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60-Second Science



Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of ou



 



Ants Use Celestial Cues to Travel in Reverse

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 12:00:00 -0500

The six-legged savants appear to use celestial cues and three forms of memory, as they blaze a trail back to the nest. Karen Hopkin reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=95C982A9-4CF5-4130-9066DA4BCA5DE8F3




High-Sugar Diet Makes Flies Drop Like...Flies

Mon, 23 Jan 2017 22:45:00 -0500

A study examines the effects of a high-sugar diet on the life spans of fruit flies. Another studies how the flies’ appetite-suppressing pathways may be similar to ours. Karen Hopkin reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=968BB5DC-B4F9-4DFE-960C61A1362DB4D9




Pesticide Additive Could Be One Culprit in Bee Deaths

Sat, 21 Jan 2017 11:02:00 -0500

A common pesticide additive, known as an "inert" ingredient, could be one of the causes of the die-offs beekeepers have observed in their hives. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=ADA1E2B6-7F5F-4FDC-A54CBC4711A9EC87




Knot Not Easy to Knot

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:01:00 -0500

Chemists have synthesized the most complex molecular knot ever, using a strand just 192 atoms long. The advance could lead to new tougher materials. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=F7532DAE-BEAC-42A6-A4D025F86AB3A97F




Bat Chatter Is More Than a Cry in the Dark

Sat, 14 Jan 2017 12:00:00 -0500

Using algorithms developed for human speech recognition, researchers decoded which bats in an experimental colony were arguing with each other, and what they were arguing about. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=C73B6AFF-1C3E-48D1-927F01ED445F69AD




Bird Feeders Attract Bird Eaters, Too

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 09:00:00 -0500

Some predators are attracted to the food in bird feeders, and end up targeting nestlings, too. Jason G. Goldman reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=E0AF5C4D-8414-4B2D-AB4FC5ACC4499DBE




Adult Daughter Orcas May Trigger Moms' Menopause

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 12:18:00 -0500

Competition between older female orcas and their adult daughters when they can breed simultaneously may cause the matriarch to enter menopause.  


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=4E0096F8-BEF2-46D4-B9D4D7D3F12DD422




Climate Cycles Could Have Carved Canyons on Mars

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 23:35:00 -0500

Researchers think Mars may have experienced a series of climate cycles, which etched the planet’s surface with river valleys and lake basins. Julia Rosen reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=C2C42661-2142-4BFD-AF02EA98695D8D0F




Hair Cells Could Heal Skin Sans Scars

Fri, 6 Jan 2017 19:43:00 -0500

Hair follicles appear to be key in reprogramming other cells in the wound, restoring the original skin architecture, instead of simply scarring. Christopher Intagliata reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=717046BA-0A2A-4672-A8C31A6E8514DB9A




Concrete Defects Could Become Strengths

Thu, 5 Jan 2017 10:45:00 -0500

By optimizing the imperfections in concrete, manufacturers could make the material tougher and stronger—allowing builders to use less of it. Christopher Intagliata reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=D1A0600F-2860-40A9-9D172CF1AAAACF0C




Zika Linked to a Variety of Birth Defects

Tue, 3 Jan 2017 20:27:00 -0500

Zika virus infection during pregnancy appears to cause a range of birth defects, such as joint, eye and ear abnormalities, in addition to microcephaly. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=AB2EE6FC-AE58-4B34-A400C7F1500F15EF




When Dining for Trillions, Eat Wisely

Thu, 29 Dec 2016 20:20:00 -0500

What you ate in the past can shape the diversity of your gut flora, and affect how well your gut microbes respond to new foods. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=EE10DF9E-DCD7-4F74-81B5B0724D00B48B




Weakest Piglets May Sneak Help from Strongest Siblings

Wed, 28 Dec 2016 19:35:00 -0500

If a weak piglet positions itself next to a strong sibling while feeding, it may get some extra nutrition from inadvertently stimulated mammary glands.     


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=F2B164C4-6138-4893-AF9FEE7406251210




Isolated Low Temps May Reassure Climate Skeptics

Mon, 26 Dec 2016 09:00:00 -0500

Areas of the country that have experienced record low temperatures since 2005 happen to be home to many global warming deniers. And researchers theorize there may be a connection. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=31F8A415-1692-4FD9-98A48680A901B377




Bats Learn to Take White-Nose Punch

Fri, 23 Dec 2016 18:55:00 -0500

In areas where the white-nose syndrome fungus has been around for awhile, little brown bats seem to have found a way to limit the disease damage.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=A8803BA0-2838-4556-80988F804A691B2A