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Physicians' communication of risks from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and attitude towards providing adverse drug reaction information to patients.
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Physicians' communication of risks from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and attitude towards providing adverse drug reaction information to patients.

J Eval Clin Pract. 2017 Aug 15;:

Authors: Phueanpinit P, Pongwecharak J, Sumanont S, Krska J, Jarernsiripornkul N

Abstract
RATIONALE, AIMS, AND OBJECTIVES: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently prescribed for orthopaedic conditions, therefore this study aimed to explore orthopaedic physicians' perceptions of their role in NSAID-risk communication, their attitudes towards the necessity of informing patients about adverse drug reactions (ADR), and factors associated with these.
METHODS: Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to all 206 orthopaedic physicians working at hospitals in Northeastern Thailand. Attitudes were assessed using 17 statements and total scores classed as poor, moderate and good attitude.
RESULTS: Sixty-six questionnaires were returned (32.04%). The responses showed that 75% of physicians claimed to communicate NSAID ADR information, more frequently about gastrointestinal (GI) complications, than about renal and cardiovascular (CVS) complications. ADR management (36%) and monitoring (30%) were not frequently communicated. The time spent with patients was associated with provision of ADR and monitoring advice. Renal function was the risk factor of greatest concern for prescribing any NSAID, followed by history of GI complications, and allergy for non-selective NSAIDs, and history of CVS diseases and age for selective COX-2 NSAIDs. Most physicians (41) had moderate attitude towards providing information and 24 good attitude. Fewer physicians working in tertiary hospitals than general and community hospital physicians considered that time limitations prevented counseling and that patient information leaflets offered easily accessible information. Additionally, more physicians who did not inform patients about ADRs agreed that ADR communication can lead to anxiety and discontinuing treatment.
CONCLUSION: The study indicates that, although orthopaedic physicians had positive attitudes towards providing ADR information to patients, improvement is needed in communicating NSAID risk information.

PMID: 28809071 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]