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Preview: PRI: RadioWest

RadioWest Podcasts



A radio conversation where people tell stories that explore the way the world works. Produced by KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City and hosted by Doug Fabrizio.



Last Build Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 04:10:26 +0000

 



Special Inauguration Coverage / How Eloquence Works

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Friday morning, KUER brings you NPR special coverage of President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration. At 7:00 p.m., tune in to RadioWest for a conversation about eloquence. We all know it when we hear it. The skillful delivery of language delights us, captivates us, persuades and moves us. Most importantly, says the linguist David Crystal, speakers and listeners alike enjoy eloquent speech. Crystal has dissected the qualities and practice of eloquence. Partly, he wants to better understand how it's achieved. He also wants to show that eloquence is a talent everyone who uses words can possess. Crystal joins us to examine how the gift of gab works. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw012017.mp3




Sundance 2017: Trophy

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Thursday, we begin our coverage of Sundance with the documentary Trophy . Filmmakers Shaul Shwarz and Christina Clusiau followed hunters, breeders, and conservationists to ask what we do to save the great species of the world from extinction. The high cost of trophy hunting trips to Africa often fund conservation efforts and communities, but critics say there’s a danger in treating animals like commodities. Schwarz and Clusiau join Doug to talk about that relationship between hunting and conservation.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw011917.mp3




Art and Activism

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Wednesday, the legendary choreographer and dancer Bill T. Jones is among our guests. We recorded a conversation last night at Kingsbury Hall in Salt Lake City. We were also joined by playwright Taylor Mac and director Niegel Smith. It was a conversation about getting an audience to be part of the process. We also talked about the ways artists are often activists, and what it will mean to make art at this transitional moment in American culture.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw011817_0.mp3




Biblical Literalism

Tue, 17 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Retired Episcopal Bishop John Shelby Spong presents a provocative idea in his latest book. Reading the Bible literally, he says, is heresy. He bases his argument on a close reading of the Gospel of Matthew, which he argues was written by Jews for Jews. Spong says the gospel was not written as a literal account of Christ’s life, but rather as an interpretative portrait of God’s love. Spong joins us to talk about biblical literalism and his uniquely progressive approach to Christianity. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw011717.mp3




Sebastian Junger on Conflict and Coming Together

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

The journalist Sebastian Junger has noticed that for many veterans, and even some civilians, war feels better than peace, and he has a theory about why that might be. War, he says, compels us to band together and support one another in pursuit of a clear goal. But under the normal conditions of modern culture, we lose those connections, and we feel lonely and lost. Monday, we're rebroadcasting a conversation with Junger about why we’re stronger when we come together and what tribal societies can teach us about leading meaningful lives. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw011617.mp3




The Economic Value of Public Land

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Friday we’re asking whether the Outdoor Retailer Trade Show would leave Salt Lake City because of the public land agenda of state lawmakers. Peter Metcalf, the founder of the outdoor company Black Diamond, says the trade show should consider leaving if state leaders don’t back off from their attempt to take ownership of public land. But these kinds of warnings have been made before. What’s different this time, and what is the economic value of public land in Utah? Metcalf and others join us.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw011317.mp3




Through the Lens: Tower

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

On August, 1, 1966, a lone gunman opened fire from the top floor of a tower at the University of Texas at Austin. It was America’s first mass school shooting, and civilians and law enforcement on the ground struggled to respond. When the gunshots were silenced, 16 people lay dead and dozens were wounded. In a new documentary film, director Keith Maitland revisits the events of that infamous day through the words of the people who lived it. Maitland joins us Thursday to talk about his film. It’s called TOWER.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw011217.mp3




August Wilson and Fences

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 17:00:00 +0000

Wednesday, we’re talking about August Wilson, one of the great American playwrights … period. That doesn’t need the qualifier that he was a black playwright. But his plays were about the black experience in this country, and one of his masterpieces was Fences. Denzel Washington’s film version is now in theaters, and the stage version has just opened at Pioneer Theatre Company. We’re taking the opportunity to talk about the heart breaking beauty of August Wilson’s work.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw011117.mp3




The Gunning of America

Tue, 10 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Historian Pamela Haag says there’s a mythology around American gun culture. The conventional wisdom is that since the Revolutionary War we’ve had some primal bond with our firearms. But Haag argues that our guns were once just another tool of everyday life, and that the gun industry convinced us we needed to be armed. In her latest book, she follows the rise of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company and the marketing campaign she says created our gun culture. We spoke with Haag about the story.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw011017.mp3




A Conversation with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

Mon, 09 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich grew up in Sugar City, Idaho, and in the late 50s, she figured she would just “get married and have children.” So it may surprise you to hear that she coined the phrase “well-behaved women seldom make history.” Ulrich is a Mormon, a feminist, a Harvard professor, and a Pulitzer Prize-winner. She’s dedicated her career to telling the stories of early American women and helping modern women find their voices. She’s in Utah, and joins Doug on Monday.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw010917.mp3




Salt Lake City's Plan to Fight Homelessness

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0000

When Salt Lake City officials announced the proposed sites of four future homeless shelters, opposition from the public was swift and fierce. The new shelters are meant to help people get off the street, while also reducing crime and stress downtown. But residents near the proposed sites say they were cut out of the decision process and that the shelters will endanger their neighborhoods. Thursday, we’re examining the crisis of homelessness in Salt Lake City and the new plan to address it.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw010517.mp3




The Science of Fat

Wed, 04 Jan 2017 23:56:10 +0000

Body fat is a source of shame for many people, something to be hidden, fought, and burned away. But fat, says the biochemist Sylvia Tara, isn’t just unsightly blubber, it’s an essential and deeply misunderstood organ that’s vital to our existence. It enables our reproductive organs, strengthens our immune system, protects us from disease, and may even help us live longer. In a new book, Tara explores the science behind our least appreciated organ, and she joins us Wednesday to talk about it.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw010417.mp3




The Gardener and the Carpenter

Tue, 03 Jan 2017 18:00:00 +0000

The psychologist Alison Gopnik is worried about modern day parenting, including her own. It’s too much like being a carpenter, she says, where you shape chosen materials into a final, preconceived product. Kids don’t work like that. In a new book, Gopnik suggests parents think less like carpenters and more like gardeners: creating safe, nurturing spaces in which children can flourish. Gopnik joins us to discuss how we can raise better kids by changing our approach to parenting. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw010317.mp3




Pinpoint

Mon, 02 Jan 2017 18:00:00 +0000

Even if you didn’t use GPS to find your way around town today, there’s every chance it touched your life. The Global Positioning System is now integrated into almost every part of modern existence. It helps land planes, route cell phone calls, predict the weather, grow food, and regulate global finance. Our guest, Greg Milner, has written a book that traces the history of GPS. He also examines the frightening costs of our growing dependence on it. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw010217.mp3




How Eloquence Works

Thu, 29 Dec 2016 18:00:00 +0000

We all know eloquence when we hear it. The skillful delivery of language delights us, captivates us, persuades and moves us. Most importantly, says the linguist David Crystal, speakers and listeners alike enjoy eloquent speech. Crystal has dissected the qualities and practice of eloquence. Partly, he wants to better understand how it's achieved. He also wants to show that eloquence is a talent everyone who uses words can possess. Crystal joins us to examine how the gift of gab works. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/12/rw122916.mp3




The Curious Science of Humans at War

Wed, 28 Dec 2016 18:00:00 +0000

When you think about military science, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Bombs and guns, right? Well, that’s not what interests the writer Mary Roach, who has a habit of seeking out eccentric scientific corners. She’s not so much curious about the killing as she is about the keeping alive. That curiosity led her to research into the battlefield’s more obscure threats: exhaustion, shock, bacteria, panic, even turkey vultures. Roach joins us to explore the curious science of humans at war. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/12/rw122816.mp3




The Life and Art of Hieronymus Bosch

Tue, 27 Dec 2016 18:00:00 +0000

If you’ve ever seen paintings by the Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch, such as The Garden of Earthly Delights , you’ve probably wondered what they mean and what kind of person could have imagined such fanciful scenes. Problem is, we know very little about Bosch’s personal story. That leaves the paintings, which present their own puzzles. This year marks the 500th anniversary of Bosch’s death, and Tuesday, art historian Gary Schwartz joins us to discuss the fearless artist’s life and his inventive art. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/01/rw122716.mp3




Coyote America

Mon, 26 Dec 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Monday, we’re talking about a homegrown American success: coyotes. The country has been at war with the iconic species since white settlers first reached the heartland plains. But coyotes, according to biologist Dan Flores, not only survived our assault on them, they simultaneously expanded their range across the continent and into our cities. Flores joins us to explore the coyote’s fascinating story of resilience and adaptability and how it parallels our own version of Manifest Destiny. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/12/rw122616.mp3




A Christmas Carol

Fri, 23 Dec 2016 18:00:00 +0000

In the fall of 1843, Charles Dickens was in something of a mid-life crisis. His marriage was troubled, his career tottering, his finances on the verge of collapse. He even considered giving up writing. He didn’t, of course. Instead, he wrote his most famous work, A Christmas Carol , in just six weeks, and then self-published it. As the historian and writer Les Standiford notes, Dickens’ famous Christmas tale didn’t just change his life, it reinvented the way we celebrate the holiday. We’ll talk with Standiford about A Christmas Carol on Friday. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/12/rw122316.mp3




American Utopianism

Thu, 22 Dec 2016 18:00:00 +0000

What should the future look like? That’s the question posed by ambitious, sometimes delusional Americans in the early 1800s who dedicated themselves to creating new ways of living. You had Mother Ann Lee’s Shakers; the Oneida community in New York; New Harmony, Indiana; intentional communities inspired by French socialist Charles Fourier; and the roots of a communist paradise in Texas. Thursday, the writer Chris Jennings joins us to explore the idealism and the lasting impact of these five utopian movements. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2016/12/rw122216.mp3