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World Hum



Get the latest world travel news, stories, book reviews, and more on World Hum. Travel dispatches from a shrinking planet.



Published: 2016-08-09T17:46:41+00:00

 



2016 Book Passage Travel Writers & Photographers Conference

2016-08-09T17:46:41+00:00

This year’s Book Passage Travel Writers & Photographers Conference—or as many justly call it, summer camp for travel writers—kicks off Thursday in Corte Madera, California. If you’ve ever wanted to study travel writing with a host of accomplished writers and editors, this is the time and place. The four-day conference features classes and panel discussions about the art, craft and business of travel writing and photography—and, just as importantly, hours of conversation over wine and dinner.

I’ll be teaching a series of morning classes with Los Angeles Times staff writer Chris Reynolds.

Also on the faculty are World Hum contributors Lavinia Spalding, Pam Mandel, Candace Rardon, Michael Shapiro, Andrea Johnson, Larry Habegger, Linda Watanabe McFerrin, Spud Hilton and Abbie Kozolchyk. Other luminaries include Don George, Tim Cahill, Elizabeth Harryman, Jeff Greenwald, Janis Cooke Newman and Robert Holmes.

Hope to see you there.




How Korean Karaoke Changed My Life

2016-08-09T17:05:21+00:00

After being turned away from the school choir, Lavinia Spalding lost her love of public singing. Then she moved to South Korea.



Talking Travel Writing at AWP 2016

2016-03-19T16:30:29+00:00

I’ll be moderating a panel on travel writing—Does Travel Writing Have a Place in the Age of Instagram and Google Earth?—at the AWP conference in Los Angeles on Saturday, April 2.

I’ll be joined by World Hum contributors Tom Swick and Pam Mandel, as well as travel writer and novelist Janis Cooke Newman.

If you’ll be at the conference, stop in and say hi!




Riding the Slot

2016-03-19T16:09:52+00:00

As she struggled to make sense of her father's final days, Lenore Greiner sailed across a treacherous patch of San Francisco Bay



Road Trip to the Spiritual Assembly

2016-01-26T16:18:29+00:00

When her Aunt Noonie needed company on an annual pilgrimage, Nancy Davis Kho tagged along. Just how "woo-woo" would things get?



The Intricate Weave

2015-12-09T16:20:31+00:00

Don George was in Cremona, Italy, and grieving the loss of his father, when he heard the violin soar



War Story

2015-09-23T15:48:01+00:00

Could a trip to the old battlefields of Europe with his veteran father work a little magic on their relationship? Jim Benning hoped so.



Walking Off Writer’s Burnout

2015-09-17T17:33:59+00:00

Jeff Biggers hadn't written anything original in months. The joy was gone. Then he and a friend went for a stroll in Bologna.



The Accidental Hitchhiker

2015-08-14T14:26:57+00:00

In Samoa, Celeste Brash gave a ride to a man she didn't know. Their encounter will stay with her forever.



How a Taxi Ride Changed a Writer’s Life

2015-07-21T15:13:28+00:00

Layne Mosler's memoir, "Driving Hungry," chronicles her cab-centric quest for great meals and experiences. Jim Benning asks about it.



A Not-So-Literary Tour of South-Central Mexico

2015-06-27T20:11:49+00:00

Peter Ferry made the trip based on a story he'd heard about Hemingway's Lady Brett Ashley, but in Taxco, nothing was quite what it seemed.



The U.S. Interstate Highways, Ranked

2015-03-17T11:26:01+00:00

The common road-tripper’s wisdom tells us to steer for America’s secondary highways to really see the country—and doing so has resulted in travel writing classics like William Least Heat Moon’s Blue Highways. But over at MapQuest, Robert Reid argues that we shouldn’t give up on the interstate so fast. “No interstate can outrun what’s outside the window—a desert, a Rockie, a swamp, a beach, or witness that change in lighting of a southwestern dusk, or the size of a western sky, or even the steamy air in a southern night,” Reid writes.

He’s ranked every interstate in the system on a combination of traffic levels, thematic or regional cohesion, and the overall “joy of the ride.” The result is worth a read.