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Preview: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories

Christian Science Monitor | All Stories



Read the front page stories of csmonitor.com.



 



Voter redistricting: US Supreme Court to hear third key case of term

In a year marked by several potentially landmark decisions, the most significant could be in the trio of gerrymandering cases the high court has reviewed – the last of which is being argued Tuesday.

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Americans support raises for teachers, poll finds

As teacher strikes crop up across the country, a poll finds that many Americans support more money for teachers, and half would pay higher taxes to do so, according to The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

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Girls receive warm welcome in introduction to Cub Scouts

An 'early adopter' program in New Hampshire has begun to bring girls into the Cub Scouts – the organization that feeds into the Boy Scouts – in advance of a broader national movement. So far, both Scouts and troop leaders have heralded the change. 

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Ethiopian mega-dam causes stir in Egypt-Ethiopia relations

The filling of Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam using water from the Nile River threatens Egypt's agriculture industry even as it promises to boost Ethiopia's hydropower industry. The dam calls into question who has the right to the waters of the Nile.

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At college decision time, conservatives face tough choices

Amid a growing feeling on the right that academia is shutting out conservative perspectives, new institutions are cropping up around the country to provide alternatives. But some students find that engaging with liberal ideas hones their own viewpoints.

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Bob Corker’s relationship with President Trump: It’s complicated

Senator Corker told reporters at a Monitor Breakfast that he has a ‘very warm relationship’ with the president, but questions his colleagues who aren’t conflicted over the Trump presidency. 

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Why a wave of Asian summitry

Leaders of India and China are meeting this weekend, as are those of the Koreas. Perhaps the region’s historic disputes over land are yielding to a need for common prosperity.

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For South Africa's students, college means promise – if they can get there

College access has grown dramatically since the end of apartheid, particularly for black students. But so has awareness of the challenges they face trying to graduate. And for many, like star student Naledi and her family, that struggle starts before they step on campus.

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Britain's DACA? Children of invited laborers caught in 'Windrush' controversy

They didn't need passports to accompany their laborer parents into Britain from the far corners of the Commonwealth. Now, some 50,000 offspring of the 'Windrush generation' appear caught in a press amid immigration scrutiny. 

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Report highlights barriers for working women in China

Chinese companies regularly advertise for job openings using gender stereotypes, according to a recent report from Human Rights Watch. To promote gender equality, experts say, the government needs to do more to enforce anti-discrimination laws. 

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Denver Post hopes for help from wealthy locals to stay afloat

The Denver Post recently published an editorial criticizing its owner, Digital First Media, and asking to be purchased by local investors. The piece kickstarted a chorus of other voices from publications around the country who have successfully found private backers. 

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Memorial addresses history of lynching in the US

A new memorial for thousands of victims of lynching built by the Equal Justice Initiative is set to open in Montgomery, Ala. The memorial aims to commemorate the lives of victims and encourage discussion regarding the history of lynching in the United States.

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How Egypt’s stubborn poverty threatens strongman Sisi’s grip

The majority of Egyptians have agreed to 'tighten their belts' to give Sisi time for his painful, IMF-mandated economic reforms. But without a turnaround, their patience could soon run out. There are already signs of voter apathy.

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Another way to look at ‘DNA’

Today’s contributor was healed of a hereditary, chronic back problem as his sense of identity shifted radically.

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Where maple syrup meets global economics

The recent upheaval in Western democracies has several causes, but perhaps the greatest is this: How are they coming to terms with their shifting role in the global economy?

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Readers write: Lifting humanity through a story, prayer after mass shootings, making sense of confusing events

Letters to the editor for the April 23, 2018-April 30, 2018 weekly magazine. 

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As its beaches recede, Florida shores up private ownership

A new law passed in March sets limits on public access to private beaches. Some conservatives say private beaches should be sacrosanct, pitting them against advocates for customary-use access along Florida's coastline. 

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The art of parsing apologies

A wave of recent apologies by public figures requires a fine discernment to understand when someone does right for the original offense.

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Are environmentalists hypocrites?

Concern for the environment often rises alongside material wealth. Yet that wealth in turn drives environmental destruction. Is there a way out?

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UW-Madison announces plan to address history of racism

The plan comes out of a working group formed in response to the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., and aims to acknowledge the university's history and find ways to move forward and increase inclusivity of underrepresented groups.

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Former NFL player Chris Borland helps athletes and veterans adjust to retirement

The former 49er walked away from a promising football career after one year because of concerns over head injuries. Now he helps military veterans and other football players deal with the challenges they share reintegrating into society. 

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Protest art is preserved in libraries, museums

Museums, universities, and libraries across the United States collected signs from the 2017 Women's March sites and put out a call on social media. Now these artifacts are being placed in archives and displayed in exhibitions.

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Churches struggle with their #MeToo moment

The #MeToo movement has forced Hollywood, Washington, and Wall Street to grapple honestly with patterns of sexual harassment and abuse. Many churches are still struggling to embrace such introspection and the disruption it brings.  

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Amid US woes, Chinese telecom giant turns to Europe, Asia

Huawei, the No. 3 smartphone brand, has repeatedly been stymied trying to enter the American market. The US has cited national security concerns. 

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Diversity on display at tech conference minus 'tech bros'

An alternative cybersecurity conference held this week in San Francisco was notable for its representation of women and minorities who are often absent at such events. Only one in ten cybersecurity workers are women. 

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After sex-abuse scandal, protesters demand change on Nobel literature prize board

Sara Danius was the first woman to lead the secretive board that awards the Nobel Prize in Literature. Her removal from the academy, amid criticism from male members for her handling of the scandal, has sparked protests across Sweden. 

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Dainty machines? Collaborative robots help humans in Japanese factories

As the workforce ages in Japan and elsewhere, "cobots" are emerging as a way to keep assembly lines moving without replacing humans. Cobots are being used by companies of all sizes for simple tasks and small-batch manufacturing.

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On 19th anniversary, Columbine asks other schools to remember, not politicize

As students around the nation plan walkouts, Columbine will continue its tradition of commemorating the anniversary of the shooting with a day of service. 

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'Dread Nation' is a rollicking 'Gone With the Wind + Zombies' adventure

But don't underestimate the latest YA novel by activist Justina Ireland – it's also a biting commentary on contemporary race relations in America.

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Still small voice

In recognition of Earth Day on April 22, today’s column is a poem that points to the light, peace, harmony, and joy that divine Spirit has bestowed on its entire creation.

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Top Picks: The Shacks' 'Haze,' the podcast 'Brains On!,' and more

The film 'Phantom Thread' is available on DVD and Blu-ray, the PBS program 'The Jazz Ambassadors' chronicles how the American government sent jazz musicians around the world as cultural ambassadors, and more top picks.

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#MeToo's next challenge: domestic gun violence

The #MeToo movement has empowered thousands of women to tell their stories of harassment and abuse throughout America's workplaces. But advocates say women abused at home often face a more dangerous path.

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What's in a name? Why a Castro-less Cuba may not mean a changed one.

Former President Raúl Castro, brother of revolutionary leader Fidel, handed over the presidency Thursday to Miguel Díaz-Canel. His first task will be getting the economy back on track, but just how radical an approach he can take is uncertain – as is whether he wants one.

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Kremlin cyberpower? How fight over messaging app is showing its limits.

The Russian government is trying to block popular messaging app Telegram from domestic users. But its creator, Pavel Durov, is easily winning the fight, ensuring Telegram stays up even as the Kremlin clumsily causes collateral damage online.

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The new mercy for corrupt firms that fess up

For most white-collar crimes, such as corruption, more countries are following a US practice of legal leniency toward companies that confess and reform.

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Ivory Coast, chocolate giants team up to make cocoa production more sustainable

Ivory Coast is the world's biggest cocoa producer, but agriculture of the plant has led to mass deforestation. In order to prevent losing all its forest cover by 2034, the country is exploring new ways of tracking cocoa production and developing agroforests.

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Promise of outdoor activities pulls new residents to rural areas

Rural communities with large recreation industries have seen a dramatic rise in population. The trend is part of what drove the overall slight growth of the rural population in the US from 2016 to 2017, even though many rural counties have been shrinking for years. 

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Voice assistants can't understand Pittsburghese

If you're from Pittsburgh, 'Sorry, I didn't get that,' may be a refrain you're used to hearing from Alexa. Voice assistants, trained on regular American English, often trip up on requests in regional dialects.

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Senate to allow infants into the chamber

The tradition-bound institution voted to allow newborns of senators into the chamber. Though the rules change passed without issue, some senators voiced private concerns about allowing infants inside the chamber.

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