote about what he learned in the Atlantic magazine, and he'll join Doug to talk about it. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1008974/mp3/news/podcast/228/1008974.mp3




4/5/12: Local Music - Desert Noises

Wed, 04 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Thursday, we've got the Provo-based band Desert Noises in studio as part of our local music series. A lot of musicians are dedicated to their music and try to make a splash - but Desert Noises has gone all-in. The four members quit their jobs and they spent six months last year playing around the country. They're hitting the road again at the end of the month for a 16-city-tour, but first they'll join us to talk about evolving as a band and to play some of their newest songs.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1008853/mp3/news/podcast/228/1008853.mp3




4/4/12: Unwarranted Influence

Wed, 04 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

In Eisenhower's farewell address, he warned about a growing dependency between America's military and its industrial base. Some benefits have emerged from the "military-industrial complex" like cell phones and the Internet, but it's also provoked questions like "does our massive military establishment really make us safer?" Journalist James Ledbetter has written a book that explores the origins and effects of the military's role in our economy and he joins Doug to talk about it. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1008723/mp3/news/podcast/228/1008723.mp3




4/3/12: How Creativity Works

Mon, 02 Apr 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Tuesday, science writer Jonah Lehrer is with us for a look at what the latest research can teach us about our imaginations. Creativity isn't the special purview of artists and inventors; it's an impulse that's hard-wired into our brain and we can all learn to use it more effectively. We'll talk about how techniques like daydreaming, perseverance and channeling the inner seven-year-old can help us re-imagine the world.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1008607/mp3/news/podcast/228/1008607.mp3




4/2/12: Decision Making and the US Supreme Court

Fri, 30 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

With oral arguments on the Affordable Care Act complete, now comes the wait for the Supreme Court decision expected this summer. Some observers think the justices' tough questions mean defeat for the White House. But can you predict an outcome based on justices' behavior? Scholar Timothy Johnson has analyzed thousands of cases, and he's developed a model to do just that. Monday he joins us to explain what this historic case can teach us about how the Supreme Court works.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1008485/mp3/news/podcast/228/1008485.mp3




3/30/12: When Hollywood Came to Town

Fri, 30 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Friday, we're talking about Utah on the silver screen. Our guest is BYU film historian James D'Arc whose book chronicles Utah's part in American cinema from the early days of silent film to today. More than 700 movies and television productions have been made here, and it has meant big business for the small towns that welcomed directors, actors and production crews. As one Moab rancher explained, "They don't take anything but pictures and don't leave anything except money." (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1008249/mp3/news/podcast/228/1008249.mp3




3/29/12: Art, Politics and the Paintings of Jon McNaughton

Thu, 29 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Provo painter Jon McNaughton is getting attention for his latest work "One Nation Under Socialism." It depicts Barack Obama holding the Constitution as it burns. Art critics aren't impressed; it's been called "junk" and "visually dead as a doornail." McNaughton isn't worried about impressing the arts community though; he says his goal is to communicate a political opinion. Thursday, McNaughton and others will join us to talk about political imagery and the relationship between art and ideology.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1008211/mp3/news/podcast/228/1008211.mp3




3/28/12: Lynne Rossetto Kasper

Tue, 27 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

When the Splendid Table, "the radio program for people who love to eat," first hit the air in 1994, host Lynne Rossetto Kasper had to define terms like "organic" and "sustainable," so the show has long been at the forefront of food policy. It has also been informing and charming listeners with the key ingredients that, when blended together, put delicious food on our tables. Those ingredients: history, personality, science and stories. Lynne joins us on Wednesday to talk about food on the radio


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1007954/mp3/news/podcast/228/1007954.mp3




3/27/12: The Book of Mormon Girl

Tue, 27 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

With Mormon personalities on the national stage over the last few years, think Mitt Romney or Glenn Beck, Americans have a lot of questions about the LDS Church. That's where the scholar Joanna Brooks comes in. Brooks writes the candid Ask Mormon Girl blog and she's been a commentator on Mormon life and politics for news outlets like The Washington Post and BBC. Now she's telling her own story in a new memoir and Tuesday, she joins Doug to talk about her complicated relationship with her faith.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1007847/mp3/news/podcast/228/1007847.mp3




3/26/12: The Hunt for D.B. Cooper

Fri, 23 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

For more than four decades, one of America's most astonishing whodunits has gone unsolved. "D.B. Cooper" was on a flight from Portland to Seattle when he handed over a bomb threat. The airline gave him $200,000 and the hijacker parachuted from the plane, never to be seen again. Cooper evaded one of the most extensive manhunts of the 20th century and has become the stuff of legend. Monday, investigative journalist Geoffrey Gray joins Doug to separate myth from fact in the case of D.B. Cooper.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1007700/mp3/news/podcast/228/1007700.mp3




3/23/12: Radiolab

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with Jad Abumrad, co-host of WNYC's Radiolab. The easiest way to explain Radiolab is to say it's a series on science, but that only scratches the surface. The show is highly regarded for its rich layers of sound and music and for making what could be rather dense topics accessible to the average listener. Abumrad joins us to talk about the craft of really good radio and to share some of the stories from the series. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1007378/mp3/news/podcast/228/1007378.mp3




3/22/12: Pauline Kael - A Life in the Dark

Wed, 21 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

During her long tenure as a film critic at the New Yorker, Pauline Kael was the tastemaker. With her brash, vernacular style and unalloyed opinions, she often generated controversy. She also created an impressive body of criticism that still haunts and inspires film critics. Unlike the movies she so passionately reviewed, Kael's life went largely unreported. The writer Brian Kellow has written a biography of Kael that captures this tough, exacting woman, and he'll join Doug on Thursday.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1007327/mp3/news/podcast/228/1007327.mp3




3/21/12: The Truth of a Matter

Wed, 21 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

In January, This American Life aired an episode about deplorable conditions in Chinese factories where Apple products are made, using the work of monologist Mike Daisey to tell the story. It turns out that some of Daisey's anecdotes weren't true though and This American Life has retracted the program. Daisey stands by his writing, saying it's not a lie, it's art. Wednesday, we're talking about facts, fictionalization and truth and where it is and is not acceptable to blur the boundaries.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1007211/mp3/news/podcast/228/1007211.mp3




3/20/12: A Conversation with Neil deGrasse Tyson

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Neil deGrasse Tyson, the director of the Hayden Planetarium and one of America's most vocal proponents of space exploration, is as fascinated with the depth and mysteries of outer space as he is with its proximity. "We are part of this universe; we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts, is that the universe is in us," he has said. Tyson joins Doug on Tuesday to talk about his personal relationship with the cosmos and his crusade to get humanity back into space


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1007189/mp3/news/podcast/228/1007189.mp3




3/19/12: Would It Kill You To Stop Doing That?

Fri, 16 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Modern American manners leave much to be desired. People answer their cell phones in the middle of meals, they shush loudly in movie theaters and even clip their toenails on the train. Henry Alford wanted to learn a little more about 21st century etiquette, so he went to Japan, AKA the Fort Knox of good manners, interviewed etiquette experts and even played a game called "Touch the Waiter." Doug talks with Alford about how we behave and how we could behave better. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1007188/mp3/news/podcast/228/1007188.mp3




3/16/12: The Book of Books

Thu, 15 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation about the King James Bible and its 400 year history. Our guide is the British historian, novelist and broadcaster Lord Melvyn Bragg. Bragg says that while there have been times the Bible was used "in the pursuit of wickedness," it has also transformed the world for the better. He joined Doug last year to talk about the origins of the King James Bible and how it has shaped social movements, politics and literature, even the way we speak. [Rebroadcast]


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1006685/mp3/news/podcast/228/1006685.mp3




3/15/12: No One in the Middle

Wed, 14 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

Thursday, we're talking about the death of centrism in American politics. Republican Senator Olympia Snowe recently announced her retirement, citing her disgust with the "my way or the highway ideologies" in Washington these days. But she's just the latest casualty of an ever-increasing polarization of the political parties. John Farrell of National Journal and John Avlon of The Daily Beast join us to explain how we've gotten to this point and what it means for the way government works.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1006682/mp3/news/podcast/228/1006682.mp3




3/14/12: The Man Who Quit Money

Tue, 13 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

In 2000, a man in Moab left his life savings - $30 - in a phone booth and walked away. Twelve years later, Daniel Suelo enjoys an apparently full and sane life without money, credit, barter or government hand-outs, fulfilling a vision of the good life inspired by his spiritual guides: Jesus, Buddha and wandering Hindu monks. The writer Mark Sundeen has written a book that traces the path and the singular idea that led Suelo to his extreme lifestyle, and he joins Doug on Wednesday.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1006555/mp3/news/podcast/228/1006555.mp3




3/13/12: Lucky Peach - The Cooks & Chefs Issue

Mon, 12 Mar 2012 04:00:00 GMT

On Tuesday, Doug is joined once again by Peter Meehan and Chris Ying, editors of the food magazine Lucky Peach. The newest issue of the magazine explores the world of cooks and chefs -- from three-star Michelin restaurants, to street cooks in Thailand, even an elementary school cafeteria and a military dining hall. Ying and Meehan will give us a guided tour to the inner-sanctums of celebrity chefs, explore the intersection of food and fashion, and discuss the influence of molecular gastronomy.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1006436/mp3/news/podcast/228/1006436.mp3




3/12/12: Starving your Way to Vigor

Fri, 09 Mar 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Two years ago, the writer Steve Hendricks felt overweight, and he resolved to shed 20 pounds. His weight loss method might strike some as reckless: he fasted for over three weeks. Vanity, he writes, wasn't his only concern. He was informally testing theories which suggest that fasting can alleviate numerous maladies and symptoms and improve general health, much like exercise. Hendricks wrote about the benefits of an empty stomach for Harper's, and he joins Doug on Monday to talk about it.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1006335/mp3/news/podcast/228/1006335.mp3




3/9/12: The World of Sherlock Holmes

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 05:00:00 GMT

The iconic detective Sherlock Holmes has been portrayed on radio, television, comic books, board and video games and of course the silver screen. The scholar Leslie Klinger says that Holmes has been popular ever since Arthur Conan Doyle first introduced him in 1887. Friday, Klinger joins us to explain why Sherlock Holmes still works as a character. It's because he's the person we all want to be - smart, in complete command of the situation and always doing the right thing. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1006113/mp3/news/podcast/228/1006113.mp3




3/8/12: The Myth of American Decline

Wed, 07 Mar 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Some political observers say the United States is a global superpower on the wane. They see the rise of China and America's increasing failure to get its way in the world as signs of decline. Robert Kagan, a foreign policy commentator, disagrees. He says the size and influence of America's economy, its unparalleled military might and its global political clout position it to remain the world's predominant power. Kagan joins Doug on Wednesday to discuss America's present and future status.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1006034/mp3/news/podcast/228/1006034.mp3




3/7/12: The Third Crossing

Tue, 06 Mar 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Wednesday, we're talking with Utah playwright Debra Threedy about her latest work, "The Third Crossing." It's a term Thomas Jefferson used in calculating when an interracial child would be considered "white." By his math, the children he had with his slave Sally Hemings were white, yet he never freed them or their mother. Threedy's play explores their complicated relationship, but it also confronts the fascination and uneasiness that Americans still feel regarding race some two centuries later.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1005866/mp3/news/podcast/228/1005866.mp3




3/6/12: Controlling Utah's Public Land

Mon, 05 Mar 2012 05:00:00 GMT

The Utah House passed a suite of bills last week that would put control of public land in the hands of the state. Some 64% of Utah is managed by the federal government and that's land state lawmakers contend was promised to Utah when it became a state. Proponents argue this is a chance to increase revenue for schools, but critics say it's an unrealistic effort that would violate the Constitution. Tuesday, we're talking about public land - who should own it and what should be done with it.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1005787/mp3/news/podcast/228/1005787.mp3




3/5/12: Everything Is Obvious, Once You Know the Answer

Sun, 04 Mar 2012 05:00:00 GMT

You may think there's nothing more natural than common sense. Well think again. The sociologist and network scientist Duncan Watts says that commonsense reasoning fails us time after time. It often misleads us into thinking we know more about human behavior than we actually do. Only by understanding how and when common sense fails us, Watts says, can we improve how we plan for the future and understand the present. Watts joins Doug on Monday to expose the holes in our common sense thinking.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1005642/mp3/news/podcast/228/1005642.mp3




3/2/12: El Narco - Inside Mexico's Criminal Insurgency

Thu, 01 Mar 2012 05:00:00 GMT

The journalist Ioan Grillo has closely followed the rise of the Mexican drug cartels. The cartels--fueled largely by guns smuggled from America, and by our hunger for drugs--have grown so powerful they arguably trump the country's government for supremacy in Northern Mexico. Their virulent and ruthless violence increasingly reaches north of the border. Grillo spoke with Doug last November about Mexico's drug war, America's liability in it and what might be done to fix things. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1005375/mp3/news/podcast/228/1005375.mp3




3/1/12: Into the Silence

Wed, 29 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Thursday, Doug is joined by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Wade Davis for a look at British attempts to conquer Mount Everest in the early 1920s. George Mallory is the most recognizable name from the expeditions, but Davis wanted to go beyond the icon of mountaineering to explore the spirit that drew the group to such heights. Davis has called the expeditions "a mission of regeneration and redemption for a nation ... bled white by war." His book is called "Into the Silence."


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1005376/mp3/news/podcast/228/1005376.mp3




2/29/12: The Music and Mysticism of La Monte Young

Tue, 28 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Wednesday, we're talking about one of the most enigmatic and fascinating characters in American music. La Monte Young was a pioneer of the minimalist movement and his work influenced artists like Terry Riley, Yoko Ono, The Velvet Underground and Brian Eno. So it may surprise you to hear that he was born in a log cabin in Idaho and worked the family farm on Utah Lake. BYU Professor Jeremy Grimshaw has written a biography and joins Doug to talk about Young's music and mysticism. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1005214/mp3/news/podcast/228/1005214.mp3




2/28/12: The Amish

Mon, 27 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Director David Belton faced a big challenge when he set out to create a new documentary for the PBS series American Experience. It's about the Amish, the insular religious group that eschews many forms of technology - including photography. Belton respected this limitation while still creating an intimate portrait of the Amish in their own voices. Tuesday, David Belton joins Doug to talk about the people he met and what it means to hold on to a community.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1005139/mp3/news/podcast/228/1005139.mp3




2/27/12: Teaching Abstinence

Sun, 26 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Last week, the Utah House passed a bill that would implement abstinence-only sex education in schools. Currently teachers aren't allowed to advocate the use of contraception. Under this bill, they would be prohibited from talking about contraception at all - and schools could opt to drop sex-ed entirely from their curriculum. Monday, we're talking to lawmakers and activists on both sides of the debate to ask what this change would mean for Utah teens.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1005037/mp3/news/podcast/228/1005037.mp3




2/24/12: Van Gogh - The Life

Thu, 23 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

For 10 years, writers Gregory White Smith, Steven Naifeh and a team of researchers delved deeply into the life of Vincent van Gogh. They read the books he read in his day, dissected his numerous letters and scoured every text and record they could find on him. Their biography of the fabled artist lays bare van Gogh's deeply troubled, fanatic and passionate soul, and it offers a revisionist history of his death. Gregory White Smith joins Doug to talk about Van Gogh: The Life. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1005005/mp3/news/podcast/228/1005005.mp3




2/23/12: God's Jury

Wed, 22 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition. But not everybody really knows what it is, either. In a new book, the writer Cullen Murphy sets the record straight about the Catholic Church's 700-year persecution of its enemies, both real and imagined. And he says the "inquisitorial impulse" lives on - in America's massive surveillance and routine use of torture in the wake of 9/11, for example. Murphy joins Doug on Thursday to remind us the Inquisition isn't something safely relegated to the past.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1004748/mp3/news/podcast/228/1004748.mp3




2/22/12: Israel and Iran - A Dangerous Rivalry

Tue, 21 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

It's difficult to remember a time when Israel and Iran weren't always about to go to war, but political analysts Dalia Dassa Kaye and Alireza Nader say the two countries were once informally allied, bound by their shared enemies. The downfall of Saddam Hussein's regime, Iran's quest for nuclear capabilities and the ongoing Arab Spring have helped sunder the alliance. Doug talks with Kaye and Nader on Wednesday about Israel and Iran's relationship and how they arrived at the brink of war.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1004590/mp3/news/podcast/228/1004590.mp3




2/21/12: Through the Lens - Resurrect Dead

Mon, 20 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Director Jon Foy joins us for the latest installment in our Through the Lens documentary film series. Foy created one of the strangest docs at Sundance last year. It's about the mystery of the Toynbee tiles, linoleum tiles that started showing up embedded in roads along the East coast in the 1980s with bizarre messages carved in them. Foy joins us to talk about the film and the mystery. He'll also be on hand when we screen the film Thursday at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1004460/mp3/news/podcast/228/1004460.mp3




2/20/12: Saving the Planet in the Age of Humans

Fri, 17 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Environmentalist Mark Lynas believes nature no longer runs the Earth. We do. Managing an entire planet isn't easy, but in his book God Species, Lynas aims to show how humans can tackle this monumental task. In doing so, he disposes with the environmentalist playbook, arguing that to save Earth from ourselves, humans can and should play God at a planetary level. He joins Doug on Monday to make his case for "jettisoning sacred cows" to solve the world's gravest ecological problems. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1004228/mp3/news/podcast/228/1004228.mp3




2/17/12: Klea Blackhurst and the Songs of Ethel Merman

Fri, 17 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Friday, a conversation with Broadway and cabaret singer Klea Blackhurst. Blackhurst was born and raised in Salt Lake City and she's best known for her tribute to the legendary Ethel Merman. They say Merman could make you hear it in the balcony and Blackhurst has her own back-row belt. She'll be in town next week to receive the University of Utah's Distinguished Alumna Award, so we're taking the opportunity to rebroadcast our conversation with her about Merman, music and home. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1004245/mp3/news/podcast/228/1004245.mp3




2/16/12: Bedside Manners

Wed, 15 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Thursday, Doug sits down with doctor and writer Abraham Verghese. Verghese wrote the wildly popular novel Cutting for Stone, and he's in Utah. He's said that he has "the distinct feeling that the patient in America is becoming invisible her illness has been translated into binary signals stored in the computer." Verghese is interested in listening and interacting with people through the art and ritual of the physical exam. We'll talk about that connection and what it means for the patient.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1004045/mp3/news/podcast/228/1004045.mp3




2/16/12: Bedside Manners

Wed, 15 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Thursday, Doug sits down with doctor and writer Abraham Verghese. Verghese wrote the wildly popular novel Cutting for Stone, and he's in Utah. He's said that he has "the distinct feeling that the patient in America is becoming invisible her illness has been translated into binary signals stored in the computer." Verghese is interested in listening and interacting with people through the art and ritual of the physical exam. We'll talk about that connection and what it means for the patient.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1000305/mp3/news/podcast/228/1000305.mp3




2/15/12: Elna Baker

Tue, 14 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Three years ago, the comedienne and storyteller Elna Baker published her memoir, The New York Regional Mormon Singles Halloween Dance. It's about being a twenty-something Mormon virgin in a town - New York City - that doesn't take kindly to that type. A lot has changed for Elna Baker since 2009: now she's an ex-28-year-old virgin and ex-Mormon comedienne. Wednesday on RadioWest, Elna joins Doug to talk about leaving the church, her journey to Siberia and the challenges of honest storytelling.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1003932/mp3/news/podcast/228/1003932.mp3




2/14/12: The Interrupters

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

On Tuesday we're rebroadcasting our conversation with director Steve James. James made the extraordinary documentary "Hoop Dreams" in 1994. His most recent film, The Interrupters, premiered last year at Sundance and it's airing on PBS tonight. The film examines the complexities and realities of inner-city violence by following three violence prevention workers on the streets of Chicago. James spoke with Doug last year about the ideas in his films and the craft of making them. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1003787/mp3/news/podcast/228/1003787.mp3




2/13/12: Looking Back at 2002

Fri, 10 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Ten years ago, Salt Lake City opened its doors to the world with the Winter Olympic Games and Monday, Doug is joined by NPR's Howard Berkes and KUER's reporting team Terry Gildea, Andrea Smardon and Dan Bammes for a look back at 2002. We'll talk about the battle to get and keep the games, the economics of hosting an international sporting event and what it's all meant for the Beehive State.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1003741/mp3/news/podcast/228/1003741.mp3




2/10/12: Hamlet's Blackberry

Thu, 09 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

It takes a lot of work to stay afloat in today's ultra-connected world. Every day we face a torrent of emails, tweets, texts, tags, alerts, comments, pokes and posts. The writer William Powers believes that all those digital demands increasingly distract us from ourselves, from an inner place where time isn't so fugitive and the mind can slow down. He proposes a new digital philosophy that accounts for our needs to connect and for time apart, and he'll talk with Doug about it. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1003501/mp3/news/podcast/228/1003501.mp3




2/9/12: Local Music - The Moth & The Flame

Wed, 08 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

As new bands scramble for on-line attention with digital downloads, the Provo-based duo The Moth & The Flame are taking a different tack. Brandon Robbins and Mark Garbett aren't just about making music. They also want to create an aesthetic around their debut CD. They've called the cover art the opening track of their album and to make sure you see it, you can only buy their music in its physical form. Thursday, they'll join us in studio to talk about their collaboration and play their music.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1003384/mp3/news/podcast/228/1003384.mp3




2/8/12: Anonymous

Tue, 07 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

The journalist Quinn Norton admits it's difficult to pin a name tag on the group Anonymous. Is it a bunch of hackers? Activists? Terrorists? As far as she can tell, the internet meme that inspires online and offline users to participate in an archaic, globalized hive mind is really a culture, with its own ever evolving aesthetics, values, idioms and iconography. Norton and anthropologist Gabriella Coleman join Doug on Wednesday to look behind the Guy Fawkes masks and try to understand Anonymous.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1003266/mp3/news/podcast/228/1003266.mp3




2/7/12: Understanding Pedophilia

Mon, 06 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

No behavior is more reviled in America than pedophilia. Dr. Fred Berlin, a professor at Johns Hopkins University, believes in the necessity of criminal penalties for pedophiles, but, he argues, thinking of pedophilia solely as a criminal mindset hamstrings our ability to control it. Berlin regards pedophilia as a treatable mental disorder. He'll join Doug on Tuesday to discuss our understanding of pedophilia and how we can manage and treat it before it leads to a pernicious incident.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1003155/mp3/news/podcast/228/1003155.mp3




2/6/12: Going Dirty

Sun, 05 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Imagine a Presidential race in which one campaign calls the incumbent a "hideous hermaphroditical character with neither the force and firmness of a man, nor the gentleness and sensibility of a woman." You might think things have gotten bad in today's political rhetoric, but Thomas Jefferson's camp leveled this attack against John Adams in the 1800 race. Monday, we're talking about negative campaigning in American politics: its history, effectiveness and whether it's on the rise.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1002996/mp3/news/podcast/228/1002996.mp3




2/3/12: Merchants of Doubt

Thu, 02 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Historian Naomi Oreskes says that while the U.S. scientific community has led the world in research on issues like public health and environmental science, there's also a small group of scientists that mislead the public with ideas based on political agendas rather than science. Oreskes has written a book that explores how this has skewed our understanding of climate change, tobacco and more. She joins Doug to talk about these "Merchants of Doubt." (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1002634/mp3/news/podcast/228/1002634.mp3




2/2/12: Life Below Stairs

Wed, 01 Feb 2012 05:00:00 GMT

The popular TV series DOWNTON ABBEY takes pains to hew closely to historical fact, and yet there remains much we don't know about the reality of life in England's grand country houses. How did aristocrats come to own such vast tracts of land? How was servants' work regarded? And how did England's servant system collapse after the Great War? The cultural historian Sian Evans, author of the book LIFE BELOW STAIRS, joins Doug on Thursday to help us peel back the fictional veneer of DOWNTON ABBEY.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1002628/mp3/news/podcast/228/1002628.mp3




2/1/12: Beethoven's Fifth Symphony

Tue, 31 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Even if you're not an aficionado of classical music, it's very likely you would recognize the first four notes of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5. You know - it's the one that goes "DUH DUH DUH DUUUH." This weekend, the Utah Symphony is performing the iconic work under the direction of Maestro Thierry Fischer. We're using it as an opportunity to talk to music scholar Thomas Forrest Kelly about the night in 1808 when Beethoven's Fifth was first performed and about why it has endured for more than 200


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1002485/mp3/news/podcast/228/1002485.mp3




1/31/12: Why Not Romney?

Tue, 31 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Conventional wisdom has favored Mitt Romney in the race for the Republican presidential nomination because many see him as the chance to beat Barack Obama. This month though, Romney's favorability ratings have fallen and he heads to Florida with just 1 of 3 primary victories. Reporter McKay Coppins says pragmatism gets boring for voters and Romney needs more to connect with conservatives. Coppins and biographer Scott Helman join us to explain Mitt Romney's rocky trajectory with Americans.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1002259/mp3/news/podcast/228/1002259.mp3




1/30/12: Homesickness - An American History

Mon, 30 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Susan Matt, a professor at Weber State University, laughed when she first read of someone actually dying of homesickness. Nowadays, homesickness is regarded as a childish affliction that Americans, with our penchant for frequent relocation, are immune from. But as Matt writes, nostalgia has long distressed Americans--we leave to college, move for a new job, or migrate to a new country. She joins us to talk about homesickness and how we've managed to cope with it. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1002015/mp3/news/podcast/228/1002015.mp3




1/27/12: Sundance - Searching for Sugar Man

Thu, 26 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

In the early 1970s, Sixto Rodriguez, a poet-musician from inner-city Detroit, produced two albums. His producers thought they would be hits, but they were utter flops - in America, that is. In South Africa though, Rodriguez was bigger than Elvis or The Rolling Stones, and his albums provided the soundtrack for white opposition to apartheid. Filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul has documented Rodriguez' unlikely fall and rise, and he'll talk with Doug about it on Friday.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1001898/mp3/news/podcast/228/1001898.mp3




1/26/12: Sundance - Shadow Dancer

Wed, 25 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Thursday, our guest is Oscar winning documentary filmmaker James Marsh. Marsh's films Man on Wire and Project Nim both earned him Sundance accolades, but this year he's at the festival with his latest narrative film. Clive Owen stars in the thriller set in 1990's Belfast, and he says Marsh brought a documentarian's sensibility to the work by "trying to capture the essence of something real." Doug talks to Marsh about Shadow Dancer and about the craft of documentary and dramatic filmmaking.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1001729/mp3/news/podcast/228/1001729.mp3




1/25/12: Sundance - Room 237

Tue, 24 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

To some people, Stanley Kubrick's film THE SHINING set the standard for modern horror cinema. For others, it was the result of a talented filmmaker slacking off. And then there are the ardent fans convinced they've decoded the film's hidden messages of genocide, cabals and the nightmares of history. Rodney Ascher and Tim Kirk made a film about these conspiracy theorists that investigates the act of criticism and what it means to be a fan. They'll join Doug on Wednesday to talk about ROOM 237.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1001528/mp3/news/podcast/228/1001528.mp3




1/24/12: Sundance - The Invisible War

Mon, 23 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

There are 1.5 million active-duty personnel in the U.S. Armed Forces. Sexual assault is an increasing problem within those ranks. In many, if not most cases, it's swept under the carpet: only 8 percent of sexual assault cases are prosecuted in the military, and only 2 percent of those cases result in convictions. The filmmaker Kirby Dick's new documentary, THE INVISIBLE WAR, sheds light on the suffering of thousands of military rape victims, and he'll join Doug on Tuesday to talk about it.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1001327/mp3/news/podcast/228/1001327.mp3




1/23/12: Sundance - The House I Live In

Fri, 20 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

On Monday, Doug talks with documentary filmmaker Eugene Jarecki. In his film Why We Fight, Jarecki examined America's war machine. His new documentary, The House I Live In, scrutinizes another unique expression of American conflict by telling the stories of individuals at all levels of our war on drugs. The drug war has made America the world's largest jailer even as narcotics of all kinds have become purer, cheaper and more available. Where did we go wrong, and what, can be done about it?


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1001217/mp3/news/podcast/228/1001217.mp3




1/20/12: Sundance - Ethel Kennedy

Thu, 19 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Much has been written about the Kennedy family. And yet, Ethel Skakel Kennedy, wife of the late Robert F. Kennedy, has somehow managed to elude scrutiny, interview and biography. Until now. Rory Kennedy, Ethel's youngest child, has made a film about her mother that captures the life of a vivacious, authentic heroin who's often quick to deflect attention from herself. Ethel and Rory join Doug on Friday in Park City to talk about the film, ETHEL.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1000966/mp3/news/podcast/228/1000966.mp3




1/13/12: Eating Ethically

Wed, 18 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

It seems eating has come to be as much about guilt as it is about nutrition and pleasure. But what does it mean to be a virtuous eater? Food writer Alan Richman decided to find out. For thirty days, he set off on what he calls a "journey of ethical enlightenment." He visited farms and restaurants and ate not just for taste, but with a conscience. Tuesday, Richman joins Doug to talk about his trip and about his "10 Commandments of Ethical Eating." (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1000309/mp3/news/podcast/228/1000309.mp3




1/19/12: Fringeology

Wed, 18 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Many of us have stories of paranormal events. Strange objects in the skies, ghosts at the old hotel. When Steve Volk was a kid, odd bumps echoed through his house at night. His sisters said their sheets were pulled from their beds while they slept and that an old woman walked through the closed door of their room. Inspired by the noise his family could never trace, Volk set out to explore the world of the paranormal. Doug talks to him on Thursday about his research in the field of fringeology.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1000734/mp3/news/podcast/228/1000734.mp3




1/17/12: Making It In America

Tue, 17 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

In the last decade, almost 6 million manufacturing jobs in America disappeared. Still, the U.S. remain either the number 1 or 2 manufacturer in the world. The journalist Adam Davidson went to the factory of Standard Motor Products in South Carolina to find out how the U.S. has remained a global leader in manufacturing even as fewer and fewer of us hold factory jobs. Davidson wrote about what he learned in the newest issue of the Atlantic magazine, and he'll join Doug on Tuesday to talk about it.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1000303/mp3/news/podcast/228/1000303.mp3




1/16/12: LDS Values & Political Beliefs

Mon, 16 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

A new study by the Pew Forum came out last week. It was about Mormons. The survey contained a lot of information, but one part of it was no surprise: most Mormons call themselves political conservatives. Utah Mormons are nine times as likely to be Republican than Democrat. But why? On Monday we're broadcasting a show we recorded last week at Utah Valley University. A group of LDS legislators joined Doug on stage to discuss how their political beliefs are informed by Mormonism and vice versa.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1000304/mp3/news/podcast/228/1000304.mp3




1/12/12: The Iron Lady

Wed, 11 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

When British politician Margaret Thatcher was first dubbed "the Iron Lady," it was meant to be an insult. A Soviet newspaper gave her the name three years before she became Prime Minister. The biographer John Campbell calls Thatcher a "feminist pioneer" who rose to global political power through her own ambition and determination. Campbell's portrait of Margaret Thatcher was the basis for the new biopic starring Meryl Streep, and Thursday he joins us for an unvarnished look at "The Iron Lady."


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/999782/mp3/news/podcast/228/999782.mp3




1/11/12: The Pirates of Somalia

Tue, 10 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

In the fall of 2008, Jay Bahadur was stuck in a job he hated. He yearned to be a journalist, but he had no faith in journalism schools. So he flew to Somalia to write a book about the world of modern day buccaneers. He wanted to tell the full story of the pirates of Puntland: what they do and who they are as human beings on both land and sea, not simply the AK-47-toting thugs who appear in news stories. Bahadur talks to Doug on Wednesday about the pirates of Somalia. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/999527/mp3/news/podcast/228/999527.mp3




1/10/12: Billy the Kid

Mon, 09 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Tuesday, we're talking about a new American Experience documentary, Billy the Kid. His real name was Henry McCarty and he was just days from hanging when he made his last daring escape from jail. Billy was one of the nation's most notorious criminals and after he was shot a few weeks later by Sheriff Pat Garrett, he became one of the West's most enduring legends. Doug is joined by filmmaker John Maggio and historian Mark Lee Gardner to separate the fact from the myth of Billy the Kid.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/999515/mp3/news/podcast/228/999515.mp3




1/9/12: The Long Arm of Warren Jeffs

Sun, 08 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

FLDS leader Warren Jeffs is communicating to his followers from his Texas prison cell. He's convicted of child sexual assault but he commanded church members to rededicate themselves by December 31st. They've had to abstain from marital relations, sign over possessions and come up with $5,000 to remain in good grace. Those found "unworthy" are now banned from Church meetings and must repent. Monday, we're talking about Jeffs, the power he holds and what this means for a community in turmoil.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/999372/mp3/news/podcast/228/999372.mp3




1/6/12: The Not So Big Life

Fri, 06 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

The writer and architect Sarah Susanka has created a movement around the idea of finding a proper scale for the houses we inhabit, and the way she sees it, houses are the perfect metaphor for our lives. Her book, "The Not So Big Life," is also an idea: it's about living a life that's just the right size. We're rebroadcasting our conversation with Susanka on Friday, and it might provide some inspiration for those of you putting the final touches on your New Year's resolutions. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/1000317/mp3/news/podcast/228/1000317.mp3




1/5/12: A Safeway in Arizona

Wed, 04 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

This weekend marks a year since the tragic shooting at a Tucson meet-and-greet held by U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords. 22-year-old Jared Lee Loughner killed six people and injured eighteen, including the congresswoman, who was shot in the head. Thursday, Doug is joined by journalist Tom Zoellner, an Arizona native and friend of Giffords. Zoellner has just published a book that asks this question: what does the shooting tells us about the Grand Canyon State and life in America?


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/999074/mp3/news/podcast/228/999074.mp3




1/4/12: Would It Kill You To Stop Doing That?

Tue, 03 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Modern American manners leave much to be desired. People answer their cell phones in the middle of meals, they shush loudly in movie theaters and even clip their toenails on the train. Henry Alford wanted to learn a little more about 21st century etiquette, so he went to Japan, AKA the Fort Knox of good manners, interviewed etiquette experts and even played a game called "Touch the Waiter." On Wednesday, Doug will talk with Alford about how we behave and how we could behave better


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/998941/mp3/news/podcast/228/998941.mp3




1/3/12: Through the Lens - Frederick Wiseman's "Crazy Horse"

Mon, 02 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Tuesday, Doug is joined by legendary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman. A year ago, RadioWest and the Utah Film Center began our Through the Lens documentary film series with a conversation with Wiseman. His latest work is set to open later this month around the country. It's called "Crazy Horse," and it's a spare, unfiltered look inside a Parisian nude cabaret. Doug talks to Wiseman and others about his 44 year career and what the new film reveals about Wiseman's unique process.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/998812/mp3/news/podcast/228/998812.mp3




1/2/12: Apollo's Angels

Mon, 02 Jan 2012 05:00:00 GMT

Ballet has played an important role in Western art for more than 400 years, but the historian and dance critic Jennifer Homans cautions we shouldn't take it for granted. Homans is the author of "Apollo's Angels," which looks at the rich and complex history of ballet. She joins us to talk about the art form and the ways it has renewed itself in the face of political and social upheavals. We'll also talk about the "uncertain moment" Homans says ballet is experiencing now. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/998043/mp3/news/podcast/228/998043.mp3




12/30/11: Lost in Shangri-La

Fri, 30 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Doug talks to Mitchell Zuckoff, author of the book Lost in Shangri-La. In 1945, a site seeing plane of American soldiers crashed in a remote valley in Dutch New Guinea. The local tribe was rumored to be head-hunters and had never before been in contact with white people. But the three survivors were caught between the valley and the Japanese enemy. Zuckoff joins us to tell the story of the time they spent with the Dani tribesmen and the daring rescue that brought them home. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/998147/mp3/news/podcast/228/998147.mp3




12/29/11: The Man Who Never Died

Thu, 29 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Labor icon Joe Hill was executed by firing squad for the murder of a Salt Lake grocer nearly a century ago. His controversial conviction rested largely on two pieces of evidence: the gunshot wound he sustained the night of the murder and the IWW membership card in his wallet. The writer Bill Adler has made new findings he says debunk the evidence against Hill. He'll join Doug on Thursday to talk about his book, The Man Who Never Died," and make the case for Hill's innocence. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/998479/mp3/news/podcast/228/998479.mp3




12/28/11: Sons of Perdition

Wed, 28 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

St. George, Utah is only an hour away from Warren Jeffs' polygamist community, but it might as well be another planet. Children of the fundamentalist group are taught little of the outside world, and they're told that leaving their faith means their damnation. Wednesday, we're talking to the creators of a documentary that follows 3 teenage boys who fled to St. George and had to give up their families and everything they knew to create a new life. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/998141/mp3/news/podcast/228/998141.mp3




12/27/11: The Influencing Machine

Tue, 27 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Tuesday, Doug talks to Brooke Gladstone, host of NPR's "On the Media." She's written a new book. It's graphic nonfiction - a journey through two millennia of journalism. Gladstone says that there's always been a fear that the media are somehow controlling our minds. But rather than being an external force, she argues that the media are mirrors that show us our own reflection. Doug talks to her about "The Influencing Machine," and about what we can do to be savvy media consumers. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/997895/mp3/news/podcast/228/997895.mp3




12/26/11: Making Sense of North Korea

Mon, 26 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Earlier this month, North Korean leader Kim Jong-il died of a heart attack at the age of 69. Monday on RadioWest, we're rebroadcasting our conversation about the behavior of North Korea. This is about political culture. The scholar B.R. Myers is our guest. He describes the ideology of North Korea this way - race based paranoid nationalism. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/998087/mp3/news/podcast/228/998087.mp3




12/23/11: How the Grinch Stole Christmas

Thu, 22 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

"Cuddly as a Cactus" and "Charming as an Eel" hardly seem like descriptions of a beloved Christmas character, but fans of Dr. Seuss will immediately recognize the mean Mr. Grinch. From the 1957 children's book and the 1966 television adaptation, How the Grinch Stole Christmas is for many an integral part of the holiday season. Tuesday, we're talking about Dr. Seuss's tale and offering you a new reading by the actor Tobin Atkinson. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/998076/mp3/news/podcast/228/998076.mp3




12/22/11: The World of Sherlock Holmes

Wed, 21 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Robert Downey Jr. returned to theaters last weekend as Sherlock Holmes, taking in nearly $40 million. That's not bad for a 124-year-old hero. The scholar Leslie Klinger says that the character has had enduring appeal since Arthur Conan Doyle first introduced him in 1887 because Holmes is the kind of person we'd all like to be: smart, always in command and always doing the right thing. Thursday, Klinger joins Doug to talk about Holmes, his loyal companion Watson and the world they inhabited.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/998034/mp3/news/podcast/228/998034.mp3




12/21/11: Far Between, Part II

Tue, 20 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Wednesday, Doug sits down again with Utah filmmaker Kendall Wilcox. Wilcox is creating a documentary that explores the tension between being a member of the LDS Church and being gay. Since joining us in August, Wilcox has been fired from Brigham Young University, but he says he still believes that the Mormon community is leaving polemics behind and "treating each other with genuine love, respect and empathy." We'll talk about his journey and about what he's learning as he films "Far Between."


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/997859/mp3/news/podcast/228/997859.mp3




12/20/11: Local Music - Spell Talk

Mon, 19 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Since Andrew Milne, Jared Phelps and Sammy Harper formed Spell Talk four years ago the band has quickly become one of the biggest fish in Salt Lake's admittedly small-pond music scene. They first drew crowds with a brand of droney, blues-inflected psych rock, but their latest release, Touch It, features the band's new sound: rock n' roll, raw, gritty and unadulterated. Spell Talk will play live in the RadioWest studio on Tuesday, and we'll review the best in local albums from the year that was.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/997787/mp3/news/podcast/228/997787.mp3




12/19/11: Witnessing the Iraq Withdrawal

Fri, 16 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Local filmmaker Dodge Billingsley was in Iraq when the U.S. first invaded in 2003. He returned there last month to film as the U.S. withdrew combat troops from Al Anbar province. The efficient withdrawal that Billingsley witnessed contrasts starkly with America's bumpy progress subduing and rebuilding Iraq, and he says the country, while safer now than it was eight years ago, still stands on shaky ground. Doug will talk with Billingsley on Monday about the war and how America has altered Iraq.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/997654/mp3/news/podcast/228/997654.mp3




12/19/11: Witnessing the Iraq Withdrawal

Fri, 16 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Local filmmaker Dodge Billingsley was in Iraq when the U.S. first invaded in 2003. He returned there last month to film as the U.S. withdrew combat troops from Al Anbar province. The efficient withdrawal that Billingsley witnessed contrasts starkly with America's bumpy progress subduing and rebuilding Iraq, and he says the country, while safer now than it was eight years ago, still stands on shaky ground. Doug will talk with Billingsley on Monday about the war and how America has altered Iraq.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/997029/mp3/news/podcast/228/997029.mp3




12/16/11: Santa Claus - A Biography

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

Some of you may be expecting a visit from that jolly Santa Claus next weekend. (If you've been good that is.) But just who is this man that will magically slide down your chimney? His family tree goes back to the fourth century Bishop of Myra, Saint Nicholas, and with the passing generations, his story has changed to suit the times. Historian Gerry Bowler joins Doug for a biographical look at Santa Claus. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/997467/mp3/news/podcast/228/997467.mp3




12/15/11: Utah's Unique Caucus System - The Pros and Cons

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 05:00:00 GMT

According to a recent report, Utah's unique caucus system gives more power to convention delegates than any other state. Another report showed that caucus delegates don't represent mainstream Utah voters. A newly formed group of politicos is fed up with the system and they want to change the way Utahns pick their candidates. A diverse panel of guests will join Doug on Thursday to discuss the state's nominating system, how it does or doesn't work, and where the voters stand on all of this.


Media Files:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kuer/.jukebox/media/kuer/997295/mp3/news/podcast/228/997295.mp3