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Preview: pubmed: "Journal of Athletic...

pubmed: "Journal of Athletic...



NCBI: db=pubmed; Term="Journal of Athletic Training"[JOUR]



 



Table of Contents.

Table of Contents.

J Athl Train. 2017 Jul;52(7):627-628

Authors:

PMID: 28722492 [PubMed - in process]




Comparative Effectiveness of Plantar-Massage Techniques on Postural Control in Those With Chronic Ankle Instability.

Comparative Effectiveness of Plantar-Massage Techniques on Postural Control in Those With Chronic Ankle Instability.

J Athl Train. 2017 Jul;52(7):629-635

Authors: Wikstrom EA, Song K, Lea A, Brown N

Abstract
CONTEXT:   One of the major concerns after an acute lateral ankle sprain is the potential for development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). The existing research has determined that clinician-delivered plantar massage improves postural control in those with CAI. However, the effectiveness of self-administered treatments and the underlying cause of any improvements remain unclear.
OBJECTIVES:   To determine (1) the effectiveness of a self-administered plantar-massage treatment in those with CAI and (2) whether the postural-control improvements were due to the stimulation of the plantar cutaneous receptors.
DESIGN:   Crossover study.
SETTING:   University setting.
PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:   A total of 20 physically active individuals (6 men and 14 women) with self-reported CAI.
INTERVENTION(S):   All participants completed 3 test sessions involving 3 treatments: a clinician-delivered manual plantar massage, a patient-delivered self-massage with a ball, and a clinician-delivered sensory brush massage.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):   Postural control was assessed using single-legged balance with eyes open and the Star Excursion Balance Test.
RESULTS:   Static postural control improved (P ≤ .014) after each of the interventions. However, no changes in dynamic postural control after any of the interventions were observed (P > .05). No differences were observed between a clinician-delivered manual plantar massage and either a patient-delivered self-massage with a ball or a clinician-delivered sensory brush massage in any postural-control outcome.
CONCLUSIONS:   In those with CAI, single 5-minute sessions of traditional plantar massage, self-administered massage, and sensory brush massage each resulted in comparable static postural-control improvements. The results also provide empirical evidence suggesting that the mechanism for the postural-control improvements is the stimulation of the plantar cutaneous receptors.

PMID: 28722491 [PubMed - in process]




Masthead.

Masthead.

J Athl Train. 2017 Jul;52(7):625-626

Authors:

PMID: 28722490 [PubMed - in process]




Evaluating the Recovery Curve for Clinically Assessed Reaction Time After Concussion.

Evaluating the Recovery Curve for Clinically Assessed Reaction Time After Concussion.

J Athl Train. 2017 Jul 19;:

Authors: Del Rossi G

Abstract
CONTEXT:   A change in reaction time is one of various clinical measures of neurocognitive function that can be monitored after concussion and has been reported to be among the most sensitive indicators of cognitive impairment.
OBJECTIVE:   To determine the timeline for clinically assessed simple reaction time to return to baseline after a concussion in high school athletes.
DESIGN:   Observational study.
SETTING:   Athletic training room.
PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:   Twenty-one high school-aged volunteers.
INTERVENTION(S):   Participants completed 8 trials of the ruler-drop test during each session. Along with baseline measures, a total of 6 additional test sessions were completed over the course of 4 weeks after a concussion (days 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):   The mean reaction times calculated for all participants from each of the 7 test sessions were analyzed to assess the change in reaction time over the 7 time intervals.
RESULTS:   After a concussion and compared with baseline, simple reaction time was, on average, 26 milliseconds slower at 48 to 72 hours postinjury (P < .001), almost 18 milliseconds slower on day 7 (P < .001), and about 9 milliseconds slower on day 10 (P < .001). Simple reaction time did not return to baseline levels until day 14 postinjury.
CONCLUSIONS:   Clinically assessed simple reaction time appeared to return to baseline levels within a timeframe that mirrors other measures of cognitive performance (approximately 14 days).

PMID: 28722468 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




The Influence of Lower Extremity Lean Mass on Landing Biomechanics During Prolonged Exercise.

The Influence of Lower Extremity Lean Mass on Landing Biomechanics During Prolonged Exercise.

J Athl Train. 2017 Jul 19;:

Authors: Montgomery MM, Tritsch AJ, Cone JR, Schmitz RJ, Henson R, Shultz SJ

Abstract
CONTEXT:   The extent to which lower extremity lean mass (LELM) relative to total body mass influences one's ability to maintain safe landing biomechanics during prolonged exercise when injury incidence increases is unknown.
OBJECTIVES:   To examine the influence of LELM on (1) pre-exercise lower extremity biomechanics and (2) changes in biomechanics during an intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) and (3) determine whether these relationships differ by sex. We hypothesized that less LELM would predict higher-risk baseline biomechanics and greater changes toward higher-risk biomechanics during the IEP.
DESIGN:   Cohort study.
SETTING:   Controlled laboratory.
PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:   A total of 59 athletes (30 men: age = 20.3 ± 2.0 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.05 m, mass = 75.2 ± 7.2 kg; and 29 women: age = 20.6 ± 2.3 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.08 m, mass = 61.8 ± 9.0 kg) participated.
INTERVENTION(S):   Before completing an individualized 90-minute IEP designed to mimic a soccer match, participants underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry testing for LELM.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):   Three-dimensional lower extremity biomechanics were measured during drop-jump landings before the IEP and every 15 minutes thereafter. A previously reported principal components analysis reduced 40 biomechanical variables to 11 factors. Hierarchical linear modeling analysis then determined the extent to which sex and LELM predicted the baseline score and the change in each factor over time.
RESULTS:   Lower extremity lean mass did not influence baseline biomechanics or the changes over time. Sex influenced the biomechanical factor representing knee loading at baseline (P = .04) and the changes in the anterior cruciate ligament-loading factor over time (P = .03). The LELM had an additional influence only on women who possessed less LELM (P = .03 and .02, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS:   Lower extremity lean mass influenced knee loading during landing in women but not in men. The effect appeared to be stronger in women with less LELM. Continually decreasing knee loading over time may reflect a strategy chosen to avoid injury. A minimal threshold of LELM may be needed to safely perform landing maneuvers, especially during prolonged exercise when the injury risk increases.

PMID: 28722467 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]