Subscribe: Comments for RealClimate
http://www.realclimate.org/wp-commentsrss2.php?p=406
Preview: Comments for RealClimate

Comments for RealClimate



Climate science from climate scientists...



Last Build Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 11:32:13 +0000

 



Comment on El Niño and the record years 1998 and 2016 by rasmus

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 11:32:13 +0000

The article is open access - see the reference above.



Comment on A brief review of rainfall statistics by rasmus

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 11:31:13 +0000

Dear Rosemary. I think the formula should be quite universal, but you can try and see. If you have data and use R, you can use the tools in https://github.com/metno/esd (see the wiki-page for more documentation). -rasmus



Comment on Unforced variations: Nov 2017 by Rosemary Barasa

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 09:19:27 +0000

Hi, just to give a perspective from East Africa, there is a collaboration with The University of Nairobi Institute for Climate Change and Adaptation on the outreach of a film called "Thank you for the Rain". The Film will be launched on the 29th of November in Nairobi at the French Cultural Center (for those of you who will be in Nairobi at the time) and all are welcome.The Film is about: Kisilu Musya, a smallholder farmer in Kenya Kitui, who for the last five years has used his camera to capture the life of his family, his village and the impacts of climate change. He takes his message all the way to the UN Climate Talks, in Paris, COP21. Here, amid the murky cut and thrust of politics at the biggest environmental show on earth, Kisilu and Norwegian filmmaker Julia Dahr's perspective takes on a remarkable twist, shedding a powerful light on the climate justice movement and the vastly different worlds they represent.* *Watch the trailer:* http://thankyoufortherain.com/trailer



Comment on Unforced variations: Nov 2017 by Rosemary Barasa

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 09:00:34 +0000

Hi, just to give a perspective from East Africa, there is a collaboration with The University of Nairobi Institute for Climate Change and Adaptation on the outreach of a film called "Thank you for the Rain". The Film will be Launched on the 29th of November in Nairobi at the French Cultural Center (for those of you who will be in Nairobi at the time) and all are welcome.The Film is about: Kisilu Musya, a smallholder farmer in Kenya Kitui, who for the last five years has used his camera to capture the life of his family, his village and the impacts of climate change. He has filmed floods, droughts. He takes his message all the way to the UN Climate Talks, in Paris, COP21. Here, amid the murky cut and thrust of politics at the biggest environmental show on earth, Kisilu and Norwegian filmmaker Julia Dahr's perspective takes on a remarkable twist, shedding a powerful light on the climate justice movement and the vastly different worlds they represent.* *Watch the trailer:* http://thankyoufortherain.com/trailer



Comment on A brief review of rainfall statistics by Rosemary Barasa

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 08:41:02 +0000

Hi, I am a student at the Institute for Climate Change and Adaptation University of Nairobi. Is the formula applicable to the El Nino/ La Nina phenomenon that has such a major impact on our weather systems in East Africa?



Comment on El Niño and the record years 1998 and 2016 by Rosemary Barasa

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 08:24:16 +0000

This is really interesting. How can I get a synopsis of this article for consumption by our students at the Institute for Climate Change and Adaptation in the University of Nairobi? I'd also like to see the projected impacts for East Africa



Comment on Unforced variations: Nov 2017 by Mr. Know It All

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 03:31:18 +0000

218 - nigelj " America is going in the other direction into an ideological war zone, with a political right wing currently in the White House and Congress and Senate plus various so called ‘institutes’ that are very irrational and entrenched in their world view, and in total denial about several things. How the hell do you expect us to fix that?" Well, there is a lot you can do. First, ignore those people - they make up only 2.5% of the world population - they are of no consequence in the AGW game. If you're willing to do something about AGW, get a bike, an electric bike if you're not in shape or are lazy, in the winter turn down the thermostat to 60 degrees, in the summer turn it up, put a 1/4 turn inline valve on your shower head to reduce the water flow to the bare minimum, open south facing blinds in winter to gather solar heat, avoid using cars as much as you can, turn off lights when no one is in the room, get more efficient appliances, see if you can add some solar PV panels to your roof, perhaps solar thermal panels for water heating, etc, etc. If all the believers will do their part that will accomplish more than any climate agreement. And, don't despair over the federal government of the USA - many state governments are implementing AGW policies on their own.



Comment on A brief review of rainfall statistics by Nir Krakauer

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 02:11:46 +0000

I've used a mixed exponential (or hyperexponential) distribution for modeling gridded daily precipitation amount, and also discussed how to fit the parameters: NY Krakauer, SM Pradhanang, J Panthi, T Lakhankar, AK Jha (2015), Probabilistic precipitation estimation with a satellite product, Climate, 3(2): 329-348, doi: 10.3390/cli3020329



Comment on Unforced variations: Nov 2017 by nigelj

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 21:11:46 +0000

Zebra @227, just on Europe compared to America I want to clarify what I said above. Climate is unlikely to be the factor. So just to be clear, according to your theory, the USA with lower population density than Europe, should consume less energy per capita. You have said country with smaller population per unit area, makes more sensible environmental choices. But the US has higher energy consumption per capita than most of Europe. This is opposite to your theory. One issue is US has poor energy efficiency laws, and higher incomes overall so more energy use.



Comment on Unforced variations: Nov 2017 by nigelj

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 20:38:59 +0000

zebra @227 Firstly if you ever feel inclined to vist NZ or move here, come vist! We could have interesting discussion. "You seem to believe that you have proposed some counterargument to my proposition (“Zebra’s Hypothesis”, in the future) that a declining population produces a non-linear benefit in reducing CO2 and other environmental insults. And you also claim others have as well." I never claimed this. I agree its plausible theory, (I'm going on instinct here plus thinking about it) but the effect would be weak at best. I have said this about three frigging times Zebra. I gave you numerous reasons and examples maybe you didn't see the post, and I'm not going to go over it all again, and try to trawl back and find it. But for example you claimed something about very small populations clustering near renewable energy resources simply because its small population. I just don't see why this would necessarily happen. But maybe lets just agree to disagree if you want, I don't want bad feeling over the issue, there's enough internet wars already. But the fact numerous other people have made criticisms of same issue tells me Im not imagining things. " I think you once said that NZ had environmental issues, but NZ has a growing population as far as I know. And NZ illustrates one of the fundamental components of my argument– which is that people tend to choose to concentrate geographically. You have lots of land relative to the population (so far), but something like 3/4 of the people live in one city, correct?" The population is only growing slightly relatively speaking, but surely total size and density is what your theory is really about? I fail to see how a change would do anything just because its a change. And as I said, we have numerous environmental problems despite small population and low density. You are right population is somewhat concentrated in Auckland about 25%, so is similar to your ideal model, but this still hasn't lead to a pristine environment free of problems, which undermines your theory. I know NZ is only one country so is possibly an anomaly, and we have environmental successes as well as problems. You should look at a range of countries and see if there's some obvious correlation between population size / density and environmental problems. Surely that's the test to do? My instinct says you are right but will be weak effect. "I go by obvious data, like the difference in per-capita energy consumption between the US and Europe. An obvious contribution to that is the higher density." Hang on higher density in Europe may be a factor, but Europe is also a colder climate and has stricter energy efficiency rules, and different technologies. And I'm not sure any of this is a function of population density, and its more likely cultural differences "As for morality, ethics, and so on: Please, this has been discussed to death by real philosophers– it is a meaningless concept because different groups of people can hold diametrically opposed opinions about “what is moral”. It sure has been discussed to death. I have read some philosophy on morality including Kant, Mill, and Ayn Rand and most of this is meaningless goobledegook going around in circles and superficial assertions. The most sensible thing I have read on morality is some of Mills work, and Aristotles ethics, which is both mercifully short and clear and grounded in the real world and rational approach. Mill also developed and excellent view on Morality that we should be free to do as we wish in life, provided it is not hurting other people (I'm simplifying his views) and this at least makes some rational sense, rather than being an arbitrary definition of right and wrong. People do hold[...]