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60-Second Science



Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of ou



 



Seeing One Solar Eclipse May Not Be Enough

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 15:18:00 -0500

David Baron, author of the new book American Eclipse, talks about how seeing his first total solar eclipse turned him into an eclipse chaser.    


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=4A7F5AAA-B8E2-4F69-95AC91FE7FF6CDE8




Solar Eclipse in 1097 May Be Rock Carving Subject

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 18:00:00 -0500

A petroglyph spotted in Chaco Canyon may depict a total solar eclipse witnessed by the Pueblo people.  


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=372EF827-9ECF-4F41-9EDE523F84892F95




Social Media Sites Can Profile Your Contacts

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 19:21:00 -0500

Why you should think twice before you give an app access to your phone’s address book.    


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=9CD6F7AB-1EFA-45EA-B5B39726073C527F




"Textalyzer" Aims at Deadly Distracted Driving

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 19:20:00 -0500

A new device promises to tell police when a driver has been sending messages while behind the wheel, but is it legal? Larry Greenemeier reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=4D1F3CD9-A4F5-485F-8181C2982DD1B8C7




Climate Change Fires Up Polar Bear Treadmill

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 19:15:00 -0500

Sea ice is drifting faster in the Arctic—which means polar bears need to walk farther to stay in their native range. Emily Schwing reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=CE492BC8-6A7E-4552-937A2E3962D933A2




No Bull: Lizards Flee When They See Red

Wed, 9 Aug 2017 14:15:00 -0500

Western fence lizards are more spooked by red and gray shirts than they are by blue ones—perhaps because the males have blue bellies themselves. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=69C2312E-246A-480F-BE977A739833849A




Celebrities Tweet Like Bots

Sat, 5 Aug 2017 23:10:00 -0500

Celebrity Twitter accounts look a lot like Twitter bots: They tweet regularly, follow relatively few people, and upload a lot of content. Christopher Intagliata reports. 


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=354F3EA6-538E-483E-BCFF1AAC340B3D22




Cold Snap Shapes Lizard Survivors

Thu, 3 Aug 2017 14:01:00 -0500

An epic bout of cold weather quickly altered a population of lizards—an example of natural selection in action. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=11D708F1-15DB-4881-BB847C8D3943AC17




Mediterranean Diet Works--for Upper Crust

Tue, 1 Aug 2017 20:50:00 -0500

Italians who stuck closely to the heart-healthy diet had fewer heart attacks and strokes—but only if they were well-off and/or college educated. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=5ED8A298-95A8-478D-A922B088F304F832




Screams Heard Round the Animal World

Mon, 31 Jul 2017 19:00:00 -0500

Humans appear well equipped to recognize the alarm calls of other animals—perhaps because sounds of distress tend to have higher frequencies. Karen Hopkin reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=AF16E1F6-83AD-4AA8-90ED3939989550FF




This Caterpillar Whistles While It Irks

Fri, 28 Jul 2017 12:32:00 -0500

The North American walnut sphinx caterpillar produces a whistle that sounds just like a songbird's alarm call--and the whistle seems to startle birds. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=E76A6B0B-2EE6-428C-80FC43F8EB943EDE




To Buy Happiness, Spend Money on Saving Time

Wed, 26 Jul 2017 19:32:00 -0500

Volunteers who used money to save themselves time were more content than volunteers who purchased themselves physical stuff. Karen Hopkin reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=B6551C34-4E33-4287-807FC4C9FFB0B02B




Bacteria Can Be Resistant to Brand-New Antibiotics

Tue, 25 Jul 2017 13:20:00 -0500

Exposure to existing antibiotics can imbue infectious bacteria with resistance that also kicks in against new drugs related to the originals. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=148B8BE5-761B-4A57-8072C2A5BB5E6CD3




Teaching Computers to Enjoy the View

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 22:00:00 -0500

Researchers in the U.K. trained computers to rate photos of parks and cities for what humans consider to be their scenic beauty. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=33538E3C-96F5-4FFF-B556161D09BC2B50




Flying through a Corpse's Clues

Mon, 17 Jul 2017 22:12:00 -0500

Forensic entomologists can chemically analyze fly eggs from a corpse, which might speed up detective work. Christopher Intagliata reports.


Media Files:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcast.mp3?fileId=1E20D424-C2EC-4ED4-8B1B4F07AD9B41EC