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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term="Journal of Athletic Training"[JOUR]



 



Injuries in Japanese Junior Soccer Players During Games and Practices.

Injuries in Japanese Junior Soccer Players During Games and Practices.

J Athl Train. 2017 Dec 11;:

Authors: Kuzuhara K, Shibata M, Uchida R

Abstract
CONTEXT:   Soccer is the most popular junior sport in the world. In junior sports, injury analysis and injury-prevention measures for players, especially those under 12 years of age, are urgently needed.
OBJECTIVE:   To prospectively study the incidence, sites, types, and mechanisms of injuries in elementary school-aged junior soccer players during games and practices.
DESIGN:   Descriptive epidemiology study.
SETTING:   Elementary school-aged junior soccer teams in Nagoya, Japan.
PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:   Eighty-nine players in 5 community-based club teams of junior soccer (U-12, age range =11-12 years; U-11, age range =10-11 years; U-10, age ≤10 years).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):   Data on all game and practice injuries for the 2013-2014 season were collected using an injury report form. Injury rates were calculated according to injury site, type, and mechanism.
RESULTS:   The overall injury rate was 2.59/1000 athlete-hours (AHs). The game injury rate (GIR; 6.43/1000 AHs) was higher than the practice injury rate (PIR; 1.49/1000 AHs; P < .05). The most common anatomical areas of injury during games and practices were the lower limbs (62.5% and 4.02/1000 AHs versus 38.5% and 0.57/1000 AHs, respectively). Contusions (27.6%, n = 8) were the most frequent type of overall injuries. Most game injuries resulted from body contact (43.8%, 2.81/1000 AHs), wherease most practice injuries resulted from other types of contact (53.8%, 0.83/1000 AHs).
CONCLUSIONS:   The GIRs were higher than the PIRs in Japanese junior soccer players. A lower overall PIR suggested that players in the U-12 age group practiced under appropriate conditions. However, the higher GIR in this age category needs to be decreased.

PMID: 29227731 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Physical and Performance Characteristics Related to Unintentional Musculoskeletal Injury in Special Forces Operators: A Prospective Analysis.

Physical and Performance Characteristics Related to Unintentional Musculoskeletal Injury in Special Forces Operators: A Prospective Analysis.

J Athl Train. 2017 Dec 11;:

Authors: Heebner NR, Abt JP, Lovalekar M, Beals K, Sell TC, Morgan J, Kane S, Lephart S

Abstract
CONTEXT:   Seventy-seven percent of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by United States Army Special Forces Operators are preventable. Identification of predictive characteristics will promote the development of screening methods to augment injury-prevention programs.
OBJECTIVE:   To determine physical and performance characteristics that predict musculoskeletal injuries.
SETTING:   Clinical laboratory.
PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:   A total of 95 Operators (age = 32.7 ± 5.1 years, height = 179.8 ± 6.9 cm, mass = 89.9 ± 12.7 kg).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):   Laboratory testing consisted of body composition, aerobic and anaerobic capacity, upper and lower body strength and flexibility, balance, and biomechanical evaluation. Injury data were captured for 12 months after laboratory testing. Injury frequencies, cross-tabulations, and relative risks (RRs) were calculated to evaluate the relationships between physical characteristics and injury proportions. Between-groups differences (injured versus uninjured) were assessed using appropriate student t tests or Mann-Whitney U tests.
RESULTS:   Less shoulder-retraction strength (RR = 1.741 [95% confidence interval = 1.003, 3.021]), knee-extension strength (RR = 2.029 [95% confidence interval = 1.011, 4.075]), and a smaller trunk extension : flexion ratio (RR = 0.533 [95% confidence interval = 0.341, 0.831]) were significant risk factors for injury. Group comparisons showed less trunk strength (extension: P = .036, flexion: P = .048) and smaller right vertical ground reaction forces during landing (P = .025) in injured Operators. Knee strength, aerobic capacity, and body mass index were less in the subgroup of spine-injured versus uninjured Operators (P values = .013-.036).
CONCLUSIONS:   Knee-extension and shoulder-retraction strength were risk factors for musculoskeletal injury in Operators. Less trunk-flexion and -extension strength, higher body mass index, lower aerobic capacity, and increased ground reaction forces during landing were characteristics that may also contribute to musculoskeletal injury. Having 2 or more risk factors resulted in a greater injury proportion (χ2 = 13.512, P = .015); however, more research is needed. Athletic trainers working in the military or similar high-demand settings can use these data to augment screening and injury-prevention protocols.

PMID: 29227730 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]