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Preview: PRI: RadioWest

RadioWest Podcasts



A radio conversation where people tell stories that explore the way the world works. Produced by KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City and hosted by Doug Fabrizio. Find archived episodes at http://radiowest.org



Last Build Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 23:53:37 +0000

 



When Race, Sport, and Religion Collide

Tue, 28 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Students at Brigham Young University are required to follow strict moral guidelines known as the Honor Code. Most students at the school are prepared to meet the code’s rigid demands, but some aren’t, says Darron Smith, a former BYU professor. Smith says that many black and/or non-Mormon athletes may not fully anticipate the challenges of the Honor Code, and he argues that they’re disproportionately punished for violating it. He’ll join us Tuesday to discuss what happens when race, religion and sports collide.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw032817.mp3




The Zookeeper's Wife

Mon, 27 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Monday, the acclaimed naturalist and writer Diane Ackerman talks about the story she uncovered of Jan and Antonina Zabinski, a zookeeper and his wife. The couple ran the Warsaw Zoo during the brutal Nazi occupation of World War II, and they were able to save more than 300 people destined to be exterminated by the Nazis. Ackerman’s book has been made into a film, so we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with her about the role of nature in kindness and savagery. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw032717.mp3




Cooking with the Elements

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Fire, water, air, and earth – these are the classical elements of cooking. According to food journalist Michael Pollan, they help us transform stuff from the natural world into delicious food and drink. But increasingly, cooking isn't done in the home; it’s done by corporations and restaurants, and that’s disconnecting us from the very idea of food and how we eat it. Pollan joins us Friday to talk about his book Cooked , and to explore how this trend affects our planet, our culture, our food, and our health. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw032417_0.mp3




Should Utah Crack Down on Drunk Driving?

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Earlier this month, Utah legislators passed a bill that would give the state the strictest DUI law in the country. The Beehive State was the first to lower the legal blood-alcohol content from .1 to .08, and the new law, if signed by Governor Gary Herbert, would further lower that limit to .05. Supporters say doing so will reduce drunk driving and save lives, while opponents worry that the law will hurt restaurants, bars, and the state’s reputation. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw032317.mp3




Pat Mulroy: The Water Problem

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

In a new book, former manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Pat Mulroy says we’re facing a tough global reality when it comes to water. Growth, urbanization, and the effects of climate change mean we have to find new ways to manage a resource she says most Americans simply take for granted. Mulroy is coming to Utah, and she joins Doug Wednesday to explain what’s at stake, and how creating a shared vision for our water future is more important than ever.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw032217.mp3




Fixing America's Public Universities

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

English professor Christopher Newfield spends a lot of time thinking about public higher education. He’s worried about it. America’s public college system, he says, is in a shambles, with students paying higher tuitions for less learning. The conventional thinking is that public sector practices are to blame, but Newfield argues that the increasing privatization of our universities is the real problem. He joins us Tuesday to explain how we wrecked public universities and how we can fix them.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw032117.mp3




Fake News vs. The Facts

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Monday, we’re talking about fake news. You’re hearing that term a lot these days, and it’s being applied to all kinds of media, from articles written by Macedonian teenagers to the work of news outlets like CNN. But what is fake news, and maybe more importantly, what isn’t it? Where does it come from and what effects has it had on our culture? We’ll also talk about the efforts to combat fake news and the challenges of getting people to change their minds about stuff they really want to believe is true.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw032017.mp3




The Immortal Irishman

Fri, 17 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Friday, journalist Timothy Egan joins us to tell the story of Irish revolutionary Thomas Francis Meagher . Egan first encountered Meagher as a statue on the Montana Capitol grounds, but tracing his life took Egan from the brutal occupation of Ireland and the famine which killed a million people, to the fields of America’s civil war and to the American frontier. We’ll talk about Meagher’s transformation from romantic to rebel to leader, and what it reveals about the journey. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw031717.mp3




A Streetcar Named Desire

Thu, 16 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

Thursday, we’re talking about one of the great classics of American theater, A Streetcar Named Desire . It was 70 years ago when Marlon Brando first played Stanley Kowalski on Broadway, but the themes of sexual violence, homophobia, addiction, and family strife still resonate today. A new production at Salt Lake City’s Grand Theatre opens this week, so we’re exploring Tennessee Williams’ masterpiece and how it’s become, as one guest puts it, enshrined in America’s psyche.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw031617.mp3




On Trails

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

In 2009, while thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths beneath our feet. On every scale of life on earth, he says, trails form that “reduce an overwhelming array of choices to a single expeditious route.” But how do they form? Why do some paths improve while others disappear? How does order emerge from chaos? Moor joins us to explore how pathways serve as an essential guiding force for trailblazers and trail followers, alike. [Rebroadcast]


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw031517.mp3




American Nations

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 15:00:00 +0000

You don’t need to be a scholar or veteran political observer to see that America is divided, but journalist and historian Colin Woodard says this is really nothing new. Woodard argues that America has always been divided, because we’re actually eleven distinct regional nations, with different cultures and ideas about how the world works. He’ll join us Tuesday to explain the historic roots of these nations, and how that past is still influencing the country today.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw031417.mp3




The Science of Fat

Mon, 13 Mar 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Body fat is a source of shame for many people, something to be hidden, fought, and burned away. But fat, says the biochemist Sylvia Tara, isn’t just unsightly blubber, it’s an essential and deeply misunderstood organ that’s vital to our existence. It enables our reproductive organs, strengthens our immune system, protects us from disease, and may even help us live longer. In her book, Tara explores the science behind our least appreciated organ, and she joins us Monday to talk about it. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw031317.mp3




The 2017 Utah Legislative Session in Review

Fri, 10 Mar 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Friday, a panel of journalists and legislators join Doug to review 2017 Utah Legislative Session. A lot has happened on Capitol Hill in the past 45 days. Legislators made a number of changes to the state’s liquor laws, including one that gives Utah the nation’s toughest drunk driving law. Deals were struck to address homelessness in Salt Lake. Tax reforms fizzled. Medical marijuana took a step forward. And car inspections could be a thing of the past. We’ll talk about all that, and more.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw031017.mp3




Viet Thanh Nguyen: The Refugees

Thu, 09 Mar 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Thursday, we’re talking about the lives of refugees with the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen. Nguyen came to this country when he was four, and he says there’s a tendency to separate the stories of immigrants from the stories of war. The people who seek refuge here though, he says, often have war stories to tell. Nguyen is in Utah, and joins us to explain what it’s like to be an outsider.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw030917.mp3




Profiling Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke

Wed, 08 Mar 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Late last week, Congressman Ryan Zinke of Montana took the job of Secretary of the Department of the Interior. As the administrator of roughly a fifth of America’s land, his influence will be widely felt, especially in the West. But who is he? And where does he stand on important issues like state control of public lands, or on the contentious designation of national monuments? Utah Congressman Rob Bishop will be among our guests Wednesday as we examine Zinke’s appointment and what it means for Utah.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw030817.mp3




The Rise of the Food Movement

Tue, 07 Mar 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Tuesday, we’re talking about the rise of the Good Food Movement. It’s an ad hoc cultural crusade that has cropped up across America in the past decade, advocating for good food produced in ways that benefit both the land and the people who grow it. And it’s been successful: local, organic, and natural food is now all the rage. The journalist Naomi Starkman has documented the growth of the Good Food Movement. She’s in Salt Lake this week, and she joins us to discuss how food nourishes the body and soul.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw030717.mp3




Mein Kampf

Mon, 06 Mar 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Mein Kampf was Adolf Hitler’s autobiographical manifesto, a kind of campaign biography. He wrote the first draft of it while in prison for leading a failed coup, and historian Peter Ross Range says the book crystallized Hitler’s “faith in himself as Germany’s coming redeemer.” Last year, Mein Kampf was republished in Germany for the first time since WWII. Range joins us Monday to talk about the notorious book’s history, influence, and future. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw030617.mp3




Words on the Move

Fri, 03 Mar 2017 16:00:00 +0000

If you’re worried that the word “literally” now means “figuratively,” or if you fret that acronyms are replacing actual words, today’s show will do one of two things: make you pull out your hair, or it’ll change your mind. The linguist John McWhorter says that changes to the English language are nothing new. Language, he says, isn’t some static thing that just is , “it’s actually something always becoming .” McWhorter will join us to discuss how languages evolve and why we should embrace the changes. (Rebroadcast)


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw030317.mp3




The New Plan for Homelessness in Salt Lake

Thu, 02 Mar 2017 16:00:00 +0000

A coalition of local government officials announced last week that they’d agreed to changes in the plan to address homelessness in the Salt Lake Valley. Previously, four homeless resource centers would be sited in Salt Lake City; now there will be just two, and a site in Sugarhouse won’t be one of them. A hard-closure date was also set for the downtown Road Home shelter. Hopes are high the new plan will work out, but there are skeptics. Doug and his guests are talking about it on Thursday.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw030217.mp3




Where Ancestors and Wilderness Meet

Wed, 01 Mar 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Wednesday, our guest is writer and environmental advocate Brooke Williams. Williams spent a year alone verifying maps of the southern Utah desert, where he felt a deep connection to the landscape. He wanted to understand that connection, and found an answer in the imagined story of his ancestor William Williams. Nature and wilderness, he concludes in his new book, are part of his DNA. Brooke Williams joins Doug to talk about listening to the “archaic whisper” of the past, and how saving the land can save us.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/radiowest/audio/2017/03/rw030117.mp3