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Preview: pubmed: "Journal of Athletic...

pubmed: "Journal of Athletic...



NCBI: db=pubmed; Term="Journal of Athletic Training"[JOUR]



 



Airway Management in Athletes Wearing Lacrosse Equipment.

Airway Management in Athletes Wearing Lacrosse Equipment.

J Athl Train. 2018 Feb 08;:

Authors: Bowman TG, Boergers RJ, Lininger MR

Abstract
CONTEXT:   Patient ventilation volume and rate have been found to be compromised due to the inability to seal a pocket mask over the chinstrap of football helmets. The effects of supraglottic airway devices such as the King LT and of lacrosse helmets on these measures have not been studied.
OBJECTIVE:   To assess the effects of different airway management devices and helmet conditions on producing quality ventilations while performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation on simulation manikins.
DESIGN:   Crossover study.
SETTING:   Simulation laboratory.
PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:   Thirty-six athletic trainers (12 men and 24 women) completed this study.
INTERVENTION(S):   Airway-management device (PM = pocket mask, OPA = oral pharyngeal airway, KA = King LT airway) and helmet condition (NH = no helmet, CH = Cascade helmet, SH = Schutt helmet, WH = Warrior helmet) served as the independent variables. Participant pairs performed 2 minutes of 2-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation\s under 12 trial conditions.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):   Ventilation volume (mL), ventilation rate (ventilations/min), rating of perceived difficulty (RPD), and percentage of quality ventilations were the dependent variables.
RESULTS:   A significant interaction was found between type of airway-management device and helmet condition on ventilation volume and rate ( F12,408 = 2.902, P < .0001). In addition, a significant interaction was noted between airway-management device and helmet condition on RPD scores ( F6,204 = 3.366, P = .003). The NH condition produced a higher percentage of quality ventilations compared with the helmet conditions ( P ≤ .003). Also, the percentage of quality ventilations differed, and the KA outperformed each of the other devices ( P ≤ .029).
CONCLUSIONS:   The helmet chinstrap inhibited quality ventilation (rate and volume) in airway procedures that required the mask to be sealed on the face. However, the KA allowed quality ventilation in patients wearing a helmet with the chinstrap fastened. If a KA is not available, the helmet may need to be removed to provide quality ventilations.

PMID: 29420059 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Athletic Training Student Core Competency Implementation During Patient Encounters.

Athletic Training Student Core Competency Implementation During Patient Encounters.

J Athl Train. 2018 Feb 08;:

Authors: Cavallario JM, Van Lunen BL, Hoch JM, Hoch M, Manspeaker SA, Pribesh SL

Abstract
CONTEXT:   Health care research evidence suggests that early patient encounters (PEs), as well as the purposeful implementation of professional core competencies (CCs), for athletic training students (ATSs) may be beneficial to their ability to provide care. However, no investigators have related facets of the clinical education experience with CC implementation as a form of summative assessment of the clinical experience.
OBJECTIVE:   To determine the relationship between the frequency and length of PEs, as well as the student's role and clinical site during PEs, and the students' perceived CC implementation during these encounters.
DESIGN:   Cross-sectional study.
SETTING:   Professional athletic training program, National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I institution.
PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:   We purposefully recruited 1 athletic training program that used E*Value software; 40 participants (31 females, 9 males) enrolled in the professional phase (12 first year, 14 second year, 14 third year) participated.
INTERVENTION(S):   Participants viewed a 20-minute recorded CC educational module followed by educational handouts, which were also posted online for reference throughout the semester. The E*Value software was used to track Pes, including the type of encounter (ie, actual patient, practice encounter, didactic practice scenario), the type of site where the encounter occurred (university, high school), and the participant's role (observed, assisted, performed), as well as responses to an added block of questions indicating which, if any, of the CCs were implemented during the PE.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):   Variables per patient were PE length (minutes), participant role, site at which the encounter occurred, and whether any of the 6 CCs were implemented ( yes/ no). Variables per participant were average encounter length (minutes), encounter frequency, modal role, clinical site assignment, and the number of times each CC was implemented. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were used to examine the relationships between role or clinical site and implementation of total number of CCs. Multiple linear regressions were used to determine how the average length and frequency of PEs were related to the average and total number of implemented CCs. Binary logistic regression models indicated how the length of each encounter, role of the participant, and type of clinical site related to the implementation of each CC.
RESULTS:   The roles of participants during PEs were related to their ability to implement the total number of CCs ( F = 103.48, P < .001). Those who observed were likely to implement fewer total CCs than those who assisted (M diff = -0.29, P < .001); those who assisted were likely to implement more total CCs than those who performed (M diff = 0.32, P < .001). Frequency of encounters was the only significant variable in the model examining all independent variables with CC implementation ( b4,32 = 3.34, t = 9.46, P < .001).
CONCLUSIONS:   The role of the student, namely assisting during PEs and the volume of PEs should be considered a priority for students to promote greater CC implementation.

PMID: 29420058 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]