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Reviewer Thank You - 2016.
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Reviewer Thank You - 2016.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan;57(1):226-228

Authors:

PMID: 28097703 [PubMed - in process]




Credit where credit is due: TRANSFUSION now offers continuing medical education (CME) to reviewers.
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Credit where credit is due: TRANSFUSION now offers continuing medical education (CME) to reviewers.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan;57(1):6-7

Authors: Eder A, Ness P

PMID: 28097702 [PubMed - in process]




Epidemiology, performance characteristics, or both?
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Epidemiology, performance characteristics, or both?

Transfusion. 2017 Jan;57(1):1-2

Authors: Dodd RY

PMID: 28097701 [PubMed - in process]




Comparison of hepatitis E virus nucleic acid test screening platforms and RNA prevalence in French blood donors.
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Comparison of hepatitis E virus nucleic acid test screening platforms and RNA prevalence in French blood donors.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan;57(1):223-224

Authors: Gallian P, Couchouron A, Dupont I, Fabra C, Piquet Y, Djoudi R, Assal A, Tiberghien P

PMID: 28097700 [PubMed - in process]




Maternal red blood cell alloantibodies identified in blood samples obtained from Iranian pregnant women: the first population study in Iran.
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Maternal red blood cell alloantibodies identified in blood samples obtained from Iranian pregnant women: the first population study in Iran.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan;57(1):97-101

Authors: Shahverdi E, Moghaddam M, Gorzin F

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The objective was to determine the frequency of occurrence of alloantibodies among pregnant women in Iran.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a prospective cross-sectional study, which was carried out in the immunohematology reference laboratory of the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization in Tehran, Iran, in 2008 to 2015. Screening and identification of red blood cell (RBC) alloantibodies was done on the sera of 7340 pregnant females using the standard tube method and gel column agglutination technique.
RESULTS: Alloantibodies were identified in the serum of 332 of the 7340 (4.5%) pregnant women. A total of 410 antibodies were detected in 332 positive maternal serum samples with no previous history of blood transfusion. Anti-D was the most common antibody accounting for 70.5% of all the antibodies formed in D- women. The incidence of specific alloimmunization other than Rh group was 14.4%.
CONCLUSION: We concluded that the alloimmunization rate was high in comparison with wide pattern in previous studies. In Iran, like other developing countries, alloimmunization screening tests are performed only to detect anti-D in pregnant D- women. This high rate of alloimmunization, quite possibly, is due to the fact that the majority of blood samples came from pregnant women known to have previous obstetric problems. However, we suggest that RBC antibody screening tests should be extended to all D+ women.

PMID: 28097699 [PubMed - in process]




Granulocytes exposed.
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Granulocytes exposed.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan;57(1):8

Authors: Tholpady A, Kelley J, Martinez F, Lichtiger B

PMID: 28097698 [PubMed - in process]




Erratum.
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Erratum.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan;57(1):225

Authors:

PMID: 28097697 [PubMed - in process]




Postpartum anemia: missed opportunities for prevention and recognition.
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Postpartum anemia: missed opportunities for prevention and recognition.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan;57(1):3-5

Authors: Prabhu M, Bateman BT

PMID: 28097696 [PubMed - in process]




Continuing Medical Education Program in Transfusion.
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Continuing Medical Education Program in Transfusion.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan;57(1):12

Authors:

PMID: 28097695 [PubMed - in process]




Pulsed xenon flash treatment inactivates bacteria in apheresis platelet concentrates while preserving in vitro quality and functionality.
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Pulsed xenon flash treatment inactivates bacteria in apheresis platelet concentrates while preserving in vitro quality and functionality.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan 12;:

Authors: Abe H, Shiba M, Niibe Y, Tadokoro K, Satake M

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pulsed xenon (Xe) flash without any photoreactive compounds has been shown to inactivate a type of bacteria spiked into platelet (PLT) suspension in plasma, but enhanced the PLT storage lesion (PSL). Predicting reduction of PSL with increasing bactericidal ability, pulsed Xe flash was filtered through a band-stop filter, which excluded ultraviolet (UV)A, UVB, and visible light.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Apheresis PLT concentrates (PCs) inoculated with bacteria were irradiated with filtered Xe flash (fXe treatment). For in vitro functional quality assessment, PLT aggregation and thrombin generation together with other assays that monitor the PSL were investigated.
RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus dysgalactiae could be inactivated without regrowth during 6 days of storage. PC variables, such as PLT count, concentrations of soluble CD40 ligand, and ratio of aggregated PLTs, were not significantly different between fXe-treated and untreated PCs after 6 days of storage, while PAC-1 binding increased in the fXe-treated PLTs. Responsiveness of fXe-treated PLTs to ADP was maintained over a 6-day storage period as shown by the up regulation of P-selectin expression and induction of both integrin αIIbβ3 conformational change and PLT aggregation. The fXe-treated PLTs showed a sustained aggregation curve in response to ADP, whereas untreated PLTs transiently aggregated and then subsequently dissociated. Thrombin-generating kinetics of fXe-treated PLTs via PLT membrane surface were equivalent to those of untreated PLTs.
CONCLUSIONS: The fXe treatment inactivated bacteria in apheresis PCs in plasma without additional chemical compounds. The fXe-treated PCs retained acceptable in vitro properties of PC quality and PLT functionality.

PMID: 28084008 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Donating blood on a regular basis appears to reduce blood pressure, but appearances can be deceiving.
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Donating blood on a regular basis appears to reduce blood pressure, but appearances can be deceiving.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan 12;:

Authors: France CR, France JL, Himawan LK, Kessler DA, Rebosa M, Shaz BH

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported a relationship between blood donation and decreased risk for cardiovascular events, and it has been proposed that this may be due to a lowering of blood pressure among hypertensive individuals who donate on a regular basis.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: With the use of a retrospective longitudinal analysis, predonation blood pressure readings were examined across consecutive whole blood donations for New York Blood Center donors. With blood pressure levels recorded at the first, second, third, and fourth donations, the sample was divided into three subgroups including high (≥140 mmHg), intermediate (>100 and <40 mmHg), and low (≤100 mmHg) systolic blood pressure (SBP). In addition, a computational approach was used to estimate regression to the mean effects for donors with high SBP or high diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at their first, second, or third donation.
RESULTS: Visual examination of SBP and DBP patterns across donations revealed that, on average, donors with extreme values at one donation had relatively normal values at the other donations. Further, comparison of computed expected versus observed blood pressure decreases supported the notion of a subsequent regression to the mean among donors with elevated SBP or DBP at Donation 1, 2, or 3.
CONCLUSION: Among individuals who are hypertensive at initial donation, reductions in blood pressure at subsequent donations appear to result from regression to the mean as opposed to a salutary physiologic process.

PMID: 28083954 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Dynamic changes in absolute immature platelet count suggest the presence of a coexisting immune process in the setting of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.
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Dynamic changes in absolute immature platelet count suggest the presence of a coexisting immune process in the setting of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

Transfusion. 2017 Jan 12;:

Authors: Stefaniuk CM, Reeves HM, Maitta RW

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated the usefulness of absolute immature platelet counts (A-IPCs) in the management and diagnostic algorithm of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Specifically a threefold increase in A-IPC from baseline may be diagnostic of TTP. Here, A-IPC was used to understand a coexisting immune dysregulation complicating TTP treatment.
CASE REPORT: A 17-year-old previously healthy female was admitted with altered mental status, petechiae, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytes on peripheral smear. Daily therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) and corticosteroids were started for suspected TTP supported by ADAMTS13 activity of less than 5%, inhibitor more than 8, and more than threefold A-IPC increase from baseline post-TPE initiation. Despite daily TPE, the patient had significant and unexpected decreases in platelet (PLT) counts and A-IPCs during her hospital course. After each PLT count decline, response to TPE and immunosuppression led to increasingly prolonged count recovery with subsequent episodes. Decreases in both PLTs and A-IPCs indicated that both mature and immature PLTs were being cleared from circulation. Recovery occurred once A-IPC dynamics indicated restored negative feedback in relation to PLT count.
CONCLUSION: Serial monitoring of A-IPC dynamics was indicative of coexisting processes in the setting of ADAMTS13 deficiency. Uncoupling of the expected A-IPC and PLT count seen in TTP suggested the presence of such an immune process in addition to TTP with high ADAMTS13 inhibitor. Monitoring of A-IPC is a clinically valuable, rapid, and noninvasive thrombopoietic measurement when TTP is suspected.

PMID: 28083876 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]