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StarDate Online - Your guide to the universe





 



Lacaille 9352

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Our home galaxy boasts hundreds of billions of stars. Some of them emit lots of light, while others are dim. And tonight, the southern sky features a stunning contrast between two nearby stars: one powerful, the other feeble.

Both reside in the constellation Piscis Austrinus, the southern fish. If you look due south in early evening, you\'ll easily see the bright star, Fomalhaut. This white star is just 25 light-years from Earth.

Just south of Fomalhaut is another nearby star. In fact, Lacaille 9352 is even closer — a mere 11 light-years away. But you’ll never see it without some help, because the star emits only one percent as much visible light as the Sun does. So, close though it is, Lacaille 9352 is visible only through binoculars or a telescope.

Despite their vast difference in luminosity, both stars generate energy the same way: Nuclear reactions in their cores convert hydrogen into helium. But Fomalhaut was born with twice the mass of the Sun, so its center is hotter, making it burn brightly. In contrast, Lacaille 9352 was born with only half the mass of the Sun. So it’s faint, cool, and red — what astronomers call a red dwarf.

Red dwarfs may seem insignificant, but in one way they far surpass their brighter brethren: They account for about three-quarters of all the stars in the galaxy.

 

Script by Ken Croswell

StarDate: 
Sunday, November 19, 2017
Teaser: 
A close but feeble neighbor



Southern Fish

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Piscis Austrinus, the southern fish, is in the south this evening. It contains only one bright star, Fomalhaut, which marks the fish’s mouth. The white star is just 25 light-years from Earth.




Fuzzy Pinwheel

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

M33, the Triangulum Galaxy, whirls through space like a big fuzzy pinwheel. Stellar nurseries (reddish blobs) line the galaxy's spiral arms, while lanes of dark dust block the light of many stars. The galaxy is about three million light-years away, in the constellation Triangulum, which is well up in the east as darkness falls on November nights. [Alexander Meleg/Wikipedia]

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Triangulum

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Fuzzy Pinwheel M33, the Triangulum Galaxy, whirls through space like a big fuzzy pinwheel. Stellar nurseries (reddish blobs) line the galaxy's spiral arms, while lanes of dark dust block the light of many stars. The galaxy is about three million light-years away, in the constellation Triangulum, which is well up in the east as darkness falls on November nights. [Alexander Meleg/Wikipedia] November’s evening skies offer constellations with great names, intriguing back-stories, and beautiful star patterns. And then there’s Triangulum, which suffers from a distinct lack of imagination. As the name suggests, it consists of three main stars that form a triangle — an accurate if dull description for one of the smallest of all the constellations. It’s well up in the east as darkness falls. The triangle is actually a thin wedge. And there’s an odd coincidence involving the stars at the base of the wedge: One of them is precisely third magnitude, while the other is precisely fourth magnitude. Under the magnitude scale, a lower number means a brighter star. So the third-magnitude star is the brighter of the two — about two-and-a-half times brighter. Both stars are easily visible from dark skywatching sites, but are more difficult targets from the city. The brighter star is Beta Trianguli. It’s a stellar giant about 127 light-years from Earth. The other, Gamma Trianguli, is a little smaller and closer. The star at the tip of the wedge, Alpha Trianguli, is even closer. It’s in the process of swelling up to become a giant. Perhaps the most impressive feature in Triangulum isn’t a star at all, though. Instead, it’s M33, the Triangulum Galaxy. Through binoculars, it looks like a fuzzy star not far from Alpha. But that little smudge of light is actually a pinwheel of tens of billions of stars — three million light-years away.   Script by Damond Benningfield Keywords: Magnitude Scale and Star BrightnessTriangulum, the TriangleStarDate: Saturday, November 18, 2017Teaser: A tiny triangle in the night sky [...]



Triangulum

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

The constellation Triangulum suffers from a lack of imagination. As the name suggests, it consists of three main stars that form a triangle -- an accurate if dull description for one of the smallest constellations. It is well up in the east at nightfall.




Rogue Clusters

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Perseus, the celestial hero, stands well up the eastern sky by mid-evening on November nights. When we gaze that way, we’re looking toward the outskirts of the Milky Way galaxy.

Perseus harbors some amazing sights far beyond the Milky Way’s borders. That includes the Perseus cluster of galaxies, which is about 250 million light-years away. And astronomers recently discovered that the cluster is home to thousands of rogue star clusters — clusters that aren’t attached to any galaxy.

The star clusters are globulars, so named because each is shaped like a globe. A typical globular cluster packs hundreds of thousands of stars into a sphere just a few dozen light-years across. The Milky Way has about 160 known globular clusters, which look like glittering cities of stars.

The brightest galaxy in the Perseus cluster boasts an astonishing 13,000 globulars. But astronomers using Hubble Space Telescope recently discovered globular clusters between the galaxies. Each intergalactic star cluster probably once lived in a galaxy. As the galaxies skirted past one another, though, their gravitational pull yanked the star clusters away from their parent galaxies.

As a result, these orphan star clusters now drift homeless between the galaxies of Perseus. In all, the galaxy cluster has roughly 50,000 globular star clusters that have lost their homes — testimony to how the lives of galaxies can alter the lives of their stars.

 

Script by Ken Croswell

StarDate: 
Friday, November 17, 2017
Teaser: 
“Cities of stars” between galaxies



Perseus Clusters

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Perseus, the celestial hero, stands well up in the east by mid-evening. When we gaze that way, we’re looking toward the outskirts of the Milky Way Galaxy. Perseus’s borders contain a massive galaxy cluster, about 250 million light-years away.




Xi Persei

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Xi Persei doesn’t look all that imposing. The star shines at fourth magnitude, so it’s visible under dark skies, but not from light-polluted cities and towns. But that’s only because it’s a long way off — about 1200 light-years. In reality, it’s one of the most impressive stars visible to the human eye.

Perseus climbs the eastern sky on autumn nights. It consists of a couple of ribbons of stars that join at Mirfak, the constellation’s leading light. And it contains the most famous variable star in the sky: Algol, the Demon Star, which gets noticeably fainter every three days or so.

Yet neither star can compare with Xi Persei, which is near the bottom of the longer ribbon of stars. At visible wavelengths, it’s about 13,000 times brighter than the Sun. But the star is tens of thousands of degrees hotter than the Sun, so it emits most of its light at ultraviolet wavelengths. When you add that in, Xi Persei is a quarter of a million times the Sun’s brightness.

The key to that showiness is the star’s mass — about 30 times that of the Sun. The star’s powerful gravity squeezes its core tightly, revving up its nuclear reactions. The energy from those reactions works its way to the surface, making Xi Persei hot and bright.

And before long, it’ll get even hotter and brighter. It’ll blast itself apart as a supernova, briefly shining brighter than billions of normal stars — a brilliant demise for an impressive star.

More about Perseus tomorrow.


Script by Damond Benningfield

StarDate: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017
Teaser: 
A brilliant but doomed star



Xi Persei

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Perseus climbs the eastern sky on autumn nights. It consists of two ribbons of stars that join at Mirfak, its leading light. Perseus contains the most famous variable star in the sky: Algol, the Demon Star, which gets fainter every three days.




Bright Meteor

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:21:06 +0000

The Leonid meteor shower is at its best in mid-November, in the hours between midnight and dawn. If meteor watchers are very lucky, the shower might produce a brilliant fireball like this one, which streaked above the Netherlands and Belgium in September. The meteor probably was spawned by a space rock no more than a few inches in diameter, which is far larger than the bits of material that produce most Leonids. An automated camera caught the meteor. The camera "blinked" 14 times per second, producing a blobby streak. By counting the number of gaps in the meteor streak, astronomers can determine the meteor's speed and how long it was visible. [K. Miskotte/Dutch Meteor Society]

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Moon, Planets, Meteors

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Bright Meteor The Leonid meteor shower is at its best in mid-November, in the hours between midnight and dawn. If meteor watchers are very lucky, the shower might produce a brilliant fireball like this one, which streaked above the Netherlands and Belgium in September. The meteor probably was spawned by a space rock no more than a few inches in diameter, which is far larger than the bits of material that produce most Leonids. An automated camera caught the meteor. The camera "blinked" 14 times per second, producing a blobby streak. By counting the number of gaps in the meteor streak, astronomers can determine the meteor's speed and how long it was visible. [K. Miskotte/Dutch Meteor Society] The three brightest objects in the night sky huddle low in the twilight tomorrow morning. You need a clear eastern horizon to see them, though. And the presence of one of the three means there should be good viewing for a meteor shower. The highest and brightest member of the trio is the Moon. It’ll be new in a couple of days, so sunlight illuminates only a sliver of the hemisphere that faces our way — the barest of crescents. The other two lights stand below the Moon. The brighter of them is the planet Venus, the “morning star.” It’s quite low in the sky, so you need a clear horizon to find it. It’s dropping toward the Sun in our sky, and soon will disappear in the Sun’s glare. The final member of the group is Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system. It’s headed in the opposite direction from Venus, so it will stand a little higher in the sky each morning. It’ll get brighter over the coming months, too. The Moon’s presence as a dawn crescent means it won’t interfere with a meteor shower that’s building toward its peak. The Leonid shower is expected to be at its best over the next night or two. A bright Moon can overpower most of the meteors. But this time around, the Moon won’t be anywhere in sight during the best time for meteor watching, which comes after midnight. So there are several good targets for early skywatching the next couple of days — the Moon, a pair of bright planets, and a meteor shower.   Script by Damond Benningfield Keywords: Meteor ShowerStargazing and SkywatchingStarDate: Wednesday, November 15, 2017Teaser: Mornings made for skywatching [...]



Moon, Planets, Meteors

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

The brilliant planets Jupiter and Venus will stand below the Moon at dawn tomorrow. Venus is the brighter of the two. And the Leonid meteor shower should be at its peak the next couple of nights. The Moon won’t interfere with the show.




Moon and Mars

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Phobos, the larger of the two moons of Mars, is living on borrowed time. In 70 million years or so, it will move so close to Mars that it’ll either spiral into Mars or be pulverized by its gravity. If it’s pulverized, some of the debris may eventually coalesce to form a new moon.

In fact, a recent study says that could be how Phobos was born — from the remnants of an earlier moon.

For a while, the leading idea has been that Phobos and the other moon, Deimos, were born when a small planet crashed into the young Mars. The impact blasted out a huge amount of debris, which formed a ring around Mars. Some of this material coalesced to make Phobos and Deimos.

That scenario leaves a lot of questions about the little moons unanswered. But a new study says the big impact was only the beginning. Deimos may have been born from the debris of the impact, but Phobos was not. Instead, a much larger moon was. Over time, that moon dropped too close to Mars and was pulverized. Most of the debris fell onto Mars. But some of it formed another moon. That process may have played out several more times, dropping great piles of debris onto Mars while giving birth to ever smaller moons — all the way down to Phobos, which may continue the cycle.

Look for Mars near our own moon at dawn tomorrow. Mars looks like an orange star close to the upper right of the Moon. The true star Spica stands to the lower right of the Moon.

More about the morning lineup tomorrow.

 

Script by Damond Benningfield

StarDate: 
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
Teaser: 
Making moons over and over again



Moon and Mars

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Look for Mars near the Moon at dawn tomorrow. The planet looks like an orange star close to the upper right of the Moon. The true star Spica stands to the lower right of the Moon.




Lunar Migration

Mon, 13 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Every year about this time, one of the planet’s most amazing migrations takes place on Christmas Island, a volcanic mountaintop in the Indian Ocean. Tens of millions of red crabs leave the island’s forests and head for the beach. The females lay their eggs in the water, where the eggs hatch and the larvae drift to sea.

The timing of this migration depends on a couple of things. One is the start of the rainy season, which can be anywhere from October to December. And the other is the Moon: It needs to be a waning crescent, as it is right now, because the tides are gentle then, making life easier on the baby crabs.

The migrations and spawnings of many other species also are tied to the phases of the Moon. A full Moon provides extra light, while full and new Moon bring higher tides.

Some sea turtles, for example, wait for high tides to return to shore to lay their eggs. Riding the higher water level makes it easier for them to lay eggs high up on the shore, where they’re less likely to be uncovered by waves. And Barau’s petrel, a tropical seabird, returns to a tiny island in the eastern Atlantic around the full Moon to mate.

One of the most incredible lunar cycles involves many species of coral on the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. They all spawn at the same time, around December’s full Moon, filling the water with many billions of tiny eggs — a natural cycle on Earth tied to a natural cycle in the sky.

More about the Moon tomorrow.

 

Script by Damond Benningfield

StarDate: 
Monday, November 13, 2017
Teaser: 
Moving with the phases of the Moon



Great Square

Mon, 13 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

The Great Square of Pegasus passes high across the south on November evenings. Its right side, which marks the square’s western edge, points down toward Fomalhaut, the brightest star of Piscis Austrinus, the southern fish.




The Crane

Sun, 12 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

By the early 17th century, European sailors were being guided through southern seas by several birds — not on the wing, but in the stars. Five southern constellations were named for birds: the peacock, toucan, crane, and bird of paradise, plus a mythological bird that’s well known to Harry Potter fans: the phoenix.

All of the constellations were outlined by Johannes Bayer in a star atlas published in the early 1600s.

Those parts of the sky were unknown to Europe until explorers began heading southward. They mapped the stars and brought their observations back to Europe. A Dutch astronomer connected the stellar dots to create a dozen constellations, which Bayer first depicted in his atlas.

Most of the birds are so far south that they’re impossible for most American skywatchers to see. But one of them strides low across the south on November evenings: the crane, known by its Latin name, Grus.

If you’re south of about Denver, look for the crane strolling along the horizon in early evening, with its long neck extending well up into the sky. The crane is to the lower right of Fomalhaut, the brightest star in that region of the sky.

The star that marks the crane’s head is visible from most of the country, standing due south a couple of hours after sunset. Known as Gamma Gruis, it’s much bigger, brighter, and heavier than the Sun. It shines at us across more than 200 light-years of space — the bright eye of a beautiful southern bird.

 

Script by Damond Benningfield

StarDate: 
Sunday, November 12, 2017
Teaser: 
A crane strides across the southern sky



The Crane

Sun, 12 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Grus, the crane, strolls low across the southern horizon in early evening, with its long neck extending well up into the sky. The crane is to the lower right of Fomalhaut, the brightest star in that region of the sky.




Venus and Jupiter

Sat, 11 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Two planets will flip positions in the dawn sky over the next few days. They’re quite low in the sky, so you need a clear horizon to spot them. But they’re the brightest objects in the night sky other than the Moon, so they do stand out.

The brighter member of the duo is Venus, the brilliant “morning star.” Tomorrow, it stands above its companion, Jupiter. But they’ll be side by side on Monday, with Jupiter pulling away from Venus on Tuesday.

To the eye alone, the two planets look a lot alike. And they do have a few things in common. The main one is that both worlds are blanketed by clouds, which reflect a lot of the sunlight that strikes them — one reason that both of them look so bright.

But there are more differences than similarities.

Venus, for example, is roughly the size of Earth — a ball of solid rock topped by a thin layer of atmosphere. Jupiter, on the other hand, is the largest planet in the solar system — big enough to hold more than 1300 Earths. Jupiter probably has a rocky core, but the core is surrounded by layers of hydrogen and helium — in both metallic and liquid forms. Those layers are topped by an atmosphere that’s thousands of miles thick — a world that’s quite different from its smaller sibling.

So keep an eye on these worlds as dawn twilight colors the sky the next few mornings. Venus will disappear from view in a few days, but Jupiter will stand higher each day as it begins a long climb across the night sky.

 

Script by Damond Benningfield

 

StarDate: 
Saturday, November 11, 2017
Teaser: 
Bright planets in the dawn sky



Venus and Jupiter

Sat, 11 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Venus and Jupiter will flip positions the next few days. They are quite low in the east at dawn, so you need a clear horizon to see them. Morning-star Venus will stand above Jupiter tomorrow. They will be side by side on Monday, with Jupiter pulling away on Tuesday.




Moon and Regulus

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

The Leonid meteor shower is beginning its annual display in the night sky. It’ll peak in the middle of next week. The Moon won’t be in view then, so the meteor watching will be especially good. The Moon is around for a few nights before then, though, and a telescope in Greece will keep an eye on it. In particular, it’s looking for impacts by space rocks, whether they’re from the stream of debris that forms the Leonids or not. The project was established by the European Space Agency, using a refurbished telescope in Greece. The telescope monitors the dark portion of the Moon when the Moon is less than half full. It’s looking for short flashes of light caused when space rocks hit the surface. Although it’s mainly looking for impacts by larger space rocks, the telescope’s mirror is big enough to detect the impacts of rocks that weigh as little as a few grams. Counting the number of flashes will help the space agency plan future missions to the Moon — it’ll have a better idea of the risks from impacts. The numbers also will reveal how many rocks are hitting Earth, which can help engineers better protect spacecraft in orbit. The project started in March, and will continue through the end of next year. And while we may not see many meteors through the moonlight tonight, the Moon does have a bright companion: Regulus, the brightest star of Leo. It rises to the lower left of the Moon late tonight, and stands closer to the Moon at dawn tomorrow.   Script by Damond Benningfield  Keywords: Earth's MoonEuropean Astronomy and Space ProgramImpacts and Impact CratersMeteors and MeteoritesSpace ExplorationStarDate: Friday, November 10, 2017Teaser: Flashes on the dark Moon[...]



Moon and Regulus

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

The last-quarter Moon has a prominent companion tonight: Regulus, the brightest star of Leo. It rises to the lower left of the Moon late tonight, and stands closer to the Moon at dawn tomorrow.




DUNE

Thu, 09 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

If you’re eating a scoop of vanilla ice cream, you’d be surprised if it turned itself to chocolate or strawberry. But nature performs this bit of alchemy all the time. The tiny particles known as neutrinos come in three forms, known as flavors. And they can transform themselves from one flavor to another. Finding out how that works can reveal important details about the nature of matter.

Neutrinos are everywhere. They’re produced in the nuclear reactions in the hearts of stars, among other places, so trillions of them pass through your body every second. But they almost never interact with normal matter, so they’re hard to catch.

A new experiment, known as DUNE, should catch more than ever before. It will use four 10,000-ton vats of liquid argon in a mine in South Dakota to catch a beam of neutrinos from a lab in Illinois. A detector at the lab will count the number of neutrinos of each flavor that are beamed out. The detector in South Dakota will also count the neutrinos. Any change will reveal how many neutrinos changed flavors during the trip.

From that, scientists hope to determine the mass of each flavor. Such details may help explain why the universe is made mainly of matter instead of antimatter, even though equal amounts of both should have been created in the Big Bang. The experiment could even reveal other flavors of neutrinos.

Construction began in July. If all goes well, DUNE will be catching neutrinos in a decade.


Script by Damond Benningfield

 

StarDate: 
Thursday, November 9, 2017
Teaser: 
The Baskin-Robbins of subatomic particles



Double Cluster

Thu, 09 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

The Double Cluster stands high in the north this evening, to the right of W-shaped Cassiopeia. To the unaided eye, the Double Cluster looks like twin balls of haze. Binoculars reveal two bulges of stars wrapped in a blanket of mist.




Neutrinos

Wed, 08 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

For astronomers, neutrinos are both good news and bad news. The good news is that these particles can reveal details about the objects that created them — stars and exploding stars, for example. The bad news is they’re really, really hard to detect. Neutrinos are the most common type of normal-matter particle. They’re produced in nuclear reactions — the fusion of hydrogen atoms to make helium, for example. So every single reaction in the heart of the Sun or any Sun-like star produces a neutrino. What makes neutrinos such good tools for astronomers is that they almost never interact with other matter, so they zip through anything in their path — from the vacuum of space to stars and planets. In fact, trillions of them pass through your body every second. And they’re not deflected by magnetic fields — they fly straight on through space. That makes it easy to track where they came from. Or it would if they were easy to detect. Since they seldom interact with normal matter, it’s hard to catch them. It takes special detectors, built underground or underwater. And even with almost countless neutrinos passing through it, a detector might catch a single neutrino every few hours or even days. But scientists want to catch a lot of them because they can reveal details about the reactions that power stars, and about the nature of matter itself. One of the biggest detectors yet is under construction in a gold mine in South Dakota. More about that tomorrow.   Script by Damond Benningfield  Keywords: Nuclear FusionSubatomic ParticlesTelescopes and Modern ObservatoriesStarDate: Wednesday, November 8, 2017Teaser: Zipping through the universe[...]



Tau Ceti

Wed, 08 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Tau Ceti, the nearest Sun-like star, is in Cetus, the whale. The constellation is low in the southeast in early evening. The faint star, which is just 12 light-years away, is barely visible to the unaided eye.




Marie Curie

Tue, 07 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Here’s a trivia question for you: Who was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes? It’s not Albert Einstein — he received only one. Instead, it was Marie Curie. She was also the first woman to win the prize, and is still the only person to win in two different scientific categories. She was born 150 years ago today, in Warsaw, as Maria Sklodowska. As a schoolgirl, she showed an aptitude for science. Women weren’t allowed in Polish universities, though, so she attended a clandestine university. Later, she studied in Paris, where she earned degrees in physics and math. Also in Paris, she married Pierre Curie, a scientist and teacher. They worked together until his death in 1906. Marie was interested in the recent discovery of X-rays. She studied uranium, which produced X-rays. She suggested that the rays came from the uranium atoms. At the time, scientists thought that atoms didn’t change, and couldn’t be split into smaller pieces. Marie’s astounding work showed otherwise. Later, she isolated two previously unknown elements that also produced radiation — a process that took years. In 1903, Marie and Pierre shared the Nobel Prize for physics with another scientist for their studies of X-rays. And in 1911, she alone was awarded the Nobel for chemistry for her discovery of the two elements, polonium and radium. Curie continued her research for many years. Eventually, she died of radiation poisoning — killed by the elements that brought her fame.   Script by Damond Benningfield Keywords: Chemistry of the UniverseHistorical EventsNobel PrizeStarDate: Tuesday, November 7, 2017Teaser: One scientist, two prizes[...]



Andromeda

Tue, 07 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

A faint but famous princess crowns the sky on November evenings. Andromeda is high in the east as night falls, and directly overhead by about 10 p.m. A slightly curved line of three equally bright stars marks the constellation.




Making Gold

Mon, 06 Nov 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Gold and silver are beautiful, but they’re also rare — they account for only a few parts per billion of Earth’s crust. These and other heavy elements, such as uranium and platinum, are so rare because they’re hard to make. They contain many protons and neutrons, and it’s hard to create the conditions needed to make all those particles stick together. Some of these elements may be formed in the titanic explosions known as supernovae. But it takes the right kind of explosion to make these heavy elements. Such blasts don’t appear to be common enough to supply all of these elements that are seen in the universe. So scientists have looked for other possible birthplaces. One possibility is the merger of two neutron stars — the dense, heavy cores of exploded stars. The merger spins off matter, which could stick together to form gold and other heavy elements. A recent study proposed an even more exotic possibility: a small black hole eating a neutron star. The idea says that small black holes were created shortly after the Big Bang. Occasionally, one of them rams into a neutron star and settles in the star’s core. As the black hole devours the surrounding material, the neutron star spins faster. Eventually, it may spin fast enough to sling material from its surface out into space. Some of the material could then stick together to form the nuclei of gold, silver, and other heavy elements: cosmic creation from a cosmic death. Script by Damond Benningfield  Keywords: Big BangBlack HoleChemistry of the UniverseNeutron StarsStarDate: Monday, November 6, 2017Teaser: Making gold in the oddest of places[...]



Cetus

Mon, 06 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Cetus, the whale or sea monster, swims through the eastern evening sky this month. It appears high in the southeast around 9 p.m. Its brightest star, Menkar, forms the monster’s nose, at the constellation’s northeastern corner.