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pubmed: 0196-0644



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Newborn With Scalp Swelling.
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Newborn With Scalp Swelling.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):e93-e94

Authors: Séguin J, Kwan C

PMID: 27894644 [PubMed - in process]




Young Woman With Paraplegia Following a Motor Vehicle Crash.
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Young Woman With Paraplegia Following a Motor Vehicle Crash.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):e91-e92

Authors: de Agustin JA, Gomez de Diego JJ, Olivares Morello DC, Perez de Isla L

PMID: 27894643 [PubMed - in process]




Young Male With Neck Pain.
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Young Male With Neck Pain.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):e89-e90

Authors: Van Aarsen M, Rajakumar C, Thompson D

PMID: 27894642 [PubMed - in process]




Ethical Use of Telemedicine in Emergency Care.
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Ethical Use of Telemedicine in Emergency Care.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):791

Authors:

PMID: 27894641 [PubMed - in process]




In reply.
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In reply.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):788

Authors: Green SM, Schriger DL

PMID: 27894640 [PubMed - in process]




Editorial Oversight of Results Reported in Annals.
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Editorial Oversight of Results Reported in Annals.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):787-788

Authors: Carson MP

PMID: 27894639 [PubMed - in process]




Additional Observations About the Diagnostic Approach to Patients With Headache and Possible Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.
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Additional Observations About the Diagnostic Approach to Patients With Headache and Possible Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):786-787

Authors: Thomas LE, Czuczman AD, Marill KA

PMID: 27894638 [PubMed - in process]




In reply.
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In reply.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):785

Authors: Faust JS

PMID: 27894637 [PubMed - in process]




Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing in Emergency Medicine.
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Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing in Emergency Medicine.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):785-786

Authors: Deal NS, Babber PA, Thaker NG

PMID: 27894636 [PubMed - in process]




Sepsis-3 Definitions.
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Sepsis-3 Definitions.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):784-785

Authors: Gheen N

PMID: 27894635 [PubMed - in process]




A Clinical Decision Rule for Thoracolumbar Spine Imaging in Blunt Trauma?
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A Clinical Decision Rule for Thoracolumbar Spine Imaging in Blunt Trauma?

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):781-783

Authors: Riddell J, Inaba K, Jhun P, Herbert M

PMID: 27894634 [PubMed - in process]




Young Child With Abdominal and Back Pain.
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Young Child With Abdominal and Back Pain.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):780-792

Authors: Lipsett SC, Neuman MI

PMID: 27894633 [PubMed - in process]




Adolescent Male With Knee Pain and Swelling.
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Adolescent Male With Knee Pain and Swelling.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):779-792

Authors: Osborn MF, Cutright A

PMID: 27894632 [PubMed - in process]




Elderly Woman With Altered Mental Status and Hypoxia.
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Elderly Woman With Altered Mental Status and Hypoxia.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):778-789

Authors: Martin RA, Wharton D, Barker C, Haivas CD, Kaur B, Whittle J

PMID: 27894631 [PubMed - in process]




Finding Factors Associated With Post-Emergency Department Morbidity and Mortality in Elderly Patients: Analyzing a Case-Control Study: Answers to the July 2016 Annals of Emergency Medicine Journal Club.
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Finding Factors Associated With Post-Emergency Department Morbidity and Mortality in Elderly Patients: Analyzing a Case-Control Study: Answers to the July 2016 Annals of Emergency Medicine Journal Club.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):772-777

Authors: Garg N, Barrett TW, Schriger DL

PMID: 27894630 [PubMed - in process]




Hello From the Other Side.
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Hello From the Other Side.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):770-771

Authors: Willinsky JL

PMID: 27894629 [PubMed - in process]




The Scab.
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The Scab.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):768-769

Authors: Harris EJ

PMID: 27894628 [PubMed - in process]




Life in Death.
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Life in Death.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):766-767

Authors: Hassaan F, Mian A, Ali SA

PMID: 27894627 [PubMed - in process]




Young Woman With Rash on Left Thigh.
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Young Woman With Rash on Left Thigh.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):696-765

Authors: Karmouta R, Mikailov A, Lorenzo M

PMID: 27894626 [PubMed - in process]




Woman With Lower Back Pain.
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Woman With Lower Back Pain.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):695-728

Authors: Schrepel CP, Condino AE, Vrablik MC, Linnau KF

PMID: 27894625 [PubMed - in process]




Female With Palpitations and Weakness.
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Female With Palpitations and Weakness.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):674-677.e1

Authors: Brady WJ, Mattu A, Cook JO, Tabas J

PMID: 27894624 [PubMed - in process]




Female With Chest Pain and Nausea.
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Female With Chest Pain and Nausea.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec;68(6):671-673

Authors: Brady WJ, Mattu A, Tabas J

PMID: 27894623 [PubMed - in process]




Graph Quality in Top Medical Journals.
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Graph Quality in Top Medical Journals.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Nov 23;:

Authors: Chen JC, Cooper RJ, McMullen ME, Schriger DL

Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Well-designed graphs can portray complex data and relationships in ways that are easier to interpret and understand than text and tables. Previous investigations of reports of clinical research showed that graphs are underused and, when used, often depict summary statistics instead of the data distribution. This descriptive study aims to evaluate the quantity and quality of graphs in the current medical literature across a broad range of better journals.
METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional survey of 10 randomly selected original research articles per journal from the 2012 issues of 20 highly cited journals. We identified which figures were data graphs and limited analysis to a maximum of 5 randomly selected data graphs per article. We then described the graph type, data density, completeness, visual clarity, special features, and dimensionality of each graph in the sample.
RESULTS: We analyzed 342 data graphs published in 20 journals. Our sample had a geometric mean data density index across all graphs of 1.18 data elements/cm(2). More than half (54%) of the data graphs were simple univariate displays such as line or bar graphs. When analyzed by journal, excellence in one domain (completeness, visual clarity, or special features) was not strongly predictive of excellence in the other domains.
CONCLUSION: Despite that graphs can efficiently and effectively convey complex study findings, we found their infrequent use and low data density to be the norm. The majority of graphs were univariate ones that failed to display the overall distribution of data.

PMID: 27889368 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Use or Abuse? A Qualitative Study of Emergency Physicians' Views on Use of Observation Stays at Three Hospitals in the United States and England.
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Use or Abuse? A Qualitative Study of Emergency Physicians' Views on Use of Observation Stays at Three Hospitals in the United States and England.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Nov 23;:

Authors: Martin GP, Wright B, Ahmed A, Banerjee J, Mason S, Roland D

Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence has shown increasing use of observation stays for patients presenting to emergency departments and requiring diagnostic evaluation or time-limited treatment plans, but critics suggest that this expansion arises from hospitals' concerns to maximize revenue and shifts costs to patients. Perspectives of physicians making decisions to admit, observe, or discharge have been absent from the debate. We examine the views of emergency physicians in the United States and England on observation stays, and what influences their decisions to use observation services.
METHODS: We undertook in-depth, qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of physicians in 3 hospitals across the 2 countries and analyzed these using an approach based on the constant-comparison method. Limitations include the number of sites, whose characteristics are not generalizable to all institutions, and the reliance on self-reported interview accounts.
RESULTS: Physicians used observation status for the specific presentations for which it is well evidenced but acknowledged administrative and financial considerations in their decisionmaking. They also highlighted an important role for observation not described in the literature: as a "safe space," relatively immune from the administrative gaze, where diagnostic uncertainties, sociomedical problems, and medicolegal challenges could be contained.
CONCLUSION: Observation status increases the options available to admitting physicians in a way that they valued for its potential benefits to patient safety and quality of care, but some of these have been neglected in the literature to date. Reform to observation status should address these important but previously unacknowledged functions.

PMID: 27889367 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Intranasal Lidocaine in Acute Treatment of Migraine: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
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Intranasal Lidocaine in Acute Treatment of Migraine: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Nov 23;:

Authors: Avcu N, Doğan NÖ, Pekdemir M, Yaka E, Yılmaz S, Alyeşil C, Akalın LE

Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal lidocaine administration for migraine treatment.
METHODS: This single-center, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in a tertiary care emergency department. Included patients met the migraine criteria of the International Headache Society. Patients were randomized to intranasal lidocaine or saline solution; all participants received 10 mg of intravenous metoclopramide. Patient pain intensity was assessed with an 11-point numeric rating scale score. The primary outcome measure was the change in pain scores at 15 minutes; secondary outcomes were changes in pain intensity after pain onset and need for rescue medication.
RESULTS: Patients (n=162) were randomized into 2 groups with similar baseline migraine characteristics and numeric rating scale scores. The median reduction in numeric rating scale score at 15 minutes was 3 (interquartile range [IQR] 2 to 5) for the lidocaine group and 2 (IQR 1 to 4) for the saline solution group (median difference=1.0; 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 2.1). The reduction in pain score at 30 minutes was 4 (IQR 3 to 7) for the lidocaine group and 5 (IQR 2 to 7) for the saline solution group (median difference=1.0; 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 2.1). Need for rescue medication did not differ between the groups, and local irritation was the most common adverse event in the lidocaine group.
CONCLUSION: Although intranasal lidocaine was found no more efficacious than normal saline solution in our study, future studies should focus on patients who present earlier after headache onset.

PMID: 27889366 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]