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Preview: PRI: RadioWest

RadioWest Podcasts



A radio conversation where people tell stories that explore the way the world works. Produced by KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City and hosted by Doug Fabrizio. Find archived episodes at http://radiowest.org



Last Build Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2017 09:19:32 +0000

 



The Seeds of Life

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

It’s a timeless question, asked by every kid that’s ever lived: where do babies come from? It turns out even the great scientific minds of the Enlightenment didn’t really have an answer. While navigators and cartographers seemed to have mastered the heavens and the Earth, other scientists were conducting bizarre experiments to put their finger on how exactly humans create life. Science writer Edward Dolnick joins us to tell the story of 250 years of searching and the meandering ways of scientific discovery.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw062317.mp3




Through the Lens: No Man's Land

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Thursday, we continue our Through the Lens series on documentary films with an on-the-ground account of the occupation last year of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. For 41 days, protestors and right-wing militia members, held the refuge hostage in open defiance of the federal government. Director David Byars’s film documents their ultimately quixotic demonstration, from its inception to its dramatic demise. His film is called No Man’s Land , and he’ll join us to talk about it.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw062217.mp3




The Politics of Julius Caesar

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Wednesday, we’re talking about Julius Caesar. You can probably guess why we’re having the conversation. A New York production of Shakespeare’s work recently caused a stir when the play’s director made Julius Caesar look a lot like Donald Trump. The problem is of course that Caesar gets assassinated. So, we’re talking about Julius Caesar the man, Shakespeare’s play, and the relationship between art and politics.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw062117.mp3




The Perfect Horse

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Tuesday, the story of a daring rescue of horses caught up in the Third Reich’s vision for genetic supremacy. Horses still played a role in the military, and Hitler aimed to use stolen purebreds to create the ideal war horse. But with the stud farm under imminent threat from the starving Russian army, the Nazi officer in charge asked General Patton himself for help. Author Elizabeth Letts joins us to explain why soldiers set aside alliances and risked their lives to save The Perfect Horse . [Rebroadcast]


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw062017.mp3




The Utah Democratic Party

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Monday, we’re talking about the Democratic Party in Utah, and we’re asking this question: is the party still relevant? It wasn’t long ago that Utah had a Democratic governor, or a Democratic congressional delegate. But, oh, how times have changed. Democrats now hold just 12 of 75 seats in the state legislature. The party won only 10 of 55 contested state races in last year’s general election, and Dems lost many of those races by massive margins. So what gives? And what can the party do to reverse its fortunes?


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw061917.mp3




Biblical Literalism

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Retired Episcopal Bishop John Shelby Spong presents a provocative idea in his latest book. Reading the Bible literally, he says, is heresy. He bases his argument on a close reading of the Gospel of Matthew, which he argues was written by Jews for Jews. Spong says the gospel was not written as a literal account of Christ’s life, but rather as an interpretative portrait of God’s love. Spong joins us Friday to talk about biblical literalism and his uniquely progressive approach to Christianity. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw061617.mp3




The Curious Science of Humans at War

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

When you think about military science, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Bombs and guns, right? Well, that’s not what interests the writer Mary Roach, who has a habit of seeking out eccentric scientific corners. She’s not so much curious about the killing as she is about the keeping alive. That curiosity led her to research into the battlefield’s more obscure threats: exhaustion, shock, bacteria, panic, even turkey vultures. Roach is coming to Utah, so we're rebroadcasting our conversation with her about the science of humans at war. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw061517.mp3




Land on Fire

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Nature writer Gary Ferguson says we are facing a “perfect storm” when it comes to wildfires. Climate change has led to less snow, longer droughts, and more wind and there’s a lot of fuel on the forest floors. The result is ten more weeks of fire season than we saw in the early 70s, and those fires are hotter and often beyond control. Ferguson joins us Wednesday to talk about the role fire should play in a healthy ecosystem and the new reality of wildfire in the West.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw061417.mp3




Zinke's Recommendations for Bears Ears

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke submitted a report to the White House over the weekend recommending Bears Ears National Monument be shrunk. While there are places there he thinks should be protected by the Antiquities Act, Zinke says the boundaries should be revised. He also suggests congress consider different conservation plans for the area, re-examine wilderness designations, and approve co-management by Native American tribes. Tuesday, we’re talking about what all this means for the future of Bears Ears.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw061317_0.mp3




Memory's Last Breath

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

In 2010, Gerda Saunders learned that she has dementia. She was 61 years old at the time, and soon had to leave her post teaching at the University of Utah. So Gerda started writing what she calls her field notes on dementia. The result is a new memoir due out this week. We’ve been following Gerda over the last year with a series of short films documenting her journey, and Monday, Doug sits down to talk to her about her book. It’s called Memory’s Last Breath.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw061217.mp3




The Trouble with Reality

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

In her latest book, media analyst Brooke Gladstone tries to understand the current landscape of “fact” and “truth” in the United States. Facts, she says are crucial for negotiation and compromise in a democracy. Truth, though, is subjective. So how have we reached a point where reality is so fractured? Gladstone joins Doug to talk about lies, the Trump administration, journalism, and why we all need to know more about each other's truth.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw060917.mp3




The Evolution of Fitness Culture

Thu, 08 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

For years, Daniel Kunitz lived the life of the mind. His body though “became a trash depot.” Then he started running, which led to swimming, weightlifting, and eventually CrossFit. His health and his life steadily improved. Kunitz’s personal quest got him wondering how fitness culture has changed through the years. Why were the Greeks so buff? Why do guys do dumbbell curls? How have women changed exercise as we know it? Kunitz joins us to share what he’s learned about the evolution of fitness. (Rebroadcast at 7 p.m. MDT)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/060817.mp3




2017 Summer Reading

Wed, 07 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

There are a couple of book trends this year that may not come as a surprise: politics is hot and the New Yorker recently declared this a “golden age” for dystopian fiction. Wednesday, we’re gathering Utah booksellers Ken Sanders of Ken Sanders Rare Books , Catherine Weller of Weller Book Works , and Betsy Burton of The King’s English with their recommendations. But it is a summer reading list, so we’ll temper some of that pessimism with poetry and mysteries, children’s books and more.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw060717.mp3




The Nature Fix

Tue, 06 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

For centuries, great minds like Beethoven, Tesla, and Einstein have extolled the benefits of the outdoors. But these days, our lives are increasingly lived indoors and onscreen. Wondering if we could all use some more exposure to the natural world, the writer Florence Williams set out to explore the science of “our deep, cranial connection to natural landscapes.” She’ll join us to discuss how nature can make us healthier, happier, and more creative. [Rebroadcast]


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw060617.mp3




The Life and Art of Hieronymus Bosch

Fri, 02 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

If you’ve ever seen paintings by the 15th-century Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch, such as The Garden of Earthly Delights , you’ve probably wondered what they mean and what kind of person could have imagined such fanciful scenes. Problem is, we know very little about Bosch’s personal story. That leaves the paintings, which present their own puzzles. Art historian Gary Schwartz will join us to discuss the fearless artist’s life and his inventive art. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw060217_0.mp3




Pinpoint

Thu, 01 Jun 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Even if you didn’t use GPS to find your way around town today, there’s every chance it touched your life. The Global Positioning System is now integrated into almost every part of modern existence. It helps land planes, route cell phone calls, predict the weather, grow food, and regulate global finance. Our guest, Greg Milner, has written a book that traces the history of GPS. He also examines the frightening costs of our growing dependence on it. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw060117.mp3




Salvadorans' Terrible Choice

Wed, 31 May 2017 15:00:00 +0000

The homicide rate in El Salvador is 20 times higher than it is in the U.S., and nearly 5% of Salvadorans fled their county because of violence in 2016. Utah journalist Matthew LaPlante recently went to El Salvador to try and understand the impact of this on the nation’s children, and the desperation of many families to get their kids out. Wednesday, he joins us to talk about what he learned about life and survival in one of the world’s most dangerous places, and the risks of sending kids north.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/06/rw053117.mp3




The Moth: The Art & Craft of Storytelling

Tue, 30 May 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Everyone has a story, and a good one well told can be captivating. The Moth is a venue for great stories. It has given people around the world a stage for their stories, and its producers and presenters know what it takes to weave a compelling tale. It’s about vulnerability, authenticity, living the story as you tell it, and whisking the audience, however large or small, along for the ride. The Moth is in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, and they’ll join us to explore the art and craft of storytelling.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/05/rw053017_0.mp3




Where Ancestors and Wilderness Meet

Mon, 29 May 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Monday, our guest is writer and environmental advocate Brooke Williams. Williams spent a year alone verifying maps of the southern Utah desert, where he felt a deep connection to the landscape. He wanted to understand that connection, and found an answer in the imagined story of his ancestor William Williams. Nature and wilderness, he concludes in his book, are part of his DNA. Brooke Williams joins Doug to talk about listening to the “archaic whisper” of the past, and how saving the land can save us. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/05/rw052917.mp3




The Science of Swearing

Fri, 26 May 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Benjamin Bergen is a cognitive scientist and he loves swearing. He actually studies it for a living. In a fascinating book, Bergen examines why we use swear words, why they’re so powerful, and how they work in our language and on our minds. Swearing, he says, can be useful, funny, and cathartic. It also helps us express the strongest human emotions. Friday, we’re airing that conversation, but don’t worry: we’ve bleeped all the swear words. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/05/RW052617.mp3