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Preview: The New Age of HIV/AIDS | UNC-TV

The New Age of HIV/AIDS | UNC-TV



Who is at greatest risk and why? See how what was once just a big-city problem now also affects small town and rural areas. Who pays for treating and preventing HIV? We'll talk about what scientists are doing to stop it. And see where people living with H



Published: Sun, 3 Sep 2006 19:54:05 -0700

Last Build Date: Sun, 3 Sep 2006 19:54:07 -0700

Copyright: Copyright UNC-TV, All Rights Reserved
 



The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 10

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:26:30 -0400

Living With HIV/AIDS

From prevention strategies to treatments, scientists in labs just like this one all across North Carolina have made great strides in eradicating HIV. Advocates are working to educate people about the ever-widening scope of the epidemic, to lessen stigma, and to encourage people to protect themselves. We've shown you how far they've come and how much work is still to do. You've met the people who live each day with the disease and its physical and emotional effects. But behind each of those people is a story, sometimes of struggle and sadness, but also of encouragement and inspiration.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_living.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 9

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:26:34 -0400

HIV/AIDS Research
Something Gerrod Henderson and the approximately 28 thousand other North Carolinians living with HIV/AIDS can look forward to these days is growing old, thanks to significant advances in research. In the early days of the epidemic, an HIV diagnosis was essentially a death sentence. Scientists knew very little about how the disease worked in the body. The tide began turning in 1987 when the food and drug administration approved AZT, the first aids drug. Now there are more than 20 medicines to treat HIV, and many experts believe the new drugs have truly ushered in the new age of HIV/AIDS by allowing people to live longer with the disease. But aids educators say as great as they are, the drugs have also created a whole new set of problems.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_research.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 8

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:26:38 -0400

HIV in Children
Gerrod Henderson wasn't so lucky. He contracted HIV at birth from his mother.

"I found out when I was 5 or 6, one of those, and it was through eavesdropping which little kids like to do," says Henderson. "My mother and my doctor were talking and they had mentioned it, and I was just like oh, I have HIV; okay let me go play in the toy center, and it was just something in the back of my head."


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_kids.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 7

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:26:42 -0400

Acute HIV Testing
Help for people with HIV/AIDS is also coming in the form of rapid scientific advances, new frontiers of medicine for a new age of the disease. And it starts with testing. AIDS Advocates say no matter who you are, it's important to be tested for HIV because early detection improves your chance of survival and reduces your risk of transmitting HIV to other people. Now, North Carolina is the first and only state in the country to test for the newest, most contagious cases.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_acutehiv.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 6

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:26:45 -0400

HIV/AIDS Funding
Whether someone lives in a small town like Jason or in a big city, state leaders say it costs tens of thousands of dollars to treat HIV. And they say because the face of HIV is increasingly poor, public assistance is essential. So where does the money come from? And is it enough, especially when it comes to buying life-prolonging medications? Doctors say for many patients, a combination of three medicines, the so-called drug cocktail, is their best bet for fighting HIV. But the drugs are expensive-at least 12 thousand dollars a year, which puts them out of reach of many of the people who need them the most.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_funding.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 5

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:26:50 -0400

Rural North Carolina
Twenty years ago, you probably wouldn't have found people with HIV in a place like this in the early days, it was a big city problem. But today, in the new age of HIV/AIDS, specialists say the virus has invaded small towns and quiet countrysides all across North Carolina. Statistics show about 25-percent of the state's HIV and AIDS cases are in rural areas, and researchers say people there face a special set of challenges, the biggest being stigma and discrimination.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_rural.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 4

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:26:55 -0400

College Outbreak
One place many people say you can talk about sex is a college campus, where attitudes about sex are often more open. But talk is not enough to stop the disease from spreading, because doctors say the new age of HIV/AIDS has seen a rapid rise in new cases among college students in North Carolina. Jonathan Perry is one of the people infected. He got the disease from the man he'd been dating.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_campus.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 3

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:26:59 -0400

Latinos
And state health leaders say they hope to see similar efforts among Latinos, where they say the new age of HIV/AIDS could someday soon be an AI DS crisis. Epidemiologists say the number of new cases among Latinos jumped from 15 in 1998 to 125 in 2005. That's an eight-fold increase. Latinos represent seven percent of all cases in North Carolina.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_latinos.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 2

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:27:03 -0400

African Americans
Epidemiologist Dr. Del Williams says HIV is hitting African Americans especially hard. State statistics show the rate of infection for all African Americans is seven times greater than for whites. For black women, the rate is 12 times higher than for white women. Guilford County outreach worker Lloyd Mickens says a lack of empowerment is part of the reason why.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_aamericans.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS Part 1

Tue, 23 May 2006 14:27:07 -0400

Introduction
HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is an infection transmitted through blood and other body fluids. It attacks the body's immune system and ultimately leads to AIDS, a disease in which immune function fails and a person develops opportunistic infections that cause death. We talked to the experts on HIV and AIDS, at leading research institutions such as the University of North Carolina and Duke University, and we also went to the state's HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, international research organizations, and community-based agencies across North Carolina to learn how the disease affects North Carolinians.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidsp_intro.mp3




The New Age of HIV/AIDS

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Entire Broadcast Program
Doctors reported the first case of AIDS in North Carolina in 1983, but epidemiologists believe the disease was here as early as 1980. In the years immediately following, the disease affected primarily white, gay men. But not anymore. This is the new age of HIV and AIDS.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/new_age_hivaids.mp3




FAQ: How significant an issue is HIV/AIDS in North Carolina?

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Frequently Asked Questions.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidp_faq11.mp3







FAQ: Will there ever be a cure for HIV or AIDS?

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Frequently Asked Questions


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidp_faq09.mp3




FAQ: How close are scientists to developing a vaccine for HIV?

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Frequently Asked Questions.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidp_faq08.mp3




FAQ: How is HIV treated?

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Frequently Asked Questions.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidp_faq07.mp3










FAQ: What are the symptoms of HIV?

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Frequently Asked Questions


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidp_faq04.mp3




FAQ: How can people protect themselves from HIV?

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Frequently Asked Questions


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidp_faq03.mp3




FAQ: How does HIV spread?

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Frequently Asked Questions


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidp_faq02.mp3




FAQ: What are HIV and AIDS?

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Frequently Asked Questions


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaidp_faq01.mp3




NC Now: Helping Orphans in Africa

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

For millions of children in Africa, the AIDS pandemic has left them without a mother, without a father, and without the resources to take care of themselves. They are the AIDS orphans, and some estimates say there are six-thousand more each day. Claire Monroe brings us the story of these children trying desperately to survive. and the North Carolina man trying desperately to save them.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_orphans.mp3




NC Now: AIDS in Women

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Of the more than 40 million people worldwide who live with HIV and AIDS, the United Nations estimates almost half of them are women. And the number of new infections among women and girls is increasing every year. Claire Monroe takes a look at how the epidemic affects women in our state.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_women.mp3




NC Now: AIDS Volunteer

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Of the thousands of North Carolinians living with HIV and AIDS, many find themselves alone. Some have families who don't support them; others have partners who leave them. But volunteer organizations can help to foster new relationships and provide much-needed support. One of those groups is the Regional AIDS Interfaith Network in Charlotte. Claire Monroe shows us how, for its volunteers, helping people with AIDS is a matter of faith.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_volunteers.mp3




NC Now: AIDS in Rural Towns

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

In the 20-plus years we've dealt with the epidemic in North Carolina, it has changed dramatically. What began as a disease infecting primarily white, gay men now affects everyone.. gay, straight, white, black, latino, rich, and poor. There is not a corner of North Carolina that HIV or AIDS hasn't touched. And, new reports show, the disease is spreading rapidly in rural parts of our state. Claire Monroe shows us what that means for the people who live with it.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_rural.mp3




NC Now: AIDS Research

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

More than 40-million people worldwide live with HIV and AIDS, according to the United Nations. Before the decade is over, researchers estimate anywhere from 25 to 40 million children in Africa will lose their parents to AIDS. Experts say the message is clear: AIDS is a worldwide health emergency. And as Claire Monroe shows us, world-renowned researchers in North Carolina's Research Triangle are playing a big part in working to stop it.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_research.mp3




NC Now: AIDS Overview

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

More than twenty years after AIDS was first diagnosed, the disease is taking a deadlier toll than ever. The United Nations says more than 40-million people worldwide live with HIV or AIDS, and the disease killed more than three million people just last year. State health experts say the AIDS crisis is not over in North Carolina either, as more than a thousand people become infected each year. Claire Monroe looks at why the numbers are rising and who is most vulnerable.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_overview.mp3




NC Now: AIDS and Latino

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

We're setting ourselves up for a crisis. That's the word from state and local agencies after a significant and disproportionate increase in HIV and AIDS cases among Latinos in North Carolina. As Claire Monroe reports, educators are racing to get ahead of the epidemic despite large obstacles in reaching the Latino population.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_latino.mp3




NC Now: AIDS and Kids

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Imagine being born with a disease you know one day will kill you. That's the reality for thousands of children in the U.S. who live with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. In North Carolina, the Department of Health and Human Services says last year, nine children contracted HIV at birth from their mothers. Claire Monroe shows us what it's like for some of those children. and how doctors are dramatically reducing the number of babies born with HIV.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_kids.mp3




NC Now: HIV on Campus

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

For years, doctors though college students were at low risk for contracting HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But researchers at UNC Chapel Hill's Medical School recently found an outbreak of the virus on 37 campuses in our state. As Claire Monroe reports, it sheds a concerning new light on the presumption of risk. and is prompting action across North Carolina.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_hivcampus.mp3




NC Now: AIDS Funding

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Of the estimated 29-thousand-five-hundred North Carolinians living with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, a significant percentage of them depend on public funding to pay for medications, housing, and other necessities. Claire Monroe shows us where that money comes from.. and asks the question, is there enough?


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_funding.mp3




NC Now: Acute HIV Testing

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Early detection is crucial in treating many illnesses and improving a person's chances of survival. The human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, is no different. That's why North Carolina is now testing for the earliest stages of the infection, and it was the first state in the country to do so. Claire Monroe reports.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/ncn06p_aids_acuteHIV.mp3




Interview: Gerrod Henderson

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Gerrod Henderson, HIV Positive teenager


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_ghenderson.mp3




Interview: Bart Haynes, M.D.

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Bart Haynes, M.D., Director, Duke University Human Vaccine Institute Director, Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology, part of the National Institutes of Health


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_ssherman.mp3




Interview: Steve Sherman

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Steve Sherman, Coordinator, NC AIDS Drug Assistance Program


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_ssherman.mp3




Interview: Susan Bullard

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Susan Bullard, Care Team Volunteer


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_sbullard.mp3




Interview: Rev. Deborah Warren

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Rev. Deborah Warren, President & CEO, Regional AIDS Interfaith Network


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_rev_drarren.mp3




Interview: Peter Leone, M.D.

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Peter Leone, M.D. , Medical Director, HIV/STD Prevention & Care Branch Associate Professor of Infectious Diseases, UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_pleone.mp3




Interview: Milford Evans

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Milford Evans, Benefits Advocate


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_mevans.mp3




Interview: Kate Whetten, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Kate Whetten, Ph.D., M.P.H.


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_mevans.mp3




Interview: Jonathan Perry

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Jonathan Perry, HIV Positive


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_jperry.mp3




Interview: James Grissom

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with James Grissom, HIV Positive


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_jgrissom.mp3




Interview: Fred Wiggins

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Fred Wiggins, HIV Positive


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_fwiggins.mp3




Interview: Florence Scott

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Florence Scott , Care Team Volunteer


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_fscott.mp3




Interview: David Witt

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with David Witt, HIV Positive, Partnered with a Care Team from RAIN


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_dwitt.mp3




Interview: Del Williams, Ph.D.

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Del Williams, Ph.D.
Manager, Epidemiology & Special Studies, HIV/STD Prevention & Care Branch


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/dwailliamp_rev2.mp3




Interview: Adolfo Aguilar

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Adolfo Aguilar, Outreach Worker, Chatham Social Health Council


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_aaguilar.mp3




Interview: Coleen Cunningham, M.D.

Fri, 19 May 2006 07:29:01 -0400

Interview with Coleen Cunningham, M.D.
Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Duke University Medical Center


Media Files:
http://podcast.unctv.org/hiv_aids/hivaids_ccunningham.mp3