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60-Second Science



Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of ou



 



Why One Researcher Marched For Science

Sat, 22 Apr 2017 13:53:00 -0500

Lisa Klein, from the materials science and engineering department at Rutgers University, commented on the March For Science at an April 21st talk to the chemistry department at Lehman College in the Bronx.  


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=A0267C9D-5001-41EC-AAEF431D5011D7C7




Healthy Behavior Can Spread Like Illness

Thu, 20 Apr 2017 16:40:00 -0500

If people run more in New York City, that can push their socially connected counterparts in San Diego to run more as well. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=8682D9E3-6A37-42FD-BD45B6CCBE637FEA




Climate 420 Million Years Ago Poised for Comeback

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 19:31:00 -0500

Starting in the next century, atmospheric carbon levels could begin to approach those of hundreds of millions of years ago, and have their warming effect augmented by a brighter sun. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=14789B4B-F3D7-438A-A76F5987C1313C20




Traces of Genetic Trauma Can Be Tweaked

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 14:11:00 -0500

Trauma can be passed down to offspring due to epigenetic changes in DNA. But positive experiences seem able to correct that. Erika Beras reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=66B30041-B5ED-41FD-925C3A346C97EDF8




Species Split When Mountains Rise

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 20:10:00 -0500

Plant species in China's Hengduan Mountains exploded in diversity eight million years ago—right when the mountains were built. Christopher Intagliata reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=710B9D43-8C74-4101-B5C6DE8E2C7D1063




Shoelace Study Untangles a Knotty Problem

Wed, 12 Apr 2017 20:48:00 -0500

Researchers have trotted out data that show a combination of whipping and stomping forces is what causes laces to unravel without warning. Karen Hopkin reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=CED87B22-26ED-4818-BFB13FEB03AD4749




World Parkinson's Day Puts Spotlight on Condition

Tue, 11 Apr 2017 15:28:00 -0500

Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research CEO Todd Sherer, a neuroscientist, talks about the state of Parkinson's disease and research.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=0FB14D83-1A9C-41FF-B09EF1A143C23134




Cave Dwellers Battled Bed Bug Bites, Too

Thu, 6 Apr 2017 17:40:00 -0500

Researchers have found the earliest evidence of bugs in the Cimex genus co-habitating with humans, in Oregon's Paisley Caves. Christopher Intagliata reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=6DC2D1F4-CA56-444E-AD9794A85DB1763E




Extreme Storms Are Extreme Eroders

Wed, 5 Apr 2017 14:40:00 -0500

The storm that swept across the Rockies in September 2013 unleashed huge amounts of sediment downstream, doing the work of a century of erosion. Julia Rosen reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=B2E7561B-2EFD-4C33-924A32FEDF60CA6C




Spiders Gobble Gargantuan Numbers of Tiny Prey

Mon, 3 Apr 2017 21:35:00 -0500

The low-end estimate for how much the world's spiders eat is some 400 million tons of mostly insects and springtails.  


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=82340901-4316-439D-A5069A9A521DCFC5




Your Cat Thinks You're Cool

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 17:23:00 -0500

A study of house cats and shelter cats found that the felines actually tended to choose human company over treats or toys.  


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=DA3E5B8B-B625-4D2D-A46C1FBA31FC364E




Exoplanets Make Life Conversation Livelier

Sat, 25 Mar 2017 07:30:00 -0500

Astronomer Caleb Scharf weighs what ever more exoplanets mean in the search for extraterrestrial life.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=A90E4A74-3536-447B-A275323C3FB61067




Bring Bronx Zoo to Your Living Room

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 13:18:00 -0500

Animal Planet's series The Zoo shows viewers the biological, veterinary and conservation science at a modern zoo.  


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=641480FB-4A86-4536-9778D316B03AF549




UV Rays Strip Small Galaxies of Star Stuff

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 23:27:00 -0500

Researchers measured the intensity of the universe's ultraviolet background radiation, and say it may be strong enough to strip small galaxies of star-forming gas. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=19AAD236-BCE7-4F27-92743D918DC3DE4E




Aggressed-Upon Monkeys Take Revenge on Aggressor's Cronies

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 21:42:00 -0500

Japanese macaques at the receiving end of aggression tend to then take it out on a close associate or family member of the original aggressor.  


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=EC3F85FF-A0FC-4D08-973331C73A8B7A6A