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Last Build Date: Thu, 22 Feb 2018 09:24:47 +0000

 



Steve Flowers on Harry Truman

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 19:36:11 +0000

Many of ya'll have heard of the famous story surrounding Harry Truman; ya'll have heard of the mistaken newspaper headline "Dewey defeats Truman" - that's when the Chicago Daily Tribune incorrectly reported that Thomas Dewey had beaten Harry Truman in 1948 for the White House...


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/truman_2018_02212018_flowers_36850_news.mp3




Pet Dental Health Month 2018

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 14:45:00 +0000

Poor dental health for your pet can lead to gingivitis or periodontal disease, common dental issues for your best friend. It is estimated that most pets show signs of periodontal disease as early as three years old. Regular checkups and good dental care can help to insure that your pet stays healthy, and keep you both smiling, **********************


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/SpeakingOfPets_20180217_36800.MP3




Dueling Holidays: MLK's Legacy and Robert E. Lee

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 17:59:47 +0000

Next month marks fifty years since the death of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Junior. All month long, the APR news team is looking at King’s work and impact here in Alabama. Each year, America honors King on the third Monday in January. The nation takes a day off work and school to remember his accomplishments. Alabama is one of only two states that also celebrates another man on the same day as Dr. King. “He asked a question: why do we celebrate Robert E. Lee’s birthday?” That’s Carl Jones. He’s speaking at the Sons of Confederate Veterans’ Robert E. Lee celebration. “Well if Lee’s birthday is not worthy of celebration, apart from Jesus Christ, I don’t know whose is.” Jones and his supporters all gathered in the auditorium at the state archives building in Montgomery. Men in grey confederate uniforms sit side by side with men in motorcycle jackets and women dressed in their Sunday best. The mood moves between celebration and the sense that a grand cause is under attack.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/mlk_for_web.mp3




Steve Flowers on Congressman Carl Elliott

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 17:43:27 +0000

Some of you folks in Northwest Alabama, around Jasper, may remember Carl Elliott; he was one of our most progressive Democratic Congressmen...


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/carl_elliott_02142018_flowers_36850_news.mp3




Steve Flowers on Mobile 1st Congressional District

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 17:33:31 +0000

The Mobile First Congressional District has had quite a legacy over the last century. Alabama's first district has always been primarily made up in Mobile County...


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/first_district_02072018_flowers_36850_news.mp3




Best Student Feature: "The High Cost of Sugar"-- Miranda Fulmore

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 21:11:39 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for the Best Student Radio Feature titled “The High Cost of Sugar,” by APR student intern Miranda Fulmore. The University of Alabama is ranked ninth in the nation for “sugar babies,” which are young women and men who seek cash from “sugar daddies,” or “sugar mamas,” often on websites that provide opportunities to “link up.” Sometimes this money is sought to pay off college costs, while others use these dollars to support a preferred lifestyle. Miranda brought this story to my attention and asked to pursue it. On her own initiative, Fulmore arranged interviews with female students who created financial relationships as “sugar babies.” One young woman felt it was an easy way to make money. Another used her “sugaring” payments to pay college costs not covered by the “GI bill” from her military service. Miranda also went to an Atlanta winery where young women received tips from staff members of the website “Seeking Arrangement.” Fulmore


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2017/12/hearst_entry_miranda_fulmore_for_web.mp3




Best News feature-- Alabama Midwives Wait In The Shadows

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 20:19:48 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for best radio feature, titled “Alabama Midwives Wait In the Shadows.” Since 1975, the practice of midwifery has been outlawed in Alabama, with violators facing fines or jail time. This, despite the fact Alabama has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the nation, and only sixteen of the state’s fifty four rural counties have hospitals that can deliver a baby. Some midwives continue to practice illegally with families that travel to Tennessee, Florida, or Mississippi to give birth. Alabama Public Radio networked with midwife support groups for three months to gain their confidence and arrange the opportunity to go “behind the scenes” of this illegal practice. I interviewed a midwife and two expectant families during routine check-ups, while state lawmakers debated whether to legalize midwifery. Within days of the airing of our feature, Governor Kay Ivey signed the bill, permitting midwives to practice for the first time in forty


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/midwives_for_web.mp3




SPJ Sigma Delta Chi Awards-- Best Documentary "Help Wanted: Alabama's Rural Health Care Crisis"

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 20:14:33 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for best radio documentary, titled “Help Wanted: Alabama’s Rural Health Care Crisis.” The three member Alabama Public Radio news team spent the year, with no budget, investigating why the system here is so badly broken and why solutions aren’t being pursued. On September 27, 2017, the Washington Post published an article about how only one half of rural hospitals in the U.S. can deliver a baby. In rural Alabama, it’s barely a third. The National Rural Health Association says Alabama is “ground zero” for most of what’s wrong with rural healthcare in the nation. Studies frequently list Alabama as having the highest infant mortality rate and the highest number of diabetics in the U.S. In 2016, the city of Gadsden, east of Birmingham, had the lowest life expectancy in the country. Despite these trends, rural hospitals in Alabama receive among the lowest reimbursements from Medicare. The result is that 80% of these healthcare facilities are


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/apr_help_wanted_rural_health_doc.mp3




Pet Theft Awareness Day

Sat, 10 Feb 2018 14:45:00 +0000

If you are concerned for your pet's safety, do not put its name on the collar or ID tag. An animal may be more receptive and willing to go with a stranger that knows its name. And remember - unattended means unsafe when it comes to your best friend. *************************


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/SpeakingOfPets_20180210_36800.mp3




The Flu - in Dogs

Sat, 03 Feb 2018 14:45:00 +0000

With the flu season being especially difficult for humans this year, concern is growing about the threat of dog flu. Yes, dogs have their own strain of flu, not contagious to humans but very easily spread to other dogs and even to cats. The advice is the same for your dog as it is for you - get the flu shot. ***************************


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/SpeakingOfPets_20180203_36800.mp3




Overall Excellence-- Alabama Public Radio

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 19:29:32 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for the Edward R. Murrow Award for Radio Overall Excellence, titled “Alabama 2017.” The list of stories in our entry and a selection of web links are at the bottom. Our news content featured here was produced by the three member APR news team and two student reporters. The year, just ended, included the campaign for Alabama junior U.S. Senate seat. Civil rights champion, and former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones faced twice-removed Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore. The campaign pitted Jones’ view of putting Alabama on the “right of history” against Moore’s “fire and brimstone” goal of taking his brand of evangelical Christianity to Washington, D.C. 2017 also marked the 45th anniversary of the Associated Press story that broke the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, where African America men with the disease went untreated while federal health official watched the progression of the illness. APR covered this story, along with how state lawmakers


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/apr_ap_most_outstanding_news.mp3




National Headliner Awards: Best Documentary-- "Help Wanted: Alabama's Rural Health Care Crisis"

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 19:28:32 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for best radio documentary, titled “Help Wanted: Alabama’s Rural Health Care Crisis.” The three member Alabama Public Radio news team spent the year, with no budget, investigating why the system here is so badly broken and why solutions aren’t being pursued. On September 27, 2017, the Washington Post published an article about how only one half of rural hospitals in the U.S. can deliver a baby. In rural Alabama, it’s barely a third. The National Rural Health Association says Alabama is “ground zero” for most of what’s wrong with rural healthcare in the nation. Studies frequently list Alabama as having the highest infant mortality rate and the highest number of diabetics in the U.S. In 2016, the city of Gadsden, east of Birmingham, had the lowest life expectancy in the country. Despite these trends, rural hospitals in Alabama receive among the lowest reimbursements from Medicare. The result is that 80% of these healthcare facilities are


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/apr_help_wanted_rural_health_doc.mp3




RFK Awards-- Best Documentary "Help Wanted: Alabama's Rural Health Care Crisis"

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 19:27:40 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for the RFK Award for best radio documentary, titled “Help Wanted: Alabama’s Rural Health Care Crisis.” The three member Alabama Public Radio news team spent the year, with no budget, investigating why the system here is so badly broken and why solutions aren’t being pursued. On September 27, 2017, the Washington Post published an article about how only one half of rural hospitals in the U.S. can deliver a baby. In rural Alabama, it’s barely a third. The National Rural Health Association says Alabama is “ground zero” for most of what’s wrong with rural healthcare in the nation. Studies frequently list Alabama as having the highest infant mortality rate and the highest number of diabetics in the U.S. In 2016, the city of Gadsden, east of Birmingham, had the lowest life expectancy in the country. Despite these trends, rural hospitals in Alabama receive among the lowest reimbursements from Medicare. The result is that 80% of these


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/apr_help_wanted_rural_health_doc.mp3




Best Continuing Coverage-- Jones/Moore Race for the U.S. Senate

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 19:26:49 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for the best continuing coverage, titled “Jones/Moore Race for the U.S. Senate.” The race for Alabama’s junior U.S. Senate, formerly held by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, generated more than a little national attention. Civil rights champion, and former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones faced twice-removed Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore. The campaign pitted Jones’ view of putting Alabama on the “right of history” against Moore’s “fire and brimstone” goal of taking his brand of evangelical Christianity to Washington, D.C. President Trump threw his support behind Moore, after supporting his GOP rival in Alabama’s Republican runoff. Trump endorsement came despite allegations against Moore including sexual assault, child molestation, and sexual misconduct involving teenagers. Trump stumped for Moore, but declined to come to Alabama to campaign for the Senate hope. The Commander-in-Chief did, however, come within twenty miles of Alabama for a


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/moore_jones_race_continuing_0.mp3




Scripps-Howard Awards: Help Wanted--Alabama's Rural Health Care Crisis

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 17:53:13 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for The Scripps-Howard's Jack R. Howard award, titled “Help Wanted: Alabama’s Rural Health Care Crisis.” The three member Alabama Public Radio news team spent the year, with no budget, investigating why the system here is so badly broken and why solutions aren’t being pursued. On September 27, 2017, the Washington Post published an article about how only one half of rural hospitals in the U.S. can deliver a baby. In rural Alabama, it’s barely a third. The National Rural Health Association says Alabama is “ground zero” for most of what’s wrong with rural healthcare in the nation. Studies frequently list Alabama as having the highest infant mortality rate and the highest number of diabetics in the U.S. In 2016, the city of Gadsden, east of Birmingham, had the lowest life expectancy in the country. Despite these trends, rural hospitals in Alabama receive among the lowest reimbursements from Medicare. The result is that 80% of these


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/apr_help_wanted_rural_health_doc.mp3




Justice Reform: "What is three years on death row worth?"

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 21:22:05 +0000

Alabama’s prison system has been in the news a lot this year, and not for good reasons. Inmate riots, allegations of mismanagement and corruption, and a failed prison building plan in the state legislature have pointed out plenty of problems. The Alabama Public Radio news team has spent the past several months examining what happens as people go into the state’s prison system and what happens when they come out. This week, I examine what the State of Alabama does when people are convicted of crimes they didn’t do. Critics say, not much… If you had just been released after three years on Alabam’s death row, what would be first on your to-do list? “Well, hug my kids and my family,” says Randall Padgett of Guntersville. “And, see some nature, touch a tree, touch some grass. I think a tree was the first thing…no, I had to walk across some grass to get to the tree…” Padgett was convicted for the murder of his estranged wife in 1990. He was exonerated seven years later. As a free man, you


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/01/reparations_web_version.mp3




Naming the Cat

Sat, 27 Jan 2018 14:45:00 +0000

This is Gypsy. If you look closely, you will see her "tipped" left ear. The tip was surgically removed to indicate she has already been spayed, to alert anyone who might find her, to prevent unnecessary surgery in the future. *******************


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/01/SpeakingOfPets_20180127_36800.mp3




Best Commentator: Steve Flowers on on the Downfall of Big Jim Folsom

Sat, 27 Jan 2018 12:01:00 +0000

Steve Flowers Big Jim #11 September 13, 2017 Flowers Big Jim 11_Flowers_36850_NEWS.WAV Since early July, APR political commentator Steve Flowers has been weaving stories about one of Alabama’s most colorful Governors—Big Jim Folsom. Every political career has to come to an end, and 1962 saw the beginning of the end for Folsom. Television was becoming more and more popular during political campaigns. Observers of the 1960 debates between Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy noted how Nixon didn’t look good on TV. Steve Flowers explains how television was equally unkind to Big Jim…


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/01/apr_flowers_big_jim.mp3




Best Public Affairs-- "Help Wanted: Alabama's Rural Health Care Crisis"

Sat, 27 Jan 2018 12:00:35 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for best radio public affairs, titled “Help Wanted: Alabama’s Rural Health Care Crisis.” The three member Alabama Public Radio spent the year, with no budget, investigating why the system here is so badly broken and why solutions aren’t being pursued. On September 27, 2017, the Washington Post published an article about how only one half of rural hospitals in the U.S. can deliver a baby. In rural Alabama, it’s barely a third. The National Rural Health Association says Alabama is “ground zero” for most of what’s wrong with rural healthcare in the nation. Studies frequently list Alabama as having the highest infant mortality rate and the highest number of diabetics in the U.S. In 2016, the city of Gadsden, east of Birmingham, had the lowest life expectancy in the country. Despite these trends, rural hospitals in Alabama receive among the lowest reimbursements from Medicare. The result is that 80% of these healthcare facilities are


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/02/apr_help_wanted_rural_health_doc.mp3




Best Investigative: "Rural Health Care in Alabama"

Sat, 27 Jan 2018 11:59:53 +0000

Please find enclosed Alabama Public Radio’s entry for best investigative, titled “Alabama's Rural Health Care Concerns.” The three member Alabama Public Radio news team spent the year, with no budget, investigating why the system here is so badly broken and why solutions aren’t being pursued. On September 27, 2017, the Washington Post published an article about how only one half of rural hospitals in the U.S. can deliver a baby. In rural Alabama, it’s barely a third. The National Rural Health Association says Alabama is “ground zero” for most of what’s wrong with rural healthcare in the nation. Studies frequently list Alabama as having the highest infant mortality rate and the highest number of diabetics in the U.S. In 2016, the city of Gadsden, east of Birmingham, had the lowest life expectancy in the country. Despite these trends, rural hospitals in Alabama receive among the lowest reimbursements from Medicare. The result is that 80% of these healthcare facilities are operating in


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/wual/audio/2018/01/rural_health_series.mp3