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Symptom Severity Classification with Gradient Tree Boosting.
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Symptom Severity Classification with Gradient Tree Boosting.

J Biomed Inform. 2017 May 22;:

Authors: Liu Y, Gu Y, Nguyen JC, Li H, Zhang J, Gao Y, Huang Y

Abstract
In this paper, we present our system as submitted in the CEGS N-GRID 2016 task 2 RDoC classification competition. The task was to determine symptom severity (0-3) in a domain for a patient based on the text provided in his/her initial psychiatric evaluation. We first preprocessed the psychiatry notes into a semi-structured questionnaire and transformed the short answers into either numerical, binary, or categorical features. We further trained weak Support Vector Regressors (SVR) for each verbose answer and combined regressors' output with other features to feed into the final gradient tree boosting classifier with resampling of individual notes. Our best submission achieved a macro-averaged Mean Absolute Error of 0.439, which translates to a normalized score of 81.75%.

PMID: 28545836 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




OmniPHR: A Distributed Architecture Model to Integrate Personal Health Records.
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OmniPHR: A Distributed Architecture Model to Integrate Personal Health Records.

J Biomed Inform. 2017 May 22;:

Authors: Roehrs A, da Costa CA, Rosa Righi RD

Abstract
The advances in the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) brought many benefits to the healthcare area, specially to digital storage of patients' health records. However, it is still a challenge to have a unified viewpoint of patients' health history, because typically health data is scattered among different health organizations. Furthermore, there are several standards for these records, some of them open and others proprietary. Usually health records are stored in databases within health organizations and rarely have external access. This situation applies mainly to cases where patients' data are maintained by healthcare providers, known as EHRs (Electronic Health Records). In case of PHRs (Personal Health Records), in which patients by definition can manage their health records, they usually have no control over their data stored in healthcare providers' databases. Thereby, we envision two main challenges regarding PHR context: first, how patients could have a unified view of their scattered health records, and second, how healthcare providers can access up-to-date data regarding their patients, even though changes occurred elsewhere. For addressing these issues, this work proposes a model named OmniPHR, a distributed model to integrate PHRs, for patients and healthcare providers use. The scientific contribution is to propose an architecture model to support a distributed PHR, where patients can maintain their health history in an unified viewpoint, from any device anywhere. Likewise, for healthcare providers, the possibility of having their patients data interconnected among health organizations. The evaluation demonstrates the feasibility of the model in maintaining health records distributed in an architecture model that promotes a unified view of PHR with elasticity and scalability of the solution.

PMID: 28545835 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Enhancing Requirements Engineering for Patient Registry Software Systems with Evidence-based Components.
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Enhancing Requirements Engineering for Patient Registry Software Systems with Evidence-based Components.

J Biomed Inform. 2017 May 20;:

Authors: Lindoerfer D, Mansmann U

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Patient registries are instrumental for medical research. Often their structures are complex and their implementations use composite software systems to meet the wide spectrum of challenges. Commercial and open-source systems are available for registry implementation, but many research groups develop their own systems. Methodological approaches in the selection of software as well as the construction of proprietary systems are needed. We propose an evidence-based checklist, summarizing essential items for patient registry software systems (CIPROS), to accelerate the requirements engineering process.
METHODS: Requirements engineering activities for software systems follow traditional software requirements elicitation methods, general software requirements specification (SRS) templates, and standards. We performed a multistep procedure to develop a specific evidence-based CIPROS checklist: (1) A systematic literature review to build a comprehensive collection of technical concepts, (2) a qualitative content analysis to define a catalogue of relevant criteria, and (3) a checklist to construct a minimal appraisal standard.
RESULTS: CIPROS is based on 64 publications and covers twelve sections with a total of 72 items. CIPROS also defines software requirements. Comparing CIPROS with traditional software requirements elicitation methods, SRS templates and standards show a broad consensus but differences in issues regarding registry-specific aspects.
DISCUSSION: Using an evidence-based approach to requirements engineering for registry software adds aspects to the traditional methods and accelerates the software engineering process for registry software. The method we used to construct CIPROS serves as a potential template for creating evidence-based checklists in other fields.
CONCLUSION: The CIPROS list supports developers in assessing requirements for existing systems and formulating requirements for their own systems, while strengthening the reporting of patient registry software system descriptions. It may be a first step to create standards for patient registry software system assessments.

PMID: 28536063 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




A Systematic Review of Gamification in e-Health.
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A Systematic Review of Gamification in e-Health.

J Biomed Inform. 2017 May 20;:

Authors: Sardi L, Idri A, Luis Fernández-Alemán J

Abstract
Gamification is a relatively new trend that focuses on applying game mechanics to non-game contexts in order to engage audiences and to inject a little fun into mundane activities besides generating motivational and cognitive benefits. While many fields such as Business, Marketing and e-Learning have taken advantage of the potential of gamification, the digital healthcare domain has also started to exploit this emerging trend. This paper aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding gamified e-Health applications. A systematic literature review was therefore conducted to explore the various gamification strategies employed in e-Health and to address the benefits and the pitfalls of this emerging discipline. A total of 46 studies from multiple sources were then considered and thoroughly investigated. The results show that the majority of the papers selected reported gamification and serious gaming in health and wellness contexts related specifically to chronic disease rehabilitation, physical activity and mental health. Although gamification in e-Health has attracted a great deal of attention during the last few years, there is still a dearth of valid empirical evidence in this field. Moreover, most of the e-Health applications and serious games investigated have been proven to yield solely short-term engagement through extrinsic rewards. For gamification to reach its full potential, it is therefore necessary to build e-Health solutions on well-founded theories that exploit the core experience and psychological effects of game mechanics.

PMID: 28536062 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




3D Interactive Surgical Visualization System using Mobile Spatial Information Acquisition and Autostereoscopic Display.
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3D Interactive Surgical Visualization System using Mobile Spatial Information Acquisition and Autostereoscopic Display.

J Biomed Inform. 2017 May 19;:

Authors: Fan Z, Weng Y, Chen G, Liao H

Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of preoperative and intraoperative medical information becomes more and more important in minimally invasive surgery. We develop a 3D interactive surgical visualization system using mobile spatial information acquisition and autostereoscopic display for surgeons to observe surgical target intuitively. The spatial information of regions of interest (ROIs) is captured by the mobile device and transferred to a server for further image processing. Triangular patches of intraoperative data with texture are calculated with a dimension-reduced triangulation algorithm and a projection-weighted mapping algorithm. A point cloud selection-based warm-start iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm is also developed for fusion of the reconstructed 3D intraoperative image and the preoperative image. The fusion images are rendered for 3D autostereoscopic display using integral videography (IV) technology. Moreover, 3D visualization of medical image corresponding to observer's viewing direction is updated automatically using mutual information registration method. Experimental results show that the spatial position error between the IV-based 3D autostereoscopic fusion image and the actual object was 0.38±0.92 mm (n=5). The system can be utilized in telemedicine, operating education, surgical planning, navigation, etc. to acquire spatial information conveniently and display surgical information intuitively.

PMID: 28533140 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Examining Daily Activity Routines of Older Adults Using Workflow.
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Examining Daily Activity Routines of Older Adults Using Workflow.

J Biomed Inform. 2017 May 18;:

Authors: Chung J, Ozkaynak M, Demiris G

Abstract
We evaluated the value of workflow analysis supported by a novel visualization technique to better understand the daily routines of older adults and highlight their patterns of daily activities and normal variability in physical functions. We used a self-reported activity diary to obtain data from six community-dwelling older adults for 14 consecutive days. Workflow for daily routine was analyzed using the EventFlow tool, which aggregates workflow information to highlight patterns and variabilities. A total of 1453 events were included in the data analysis. To demonstrate the patterns and variability of each individual's daily activities, participant activity workflows were visualized and compared. The workflow analysis revealed great variability in activity types, regularity, frequency, duration, and timing of performing certain activities across individuals. Also, when workflow approach was applied to spatial information of activities, the analysis revealed the ability to provide meaningful data on individuals' mobility in different levels of life spaces from home to community. Results suggest that using workflows to characterize the daily activities of older adults will be helpful for clinicians and researchers in understanding their daily routines and preparing education and prevention strategies tailored to each individual's activity level. This tool also has the potential to be integrated into consumer informatics technologies, such as patient portals or personal health records, so that consumers may be encouraged to become actively involved in monitoring and managing their health.

PMID: 28529189 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]