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Preview: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories

Christian Science Monitor | All Stories



Read the front page stories of csmonitor.com.



 



Syria: Can Trump's anti-Iran strategy survive hostilities with Turkey?

As Russia, Iran, and the US strive to establish facts on the ground to maximize their chances of shaping postwar Syria, Turkey is posing a challenge to a key piece of the Trump administration’s emerging policy.

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Shutdown saga sparks debate about how to fix 'broken' Congress

Ideas such as ending the filibuster are floated as lawmakers consider whether a deliberately cumbersome system of checks and balances, designed to forge compromise, truly remains viable in today’s highly polarized environment.

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Facebook’s about-face on news credibility

Rather than rely on machines to pick items for its news feed, the media giant will now trust its users to select trustworthy media outlets. The move reflects a broader need to restore trust in news by relying on readers as truth seekers.

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EU reform effort reopens eurozone divide in Central Europe

As Germany and France push for reform in the European Union, Central European countries say joining the eurozone will limit their autonomy, while supporters of European integration say they risk being left behind.

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Pence's reference to 'Israel's capital' calls US ability to mediate into question

Vice President Mike Pence began his meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu by referring to Jerusalem as Israel's capital. The US stance on Israel's capital continues to sow doubt among Arab leaders that the US can effectively mediate Israeli-Palestinian conflicts. 

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Immigration concerns drive legal immigrants away from public health care

The Trump presidency has seen a drop in the number of legal Latino immigrants who use public health services and federally subsidized insurance. Many US residents worry that submitting their papers might lead immigration officers to undocumented relatives. 

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Romanian Roma use theater to address bigotry

A feminist Roma theater company is staging plays to highlight the racism and sexism that Roma women are subjected to in Romania. The group uses art to raise awareness of the social issues facing marginalized Roma, the largest ethnic minority in Europe.

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Briefing: What to expect at the Olympics

The Games will be held in Pyeongchang, South Korea, from Feb. 9-25. South Korea's government has trumpeted the Games as an opportunity to improve relations with its northern neighbor.

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Mattis visit highlights shift in US-Vietnam relations

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis's visit to Vietnam comes days before the 50th anniversary of a key Vietnam War battle. The former enemies have gradually developed closer ties as the United States seeks to address China's growing military power.

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South Korean protesters burn 'unification flag' and photos of Kim Jong-un

Protesters in South Korea took to the streets during the visit of North Korean pop-star in Seoul to voice displeasure about the North's participation in the Winter Olympics and recent rapprochement deals between the neighboring nations.

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New Trump office would protect doctors with conscientious objections

Medical providers who object to performing abortions or other procedures on moral or religious grounds have gained new support. Conservatives say that the office will help maintain balance in the health care system, while opponents say it will lead to discrimination. 

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Meaningful giving

A Christian Science perspective: As the reflection of God, infinite Love, everyone has something meaningful to give – we’re never left without love to express.

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How can China grow?

Sitting on a park bench in Beijing, moved to tears by the memories that came flooding back to her as she watched an amateur opera, our reporter saw other core values expressed by a gentleman who sat next to her: harmony, civility, friendship.

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Return to China: One reporter finds a nation that has gone from bicycles to bullet trains

For a visiting journalist, the country of today feel worlds away from the China she first encountered decades earlier.

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US government shuts down amid standoff over immigration

A last-ditch Republican funding bill fell well short of the 60 Senate votes needed Friday night to prevent the country's first shutdown since 2013.

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Cutting off communication, no more street protests, improving Parliament, projections for India

 A roundup of global commentary for the Jan. 22, 2018 weekly magazine.

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Russia investigation: An eventful week, and what happens next

New details emerged this week in the broadening investigation into alleged efforts by Russia to interfere in the 2016 presidential election.

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Battle over legal marijuana: a monumental moment for states’ rights

The Department of Justice's crackdown comes as 64 percent of Americans, including for the first time more than half of Republicans, support legalization, Gallup found this month. So far, 29 states have legalized the medical use of the drug, while eight have legalized recreational use.

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With forgiveness, a need for economic justice

In Liberia and Colombia, civil conflict has been halted by programs that aid former rebels. South Africa has avoided civil war but it also needs to help those who don’t share in its wealth.

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A year after the March, women are sprinting forward

The Women's March on Jan. 21, 2017 sparked new levels of activism and engagement for many, with record numbers of women running for office, donating to campaigns, and finding new ways to get involved.

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California keeps girls in school by providing feminine products

Low-income students often stay home when menstruating due to the cost of pads and tampons. California's new law requiring products be available to young women in all Title I public schools joins similar legislation around the US addressing the issue.  

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A year into 'America First,' the world eyes US – and Trump – with less trust

President Trump's mistrust and rejection of international agreements and institutions have transformed America's status. And the lack of global leadership shown in the first year of his administration may have a lasting effect.

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The movie's ambitions far exceed its grasp in 'All the Money in the World'

At 88, Christopher Plummer, who portrays John Paul Getty, is at the top of his game.

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They didn't make Amazon's final cut, but these cities still hope to welcome big business

Cities that didn't make Amazon's shortlist for a second headquarters say failed bids to attract Amazon could be used as material to appeal to other businesses with planned tax breaks, land proposals, and grants.

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Mexico looks abroad for examples of peace processes to end drug violence

In attempts to curb drug violence and rampant murder rates, Mexican politicians are seeking new paths to peace. Countries with violent histories, such as Colombia and South Africa, are being viewed as models to learn from.

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In upcoming Mexican election, migrants living in the US could tip tight presidential race

New rules allowing Mexican citizens to register to vote from abroad could reshape the country's electoral landscape. 

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Minnesota sisters used to sharing the ice will play hockey for separate Olympic teams

Hannah and Marissa Brandt, who grew up playing on the same ice hockey teams, will now play for different countries in the upcoming Olympic Games. Marissa will represent South Korea, from which she was adopted as a child, and Hannah will play for the United States.

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Chilean protests, threats 'unprecedented' for papal visit

Pope Francis faced an unusually high level of hostility on his visit to Chile with protestors burning at least 11 churches and leaving threatening pamphlets directed at the pope.

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Rohingya refugees find their voice in demands to Myanmar

Citizenship, return of land, and justice are just some of the things being petitioned by Rohingya refugee leaders in a Bangladesh refugee camp. Representing 40 villages, Rohingya elders are heading the effort to have their demands met by Myanmar ahead of the repatriation process. 

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What makes immigration deals so hard

Increased partisanship and decreased trust among lawmakers have made reforming immigration harder than ever – even as pressure to fix the problems in the system has grown.

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Abundance and the global economy

A Christian Science perspective: God is constantly communicating the ideas we need to express His intelligence, love, and goodness in serving others and seeing our own needs met.

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Top Picks: 'Last Flag Flying,' 'David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef,' and more

PBS gives you a look behind the scenes with the new program 'Queen Elizabeth’s Secret Agents,' the AccuWeather app has all the up-to-date information you need, and more top picks.

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In shutdown showdown, a crucial question: Who will get the blame?

With Friday’s deadline looming to avert a government shutdown, some observers see a twist to what is typically a party-line battle. Some Republicans and Democrats say they are tired of short-term funding of government – with its patches, unpredictability, and the toll that takes.

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Reducing drunken-driving tragedies

A new study suggests tougher laws will work and a new task force points to higher taxes that change behavior.

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#MeTooK12: New campaign raises awareness about rights at school

Launched this month, #MeTooK12 aims to broaden the discussion about sexual harassment and violence to include elementary, middle, and high schools. Enforcement of Title IX at that level needs a major boost, students and advocates say.

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Italy's migrants teach themselves to stand up for themselves

Migrants and refugees living in the region around Caserta are vulnerable to being exploited, including by the mafia. But they’re growing increasingly aware of their rights and their power to help each other fight for fair treatment.

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Why fixing US infrastructure matters: $9 per household per day

The average household would save $9.31 a day by 2025, by one estimate, if the federal government fixed deteriorating roads, public transit, and other infrastructure. But as President Trump prepares a $1 trillion package to address the need, there are big divisions over how to fund it.

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Some of Broadway's best picks focus on love, inclusiveness

Some new and recent musicals have become modern Broadway icons. They are holding a mirror up to the America of today with a promise of inclusiveness and brotherly love. 

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An optimistic bear returns in transcendentally cheerful 'Paddington 2'

The dream cast includes Sally Hawkins, Hugh Bonneville, and Julie Walters, with Ben Whishaw voicing the title character with just the right note of prim wistfulness.

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