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Preview: pubmed: Transfusion[jour]

pubmed: Transfusion[jour]



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Fatal hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by an antibody to KEAL, a new low-prevalence Kell blood group antigen.
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Fatal hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by an antibody to KEAL, a new low-prevalence Kell blood group antigen.

Transfusion. 2016 Sep 28;

Authors: Scharberg EA, Wieckhusen C, Luz B, Rothenberger S, Stürzel A, Rink G, Richter E, Delle Chiaie L, Burgos A, Lomas-Francis C, Bugert P

PMID: 27679424 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Detection of different categories of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a multi-regional study comparing the clinical sensitivity of hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV-DNA testing.
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Detection of different categories of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a multi-regional study comparing the clinical sensitivity of hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV-DNA testing.

Transfusion. 2016 Sep 27;

Authors: Lelie N, Bruhn R, Busch M, Vermeulen M, Tsoi WC, Kleinman S, International NAT Study Group

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Twenty-two users of individual donation nucleic acid amplification technology (ID-NAT) in six geographical regions provided detailed hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection data in first-time, lapsed, and repeat donations and classified confirmed HBV-positive donors into different infection categories. These data were used to compare the clinical sensitivity of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV-DNA testing.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: In total 10,981,776 donations from South Africa, Egypt, the Mediterranean, North and Central Europe, South East Asia, and Oceania were screened for HBV-DNA using the Ultrio assay (Grifols/Hologic) and for HBsAg using a chemiluminescence immunoassay, and 9455 HBV-infected donations were identified. HBsAg-negative window period (WP), HBsAg-positive and occult HBV infection (OBI) stages were determined using supplemental serology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and replicate multiplex and discriminatory HBV NAT test strategies. For two regions, additional data sets using the more sensitive Ultrio Plus assay were assessed.
RESULTS: Regional HBV detection rates in first-time donors varied between 0.08% and 1.07%, with WP NAT yield rates varying between 1:7700 and 1:294,000 and OBI NAT yield rates varying from 1:3900 to 1:59,000. HBsAg CLIA detected 97.0% of infections in first-time donors, 62.7% in lapsed donors, and 41.0% in repeat donors; whereas Ultrio detected 93.1%, 95.0%, and 98.3% of infections in these respective groups. HBV-DNA detection rates in HBsAg-positive donors varied from 90.2% to 96.3% between regions but increased significantly (range, 95.2-98.2%) with the Ultrio Plus assay.
CONCLUSION: ID-NAT and serology are complementary in detecting HBV infection in first-time donors, but HBV-DNA is superior to HBsAg detection in repeat donors.

PMID: 27673757 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Interactive patient blood management dashboards used in Western Australia.
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Interactive patient blood management dashboards used in Western Australia.

Transfusion. 2016 Sep 27;

Authors: Trentino KM, Swain SG, Geelhoed GC, Daly FF, Leahy MF

PMID: 27670827 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Antibodies to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens directly prime neutrophils and cause acute lung injury in a two-event in vivo rat model.
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Antibodies to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens directly prime neutrophils and cause acute lung injury in a two-event in vivo rat model.

Transfusion. 2016 Sep 25;

Authors: Kelher MR, Banerjee A, Gamboni F, Anderson C, Silliman CC

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a significant cause of mortality, especially after transfusions containing antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens. We hypothesize that a first event induces both 1) polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) to express MHC class II antigens, and 2) activation of the pulmonary endothelium, leading to PMN sequestration, so that the infusion of specific MHC class II antibodies to these antigens causes PMN-mediated acute lung injury (ALI).
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Rats were treated with saline (NS), endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), or cytokines (interferon-γ [IFNγ], macrophage colony-stimulating factor [MCSF], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNFα]); the PMNs were isolated; and the surface expression of the MHC class II antigen OX6 and priming by OX6 antibodies were measured by flow cytometry or priming assays.
RESULTS: A two-event model of ALI was completed with NS, LPS, or IFNγ/MCSF/TNFα (first events) and the infusion of OX6 (second event). Compared with NS incubation, rats treated with either LPS or IFNγ/MCSF/TNFα exhibited OX6 PMN surface expression, OX6 antibodies primed the formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine (fMLF)-activated respiratory burst, and PMN sequestration was increased. OX6 antibody infusion into LPS-incubated or IFNγ/MCSF/TNFα-incubated rats elicited ALI, the OX6 antibody was present on the PMNs, and PMN depletion abrogated ALI.
CONCLUSION: Proinflammatory first events induce PMN MHC class II surface expression, activation of the pulmonary endothelium, and PMN sequestration such that the infusion of cognate antibodies precipitates TRALI.

PMID: 27667662 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




A population-based longitudinal study on the implications of demographics on future blood supply.
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A population-based longitudinal study on the implications of demographics on future blood supply.

Transfusion. 2016 Sep 25;

Authors: Greinacher A, Weitmann K, Lebsa A, Alpen U, Gloger D, Stangenberg W, Kiefel V, Hoffmann W

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Changes in demographics with increases in older age groups and decreases in younger age groups imply an increased demand for blood transfusions paralleled by a decrease in the population eligible for blood donation. However, more restrictive transfusion triggers and the patient blood management initiative also reduce the demand for red blood cells (RBCs). Eastern Germany is a model region for the impact of demographic changes, which manifest in this region approximately 10 years earlier than in other regions due to the 50% birth rate decline after 1989.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We report the 2010 longitudinal 5-year follow-up of the study assessing all whole blood donations and RBC transfusions in Mecklenburg-West Pomerania. We compared the projections that were made 5 years ago with: 1) the current age structure of the blood donor and transfusion recipient populations and 2) its impact on blood demand and blood donation numbers in specific age groups.
RESULTS: Transfusion rates were lower and blood donation rates were higher than predicted in 2005. Although transfusion rates/1000 decreased in nearly all age groups, the overall annual transfusion rate increased to 66.4 RBC units/1000 (in 2005, 62.2/1000) due to the absolute increase in the elderly population. Despite a 7.4% decline in the population 18 to 65 years of age, whole blood donations increased by 11.7% between 2005 and 2010, but thereafter decreased by 21% (first-time donors by 39.4%), reflecting the effect of the post-1990 birth rate decline on the donor population.
CONCLUSION: Changes in demography and medical practice impact the delicate balance between available blood supply and potential future transfusion needs. In times of pronounced demographic changes, regular monitoring of the blood demand and age structure of blood recipients and donors is required to allow strategic planning to prevent blood shortages or overproduction.

PMID: 27667497 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




The impact of the context and recruitment materials on nondonors' willingness to donate blood.
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The impact of the context and recruitment materials on nondonors' willingness to donate blood.

Transfusion. 2016 Sep 25;

Authors: Masser BM, France CR, Himawan LK, Hyde MK, Smith G

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Anxiety is a frequently cited barrier to blood donor recruitment. Although the mere presence of donation paraphernalia can heighten anxiety for some individuals, such stimuli are a necessary and unavoidable part of donation. Drawing on France and colleagues' research on tailored donor education and coping materials, the current study assessed whether modifying recruitment materials could improve donor recruitment in a context where anxiety is heightened.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A field study comprising a 2 (presence or absence of a mobile blood collection unit [MCU]) × 2 (recruitment brochure: standard, coping) between-subjects design was conducted with 922 nondonors who believed themselves eligible to donate blood. In either the presence or absence of the MCU, participants received a standard or modified recruitment brochure modeled on France and colleagues' education and coping materials. Donation anxiety, attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, and intention were assessed, and donation behavior was tracked for 30 days.
RESULTS: Participants who were assessed in the presence of the MCU reported heightened anxiety, and female participants reported decreased self-efficacy. The coping brochure improved self-efficacy, heightened the intention to donate in the presence of the MCU, and promoted blood donation behavior relative to the standard brochure. Path analyses supported a model in which, in the presence of the MCU, the coping brochure boosted self-efficacy and led to increased donation intention and behavior.
CONCLUSIONS: In a context in which donation-related anxiety is heightened, provision of materials that address prospective donor concerns and suggest coping strategies can bolster self-efficacy and promote recruitment.

PMID: 27667318 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Hepatitis E virus RNA in Australian blood donations.
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Hepatitis E virus RNA in Australian blood donations.

Transfusion. 2016 Sep 25;

Authors: Shrestha AC, Flower RL, Seed CR, Keller AJ, Harley R, Chan HT, Hoad V, Warrilow D, Northill J, Holmberg JA, Faddy HM

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) poses a risk to transfusion safety. In Australia, locally acquired HEV is rare and cases are mainly reported in travelers returning from countries endemic for HEV. The risk posed by HEV to transfusion safety in Australia is unknown; therefore, we aimed to measure the rate of current HEV infection in Australian blood donations.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 14,799 blood donations were tested for HEV RNA by transcription-mediated amplification, with confirmatory testing by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Viral load quantification and phylogenetic analysis was performed on HEV RNA-positive samples.
RESULTS: One (0.0068%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.0002%-0.0376%) sample was confirmed positive for HEV RNA, resulting in a risk of collecting a HEV-viremic donation of 1 in 14,799 (95% CI, 1 in 584,530 to 1 in 2,657). The viral load in this sample was approximately 15,000 IU/mL, and it was determined to be Genotype 3.
DISCUSSION: Our finding of 1 in 14,799 Australian donations positive for HEV RNA is lower than that from many other developed countries; this is consistent with the relatively low seroprevalence in Australia. As this HEV RNA-positive sample was Genotype 3, it seems likely that this infection was acquired through zoonotic transmission, either within Australia or overseas in a developed nation. HEV has the potential to pose a risk to transfusion safety in Australia; however, additional, larger studies are required to quantify the magnitude of this risk.

PMID: 27667133 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]