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Preview: PRI: RadioWest

RadioWest Podcasts



A radio conversation where people tell stories that explore the way the world works. Produced by KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City and hosted by Doug Fabrizio. Find archived episodes at http://radiowest.org



Last Build Date: Thu, 17 Aug 2017 14:11:55 +0000

 



American Eclipse

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

With a rare total solar eclipse slated to hit parts of the United States next week, we’re taking the opportunity to talk to science journalist David Baron. In his new book, he tells the story of the 1878 eclipse which had throngs of American scientists racing West to witness and study the celestial phenomenon. Baron is obsessed with eclipses himself, and he joins Doug to talk about how mind-blowing a total solar eclipse can be to both 19th and 21st-century observers.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw081517.mp3




Devil's Bargain

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

To understand Donald Trump’s path to the White House and Hillary Clinton’s downfall, journalist Joshua Green says you have to begin with Steve Bannon. In only a few months, Bannon went from the alt-right powerhouse leading Breitbart News, to the CEO of Trump's campaign, and finally to his current position as White House Chief Strategist. Green joins us Monday to tell Bannon’s story - how a brilliant and charismatic man from the fringe of American politics helped “storm the presidency.”


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw081417.mp3




The First Love Story

Fri, 11 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Friday, we’re talking about the oldest relationship in the Christian world: Adam and Eve. The writer Bruce Feiler says the two don’t get the credit they deserve, and in his book, he aims to redeem them for a new generation. According to Feiler, the tale of Adam and Eve is a timeless myth that still has much to teach us. They confronted the ultimate human fear—loneliness—and defeated it with the ultimate human expression—love. Feiler joins us to explore the meaning of the first love story. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw081117.mp3




The "Monkey" Trial

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Thursday, we’re telling the story behind the Scopes Monkey Trial in 1925. You know the basics: the agnostic Clarence Darrow and the Bible-thumping William Jennings Bryan faced off in a court room in a battle about teaching evolution in public schools. Our guest is the historian Jeffrey Moran who says the trial came as American culture was shifting and fundamentalists were freaking out about Charles Darwin. It was the trial of the century.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw081017.mp3




Scars of Independence

Wed, 09 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Wednesday, we’re taking a different look at the American Revolutionary War. We think of it as brave patriots fighting for a noble cause, which is true, but in his new book historian Holger Hoock is trying to remind us just how bloody it was. The British brutalized American soldiers; we tortured loyalists. In fact, this cruelty shaped the outcome of the war. Hoock’s book is called Scars of Independence: America’s Violent Birth and he's joining us to talk about it.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw080917.mp3




Why Time Flies

Tue, 08 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Tuesday, we’re taking a scientific and philosophical look at “time.” If you’ve ever sat through an hour-long meeting that lasted forever, or watched a child grow up in the blink of an eye, you know that time isn’t just a quantifiable measurement. New Yorker science staff writer Alan Burdick says that writing a book about time was actually like “peering into the bottom of existence.” He joins Doug to talk about the clock, our relationship to it, and “Why Time Flies.”


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw080817.mp3




A Conversation with Alexandra Fuller

Mon, 07 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

These days, the writer Alexandra Fuller lives in a yurt in Jackson Hole. It’s a far cry from where she grew up: under the cloud of civil war in what was once called Rhodesia in southern Africa. Fuller has chronicled her life in a series of acclaimed memoirs, writing fearlessly about war, family, and the collapse of her decades-long marriage. Her newest book is a novel about two Native American cousins on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. She joins us Monday to talk about her life, her work, and how they overlap.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw080717.mp3




Overdressed

Fri, 04 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Try to imagine 18 tons of clothes. It’s the image journalist and author Elizabeth Cline said surprised her the most while researching her book about the way Americans dress. That’s because that pile represented three-days of donations to one thrift store in one U.S. city. And what’s the impact of the cheap fashion we buy and toss on such a regular basis? Cline is coming to Utah, and Monday she joins Doug to explain what it means for our economy, our environment, and for our culture. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw080417.mp3




Dream Hoarders

Thu, 03 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

The scholar Richard Reeves was raised in the U.K., and he hates the sense of class consciousness he says pervades there. That was part of the appeal in becoming an American citizen. In his latest book though, Reeves describes a growing chasm between the upper middle class and the 80% of Americans whose opportunities have stagnated. Reeves joins Doug Thursday to talk about the ways this “favored fifth” is pulling away from the rest of the nation, and what it means for the American dream.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw080317.mp3




The Gatekeepers

Wed, 02 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Wednesday, journalist Chris Whipple joins us to talk about what’s been called the toughest job in Washington. White House Chiefs of Staff serves as gatekeepers to the Oval Office, and they help define the course of the country. Whipple interviewed all 17 men still living who have served in the position. Ultimately, he says, their style makes or breaks each presidency. We’ll examine the job’s unique challenges and ask how new chief of staff John Kelly might shake up the current West Wing.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw080217.mp3




Denver Snuffer and the Remnant Movement

Tue, 01 Aug 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Tuesday, we’re talking about a man some disaffected Mormons believe to be a prophet. Denver Snuffer does claim to have spoken with Jesus, but he says he is not leading a new church. The so-called Remnant movement argues the LDS Church has strayed from Joseph Smith’s teachings and is more corporation than spiritual endeavor. So, they reject structure and authority and believe anyone can receive revelation. Doug and guests will explore the movement and the viability of a leaderless sect.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw080117.mp3




Messy

Mon, 31 Jul 2017 15:00:00 +0000

In his new book, the journalist and economist Tim Harford makes an argument that’s a tough sell for a culture hooked on neatness, structure, and tidying up. Harford comes to the defense of messiness, of inconvenient situations, clutter, and difficulty. They’re not as bad as we might think, he says, and in story after story he shows how disorder can spur creativity, nurture resilience, and bring out our very best. Harford joins us to explore the messy foundations that often underlie success. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw073117.mp3




Ardean Watts

Fri, 28 Jul 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Friday, we’re rebroadcasting a conversation with Ardean Watts, who died last week at the age of 89. Ardean happened to be one of the most interesting people around here. He was a musician, a heretic, and a Mormon. He had an epiphany at midlife that led him on a journey to rebuild his sense of faith, but he didn’t settle on just one. In fact, he said he found most descriptions of God uninteresting. We talked about a lot of things like mushrooms, music, and strangers. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/07/rw072817.mp3




The True Story of Dunkirk

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 15:00:00 +0000

After the Fall of France in 1940, nearly 340,000 allied troops were stranded at the French port of Dunkirk as the German military closed in. Churchill called what happened next a “miracle of deliverance.” Small civilian ships, along with military transports, brought the British army home. Of course, the story is now a blockbuster movie, which our guests say is pretty accurate. Thursday, historians John Broich and Matthew Booker join Doug to talk about the true story of Dunkirk.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/08/rw072717.mp3




The Search for Extraterrestrial Life

Wed, 26 Jul 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Is there anybody out there? Is there life on other planets? If the answer is yes, and we can prove it, the physicist Jim Al-Khalili says that would be a revolutionary moment in science, up there with Copernicus proving that Earth is not the center of the universe. Considering the vastness of space, scientists mostly agree that somebody or something else is out there. Al-Khalili joins us Wednesday to explore where that life might be, what it might be like, and what would happen if we found it—or it found us.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/07/rw072617.mp3




Judge Sewall and the Salem Witch Trials

Tue, 25 Jul 2017 15:00:00 +0000

The Salem witch trials haunt the American imagination as a time of extreme injustice. The story is most often told from the perspective of the accused and the accusers, but historian Richard Francis has spent years exploring the actions of Samuel Sewall. Sewall was among the judges who issued the harsh verdicts, but five years later, he became the only judge to issue an apology for his role in the trials. Richard Francis joins Doug to talk about Sewall, his idealism, and his conscience.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/07/rw072517.mp3




On Trails

Mon, 24 Jul 2017 15:00:00 +0000

When he was hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths beneath our feet. On every scale of life on earth, he says, trails form that “reduce an overwhelming array of choices to a single expeditious route.” But how do they form? Why do some paths improve while others disappear? How does order emerge from chaos? Moor joins us to explore how pathways serve as an essential guiding force for trailblazers and trail followers, alike. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/07/rw072417.mp3




The Lost Art of Natural Navigation

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Nowadays, all kinds of devices exist to help us find our way through the world. But before all that stuff, before even cartography, humankind navigated with nature as the guide. The adventurer Tristan Gooley is committed to recovering and teaching the lost arts of natural navigation. He sees compass hands everywhere he looks: in rocks, trees, grass, ducks, puddles, clouds, and the wind. Gooley joins us to share what he’s learned about natural navigation and the joys of learning nature’s subtle signs. [Rebroadcast]


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/07/rw072117.mp3




Phenomena

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 15:00:00 +0000

If you’re a skeptic, you’re going to be outraged by the “scientific projects” conducted by the U.S. government into mind reading and other paranormal phenomena. For more than 40 years the government hired magicians and hypnotists to try to figure out what the enemy was up to. Investigative journalist Annie Jacobsen’s latest book tells the story of this top secret program, and Thursday, she joins us to explain what would make people spend so much time, energy, and money on such strange ideas. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/07/rw072017.mp3




Millennials and Mormonism

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 15:00:00 +0000

We’re live Wednesday morning, talking about Millennials and Mormonism. Religion scholar Jana Riess has been studying what she calls “The Next Mormons,” and while nearly all say they believe in God, the way they practice their religion is very different from older generations. And like other faiths around the country, the LDS Church is experiencing its share of young adults leaving the fold. We’ll talk with Riess and others about this generational shift, and what it means for Mormonism.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/07/rw071917.mp3