Subscribe: pubmed: "Journal of Athletic...
http://eutils.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/erss.cgi?rss_guid=0Jx1ow1Uw9OpX9Lc13I27fNgjTqOko9FEESaGlcb301
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
age stage  age  care  groups  knee valgus  knee  phv  pre phv  property radius  radius care  radius  schools  stage maturation  valgus   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: pubmed: "Journal of Athletic...

pubmed: "Journal of Athletic...



NCBI: db=pubmed; Term="Journal of Athletic Training"[JOUR]



 



Landing Kinematics in Elite Male Youth Soccer Players of Different Chronologic Age and Stage of Maturation.

Landing Kinematics in Elite Male Youth Soccer Players of Different Chronologic Age and Stage of Maturation.

J Athl Train. 2018 Apr 25;:

Authors: Read PJ, Oliver JL, De Ste Croix MBA, Myer GD, Lloyd RS

Abstract
CONTEXT:   Despite the high frequency of knee injuries in athletes, few researchers have studied the effects of chronologic age and stage of maturation on knee-joint kinematics in male youth soccer players.
OBJECTIVE:   To use a coach-friendly screening tool to examine knee-valgus scores for players of different ages and at different stages of maturation.
DESIGN:   Cross-sectional study.
SETTING:   Academy soccer clubs.
PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:   A total of 400 elite male youth soccer players aged 10 to 18 years categorized by chronologic age and stage of maturation based on their years from peak height velocity (PHV).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):   Knee valgus was evaluated during the tuck-jump assessment via 2-dimensional analysis. Frontal-plane projection angles were subjectively classified as minor (<10°), moderate (10°-20°), or severe (>20°), and using these classifications, we scored knee valgus in the tuck jump as 0 ( no valgus), 1 ( minor), 2 ( moderate), or 3 ( severe).
RESULTS:   A trend toward higher valgus scores was observed in the younger age groups and the pre-PHV group. The lowest frequency of no valgus occurred in the U18 and post-PHV groups. The highest percentages of severe scores were in the U13 and pre-PHV groups for the right limb. Knee-valgus scores were lower for both lower extremities in the U18 group than in all other age groups ( P < .001) except the U16 group. Scores were lower for the post-PHV than the pre-PHV group for the right limb ( P < .001) and both pre-PHV and circa-PHV groups for the left limb ( P < .001). Noteworthy interlimb asymmetries were evident in the U14, U15, and circa-PHV groups.
CONCLUSIONS:   Reductions in knee valgus with incremental age and during the later stages of maturation indicated that this risk factor was more prevalent in younger players. Interlimb asymmetry may also emerge around the time of the peak growth spurt and early adolescence, potentially increasing the risk of traumatic injury.

PMID: 29693423 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Radius of Care in Secondary Schools in the Midwest: Are Automated External Defibrillators Sufficiently Accessible to Enable Optimal Patient Care?

Radius of Care in Secondary Schools in the Midwest: Are Automated External Defibrillators Sufficiently Accessible to Enable Optimal Patient Care?

J Athl Train. 2018 Apr 25;:

Authors: Osterman M, Claiborne T, Liberi V

Abstract
CONTEXT:   Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death among young athletes. According to the American Heart Association, an automated external defibrillator (AED) should be available within a 1- to 1.5-minute brisk walk from the patient for the highest chance of survival. Secondary school personnel have reported a lack of understanding about the proper number and placement of AEDs for optimal patient care.
OBJECTIVE:   To determine whether fixed AEDs were located within a 1- to 1.5-minute timeframe from any location on secondary school property (ie, radius of care).
DESIGN:   Cross-sectional study.
SETTING:   Public and private secondary schools in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan.
PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:   Thirty schools (24 public, 6 private) volunteered.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:   Global positioning system coordinates were used to survey the entire school properties and determine AED locations. From each AED location, the radius of care was calculated for 3 retrieval speeds: walking, jogging, and driving a utility vehicle. Data were analyzed to expose any property area that fell outside the radius of care.
RESULTS:   Public schools (37.1% ± 11.0%) possessed more property outside the radius of care than did private schools (23.8% ± 8.0%; F1,28 = 8.35, P = .01). After accounting for retrieval speed, we still observed differences between school types when personnel would need to walk or jog to retrieve an AED ( F1.48,41.35 = 4.99, P = .02). The percentages of school property outside the radius of care for public and private schools were 72.6% and 56.3%, respectively, when walking and 34.4% and 12.2%, respectively, when jogging. Only 4.2% of the public and none of the private schools had property outside the radius of care when driving a utility vehicle.
CONCLUSION:   Schools should strategically place AEDs to decrease the percentage of property area outside the radius of care. In some cases, placement in a centralized location that is publicly accessible may be more important than the overall number of AEDs on site.

PMID: 29693422 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]