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pubmed: 0002-9165



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Inflammatory potential of the diet and colorectal tumor risk in persons with Lynch syndrome.
Related Articles

Inflammatory potential of the diet and colorectal tumor risk in persons with Lynch syndrome.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Sep 20;:

Authors: Brouwer JG, Makama M, van Woudenbergh GJ, Vasen HF, Nagengast FM, Kleibeuker JH, Kampman E, van Duijnhoven FJ

Abstract
Background: Persons with Lynch syndrome (LS) have high lifetime risk of developing colorectal tumors (CRTs) because of a germline mutation in one of their mismatch repair (MMR) genes. An important process in the development of CRTs is inflammation, which has been shown to be modulated by diet.Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and the risk of CRTs in persons with LS.Design: We used the dietary intake of 457 persons with LS from a prospective cohort study to calculate the adapted dietary inflammatory index (ADII). The ADII was split into tertiles in which the highest tertile reflects the most proinflammatory potential of the diet. Cox proportional hazard models, with robust sandwich variance estimates to adjust for dependency within families, were used to calculate HRs and 95% CIs of CRTs by ADII tertile. HRs were adjusted for age, smoking status, and education level, and number of colonoscopies as a time-dependent variable. A potential effect measure modification was explored by stratifying the results by mutated MMR gene, sex, and a history of CRTs. We performed sensitivity analyses by repeating the analyses in non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) users (n = 315).Results: During a median follow-up time of 59 mo, 200 participants (43.8%) developed CRTs. No significant association was shown between highest compared with lowest ADII tertiles (HR for highest compared with lowest tertiles: 1.37; 95% CI: 0.80, 2.34). Stratification by mutated MMR gene, sex, and CRT history did not show significantly differential associations (P-interactions ≥ 0.64). In non-NSAID users, an HR of 1.60 (95% CI: 0.88, 2.93) for highest compared with lowest tertiles was shown. No significant effect modification was shown in this group either (P-interactions ≥ 0.24).Conclusion: A proinflammatory potential of the diet does not seem to be significantly associated with CRT risk in persons with LS.

PMID: 28931533 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Genetic variation of habitual coffee consumption and glycemic changes in response to weight-loss diet intervention: the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST) trial.
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Genetic variation of habitual coffee consumption and glycemic changes in response to weight-loss diet intervention: the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST) trial.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Sep 20;:

Authors: Han L, Ma W, Sun D, Heianza Y, Wang T, Zheng Y, Huang T, Duan D, Bray JGA, Champagne CM, Sacks FM, Qi L

Abstract
Background: Coffee consumption has been associated with glucose metabolism and risk of type 2 diabetes.Objective: We examined whether the genetic variation determining habitual coffee consumption affected glycemic changes in response to weight-loss dietary intervention.Design: A genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated based on 8 habitual coffee consumption-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms. We used general linear models to test changes in glycemic traits in groups randomly assigned to high- and low-fat diets according to tertiles of the GRS.Results: We observed significant interactions between the GRS and low compared with high dietary fat intake on 6-mo changes in fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P-interaction = 0.023 and 0.022, respectively), adjusting for age, sex, race, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, seasonal variation, and baseline values of the respective outcomes. Participants with a higher GRS of habitual coffee consumption showed a greater reduction in fasting insulin and a marginally greater decrease in HOMA-IR in the low-fat diet intervention group.Conclusions: Our data suggest that participants with genetically determined high coffee consumption may benefit more by eating a low-fat diet in improving fasting insulin and HOMA-IR in a short term. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00072995 and NCT03258203.

PMID: 28931532 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]